January 28, 2020

Rural Ore. fire, ambulance agencies seek approval to merge

Posted on January 27, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The agencies are seeking support to create a ballot measure to approve the merger, which officials say would improve service

2 arrested in SC bar shooting that killed 2, wounded 4

Posted on January 27, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Authorities haven’t released the names of the suspects or details about the cause of the shooting

Firefighter killed in suspected murder-suicide

Posted on January 23, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police say the suspect waited outside his estranged wife’s home before shooting the firefighter and then himself

EMTs added to FD day shift in milestone for NC county

Posted on January 16, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Volunteer firefighters earned their EMT certifications to improve service in Nash County’s southern region

IWCE Announces Conference Agenda, Opens Registration

Posted on January 13, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

IWCE, an annual event for critical communications technology professionals, has unveiled the full program for its 44th annual conference to be held at the Las Vegas Convention Center March 30 to April 3, 2020.

Off-duty Ala. deputies can now drive patrol cars to church

Posted on January 7, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Sheriffs say they hope it will ‘serve as a deterrence’ after a gunman opened fire at a Texas church last month

Ambulance crew, police, hospital staff failed to realize man was shot, lawsuit claims

Posted on January 6, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The family of homicide victim Frank Navaroli III said there was a delay in recognizing and treating the 27-year-old’s gunshot wound

Police On Guard Against Terror Attacks After U.S. Kills Iranian General

Posted on January 3, 2020 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

U.S. law enforcement officials say the first step is for various Joint Terrorism Task Forces — groupings of local police and the FBI — to check in with their Hezbollah sources and with sources in Iran or sympathetic communities. They will want to know whether any Hezbollah-connected individuals who have been investigated previously may need a second look in light of Soleimani’s death.

Fire, Propane Leak Sparked NH Hotel Blast that Hurt FFs

Posted on December 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An electrical fire in the mechanical room and a leaky propane piper set off the Christmas Eve explosion at the Element Hotel that injured two Lebanon firefighters, officials said.

LODD: Pilot dies after Ala. air ambulance crash

Posted on December 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A coroner said he believes the pilot most likely had a heart attack while landing the helicopter

10 fire service incidents that defined the decade

Posted on December 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

From dangerous structure fires to active shooter events, firefighters faced many significant incidents in the 2010s

Department of Justice Targeting Seven Cities in New Crackdown on Violent Crime

Posted on December 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Seven cities are now being targeted by the Justice Department for improvements to be made to safety and to crackdown on violent crime.

Submersible Robots

Posted on December 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Like tactical and bomb squad robots on land, remotely operated vehicles (ROV) can go places that it is dangerous for officers to go and protect their users from hazards. They also save agencies money by reducing the need for dive team operations to recover bodies and evidence.

CA County Fire Agencies Navigate Tricky Merger Plans

Posted on December 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Sonoma County is trying to consolidate its fire services network, but while the moves might be beneficial for firefighting, they could be tough for the agencies involved.

Arkansas Police Release Surveillance Video of Assassination of Officer

Posted on December 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Washington County Sheriff’s Office on Friday reluctantly released the preliminary findings from the state’s medical examiner’s officer and a series of five surveillance videos that showed the sequence of events surrounding the killing of Fayetteville Police Officer Stephen Carr as he sat in a patrol vehicle outside the police station earlier this month.

Pennsylvania Officer Found Dead in Squad Car—Natural Causes Suspected

Posted on December 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Ridley Township (PA) Police Department was found dead in his patrol vehicle on Saturday night in Delaware County.

Alabama Officer in Critical Condition Following Shooting

Posted on December 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Ozark (AL) Police Department is in critical condition and a suspected gunman is dead following an incident on Thursday night that ended in gunfire.

Who better than EMS to reflect the spirit of the season?

Posted on December 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

EMS providers bring comfort, calm and cheer to the lives of people who need us the most

Ala. officer critically wounded, suspect dead after shooting

Posted on December 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The officer is in critical condition after a man opened fire on him and other officers

Rapid Response: Early lessons from the JC Kosher Supermarket attack

Posted on December 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Just as with the Midland and Odessa shootings earlier this year, the Jersey City shooting hints at a vexing problem for law enforcement ‒ countering mobile killers

Fallen Houston Police Sergeant Laid to Rest

Posted on December 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Thousands of mourners on Thursday remembered fallen Houston Police Sgt. Christopher Christopher Brewster as a devoted and heroic officer with a “wonderfully weird” personality.

PA Firefighter Dies after Feeling Ill Following Call

Posted on December 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Morton-Rutledge Capt. Michael Christopher Malinowski Sr., 41, had said he wasn’t feeling well after responding to a call involving downed wires and trees last week.

Photo of the Week: Andy the Ambulance

Posted on December 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Aiken County Emergency Services hosts a bi-annual Sensory Sensitive and Special Needs Touch-A-Truck Event for children and their families

Alabama Officer Shot, Killed During Drug Investigation

Posted on December 9, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officer Bill Clardy of the Huntsville (AL) Police Department has died after being shot during a drug investigation

Dallas On Pace for Highest Murder Rate in More Than a Decade

Posted on December 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Dallas Police Department—suffering a dearth of homicide detectives—is on pace to record more murders than the city has had in more than a decade.

2 dead, at least 11 hospitalized in shooting at Fla. naval air station

Posted on December 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Authorities confirmed the suspect in the shooting at the Pensacola Naval Air Station is dead

San Diego Launching Homebuying Incentive to Help With City’s Police Officer Shortage

Posted on December 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

San Diego’s officer shortage has prompted the city to launch a new home-buying incentive that will give officers as much as $50,000 toward a down payment if they buy a house in the city.

The All-In Engine Company

Posted on December 2, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Jeff Bryant touches on how personnel with a high-performing engine company—officers, drivers and firefighters—are capable of multiple key tasks on the fireground.

Chicago police superintendent fired weeks before retirement

Posted on December 2, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Mayor Lori Lightfoot said Eddie Johnson acted unethically in relation to the night where he was found asleep in his car

How to avoid fentanyl exposure in 3 common scenarios

Posted on December 2, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Protect yourself with common-sense precautions, portable detection tools and a little know-how

Delmar, DE, Fire Company Pumper

Posted on December 2, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Delmar, DE, Fire Company has recently put in service a new Seagrave pumper built on a Capitol chassis.

Skills & Movements of a Tactical Athlete

Posted on December 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Brandon Green tells of what is necessary to help new and veteran firefighters alike improve and maintain their performance of the various skills that are required on-scene.

Leadership Lessons: Discovering the Emotionally Intelligent Fire Officer

Posted on December 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

What about traditional leadership roles and leadership paradigms could the modern fire service learn when it comes to emotional quotient (EQ)? Kris Blume says the answer might surprise you.

‘NYPD lieutenant’ twins, 5, travel nationwide to recognize police officers

Posted on November 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

What started off as a gesture of thanks to an NYPD precinct has now gone viral on social media

Milwaukee FF arrested on duty for alleged sexual assault

Posted on November 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Prosecutors said the fire lieutenant sexually assaulted a 14-year-old girl and messaged her asking her not to report him

Utah K-9 Killed After Running into Traffic

Posted on November 25, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Deputies with the Davis County Sheriff’s Office are mourning the loss of K-9 Chopper, who got out of the kennel in his handler’s patrol vehicle and ran into traffic, where he was struck by a car and killed.

Detroit Police: Slain Officer Was Ambushed

Posted on November 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Detroit Police Officer Rasheen McClain’s body camera captured the final seconds of his life as he led a team of officers into the basement of a house, where a man armed with a rifle lay in wait.

Indiana Officer Shoots and Wounds 82-Year-Old Armed Suspect

Posted on November 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police officers with the Gary (IN) Police Department shot and wounded a 82-year-old armed subject who failed to comply with commands to drop his firearm on Sunday evening.

Rich Dzierwa

Posted on November 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TX City’s Paid, Volunteer FDs’ Close Ties May be Undone

Posted on November 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Palo Pinto County’s Emergency Services District No. 1 is restructuring countywide fire service, and that could affect the relationship between Mineral Wells’ two departments.

California Sheriff’s Deputy Honored 1 Year After Mass Shooting

Posted on November 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Ventura County Sheriff’s Sgt. Ron Helus, who was killed during the mass shooting at the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks nearly one year ago, was honored Wednesday when a portion of the 101 Freeway was dedicated to him.

Family of man with mental illness questions why police, not EMS, responded to 911 call

Posted on November 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Family members of Lorenzo Sanchez, who suffers from schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder, were concerned he might hurt himself or that he overdosed

Maryland State Police Find Baltimore Detective’s Death Was a Suicide

Posted on November 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Maryland State Police investigation into the death of Detective Sean Suiter found the officer’s death was a suicide, Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison announced.

North Carolina Deputy Shot at Hospital, Suspect Killed

Posted on November 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

At the Emergency Department, the inmate tried to get the deputy’s gun and they got into a struggle, Wright and Hawkins said. “Fortunately, the deputy wrestled the subject, and luckily one of Fayetteville PD’s officers was there to help subdue the subject.”

Pa. House approves bills to aid stressed first responders

Posted on November 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Lawmakers passed 16 bills in the last two weeks aimed at supporting first responders, including mental health initiatives and tax credits

Station Repairs Costly in NY Apparatus Mishap

Posted on November 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Repair costs will be around $100,000 after a Schenectady firefighter backing an apparatus into the city’s oldest fire station accidentally clipped the building.

Air Methods Corp. facing lawsuit over alleged helicopter safety issue

Posted on November 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The lawsuit claims an Air Methods helicopter went on 51 flights after the company was notified by the FAA that the copter’s pitot tubes were “severely corroded”

MI Voters Reject Fire Station, Apparatus Tax

Posted on November 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Voters on Tuesday narrowly defeated a special tax to pay for a new fire station and apparatus for the White Lake Fire Authority in Whitehall.

Firefighters return homeowner’s heirloom ring that survived Getty Fire

Posted on November 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The ring survived two separate wildfires that erupted almost 60 years apart: the Getty Fire and Bel Air Fire in 1961

CA Fire Union: Trump’s Relief Threats ‘Cruel, Dangerous’

Posted on November 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The president of California Professional Firefighters criticized President Trump for threatening to withhold disaster relief assistance for residents affected by wildfires.

Valor Award Sponsor – Ready Rack

Posted on November 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Oklahoma Officer Convicted of Murder for Shooting Suicidal Man Doused in Lighter Fluid

Posted on November 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Prosecutors say Sweeney shot Pigeon after another officer fired a bean bag. An affidavit says Pigeon was unarmed and did not pose a threat when he was shot, and two fellow officers also testified that Pigeon posed no threat.

Canadian Man Facing Charges After Pointing Laser at Police Helicopter

Posted on November 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An Edmonton man is facing charges after being caught pointing a laser at a helicopter operated by the Edmonton Police Service on Saturday night.

Hollywood Actor Thanks Officer Who Arrested Him for “Changing My Life”

Posted on November 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Shia LaBeouf took to the podium at to accept the Breakthrough Screenwriting Award at the Hollywood Film Awards on Sunday night and used the occasion to thank an officer with the Savana (GA) Police Department who arrested him for helping him get his life back on track.

NYPD Commissioner Resigns, Replacement Named

Posted on November 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

New York City Police Commissioner James O’Neill resigned Monday after three years as the head of the nation’s largest police force.

Man Accused of Head Butting Trooper After Dancing in Road

Posted on November 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A man dressed all in black and dancing in the middle of the street is facing charges after authorities say he head butted the state trooper who was arresting him in Lancaster County.

North Carolina Officer Shot During Warrant Service Expected to Be OK

Posted on November 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Gastonia (NC) Police Department who was shot during a joint operation with the FBI early Friday morning reportedly suffered non-life-threatening injuries and is expected to be OK.

In Rare Move, Florida Police Officer Faces Criminal Leak Investigation

Posted on November 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

It’s a rare step for police to take — pursuing a criminal case against one of their own for leaking sensitive information to the press.

Chicago LEO saves a life, proposes during downtown run

Posted on November 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Sgt. Mike Nowacki assisted a woman in cardiac arrest before proposing to his girlfriend

Report on Iowa university death raises questions about FD response

Posted on November 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“Due to staffing,” only two of four dispatched units initially responded to retrieve a UNI worker they understood to be inside the campus’ compromised steam system

Long response times push NC residents to demand their own EMS service

Posted on November 4, 2019 by in Uncategorized

A resident and former firefighter said it takes almost 20 minutes for an ambulance to respond to an emergency in Harlowe, N.C.

7 habits of unsuccessful departments

Posted on November 3, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

If you want cops who care about citizens, you need leaders who care for cops

Wind-whipped fire destroys century-old Pa. inn

Posted on November 3, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officials believe the fire started in a dining area and quickly spread at the Pocono Manor Resort

Pa. EMS company in ‘critical situation’ due to lack of funds

Posted on November 3, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

In a Facebook post, Port Matilda EMS wrote that it has “enough funds available to cover one more payroll cycle and that is it”

Community honors Ohio firefighter-EMT who died helping crash victims

Posted on November 3, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighter-EMT Brett Wilson, 23, was killed after coming in contact with downed power lines while on scene

Fla. county begins PTSD survey, plan to address growing LEO mental health crisis

Posted on November 2, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Miami-Dade County has already seen a rise in officers seeking psychological help, emerging peer-support groups

North Carolina Agency Implements “Written Consent” Policy, Limiting Search Powers

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A police advocacy group, the N.C. Police Benevolent Association, opposes the proposed policy, saying it should include a way for officers to bypass the written requirement if it is not safe or practical. The group would continue to oppose the practice, which isn’t backed by law, said PBA President John Midgette.

Police Say Sriracha Bottles Disguised 900 Pounds of Crystal Meth

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Authorities in Australia busted four men for allegedly smuggling hundreds of pounds of crystal meth in bottles of Sriracha hot sauce.

Toledo SWAT Officers Dress as Superheroes, Rappel Down Children’s Hospital to Entertain Kids on Halloween

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“It’s just great to see the joy on their face! It brings us joy too, but it’s nice to just see them have a day where they can just be themselves and be kids again, and not have to worry about being in the hospital,” said one member of the SWAT team, dressed as “The Wolverine” 

NC officer shot during FBI operation

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The officer, who was serving a search warrant, sustained non-life-threatening injuries

Amid Anti-Police Rhetoric, Police Remain Vigilant Public Safety Servants

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Elected leaders and those seeking election routinely make statements—and enact policies—that put police officers in difficult positions at best and in danger at worst.

CT Governor Thanks FFs for Efforts in Fatal Plane Crash

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“We owe you folks a debt of gratitude. These are the folks who saved lives that day,” Gov. Ned Lamont told a group of firefighters and others at Bradley International Airport.

Kincade Fire burns into history as Sonoma County’s largest blaze

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The blaze scorched an area three times the size of Santa Rosa as a force of more than 5,000 firefighters gained a grip on the week-old conflagration

Research Corner: Water Application During Suppression

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Robin Zevotek researches whether or not water application during suppression increases the water vapor in the fire environment.

As Firehouse Sees It: Keep Your Head on a Swivel

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firehouse Editor-in-Chief Peter Matthews says stay alert because dangers and threats are not only on the fireground.

2019 Apparatus Showcase

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

In the 2019 Apparatus Showcase, manufacturers display the latest and greatest in fire-rescue and EMS apparatus.

Firefighter Training: Smarter, Safer

Posted on November 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Effective training options that minimize risk

When the call has no address: Responding to homeless encampments

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reviewing fire department response challenges and solutions to these unique calls

Thomson Reuters to Provide DOJ with Legal and Investigative Tools

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Thomson Reuters announced it has been awarded a long-term contract to provide its leading legal research and investigative technology tools to the Department of Justice professionals.

CA Chopper Pilots Face High Winds for Wildfire Air Drops

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Helicopters can drop hundreds of gallons of water at time on California wildfires, but the use of firefighting aircraft come with limitations and a high price tag.

Ohio police dressed as superheroes surprise children’s hospital patients

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

This is the sixth year in a row SWAT officers have rappelled down the building in full costume

Arizona Corrections Officer Dies After Unprovoked Attack at Jail

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Corrections Officer Gene Lee was the victim of an unprovoked attack and was choked and thrown to the ground at the Lower Buckeye Jail Tuesday morning.

Fla. firefighter-medic’s stolen iPhone helped cops solve his murder case

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Coral Springs firefighter-paramedic Christopher Randazzo was shot dead after refusing to unlock his iPhone

DNA Testing Helps ID Jane Doe Found Murdered in 1980

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Nearly 40 years after a young woman’s body was found near Fly Creek in rural Clark County, genetic genealogy has helped investigators learn her name. The victim known for decades as the “Fly Creek Jane Doe” was Sandra “Sandy” Renee Morden, born in 1962.

Driver crashes into Minn. fire station, memorial to fallen firefighter-medic

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighters had just finished dinner when they heard a loud bang and ran outside to find out what happened

FDNY EMT who suffered aneurysm while on duty released from hospital

Posted on October 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Lt. Raymond Wang suffered an aortic aneurysm after responding to the scene of a fellow EMT who suffered a stroke while driving an ambulance

Watch out for ‘Bozo the Clown’ on Halloween

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Halloween is both an opportunity for positive community engagement and a snake pit for police officers

Fourth Man Arrested for Marijuana Conspiracy That Led to Murder of California Deputy

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Deputy Ishmael was shot and killed in the early-morning hours of Oct. 23 as he was responding to a 911 call from an individual in Somerset reporting that someone was stealing his marijuana plants.

Female Colorado Officer Welcomes 2 Daughters to Police Ranks

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A 30-veteran officer with the Aurora (CO) Police Department is welcoming her two daughters to the ranks, making the department one of those in the Rocky Mountain State to have three women from the same family in law enforcement.

Baltimore to consider $8M settlement in 2013 police academy shooting

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police recruit Raymond Grey was accidentally shot in the head during a training exercise, sustained ‘severe and permanent’ injury

IACP 2019: Rigaku Analytical Devices Presents Portfolio of Handheld Raman Analyzers

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Rigaku family of handheld Raman analyzers is designed to provide on-site identification and detection of narcotics for law enforcement.

Family suit in OIS of Antwon Rose settled for $2M

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A federal lawsuit against the officer was also dismissed

AZ Fire Chief Goes Missing on Four-Day Hike

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Pine-Strawberry Fire District Chief Gary Morris was finishing a 51-mile hike, but he didn’t call for his pick-up and attempts to contact him were unsuccessful.

Woman Charged With Assaulting Massachusetts Police Officer

Posted on October 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Somerset Police Officer Raymond Almeida was assaulted and injured during an incident at Stop & Shop supermarket last Friday.

Firefighter/EMT

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Loudoun County, VA, Fire and Rescue is currently seeking qualified applicants to establish an eligibility pool for the position of Firefighter/EMT.

West Virginia Man Who Made Threats Against Police Denied Bond

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A man who is accused of making terroristic threats against the Beckley (WV) Police Department will remain in jail as he awaits trial, as a judge denied bond in a proceeding on Monday afternoon.

Texas Lawmaker Wants to Name Courthouse After Slain Deputy

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A proposal by Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia to rename the downtown criminal courthouse after Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal, however, so far has failed to gain widespread support. Commissioners Court will consider the measure Tuesday.

Real-Life Terrors Force Philadelphia Residents to Leave Own Neighborhoods for Halloween

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Many Kensington residents leave their neighborhood to trick-or-treat elsewhere.

AL City Approves More Money for Private EMS Service

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

It’s the third time this year Oxford Emergency Medical Services has received money, and over the years, the funding has helped improve response times and expand coverage.

Firefighter Comes Out of Retirement for MO Chief Job

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“I had retired and, after a year, turns out I didn’t like it,” said Bob Shaw, who takes over as chief of the Warrensburg Fire Department.

Patriot One Unveils New PATSCAN Mobile Concept at International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Conference

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Company returns to the conference where it launched with a new PATSCAN solution and new website focused on end-users

Missouri Police Officer Told to Tone Down ‘Gayness’ Wins $19M in Lawsuit

Posted on October 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The week-long trial, which ended Friday, included testimony about several times Sgt. Keith Wildhaber was denied a promotion, about the use of demeaning, homophobic terms to refer to him, as well as the retaliation he faced, after filing a complaint.

Texas Officer Mistakes Shoots His Own Son, Mistaking Him for Intruder

Posted on October 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An off-duty officer with the Dallas Police Department was entering his home when he encountered a man he thought to be an intruder. He opened fire without realizing that the man was his own son.

NYPD Officer Badly Wounded in Deadly Fight Emerges from Coma

Posted on October 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the New York Police Department who was bashed in the head with a metal chair during a deadly fight has emerged from a medically-induced coma.

Jury: FDNY EMS Workers Must be Paid for Shift Prep Time

Posted on October 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A federal jury determined that more than 2,500 FDNY paramedics and EMTs deserved to be paid for the 15 minutes they prepared before and after shifts.

Deadly Camp Fire revisited in powerful Netflix documentary

Posted on October 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The film recounts the catastrophe in as-it-happened fashion from the moment of ignition and via harrowing first-hand footage

Ohio firefighter-EMT dies while trying to help car crash victims

Posted on October 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighter-EMT Brett Wilson, 23, was killed after coming in contact with downed power lines while on scene

NYPD Officer Critically Injured in Struggle Wakes From Medically-Induced Coma

Posted on October 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

NYPD Officer Lesly Lafontant, who was smashed in the head with a chair in a wild Brooklyn nail salon melee, emerged from his medically-induced coma on Sunday.

Blue Sky Day Relationships

Posted on October 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Do Chiefs compete with each other for dollars in budgets? It may not seem like it, but…

Fierce Winds Driving Massive CA Wildfire

Posted on October 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fierce winds drove across Sonoma County early Sunday, pushing the massive Kincade Fire further south as nearly 90,000 were ordered to evacuate.

2 NC troopers arrested in ticket-writing probe

Posted on October 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The state Bureau of Investigations says Jason Benson and Christopher Carter wrote traffic tickets that weren’t given to drivers

Mass. AMR, union EMTs reach deal for wage increases

Posted on October 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

They have agreed to a renegotiated contract that the company said will bump their pay as much as 11.86%

IACP Quick Take: 5 ways to solve a cold case

Posted on October 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Agencies must address the growing problem of unresolved criminal cases

How One Police Officer Built His Own AI Application for Law Enforcement Communication

Posted on October 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Austin Handle is a police officer and tech hobbyist with a dream–to get his self-made application, Apollo AI (or Apollo), in the hands of first responders.

Meggitt Training Systems to highlight irrefutable, life-saving benefits of virtual training through Georgia state study

Posted on October 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Company emphasizes insightful customer study, 10 lanes of military-grade 3D marksmanship, unmatched live-fire products and a replica Tommy Gun reflecting 1920s policing

Discover incident-based preemption from Opticom at the 2019 IACP Annual Conference

Posted on October 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Find solutions that meet your needs, win prizes and ask questions at Booth 1055

OH Firefighters Speak Out amid PTSD Battle

Posted on October 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Ohio firefighters who have battled PTSD are speaking out as lawmakers consider a bill that would provide workers compensation benefits for mental health issues.

San Francisco Police Union Puts $50K Up Against DA Candidate

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The San Francisco Police Officers Association has poured $50,000 into a newly created political action committee opposing candidate Chesa Boudin.

Outside-the-box funding for police fleets

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

With some creative thinking, strategic writing and matching your needs to the grant agency’s purpose, you could be awarded funding to upgrade your department’s fleet

Calif. police stand by cop after video released in 2017 shooting

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Community activists protesting after video of fatal shooting of teen is released, lawsuit filed

New Apparatus Honors Fallen IA Firefighter

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

As part of the traditional push-in ceremony, Clinton firefighters dedicated its new apparatus to Lt. Eric Hosette, who died in a grain silo explosion earlier this year.

Emergency Reporting Expands Customer Support Team

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Emergency Reporting has expanded its customer support team with three new members in response to a consistently growing customer base.

NYPD Announcing New Effort to Address Spike in Suicides

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill say there’s a new joint effort to tackle the mental health crisis the NYPD has been facing.

Milwaukee Police Giving Away Free Gun Locks to Prevent Tragedies

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Milwaukee Police began handing out free gun locks after a 4-year-old girl accidentally shot herself and her father over the weekend.

2 EMS providers, patient hurt in Pa. ambulance crash

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A chain-reaction crash began when the Penn State Health Life Lion ambulance clipped a car attempting to move to the right

Mass. firefighter saves American flag during house fire

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“It’s the American flag. You treat it with respect,” Lt. Billy Collins, who served in Operation Desert Storm, said

Instead Writing a Ticket, Milwaukee Officer Buys Mom Car Seats

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

While on patrol on Oct. 12, Milwaukee Police Officer Kevin Zimmerman came across Andrella Jackson, who was driving a car with an invalid registration, and had children in the back seat.

Conn. college student EMTs to help fire dept. with calls on campus

Posted on October 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Res-Q students can give basic first aid and critical care, including stopping bleeds and administering CPR

AR, DC Firefighters Honored for Raising Cancer Awareness

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Columbia Southern University has honored Little Rock firefighter Casey Jones and Washington DC firefighter Shawn Downs for their efforts to raise cancer awareness.

New Google Maps feature enables drivers to share police locations

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Law enforcement agencies have spoken out against the feature in similar apps

European Drone Leader Launches Loan Program

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Parrot, the leading European drone group, has launched a professional drone loan program to strengthen solutions for enterprise partners.

California Motor Officer Seriously Injured in Crash

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A motor officer with the California Highway Patrol was seriously injured when he collided with the back of a van travelling in the left lane of a highway on Tuesday morning.

California Motor Officer Seriously Injured in Crash

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A motor officer with the California Highway Patrol was seriously injured when he collided with the back of a van travelling in the left lane of a highway on Tuesday morning.

Countering the critics: Responses to common arguments about police use of deadly force

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The correct response to public outcry following a use of force incident is to conduct a thorough investigation, not rush to change laws or policies

Michigan Sheriff’s Deputy Avoids Injury After Vehicle Sideswiped

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Kalamazoo sheriff’s deputy avoided serious injury after his SUV was sideswiped by a suspected drunk driver early Friday morning in the 2500 block of Gull Road.

MSA Globe Gear Giveaway Benefits IL, OH Departments

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

MSA, DuPont, and the National Volunteer Fire Council (NVFC) have awarded essential turnout gear to fire departments in IL and OH through MSA’s Globe Gear Giveaway.

Missouri Highway Patrol Trooper Locates Missing Kangaroo

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Missouri Highway Patrol Trooper H. Hoemann received a call about the missing marsupial and was able to find him and return him safely.

NE Firefighter, City Agree to $1.29M Settlement

Posted on October 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The deal avoids a second trial to determine how much the Lincoln firefighter would be paid for emotional distress for retaliation he faced after reporting discrimination.

Rapid Response: What we must learn from the FDNY EMT brutally beaten by a patient

Posted on October 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Training and experience are instrumental to keeping EMTs, paramedics safe from violent attacks

Deliberate blackouts possible again as fire danger looms in Calif.

Posted on October 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A huge portion of California is under high fire risk due to unpredictable gusts and soaring temperatures

Health Scholars demonstrates First Responder ACLS VR training at EMS World Expo

Posted on October 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The virtual reality simulation training, designed specifically for first responders, launches in November 2019

Cardiac Arrest: How to improve patient outcomes (eBook)

Posted on October 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Constant training, a team approach and monitoring feedback during resuscitation can increase your patients’ chances of survival and positive outcomes

AFG 2019: Communications Project Application Guide (eBook)

Posted on October 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Use this expert guide to help you apply for and win AFG funding for your communications project

Post-shooting tips to ease the aftermath

Posted on October 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

It’s not uncommon for officers involved in traumatic events to report that they felt their agency just didn’t care about them

Roof Fall Doesn’t Seriously Hurt Los Angeles Firefighter

Posted on October 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Despite video footage showing a harrowing fall from the burning roof, the firefighter only suffered minor injuries during the large blaze at a home in Los Angeles’ Sun Valley.

Ohio ambulance stolen from station

Posted on October 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

While Clearcreek Fire District crews were responding to a vehicle fire, someone broke into their station and stole an ambulance

LE Hardware 2019

Posted on October 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

These heavy-duty devices are built to withstand rough use in the field.

Pennsylvania Police Union Loses in Fight Over Tattoos

Posted on October 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police lost in its bid to defend officers who have visible tattoos that some might construe as offensive following an incident in which an officer was seen in a short-sleeve uniform shirt revealing a tattoo some argued was a Nazi symbol.

Director of Fire & Emergency Medical Services

Posted on October 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Carroll County, MD, is accepting applications for a Director of Fire & Emergency Medical Services.

Director of Fire & Emergency Medical Services

Posted on October 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Carroll County, MD, is accepting applications for a Director of Fire & Emergency Medical Services.

Fired Phoenix Police Officer Wants His Job Back

Posted on October 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Former Phoenix police officer Tim Baiardi is trying to get his job back after being fired for slapping a handcuffed shoplifter.

Fla. sheriff fires deputy whose gun discharged in school cafeteria

Posted on October 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An investigation found he was fidgeting with his service pistol when it went off during a lunch period

Conn. EMS chief in need of kidney transplant looking for donor

Posted on October 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Adam Goldstein, who put out the call for a donor last year, said he’s hopeful he will find a match

(Video) Benefits of Showing Respect During Police Contacts

Posted on October 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Sgt. Steve Fish of the Racine (WI) Police Department discusses how officers can get more out of a variety of contacts—with offenders, witnesses, or the general public—by simply showing some respect.

Florida Deputy Whose Gun Discharged at School Fired

Posted on October 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Pasco Sheriff Chris Nocco on Wednesday fired a deputy whose gun discharged at a Wesley Chapel middle school earlier this year.

Houston Crews Rescue Pedestrian Hit, Pinned by SUV

Posted on October 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighters needed a jack to help pull out a woman who was trapped under an SUV after she was run over by the vehicle while crossing a wet street in southwest Houston.

Delta Barrier Stops Yet Another Intruder at Naval Air Station – Corpus Christi

Posted on October 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

8 Months Later, Delta MP5000 Portable Barrier Does Its Job Again

Baltimore Police Report 12 Percent Rise In Homicides Since 2018

Posted on October 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

With just a few months left in 2019, the number of homicides in Baltimore is nearing the level the city saw for all of last year.

Mass. female firefighter-paramedic commands incident, makes history

Posted on October 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“A ceiling was shattered and it’s a long time coming, and one that we’re very proud of,” Chief Kevin Gallagher said

Maryland Officer’s Death Ruled a Suicide

Posted on October 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the District of Columbia ruled the death of Montgomery County Police Officer Thomas J. Bomba, who was shot on the top level of a parking garage in Silver Spring Monday, was a result of “self-inflicted injury.”

Updated Technology Equals Efficiency

Posted on October 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

From in car devices, to speed enforcement, range equipment, and phones, newer equipment improves policing.

FFs in CA Station Wake to Stranger Cooking Breakfast

Posted on October 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

While South San Joaquin Fire Authority firefighters were sleeping, a homeless man broke into the station and was discovered microwaving a burrito in the kitchen.

NJ Firefighters Rescue Workers Six Stories Up

Posted on October 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Atlantic City firefighters were at a supermarket across the street when the workers’ scaffold malfunctioned and tilted them at a 45-degree angle, six stories off the ground.

4 Killed, 5 Injured in Shooting at Illegal Brooklyn Gambling Den

Posted on October 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A suspect was quickly in custody for the quadruple homicide that apparently started in a dispute over a card game inside the cramped club.

Firehouse Expo 2019: When Active Shooters Target Cops

Posted on October 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Tami Kayea, Dallas’ deputy chief for EMS, talked about how a 2016 active shooter event in her city changed how first responders handled those incidents.

Firehouse Expo 2019: Philly FF Learns from Train Crash

Posted on October 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Philadelphia Battalion Chief Vincent Mulray discussed the lessons he picked up from initially commanding the scene of the fatal 2015 derailment of Amtrak Train 188.

Shoplifter Armed with Edged Weapons Attacks Minnesota Officer

Posted on October 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A woman armed with a screwdriver and a knife reportedly attacked an officer with the St. Paul Police Department on Monday.

Shoplifter Armed with Edged Weapons Attacks Minnesota Officer

Posted on October 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A woman armed with a screwdriver and a knife reportedly attacked an officer with the St. Paul Police Department on Monday.

Ohio fire dept. mourning loss of firefighter-paramedic

Posted on October 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire officials said Brian Poole was a “man who always had a smile on his face and was a vital piece of DFD Company 11”

Daycare fire that killed 5 children blamed on extension cord

Posted on October 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Investigators searched the property and electrical items were examined at a bureau laboratory

4 lessons for surviving a law enforcement career

Posted on October 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The transition from idealistic rookie to cynical veteran often includes withdrawing from friendships and activities outside of law enforcement

Will HR.4527/S.2552 expand or limit retired EMS insurance options?

Posted on October 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Three questions about the Expanding Health Care Options for Early Retirees Act suggest revisions may be needed before providers should rely on the Medicare option

CentralSquare Partners with Genetec Inc.: Enables first responders to see in real time what is happening during a 911 emergency, reducing the victims of crimes and disasters

Posted on October 9, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Partnership will enable law, police and EMS to quickly connect with the nearest public camera and respond smartly based on the specific situation, potentially preventing more than 2,000 homicides

Florida Officer Helps Homeless Family Return Home to Michigan

Posted on October 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Miami-Dade Police Department is being praised for going above and beyond the call of duty when he helped a homeless family find shelter and then return to Michigan.

U.S. Supreme Court Rejects Appeal of Man Who Killed Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper

Posted on October 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected the appeal of death row inmate Ricky Ray Malone, who was convicted of killing Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Nikky Green in December 2003.

Cary, IL, Fire Protection District Gets 100-foot Platform Aerial

Posted on October 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Cary, IL, Fire Protection has taken delivery of a 100-foot rear-mount platform aerial built by Sutphen. It is built on a Sutphen Monarch heavy-duty cab and chassis with a 62-inch extended cab and a 10-inch raised roof. It is powered by a Cummins L9…

Four VA Firefighters Injured in House Fire

Posted on October 3, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Three of the Chesterfield firefighters were taken to the hospital after helping to put out the rural house blaze that killed several pet birds.

Ohio Man Threatening Municipal Court Bites, Punches Officers

Posted on October 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police officers were bitten and punched when they went to a man’s home after he called police dispatchers threatening Massillon Municipal Court, Stark County Jail records show.

Addressing the “Hiring Crisis” in Law Enforcement

Posted on September 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Investments in Explorer programs, Police Athletic Leagues, Teen Cadet Academies, summer internship programs, and other initiatives that benefit kids can pay untold dividends down the road.

Dallas cop who fatally shot neighbor breaks down in tears on stand

Posted on September 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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Jake Bleiberg Associated Press

DALLAS, Texas — A Dallas police officer started to cry and shake Friday as she began to testify about the night she killed a neighbor in his own home, which she has said she mistook for her own unit one floor below.

Amber Guyger broke down while recalling approaching her neighbor Botham Jean's door, leading the judge to call for a brief break so she could compose herself.

Guyger, who is charged with murder in the killing last September, was the first witness that her lawyers called in the high-profile case. She told jurors about how she grew up in a small house in the Dallas suburb of Arlington, how she played in the school band and how she aspired to become a police officer.

"I just wanted to help people and that was the one career that I thought I could help people in," said Guyger, who was fired from the police force after the shooting.

Guyger's testimony marked the first time the public has heard directly from the 31-year-old since Jean's killing last September. Guyger, who is white, was off duty but in uniform when she shot Jean, a 26-year-old native of the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia who was black and worked as an accountant in Dallas.

The basic facts of the unusual shooting are not in dispute. Guyger walked up to Jean's apartment — which was on the fourth floor, directly above hers on the third — and found the door unlocked. She was off duty but still dressed in her police uniform after a long shift when she shot Jean with her service weapon. Guyger was later arrested, fired and charged with murder.

Guyger's attorneys say she fired in self-defense after mistaking Jean for a burglar. Her attorneys also say the identical physical appearance of the complex from floor to floor frequently led to tenants parking on the wrong floor or trying to enter the wrong apartment.

Prosecutors have questioned how Guyger could have missed numerous signs that she was in the wrong place, and suggested she was distracted by sexually explicit phone messages with her police partner. Prosecutors also say Jean was no threat to Guyger, noting that he was in his living room eating a bowl of ice cream when she entered his apartment.

In a frantic 911 call played in court earlier this week, Guyger says "I thought it was my apartment" nearly 20 times. The shooting attracted intense national scrutiny for the strange circumstances and because it was one in a chain of shootings of unarmed black men by white police officers.

The trial began Monday.

Fla. trooper dies in crash

Posted on September 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Tracy Vickers’ patrol car “unexpectedly” drove into a truck

Federal LEO Retires After Testing Positive for THC from CBD Product

Posted on September 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A federal law enforcement officer chose to retire after he reportedly failed a drug test after using a cannabidiol (CBD) product to relieve severe lower back pain.

Canadian Officers Sue Attorney General Over Fatal Shootings

Posted on September 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Four officers with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police filed suit against the attorney general claiming they were inadequately trained and equipped to deal with a heavily armed gunman that claimed the lives of three of their colleagues in 2014.

Sirocco Marine Delivers Patrol Boat to Aventura Police Department

Posted on September 20, 2019 by in Uncategorized

South Florida city to benefit from the additional on-water patrol and vessel’s rescue capability

Injured Houston Police Officer Released From Hospital Days After Being Shot

Posted on September 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A week ago, Houston Officer Taylor Roccaforte was shot three times while making an arrest on a robbery in progress and on Thursday, he walked out of the hospital under his own power.

Multiple FDs Battle 2-Alarm Fire at MD Dental Office

Posted on September 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Crews from six fire departments responded to the blaze in Lusby early Thursday, and firefighters were ordered to evacuate the building after a mayday call was issued.

Fla. deputies find missing autistic 3-year-old in woods

Posted on September 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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Author: Calibre Press

Tony Adame Northwest Florida Daily News

MILTON, Fla. —Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Robert Lenzo listened to the call from dispatch and immediately felt the knot in his stomach.

"Missing 3-year-old boy in Pace. May have gone into woods." he heard.

"You hear that a 3-year-old is missing … it's scary," Lenzo said. "I would never say I knew we could help, but I knew we'd trained hard to get to that point. Someone tells you something like that and that knot in your stomach doesn't go away until you have the kid in your hands."

Two-and-a-half hours later, that's exactly what Lenzo did, walking out of the woods holding a muddy, bruised and battered three-year-old Aedric Hughes. Lenzo, along with Deputy Josh Chandler and a pair of K-9 bloodhounds, Copper and Zinc, were able to track the boy through swampy terrain and deliver him back safely to his family.

A picture taken of Lenzo carrying Aedric out of the woods quickly went viral and Aedric's family, along with Lenzo, Chandler, Sheriff Bob Johnson and Zinc were all reunited on Monday morning in Milton. Aedric got to formally meet Zinc and the officers who saved him and was also gifted with an enormous stuffed teddy bear from the SRSO.

"It's every parent's nightmare to get that call, that your child is missing," said Audra Hughes, Aedric's mother. "When I heard they had (Aedric) but I couldn't see him I was crying and kept yelling out 'Mama's here' over and over so he could hear me … it was just very emotional. I'm so thankful to the officers and everyone involved. Where it's the nightmare to hear your child is missing, the dream is to get him back safe. And we did."

Aedric, who is autistic and also has a congenital heart defect, went missing from his grandmother's house around 11 a.m., when he unlatched a deadbolt and wandered into the woods. The bloodhounds, who have been training with Lenzo and Chandler for the last year, quickly tracked the boy to an area in the woods approximately 200 yards back from the tree line.

While the bloodhounds were able to get to Aedric right away, Sheriff's officers had to use a machete to access the area, which was a thick and overgrown briar patch.

"One year ago we got the bloodhounds, and (Sunday) they paid off with dividends," Johnson said. "(Aedric) is no worse for wear other than a couple of scratches and bug bites … we put the dogs on the ground and they went right to him. They did exactly what they were supposed to do."

NYPD Officers Help Deliver Baby on Steps of Bronx Precinct

Posted on September 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A woman in labor rushed into the 41 Precinct in the Bronx for help. Three officers helped her deliver a baby boy on the steps of a precinct.

Heeding on-scene evacuation orders

Posted on September 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Following an evacuation order is about saving lives, not concluding interior “play time”

Seattle Police Seek to Bolster Recruitment and Retention with $1.6M Plan

Posted on September 13, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Incentives to keep officers from leaving will include striking unsubstantiated complaints from personnel records in a “clear my card” program.

Ind. man charged in K-9’s death in fiery crash

Posted on September 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Associated Press

COLUMBIA CITY, Ind. — A northeastern Indiana man has been charged in the death of a police dog that became trapped inside a burning police cruiser following a high-speed crash.

Thirty-one-year-old Clarence L. Shearer of Fort Wayne was formally charged Wednesday with causing the death of a law enforcement animal while operating a vehicle with a controlled substance in the blood, resisting law enforcement and other charges.

The Journal Gazette reports that police were investigating an armed carjacking on July 10 when Shearer allegedly crashed into a Whitley County sheriff's deputy's cruiser during a pursuit.

The deputy escaped unharmed, but a police dog died inside the burning cruiser near Larwill, about 20 miles west of Fort Wayne.

Court documents say Shearer tested positive for fentanyl and marijuana's active ingredient following the crash.

‘Rogue’ photo supporting embattled Ohio chief posted to union’s social media account

Posted on September 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The image comes on the heels of an accused culture of gender and racial discrimination at the fire department under Chief Brian Byrd’s reign

Florida Man Found Guilty of Killing 2 Officers

Posted on September 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

During closing arguments Tuesday, prosecutors told the jury Miller wanted to “make a statement” with the killings. After ambushing Howard and Baxter, he shot them both in the head. Prosecutors said Miller was motivated by hatred of police.

NY Study to Look at EMS Workers’ Eating Habits

Posted on September 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Two University of Buffalo researchers—both former first responders—plan to study the nutrition practices of western New York EMS clinicians.

LENOX Industrial Tools

Posted on September 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

LENOX has developed premium -performance tools for over 100 years. Our unique depth of experience gives us a command of cutting science and cutting performance that’s second to none. We put it to work for you, developing tools that make your job easier….

Study: 9/11 first responders with PTSD at higher risk for early-onset dementia

Posted on September 10, 2019 by in Uncategorized

A significant portion of first responders had new onset cognitive impairment years after their first initial cognitive test

September 11 Remembrance Day signed into law for New York

Posted on September 9, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo signed the legislation, which is meant to ensure future generations understand the 9/11 terrorist attacks and their place in history

Country Music Stars Donate K-9 to Indianapolis Police Department

Posted on September 9, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The country music duo Florida Georgia Line has donated a K-9 to the Indianapolis Police Department, the agency said on social media.

Trump presents medal to Ohio mass shooting responders

Posted on September 9, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

By Darlene Superville Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump presented the nation's highest award for public safety Monday to six Ohio police officers who responded swiftly to reports of gunfire last month in Dayton, confronted the shooter in under a minute and prevented more deaths.

Trump also recognized five civilians who put themselves at risk after a gunman opened fire at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, in August.

The twin shootings, hours apart, sparked renewed national discussion of gun control, a topic on Congress' agenda as it returned to Washington on Monday.

"These incredible patriots responded to the worst violence and most barbaric hatred with the best of American courage character and strength," Trump said at the White House as he shared a stage in the East Room with the 11 men and women.

"Faced with grave and harrowing threats, the men and women standing behind us stepped forward to save the lives of their fellow Americans," he said.

The six police officers each received the Medal of Valor, established by law in 2001 as the nation's highest public safety award. Nine people were killed and more than two dozen were wounded in the early morning attack Aug. 4 in a bustling entertainment district.

Since they are civilians, the five individuals from El Paso, each received Certificates of Commendation for "displaying tremendous bravery," Trump said, and helping others to flee the scene of the Aug. 3 shooting, in which 22 people were killed and many others wounded.

Trump had already recognized 14 public safety officers with the Medal of Valor earlier this year. Attorney General William Barr, who joined Trump at the ceremony, said the law allows him to expand the number of recipients "when exceptional instances of bravery arise."

"So that's what we did this year," Barr said.

2 dead, 3 injured in small plane crash at Nev. airport

Posted on September 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A single-engine Beechcraft Sierra plane took off from the runway, had a mechanical issue and turned around in an attempt to land when it crashed

New York Officer Injured in Patrol Vehicle Collision at Traffic Light

Posted on September 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Elmira Police Department suffered minor injuries when a 17-year-old female driver failed to stop at a red light and crashed into his patrol vehicle on Wednesday night.

Once a Shelter Dog, K-9 Joins Alabama Police Department

Posted on September 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A dog that was once in peril of being put down at a Georgia animal shelter is now a K-9 with the Headland (AL) Police Department.

PA VFD Shut Down over Political Controversy

Posted on September 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Bon Air Fire Company has been closed indefinitely after the department refused to dismiss a volunteer who admitted he was joining a far-right men’s group.

Hurricane Dorian pushes several bricks of cocaine onto Fla. beaches

Posted on September 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Ricky Pinela Orlando Sentinel

MELBOURNE, Fla. — Over a dozen bricks of cocaine washed onto Florida beaches Tuesday as Hurricane Dorian made its way north.

At about 8 a.m., a beachgoer found a package along the shore and alerted Melbourne police at Paradise Beach Park, NBC News reported.

When the officer investigated, he found it “wrapped in a way that was consistent with narcotics,” a Melbourne police spokeswoman said.

Authorities confirmed it was a kilo of cocaine.

Meanwhile, on Cocoa Beach, police found a duffel bag that washed ashore, containing 15 bricks of cocaine.

That amount is estimated to be worth $20,000 to $30,000. The bag has since been turned over to the U.S. Custom and Border Protection.

Read the full story on NBC News.

©2019 The Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, Fla.)

3 styles of knife that can serve you on duty

Posted on September 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: Sean Curtis

The omni-present blade has been one of law enforcement’s most stalwart companions for a very long time. Having a traditional pocketknife may have been the favored choice for officers of yesteryear, but these days there are myriad options allowing for greater diversity.

While there are still great generalized cutters, officers can now also choose mission-specific knives to assist them on the job. Choosing from one, or all, of these categories can help officers better stand ready for any call of duty.

1. Defensive/Backup

One of the first categories of knives that comes to mind is the backup. This may be counter-intuitive to a lot of people ? thinking an officer might need a knife for self-defense when they carry a firearm on their side. Where this specific type of blade shines is in keeping that very firearm.

Carrying a sidearm may seem pretty cool to the uninitiated, but if reason is applied, the weapon is also a potential liability. This is why weapon retention for officers has become such a focus over the last 20 years. In addition, it is why holsters have evolved with increasing retention levels, building in still more fail safes in order to keep a pistol from being deployed until the officer absolutely wants it. All a suspect has to do is grab an officer’s holstered gun and a deadly force scenario ensues.

With a strategically positioned backup blade, law enforcers can still use one hand to maintain critical retention of their firearm, while deploying the blade to stop the threat from disarming them. This is an ultimate case of an ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure. Find a blade that will mount within easy reach of your support hand and don’t forget to train your weapon-retention drills. A Karambit style blade is a natural fit because you can still manipulate your firearm with one in your hand.

2. General Purpose Cutter

The general-purpose cutter covers a wide swath of knives. Officers may carry a large fixed blade on their belt or vest, or they might have a small folder clipped to their pants pocket. There are few things as handy as a generalized cutting tool that can be quickly deployed and used when needed.

Scenarios for the general-purpose cutter range widely depending on the officer’s role. With SWAT and other tactical units, officers need to be able to wedge doors, cut zip cuffs, or even preparing charges for breaching. Patrol officers can benefit from a pocket folder for just about any cutting scenario. Nearly any law enforcement agent can develop acute needs to cut various materials such as a seatbelt to free a crash victim, or free an entangled animal.

As mentioned, the general-purpose cutter can range from just about any size and configuration a long as the officer can normally deploy it within their normal mission parameters. For tactical officers, consider good fixed blades for big cutting jobs. Patrol officers might benefit from a more compact, utilitarian blade such as tactical folders available in many different blade configurations. Finally, the non-uniformed ? whether plainclothes or suit and tie ? should consider lighter carry options for their day-to-day cutlery. Look for an unobtrusive, lightweight option that balances good cutting power with something that won’t damage your dress clothes.

3. Multi-tool

Having a cutting tool that generalizes is great, but what about specific situations? There are some specific cutters that can be applied to fixed scenarios law enforcement encounters that will give you an advantage should those situations occur on your shift. Without a doubt, some tools are meant to cut more optimally in certain scenarios. With the multi-tool, you can have the best of both worlds.

Responding to vehicle crashes is a common call for law enforcement. Any roving officer will eventually come upon or respond to a vehicle on its top or over an embankment. In order to get to victims trapped in vehicles it is often necessary to break the glass because the frame of the car is twisted or crush in the crash and the doors will not open. Having a specific cutting tool designed for glass-breaking is outstanding should the need arise.

Engaging a seatbelt of a trapped car crash victim can be a dicey bet. If the vehicle is off its wheels, the belt may be holding the victim in place with tension creating a thin margin of error for cutting. Easing a pointed blade in to free them is a risky gambit. Many multi-tool designs have incorporated this very concern with a seatbelt cutter. If you ever use one to snip a belt as opposed to sawing though one with a normal knife, you’ll understand. Cutters designed for seatbelts or even rope do a grand job.

The Right Tool for the Job

Officers have a wide array of tools they can carry in their vehicles or on their person to answer a number of challenges they face in the field. Find a blade that will serve as your backup, helping you to retain your firearm. Also, look for a general cutter, it is always a good choice both for on- and off-duty. Finally, pick up some mission-specific multi-tools that will assist you with some of those critical cutting needs that confront you in the field. A quality knife is always a good investment.

Woman Runs From Michigan Police, Strikes Trooper in Face

Posted on September 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A 34-year-old woman ran from a state police trooper in Northern Michigan, striking the trooper in the face as she was taken into custody.

L-Tron’s OSCR360 team returns from International Law Enforcement Conference

Posted on September 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

L-Tron’s OSCR360 team has returned from another successful trip to the IAI International Forensic Educational Conference in Reno, NV, held earlier this month.

IL Firefighter Advances to National Finals on ‘American Ninja Warrior’

Posted on September 2, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Aurora Firefighter Dan Polizzi wanted a new challenge that would help him stay fit as a firefighter.

Close Calls: North Carolina Live-Fire Drill

Posted on September 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Online video captures an apparent close call

Ohio county first responders deployed to Fla. before Hurricane Dorian makes landfall

Posted on August 31, 2019 by in Uncategorized

The IMT team will deploy for a 16-day mission to help assist with Hurricane Dorian response efforts

Baltimore Officer Wounded During Officer-Involved Shooting

Posted on August 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Baltimore Police Department was shot and wounded during an exchange of gunfire with a suspect police had been searching for since he opened fire on an officer at a traffic stop on Monday night.

California Department Recruitment Push on Facebook Gets Unexpected Attention

Posted on August 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Upton (CA) Police Department was trying to get the message across that the agency welcomes recruits with visible “sleeve” tattoos—which some agencies still refuse to consider—when they  posted a picture on Facebook, but the online response was not exactly what they expected.

Assisted Patrol to Include Video and Audio Recording Capabilities

Posted on August 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Assisted Patrol, a leading covert and bait product for cell phones and tablets, is adding new, powerful video and audio recording capabilities to its system.

FOP Honors Philadelphia Police Officers Injured in Shooting

Posted on August 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

They’ve been hailed as heroes and on Thursday night, the officers who were caught in the crossfire while responding to the Nicetown-Tioga standoff were honored by loved ones and fellow officers.

Roxana, DE, Vol. Fire Co. Put 75-foot Aerial in Service

Posted on August 30, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Roxana, DE, Volunteer Fire Company, in Sussex County, has taken delivery of a 2019 Pierce Enforcer 75-foot rear-mount aerial.

NY 9/11 stone memorial vandalized

Posted on August 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police received a criminal mischief report and found a vandalized 9/11 stone memorial covered with spray paint

Ky. county now classifies 911 dispatchers as first responders

Posted on August 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Knox County Judge and Executive Mike Mitchell said this resolution is being adopted across the Commonwealth

Astronaut accused of first-ever crime in space; NASA investigating

Posted on August 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Leada Gore Syracuse Media Group, N.Y.

NASA is reportedly investigating one of its astronauts in a case that appears to involve the first allegations of criminal activity from space.

Astronaut Anne McClain allegedly told investigators she accessed her estranged spouse’s bank account while serving on the International Space Station, the New York Times reported. McClain’s wife, Summer Worden, and her parents have filed complaints with the Federal Trade Commission and NASA’s Office of Inspector General related to the alleged identity theft incident.

The two women were in a dispute over custody of Worden’s 6-year-old son, the Times reported. There are no allegations money was taken or moved and McClain allegedly told investigators her check of the account was to ensure the child was being cared for.

In a statement, NASA praised McClain’s service but declined to address the allegations.

"Lt Col. Anne McClain has an accomplished military career, flew combat missions in Iraq and is one of NASA’s top astronauts," a statement from NASA read. "She did a great job on her most recent NASA mission aboard the International Space Station. Like with all NASA employees, NASA does not comment on personal or personnel matters."

McClain did address the allegations in a message posted to Twitter.

McClain and Worden filed for divorce in 2018 after four years of marriage. The astronaut is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. .Army, joining NASA’s astronaut corps in 2013 before spending 204 days aboard the International Space Station from December 2018 to June of this year.

McClain was a Kiowa helicopter pilot in the Army and flew 216 combat missions in Operation Iraqi Freedom. After Iraq, she was assigned to Alabama’s Fort Rucker as battalion operations manager and Kiowa instructor pilot.

©2019 Syracuse Media Group, N.Y.

Mississippi Deputy Dies in Single-Vehicle Rollover Crash

Posted on August 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

According to the Clarion Ledger, Chickasaw County Sheriff James Meyers confirmed on Wednesday that Deputy Jeremy Voyles died from injuries sustained in a single-vehicle rollover crash on Tuesday evening.

Homeowners Association Tells Police Officer to Park Car in Garage

Posted on August 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A homeowner’s association in East Lake, FL, recently sent a letter to one of its residents—an officer with the Clearwater Police Department—that she has to park her patrol vehicle in a garage and not in her driveway.

Illinois Police Arrest Man Who Allegedly Plotted Mass Shooting

Posted on August 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Pittsfield (IL) Police Department said in a statement on Wednesday that on Monday officers arrested a man who allegedly made threats on social media that he planned to shoot and kill students in the Pikeland School District.

DOJ Watchdog: Comey Violated FBI Policy in Handling of Trump Memos

Posted on August 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Former FBI Director James Comey violated bureau policy but didn’t break the law by feeding a memo about a private conversation with President Donald Trump to the press, the Justice Department’s inspector general said Thursday.

Dry Cleaners’ Collapsing Roof Injures CA Firefighter

Posted on August 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Escondido firefighter suffered the injury while working with crews to put out the blaze broke out at the business in a strip mall Wednesday afternoon.

Electronic Evidence K-9 Helps Crack Child Porn Cyber Crime Case

Posted on August 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The FBI is giving credit to a dog named Browser, an electronic evidence K-9 with the Lake County State’s Attorney’s Office, who helped crack an Indiana case involving child pornography.

2 EMTs, 2 others injured after car runs red light, hits Honolulu AMR ambulance

Posted on August 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Two EMTs and the patient they were transporting were injured in the crash and the driver of the other vehicle was taken to the hospital with serious injuries

EMS Focus Webinar Quick Take: Updating National EMS Education Standards

Posted on August 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Behind the effort to update the 2009 National EMS Education Standards and what it means for the industry

NFL Team Honors Fallen Tennessee Officer

Posted on August 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Tennessee Titans football team honored fallen Metro Nashville Police Department Officer John Anderson by presenting his family and fellow first responders with the 12th Annual “Titan Sword of Honor.”

Family of man killed by off-duty officer during confrontation wants prosecution

Posted on August 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Natalie Rice Associated Press

CORONA, Calif. — The parents of a mentally ill man who was fatally shot by an off-duty police officer in a California Costco store called for him to be criminally charged as they recover from their own gunshot wounds.

Salvador Sanchez, a Los Angeles police officer, has said he opened fire because Kenneth French attacked him while Sanchez was holding his 1½-year-old son during a shopping trip to the warehouse store.

Russell and Paola French appeared in public Monday for the first time since the shooting that led to the death of their 32-year-old son on June 14 in Corona.

Family attorney Dale Galipo acknowledged at the news conference that Kenneth French likely pushed the officer, but said it wasn't an attack and French immediately moved away.

Paola French told reporters she and her husband shouted at Sanchez not to shoot and that their son was not a threat.

"I was pleading for my son and our lives, but I was still shot in the back," she said, fighting back tears. "What threat did I pose to him?"

Russell French, who lost a kidney after the shooting and remained in a hospital until last week, said he "begged" the officer not to fire.

"I told him we had no guns and my son was sick," French said.

The family on Monday filed a claim — a precursor to a lawsuit — against Sanchez and the Los Angeles Police Department.

"My client was assaulted. He was acting in self-defense," said Ira Salzman, a lawyer for Sanchez. "It's a horrible tragedy for both families."

Galipo said he didn't know if there was any exchange before the shooting. He urged authorities to release surveillance footage and cellphone video from the scene.

However, a Riverside County judge has issued an order that keeps the video out of the public eye for one year because of the investigation. Prosecutors were still deciding whether to file criminal charges.

Galipo said he believes Sanchez should face murder or manslaughter charges.

Corona police have said French attacked the officer without provocation

Galipo called it an "open-handed push or slap" to the policeman's back.

"It certainly does not justify killing someone," Galipo said.

A trained police officer should deescalate a situation before opening fire, "especially when you're in Costco and there are children," the lawyer said.

Another lawyer for Sanchez, David Winslow, said in June that French knocked the officer to the ground and he briefly lost consciousness.

When Sanchez came to, Winslow said, "he believed his life and his son's life was in immediate danger" and fired his handgun.

Kenneth French lived with his parents. Family members believe he suffered from schizophrenia, Galipo said.

Paola French said her son was a "peaceful and loving soul" who was never aggressive.

Sanchez has been with the LAPD for seven years. He is on paid administrative leave that is mandatory after an officer-involved shooting.

1st Tix Celebrates One Year Serving First Responders

Posted on August 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Nearly 75,000 First Responders Have Joined 1st Tix

Illinois Deputy Stabbed in Face at Courthouse Holding Cell

Posted on August 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A deputy with the Vermilion County Sheriff’s Office was stabbed in the face by an inmate in a holding cell in the county courthouse in Danville, Illinois on Friday.

Officials: IN Fire District Merger Worth Taxes

Posted on August 25, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Monroe Fire Protection District officials say the higher taxes resulting from a planned merger of Bloomington and Van Buren townships will increase services.

Search for missing first responders off Fla. coast to continue by volunteers

Posted on August 25, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Volunteers including numerous JFRD and Fairfax County first responders will continue looking for the men

Federal lawsuit filed against Wash. city, FD over dead man’s intubation

Posted on August 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Jai Ginn, wife of Bradley Ginn Sr., filed a federal lawsuit alleging that the parties violated her civil rights to due process

FF-paramedic heads new Pa. school club to connect students to public service careers

Posted on August 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The organization will introduce students to careers like volunteer firefighting, police work, emergency management, EMS and 911 dispatchers

The Top 5 Emerging Technologies Police Agencies Can’t Do Without

Posted on August 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Emerging technologies are helping policemen do their work more effective and safer. Find out which technologies have already proven their true value.

Throwbot 2 Robot

Posted on August 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Liberty Dynamic, ReconRobotics will begin collaborating with ReconRobotics, Inc., on adapting a throwable robot with flash-bang capabilities. This will be an adaptation of the robotic company’s tiny, tactical Throwbot 2® robot which includes an…

Mobile Computer Tech Can Keep Responders Safer

Posted on August 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Ed Ballam spoke with mobile computer device makers who say use of technology on scene can help responders make informed decisions to keep the public and personnel safer.

Back to the advanced

Posted on August 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

We’ve all heard about getting ‘back to the basic,’ but sometimes paramedics need to make sure they get back to the advanced, as well

Police: Disgruntled Cook Planned Mass Shooting at California Hotel

Posted on August 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police in Long Beach thwarted a possible mass shooting this week when they arrested a disgruntled hotel cook they say threatened to carry out violence at his workplace.

Union Chief Urges NYPD Officers to “Proceed with the Utmost Caution”

Posted on August 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Patrick Lynch—the longtime president of the Police Benevolent Association—sent a strongly worded message to the agency’s rank and file officers following the firing of Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who was accused of killing Eric Garner in 2014 but was cleared of all wrongdoing.

Police Arrest Florida Truck Driver for Making Threats of Mass Killing

Posted on August 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Federal authorities arrested a Florida truck driver in Indianapolis just days before he planned to “shoot up” a church in Memphis, Tennessee.

2 Missouri Officers Lauded for Saving Man Stabbed in New Orleans

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Two officers with the Kansas City Police Department attending the National Fraternal Order of Police Convention in New Orleans rushed to the aid of a man who had been stabbed in the chest by a panhandler late last week.

United States Attorney Slams DA for “Culture of Disrespect” Against Police

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania on Thursday slammed Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner for creating a “culture of disrespect” that he believes led to the shooting of six Philadelphia police officers on Wednesday.

FirstNet Certified Fleet Complete Apps Bring Fully-Integrated Fleet Management Solution to Public Safety

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

AT&T, Fleet Complete, Cradlepoint Offer FirstNet Ready™ In-Vehicle Network Solution that Will Boost Public Safety for Communities Across the USA

Ky. judge orders 911 dispatch center study

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Daviess County Judge-Executive Al Mattingly requested a study be conducted on the feasibility of consolidating regional 911 dispatch centers into one center

What’s new in fire department apparatus bay design and technology

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Several new technologies are being integrated into apparatus bays to optimize firefighter safety and department efficiency

LA Audit: Ex-Fire Department Head Skimmed $56K

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The former Vacherie Volunteer Fire Department president allegedly used $56,600 of department funds to on phone bills, loans and other personal expenses.

Off-Duty FF Uses Water Truck to Douse OH Pickup Fire

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The firefighter used the water he was carrying to an asphalt company to extinguish a burning pickup truck in Tuscarawas Township.

Florida Motor Officer in Critical Condition Following Collision

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A veteran motor officer with the Pembroke Pines Police Department was badly injured when his motorcycle was struck by another vehicle.

The dirty dozen: Updating the ’10 deadly errors’ of policing

Posted on August 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Lt. Dan Marcou
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

The “10 deadly errors” hung in my locker every day of my career. I originally obtained them from the book, "Officer Down, Code Three" by LAPD homicide detective Pierce Brooks.

After attending “too many” police funerals, Brooks compiled a list of errors that were being repeatedly committed in officer-down cases.

Here is my take on those original 10, as well as two more I’ve taken the liberty of adding in order to make the “dirty dozen.”

1. Attitude

If you fail to keep your mind on the job for any reason, you may miss critical indicators of impending danger. Having an unhealthy attitude can also cause an officer to slip into such a malaise they are susceptible to committing other errors as a matter of routine.

Any coach will tell their players that attitude can make the difference between a win and a loss in any game. This could apply to law enforcement, except for the fact that police work is not a game and losing is not an option.

2. Tombstone Courage

When you wear a badge every day your courage is a given and does not need to be proven on every call. In some cases, police work is best done when done as a team. Do not hesitate to enthusiastically give and patiently wait for backup.

Sometimes it’s just plain smart to slow things down or even disengage.

3. Not Enough Rest

An old veteran told a rookie, “To survive this career all you have to do is pay attention!”

Being alert is a necessity in law enforcement, and you can’t do that when you are sleepy or asleep.

4. Taking a Bad Position

On every call, with every suspect, on every approach, you must evaluate your position constantly. You must know how to use cover, concealment, barriers and relative positioning to your advantage.

5. Missing Danger Signs

Prior to most attacks, there are usually indications that an assault is imminent. Recognize changes in a suspect’s muscular tension, an increase in respirations, modified offensive stances, offensive hand positioning, glances toward exits, looking for witnesses, checking out your weapon, furtive movements, signaling toward accomplices and verbal threats to do you harm. Learn to recognize danger signs and never explain them away. Avoid developing technological tunnel vision.

When you are in contact with the public, look up and look out. Get your head out of your apps!

6. Failure to Watch the Suspect’s Hands

The hands kill. Throughout every call and contact, “WATCH THE HANDS!”

7. Relaxing Too Soon

If you are able to convince yourself that alarms are false before you arrive on scene, you are probably an officer who is “routinely” relaxing too soon on most of your contacts.

Officers must resist the tendency to relax when they confront compliant suspects, because feigning compliance is a common criminal tactic. If you find one suspect, one weapon, one explosive device, one of anything dangerous, do not relax. Continue the search for more. Remember, nothing is “routine.”

8. Improper Use or No Use of Handcuffs

If a suspect is arrested and transported, policies all over the nation require that they be handcuffed. Officers should be as proficient with multiple tactical handcuffing techniques as they are with their firearms.

9. No Search or Poor Search

In today’s world, criminals can buy clothes that have secret compartments, within which they can conceal weapons, drugs, contraband and fruits of a crime. It is imperative that every arrested suspect be searched thoroughly. Search the suspect’s person incident to arrest as well as the lunge area. Then search them again before you take them into the jail. Additionally, you must search every suspect turned over to you for transport by other officers.

10. Dirty or Inoperable Weapon

You should neither leave firearms training, nor hit the streets with a dirty weapon. Some officers never take the time to truly learn how to field strip their weapon and when that happens they stop properly cleaning their weapons. Before beginning your shift make certain long guns are “squad ready.” There should be no firearm in your squad that you can’t quickly access and bring into the fight under stress. Take care of your weapons and they will take care of you.

Additionally, a weapon is only operable if an officer is mentally prepared to use it, when a life depends on it. Are you prepared?

Those are the original 10. Here are two new deadly errors I’ve added to the list.

11. Failure to Wear a Vest or a Seatbelt

Vests and seat belts have saved thousands of officers’ lives, but they can only save your life if you are wearing them.

12. Failure to Maintain Physical/Emotional Fitness

There is an urgent need for police officers to maintain a high level of fitness to face both the considerable physical and emotional challenges this career has to offer. To enhance your physical fitness level, train, run, lift and stretch at least three times a week. To maintain emotional fitness, laugh, love, work, play and pray, while striving to maintain a positive perspective on your life and career.

Now with that said, you may hit the streets…and in the words of Sergeant Phil Esterhaus, “Be careful out there!”

This article, originally published on 02/24/2014, has been updated.

FBI Investigating Social Media Posts After Mass Shootings

Posted on August 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Bethlehem police, along with New York City police and the FBI, are investigating “a few” social media posts mentioning Bethlehem and the recent Texas and Ohio mass shootings.

Congratulations, you’ve been promoted to fire chief! Now what?

Posted on August 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Seven tips for newly promoted chiefs looking to be successful in their new role

California Sheriff’s Office Releases Video of Crime Spree That Ended With Officer-Involved Shooting

Posted on August 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Sonoma County sheriff’s office released body camera footage this week showing a deputy fatally shooting a San Francisco man who officials say had stabbed a security guard and ran into pedestrians with a stolen truck on July 4 — all while high on LSD.

Body Camera Video Shows Iowa Officers Rescue Two People From River

Posted on August 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police body camera video captured the dramatic rescue of two people whose raft capsized, tossing them into the churning waters below a dam in Iowa’s Des Moines River.

Command Post: Good Leaders Must Find and Nurture the Next Generation

Posted on August 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

If you don’t share your experiences with those moving up the ranks, who will?

Higher Education: Much More Than Checking the Box

Posted on August 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

How collegiate learning can prepare a more well-rounded firefighter.

NY EMT accused of making racists remarks on the job

Posted on August 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A New York EMT made off-color remarks to a colleague, and on social media, concerning incidents she responded to

37 injured in Texas Exxon Mobil refinery explosion and fire

Posted on July 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The city of Baytown issued a shelter in place that lasted for about three hours for residents living west of the plant

‘He’s got my gun’: Video shows struggle before deadly Conn. OIS

Posted on July 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Nicholas Rondinone and Rebecca Lurye The Hartford Courant

HARTFORD, Conn. — A Hartford police officer yells, “He’s got my gun,” seconds before the driver of a fleeing car was fatally shot Friday during a frantic struggle with at least three cops, body camera footage released Monday shows.

Alphonso Zaporta, 41, appears to attack the officers after they approached his car about 9:15 p.m. Friday following a brief pursuit, officials said. The body camera videos start when officers get out of their vehicles and run toward Zaporta as he continues to flee on the I-84 West on-ramp by Capitol Avenue.

Zaporta opens the driver’s side door and appears to lunge at an officer before another officer, Rocky Last, arrives and clashes with Zaporta on the driver’s seat, the video shows. Last has Zaporta in a headlock inside the car before Det. Zack Sherry arrives and jerks Zaporta’s arm, turning him around inside the vehicle while he is still struggling with Last.

Sherry appears to have a grip on Zaporta’s right arm when Last twice yells, “He’s got my gun." Seconds later, another officer yells out, “Rock, he’s got your gun."

One of three officers involved in the struggle loops around to the passenger’s side of the car and yells, “You’re gonna get shot, bro," before three shots are heard. Fifteen seconds pass between when Last yells about losing his gun and Sherry fires on Zaporta.

"During those moments, it’s clear our officers lives were at risk,” Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said at a press conference Monday.

Zaporta is seen being dragged backwards from the car by his legs, falling face down on the ground, as shots are heard on the video. While blurry and somewhat frenetic, the video appears to show a gun falling from Zaporta’s hand as the officer fires the fatal shots.

The video then shows a gun lying by Zaporta’s right hand.

Authorities confirmed that Sherry fired the fatal shots. In the video, a passenger exits the vehicle and surrenders to police.

The incident began near Park Terrace and Russ Street, where officers tried to pull Zaporta over in connection with a “gun-related activity," Interim Police Chief Jason Thody said.

“It was more than just a traffic stop, it was also part of an investigation into gun-related activity that happened earlier in the month,” Thody said.

The officers were investigating a July 9 incident in which Zaporta reportedly fired several shots out of a moving car on Lawrence Street, according to law enforcement records provided by a source.

No one was injured in the shooting, but officers located several spent 9mm shell casings in the roadway, according to the records. After Friday’s shooting, ballistic testing turned up “a potential link” between those shell casings and a 9mm firearm officers discovered on the driver’s side floor of the car Zaporta was driving, the records show.

The handgun, which was reported stolen out of Springfield, was loaded, officials have said.

Asked Monday why officers immediately approached Zaporta’s car on the Exit 48 on-ramp, Thody said, “Tactics-wise, that was a vehicle that was actively moving and had already backed into another vehicle. It was a congested on-ramp.

"I would say, I don’t see an opportunity … they deployed the technology they had. They did what they could do at that point to subdue the car, to stop the car from moving. The next step is getting the driver out of the car.”

Per department protocol, Sherry was placed on a two-week, paid administrative leave due to firing his service weapon. Last was also placed on a two-week, paid administrative leave at Thody’s discretion.

At the end of that period, the department will assess whether to bring the officers back or continue their leave.

Officials had been calling for state police and the State’s Attorney’s Office to quickly release video of the shooting. An email containing the footage was released Monday evening.

“The video has been edited out of respect for Mr. Zaporta and his family, but the material being released does capture the portions of the incident pertinent to the investigation into the use of deadly force," the state Division of Criminal Justice said in a news release. It is not clear what was edited out of the videos.

"They (state’s attorney) moved with unusual speed in a situation like this to make the video available,” Bronin said. “I think the reason is as simple as what we said on Saturday: In a situation like this, we think it’s important to show the public as much as we can and provide the most transparency as possible.”

The release Monday included three videos from the cameras of three different officers — each video was more than a minute long

Zaporta, of Windsor, was known to law enforcement before Friday’s shooting, with a criminal record that began in the mid-1990s, when he was a teenager living in Hartford, according to information about his criminal history provided by sources.

Zaporta had two active arrest warrants against him, both issued earlier this year for incidents of domestic violence, according to law enforcement records provided by a source.

He was wanted since Jan. 4 on charges of second-degree strangulation – a felony – and second-degree threatening and second-degree breach of peace. Since June, Zaporta has also been wanted on new charges of second-degree threatening, second-degree breach of peace and harassment.

In 1996, he was convicted of attempted first-degree assault, second-degree larceny and several lesser offenses, including third-degree assault, two counts of probation violation and possession of narcotics, according to information from the Board of Pardons and Parole.

He was released from prison nine years later, in October 2005, to serve the rest of his 11½-year sentence on parole.

Nearly a year later, he was arrested in Hartford again on a breach of peace charge and held in prison for six months, until his conviction and eventual release by the parole board in March 2007.

By then, just three months remained in Zaporta’s sentence, but he was jailed again on May 14, 2007 for missing his curfew and staying in the wrong home, according to the board.

He was released at the end of his sentence, on June 20, 2007. That same year, Zaporta was convicted of first-degree burglary with a deadly weapon and sentenced to 15 years in prison, to be suspended after eight years, according to the criminal records shared by sources.

Zaporta’s mother, Olivia Richard, defended her son and questioned officers’ use of force against him as she spoke to reporters Monday afternoon outside the State Police Troop H office in Hartford.

“What has been previously reported was not what we saw on the video,” she told FOX61.

“My son was killed like a dog and it hurts, and I want answers,” Richard continued. “I need answers, because my son was a good person despite his criminal background or despite what they’re gonna try to paint him and make it look like. There was no reason to kill him like that.”

A relative reached at a family home in Bloomfield on Monday declined to comment.

State police, who are investigating the shooting, said the cause and manner of Zaporta’s death will be determined by the office of the chief medical examiner.

Tolland State’s Attorney Matthew Gedansky is overseeing the investigation and will determine whether the officers’ actions were legal.

“The State’s Attorney extends his condolences to Mr. Zaporta’s family. The investigation is in its early stages and it is not possible to predict at this time how long it will take to complete. Additional information will be provided when appropriate,” the Division of Criminal Justice said. “This will be a thorough and comprehensive investigation to allow the State’s Attorney to determine whether the use of force resulting in the death of Mr. Zaporta was justified under the applicable law.”

This is the first deadly police shooting in Hartford that was captured on body-worn cameras. Hartford police have been rolling out a body-worn camera program since February, Thody said.

By Friday, 200 of the 300 or so cameras were out in the field and training was on-going.

©2019 The Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.)

Wyoming K-9 Unit Locates Missing 4-Year-Old Boy

Posted on July 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

When a four-year-old child in Sweetwater County, Wyoming wandered from his yard while playing with the family’s dogs, the mother called 911 to get help locating him.

Video: New York Subway Rider Verbally Abuses Police Officer

Posted on July 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The NYC Police Benevolent Association posted on its Facebook page a video of a young man verbally abusing a police officer on a subway train.

United States Marine Corps Selects Med-Eng EOD 10 Bomb Suit to Protect the Lives of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Specialists

Posted on July 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Major contract award means multiple branches of the U.S. Military will be using Med-Eng bomb suits and helmets. Helps secure highly skilled manufacturing jobs in northern New York state.

Alabama Police Officer OK After Going Missing During Traffic Stop

Posted on July 23, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Birmingham police officer was rushed to the hospital early Sunday morning after shots were fired during a traffic stop.

FDNY calls on volunteer ambulance services to help with heat-related 911 calls

Posted on July 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The city fire department will lean on community volunteer ambulance services to handle overflow 911 medical emergencies

California Sheriff’s County Deputy, Suspect Injured in Shooting

Posted on July 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A San Bernardino Sheriff’s deputy was injured after a standoff led to a deputy-involved shooting in Victorville Wednesday evening.

LEO remains hospitalized after Baltimore clinic shooting

Posted on July 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

null
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

Associated Press

BALTIMORE — Police say a sergeant who was shot during an incident at a Baltimore methadone clinic that left two people dead remains hospitalized.

Baltimore police said in a statement Tuesday that 48-year-old Billy Shiflett is still being treated for a gunshot wound in his lower abdomen.

Shiflett had responded to a clinic where police say a man had demanded methadone before opening fire on Monday morning . The man shot Shiflett before he was fatally wounded by police.

Police identified the shooter as 49-year old Ashanti Pinkney of Baltimore. They also released the name of a clinic employee who was fatally shot. He was 52-year old David Caldwell of Baltimore.

A 41-year-old woman who worked at the clinic was also injured. She was released from the hospital on Monday night.

6 common competencies of highly effective EMS leaders

Posted on July 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

From technical and decision-making proficiency to humility and ambition, these characteristics help leaders propel EMS agencies to a future of success

Texas EMT academy receives $300K in grants

Posted on July 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The funds will help the academy get equipment and training supplies for a successful medical training program

Why Police Should Ignore the Starbucks Kerfuffle

Posted on July 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The blowback on Facebook against Starbucks was especially vitriolic, leading an outside observer to conclude that mistreatment of law enforcement officers in the company’s stores is a pervasive problem (spoiler alert: it’s not).

House approves 9/11 victims bill, sending it to the Senate for a vote

Posted on July 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The legislation, which fully funds and permanently reauthorizes the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, was approved by a 402-12 vote

California Police Change Policy on Search of Individuals on Probation and Parole

Posted on July 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officers with the Oakland (CA) Police Department will now operate under a much more restrictive policy regarding the search for subjects on probation and parole.

Mass. state legislators look to increase penalties for those who assault EMTs

Posted on July 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The bill would change an assault charge from a misdemeanor to a felony

Ghost Ship Defendant Admits to Lying

Posted on July 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A defendant has admitted he lied four times about whether anyone lived in the Ghost Ship warehouse where 36 people died in a 2016 fire.

CT Man Used ‘Jaws of Life’ to Loot ATMs

Posted on July 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Southington police have arrested a man who used a “Jaws of Life” hydraulic tool to break into ATMs across the state, stealing up to $300,000.

Do police response times matter?

Posted on July 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.
Author: Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

Complaints of poor police response time may be taking a back seat to concerns about other aspects of police conduct but getting to that 911 call in a timely manner can be the best community relations tool of all. The question, however, is whether faster arrival on scene affects crime rates, arrest rates and saves lives.

A critical component of response time is emergency vehicle operation, which claimed the lives of a dozen police officers in 2018 who crashed responding to calls – twice the number of officers killed during police pursuits, four times the number murdered by assault with a vehicle and a third of all vehicle-related officer fatalities.

What the research shows

A study recently published by Stanford University researcher Daniel S. Bennett found that, “Complicating any analysis using response times, however, is the fact that different police agencies face very different circumstances, both in the severity of the calls they respond to and in the geographic realities of the areas they serve.”

Bennett found an inverse relationship between response time for emergency calls and non-emergency calls in a multi-city study. This doesn’t sound shocking, given that more severe calls are typically given priority by dispatchers who then must place more recent but less urgent calls at the end of the call queue.

Conventional wisdom is that response time is important, but most studies cast doubt on whether decreasing the time between the notification and arrival of police has little effect on arrest or clearance rates. Bennett, however, quotes a recent study declaring that a 10% increase in response time can have a 5% reduction in solving the crime. That study claims that a new hire for the purpose of faster response times can yield a 170% return of payroll costs in the savings that result from lower crime.

The seminal study on the effectiveness of preventive patrol conducted in the 1970s in Kansas City, Missouri, has been cited as evidence that random patrol patterns have no significant effect on crime rates. An often-overlooked aspect of the study is the finding that response time has a significant effect on measures of public satisfaction with their police departments.

Incidentally, Bennett’s survey showed no significant difference in response time based on the known race or neighborhood of the caller in urgent calls. But, since lags in response time, even on non-emergency calls, have a negative effect on public perception of their police agencies, department leaders should be aware of that reality. As any officer knows who has waited for a back-up officer, ambulance, or fire department’s arrival, wait time is frustrating no matter what the clock says.

Factors complicating response time

The public rarely understands how the dispatching system works. Every communications officer can testify to the anger that callers experience when dispatch is asking screening questions to assess the call and an officer is not at the caller’s door immediately. The assessment and coding of an incoming call, directing the call to the appropriate agency or agencies, assignment of the call to the specific units and that unit’s arrival at the scene (even assuming the responder has an accurate location), all add seconds to the clock.

Police leaders and supervisors may find their strategic deployment of patrol resources has less impact on response time than factors out of their control.

Takeaways for police managers Public satisfaction is based on perceptions and expectations. Increased staffing, building new stations, establishing substations, or adjusting patrol areas can be disruptive and expensive. It may be as productive, from a community relations view, to invest in adjusting public expectations through education than from actually improving patrol response times. Predictive policing crime analysis can be a good to wise resource deployment. Assure your public that no differences in response times are due to race or economic status and have the facts to prove it. If patterns reveal a disparity, the situation should be remedied. When response time becomes highly valued, officers can feel pressured to rush through citizen contacts or avoid officer-initiated activity, both of which negatively affect police efficiency and public confidence. Use caution in measuring response time. Many dispatch systems can’t measure all of the factors involved in response time. For example, if 100% of personnel are on duty for a presidential visit, response times might be slower due to the special activity and fixed posts. Thus, in a study of response time relative to staffing that includes unusual events the averages can be skewed. Response time to major crimes should be examined by separating reports of crimes in progress from crimes discovered. Estimates are that only 25% of serious crimes reported are those actively believed to be occurring at the time of the call to the police. The number of “in-progress” calls that are subsequently determined to be unfounded should be calculated in response times, since their priority at the time of dispatch isn’t changed by the findings after response. Driving fast is dangerous. Improving response time by higher speeds of responding officers is a prospect too deadly to encourage. Investing in non-sworn personnel to handle low-priority calls can be a cost-effective way to respond effectively to citizens requests for service.

Fingernail DNA Links Man to Washington Cold Case

Posted on July 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Investigators had no way of knowing 32 years ago that 18-year-old Tammy Bristow held the key, under her fingernails, to identifying the man who investigators believe put the rope around her neck and caused her death inside her Sandpoint home.

North Carolina Man Accused of Attempting to Drown Police Officer

Posted on June 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A North Carolina man now faces three felony charges after he reportedly attempted to drown a police officer by holding his head beneath the surface of a lake.

ICE Still Playing Role Inside Los Angeles County Jails

Posted on June 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The reality inside the jails is a complex tango that grants ICE a role while distancing it as a law enforcement partner.

TX Officer Shot and Killed During Pursuit, Suspect Dead

Posted on June 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Cpl. Jose Espericueta tried to make contact with the suspect and the 33-year-old man ran away, police say. Espericueta and other officers pursued

CT Firefighter, Paramedic Save Woman in Compactor

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The woman is in critical condition after she was almost crushed in a store trash compactor before she was rescued by a New London firefighter and hospital paramedic.

Bodycam footage shows Fla. LEO dragged by suspect’s car

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Richard Tribou Orlando Sentinel

ORLANDO, Fla. — Orlando Police released body cam footage of an officer being dragged by suspect’s car that hit speeds of up to 60 mph, according to a report on ClickOrlando.com.

The report said OPD Officer Sean Murphy had pulled over Zavier Askew, 25, on May 9 near College Drive and Willie Mays Parkway east of downtown Orlando. The officer found remains of marijuana in the car and asked Askew to exit the vehicle. At one point, Askew runs back into the car and drives off with Office Murphy halfway out the car window.

The body cam footage seen on ClickOrlando shows the moment Askew jumps into the driver’s seat and races off with Murphy’s legs out the window.

“Dude, you’re killing me. Stop, stop. This is attempted murder,” you can hear Officer Murphy’s voice saying in the video.

The report said Askew hit another car on a dead-end road where the chase ended with Askew hitting another car and Officer Murphy nearly avoiding getting pinned. Askew was arrested and charged with

attempted first-degree murder of a law enforcement officer and other charges. He remains at the Orange County Jail.

———

©2019 The Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, Fla.)

Deputy in Plain Clothes Shoots Teen Who Attempted Carjacking on Him

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A deputy with the Cook County Sheriff’s Office shot and wounded a teen who attempted to carjack him overnight.

North Carolina Sheriffs Now Support Mandate to Help ICE

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association has reversed its position on an effort by state lawmakers to require law enforcement agencies to cooperate with immigration authorities.

Oregon Bill Would Make Killing of an Officer Fall Under Death Penalty

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A bill that narrows the crimes eligible for the death penalty heads to a vote of the Oregon House on Wednesday with a new provision: A last-minute change adds back the killing of law enforcement officers to the definition of aggravated murder.

Oregon Bill Would Make Killing of an Officer Fall Under Death Penalty

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A bill that narrows the crimes eligible for the death penalty heads to a vote of the Oregon House on Wednesday with a new provision: A last-minute change adds back the killing of law enforcement officers to the definition of aggravated murder.

Person shot in gunfire with officers near Dallas courthouse

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: Therese Matthews

Associated Press

DALLAS — A person was shot in an exchange of gunfire with federal officers outside a federal courthouse in downtown Dallas Monday morning, city police said, and a blast was later heard after the bomb squad said it would perform a controlled explosion on a vehicle.

The injured person was taken to a hospital and no one else was injured by shots fired outside the Earle Cabell Federal Building, Dallas police said via Twitter. A large law enforcement presence was visible downtown late Monday morning, with police closing off several blocks around the federal building.

Police did not immediately release any information about the person or the nature of their injuries. A bomb squad examined a vehicle associated with that person as a precaution and decided to perform a controlled explosion. A loud blast could be heard downtown at 10:38 a.m.

The Dallas Morning News reports that one of its photographers, Tom Fox, was outside the building and witnessed a gunman opening fire. A photograph shows authorities tending to a shirtless man lying on the ground in a parking lot outside the building.

Fox said he was outside the building when a man in a mask parked at the corner of two downtown streets. He said the man ran and began shooting at the courthouse, cracking the glass of the door.

The window panes in the courthouse's revolving door were broken.

Chad Cline, 46, who lives in a building near the courthouse, told The Associated Press that just before 9 a.m. a message was broadcast throughout the building that there was an active shooter in the area and that residents should stay inside. Less than half an hour later, another message said there was a potential bomb threat and that residents needed to leave. He, his wife and their two dogs went to a coffee shop. When he returned to his building later in the morning, he asked an officer armed with a rifle when he would be able to get back in and the officer didn't know.

Police say federal officers are now leading the investigation.

MA Fire Department to Merge with Ambulance Service

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“It streamlines the delivery of the system,” Fire Chief Jeffrey Legendre said about the merger of the Bolton Fire Department and the city’s ambulance department.

25 Officers Injured in Protest After Fatal OIS by U.S. Marshals

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

United States Marshals shot and killed a man in Memphis on Wednesday night, sparking a protest that left at least 25 officers injured.

Police release photo of bloodied LEO beaten during arrest attempt

Posted on June 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

CINCINNATI — Cincinnati’s police union president is asking for more support of their cops after an officer was beaten during an arrest.

Cincinnati’s Fraternal Order of Police President Sergeant Dan Hils posted a photo on Facebook of a bloody officer who was injured during an arrest attempt on June 6, local news station WLWT5 reports.

According to Cincinnati.com, police were called to a YMCA after receiving reports of Durrell Nichols, 25, acting disorderly and refusing to leave the basketball gym.

Police attempted to force Nichols to leave, but he resisted. Nichols then assaulted the officers with a deadly weapon, resulting in the injuries of the unnamed officer.

The officer required several stitches and his face is still swollen.

“The officer would have been justified if he had used deadly force,” Hils said. “At what levels of leadership would he have been supported and at what levels would he have been abandoned?”

Nichols is behind bars on charges of assaulting an officer, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and criminal trespassing.

This is the officer right after the vicious assault on him at the YMCA last Thursday night. The officer would have been…

Posted by Daniel Hils on Tuesday, June 11, 2019

North Carolina Officer’s Act of Kindness Applauded on Social Media

Posted on June 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officer Andrew Spottswood of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department went out of his way to help a 75-year-old man whose wallet was stolen.  

Alabama Deputy Dies in On-Duty Vehicle Collision

Posted on June 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A deputy with the Monroe County (AL) Sheriff’s Office was killed in an on-duty vehicle collision early Tuesday morning.

Bedford Hills, NY, Rescue Co. Rolls with Walk-In Rescue

Posted on June 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Bedford Hills, NY, Rescue Co. has placed in service Rescue 10 a Seagrave apparatus with a walk-in box used strictly for transportation of equipment and personnel.

St. Louis Police Chief Promises ‘Extensive’ Probe of Officers’ Facebook Posts

Posted on June 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden on Monday assured aldermen that his department’s internal affairs probe of racist, anti-Muslim and other offensive Facebook posts by some officers will be “an extensive process and a competent process.”

Conn. further restricts police cooperation on immigration

Posted on June 6, 2019 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Author: International Public Safety Association

Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. — Connecticut is further limiting local law enforcement's cooperation with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The measures were recently passed by the legislature and reduce the instances in which local law enforcement can detain an immigrant without a warrant.

Democratic Gov. Ned Lamont has said he will sign the bills.

The sponsor is state Rep. Steve Stafstrom, a Democrat from Bridgeport. He says the measures will give Connecticut one of the more restrictive policies on when local and state law enforcement will cooperate with ICE.

Critics say the legislation will make it more difficult for police to do their job and compromise public safety.

The measures come several years after the state adopted ground rules for when police are allowed to detain immigrants on behalf of ICE.

RI fire captain suspended after altercation with tow company employee

Posted on June 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

After an exchange of words at the scene of a motorcycle accident, Tiverton Fire Department Capt. Craig Committo allegedly choked the tow truck employee

Off-Duty Maryland Officer Killed in Motorcycle Crash

Posted on May 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An off-duty Prince George’s County police officer was killed on the Capital Beltway in a crash that threw him from his motorcycle and into traffic.

Texas Officer Injured in Crash Making “Remarkable Progress”

Posted on May 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A motor officer with the El Paso Police Department who was injured in a traffic collision late last week is said to be making “remarkable progress” in recovery.

Ambulance response times continue to lag in Ga. city

Posted on May 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Dunwoody and Dekalb County signed a memorandum of understanding last fall to station more ambulances around the city

10 Chicago LEOs wounded in deadly crash

Posted on May 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

null

Associated Press

CHICAGO — An 84-year-old woman has died after being injured in a Chicago crash that involved multiple vehicles and also hurt 10 police officers.

The Chicago Tribune reports that two Chicago police vehicles were in a crash with several other vehicles around 10 p.m. Saturday in the Austin neighborhood on the city's West Side. Twelve people were injured, including 10 Chicago police officers.

Police say the 10 officers and a man and woman who were both civilians were taken to a hospital. Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi confirmed in a tweet Sunday evening that the woman has died and he offered condolences to the family.

In a tweet earlier Sunday, he said the officers' injuries were not believed to be life-threatening.

Police have not released the details of the crash.

Our thoughts and prayers are with all affected by last night's tragic car accident & deepest condolences to Bishop Gunn and his family. https://t.co/1lQAx2RDZQ pic.twitter.com/e9yvTasAjk

— Anthony Guglielmi (@AJGuglielmi) May 26, 2019

10 Chicago LEOs wounded in deadly crash

Posted on May 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

null

Associated Press

CHICAGO — An 84-year-old woman has died after being injured in a Chicago crash that involved multiple vehicles and also hurt 10 police officers.

The Chicago Tribune reports that two Chicago police vehicles were in a crash with several other vehicles around 10 p.m. Saturday in the Austin neighborhood on the city's West Side. Twelve people were injured, including 10 Chicago police officers.

Police say the 10 officers and a man and woman who were both civilians were taken to a hospital. Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi confirmed in a tweet Sunday evening that the woman has died and he offered condolences to the family.

In a tweet earlier Sunday, he said the officers' injuries were not believed to be life-threatening.

Police have not released the details of the crash.

Our thoughts and prayers are with all affected by last night's tragic car accident & deepest condolences to Bishop Gunn and his family. https://t.co/1lQAx2RDZQ pic.twitter.com/e9yvTasAjk

— Anthony Guglielmi (@AJGuglielmi) May 26, 2019

San Francisco Police Union: Chief Must Quit

Posted on May 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The San Francisco Police Officers Association is calling on Police Chief Bill Scott to step down after he apologized for his officers’ raid of a journalist’s home.

CO Firefighter Injured Fighting Vehicle Fire

Posted on May 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Berthoud firefighter was transported to a local hospital and was released having sustained no serious injuries.

Colo. firefighter injured fighting vehicle fire

Posted on May 25, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

During the firefight, an explosion occurred, sending metal pieces from the vehicle’s engine compartment flying, striking a firefighter

Arizona Officer Replaces Woman’s Stolen Car Battery

Posted on May 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Phoenix Officer Veronica Lumpkin went a step further and bought Anaya a new car battery out of her own pocket.

Colorado Police Officers Have Close Call With Drunk Driver

Posted on May 24, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Colorado police officers narrowly escaped injury when a suspected DUI driver crashed into them.

New CT Fire Station Put on Hold

Posted on May 22, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Willington officials asked for more information concerning Willington Hill Fire Department’s request for $60,000 to help buy and maintain the property for the new firehouse.

Texas Lawmakers Poised to Approve Sweeping Changes Year After School Shooting

Posted on May 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A year after 10 people were gunned down at Santa Fe High School, the Texas House on Tuesday gave preliminary approval 128-14 to a sweeping school safety bill that would increase state funding to better secure schools.

CA Police Academy Grads Taught History of Police-Minority Relations

Posted on May 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Much of the course material was presented by Greg Woods, a lecturer in the university’s Justice Studies department, who zig-zagged from the Enlightenment to slavery to the Zoot Suit Riots to the present.

Documentary focuses on trauma, emotional toll faced by first responders

Posted on May 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

null
Author: James Dudley

Gary Warth The San Diego Union-Tribune

SAN DIEGO — They’ve lost colleagues to suicide, had people die in their arms, seen horrifying injuries and had to tell family members about a loved one’s death.

It takes a toll on law enforcement officers, firefighters and other first-responders, and a San Diego filmmaker is telling their stories in the new 30-minute documentary “Keeping the Peace,” which premiered at the University of San Diego last week before an audience that included police officers, sheriff’s deputies and paramedics.

Sara Gilman, president of the Encinitas counseling service Coherence Associates, Inc., discussed the importance of making mental health care available for first-responders in a keynote address before the screening.

“I have seen the look of fear and sadness in officers’ eyes when they have come upon the last and latest wreckage of the human condition,” she said. “Their reaction is not the problem. This is their humanity. Their compassionate hearts being exposed to human pain and suffering over and over and over for decades. And they say it’s just part of the job.”

Gilman, a mental health critical-incident responder who has worked with police officers and sheriff’s deputies in the field, said there has been significant progress over the past 30 years in making counselors, peer-support and chaplains available when they are needed.

Director James Ellis, owner of Legacy Productions, said he started work on the film about a year ago as a way of promoting mental health services among emergency workers while also helping the community understand the trauma often experienced by law enforcement officers.

Badge of Life has reported that law enforcement officers are 1.5 times more likely to commit suicide than the general population, although last year the organization stopped its annual reports after finding data on unreported suicides was not accurate.

El Cajon Police Chief Jeff Davis, who appeared in the film, addressed suicide in a panel discussion after the film.

“I think it’s ironic that we spend so many resources in our police academy and in service training recognizing potential threats and taking measures to mitigate them with policies, practices and procedures, but in 2018 more of us took our own lives than were killed in the line of duty,” he said. “So where’s the threat?”

The film featured San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit, San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore, retired SDPD assistant Chief Sarah Creighton, SDPD Chaplain Erin Hubbard and officers from National City, La Mesa, the Border Patrol, Anaheim and Santa Barbara.

Interviews in the documentary included several gripping tales of the emotional trauma experienced by officers from various departments. Retired California Department of Justice Special Agent Victor Resendez recalled the time he broke the news of a son’s death to his parents and sister.

“I went to the house and told the mother, the father, and the 5-year-old sister, and she gave me a teddy bear and said, ‘My brother gave me this. Can you take it and put it with him?’” he said, barely able to speak through the tears brought on by the memory. “Wow, I remember that.”

In the documentary, Nisleit said the San Diego Police Department has a robust program to help officers deal with post traumatic stress.

“When I address the new troops I say, ‘I need a healthy you,’” he said in the film. “I need a healthy you at home. I need a healthy you at work. It’s OK for you to go and talk. In fact, I want you to go talk to those folks.”

San Diego Police Detective Heather Seddon appeared in the film and at the screening to talk about the day she was shot while on duty and the emotional support she received during her recovery.

It was May 17, 2015, and she was assisting another police unit that had pulled over a vehicle known to have been involved in a series of shootings, she said. After the vehicle pursuit turned to a foot chase, Seddon described seeing the man being chased run into a garage and dig into his backpack.

“I knew at that point there was going to be a shooting,” she said.

Seddon was struck in the neck by a shot that was determined to have come from another officer.

She was rushed to a nearby hospital, and her husband Brian Crilly is shown in the film recalling getting the call saying Seddon had been shot.

Her physical injury healed, but Seddon said there still are times when something can trigger memories of the shooting. She said she is grateful counseling was available.

“I was a little hesitant at first to use it, as I’m sure most people are,” she said. “As much as I fought it in the beginning, it was a very, very good thing for me to experience. I can’t tell you how many times I just felt better when I walked out.”

The documentary ends on a positive note, with Seddon saying she still believes she was born for the job, which has brought her many great and positive experiences.

Ellis said he has received a grant from the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training to develop a mental health program based around his film over the next two years, and he has partnered with the Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma to work with other police departments across the state.

For information on how to see the film, visit Ellis’ website, legacyproduction.org.

———

©2019 The San Diego Union-Tribune

Retired Police Officer Gives Old Partner Her Kidney

Posted on May 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

They rode together as two cops on patrol, watching each other’s backs. Now, in retirement, they’re still looking out for each other.

Officer Media Group Defensive Tactics Videos Online

Posted on May 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Editorial Director Frank Borelli and Defensive Tactics expert Rich Nance teamed up to create a series of training videos. There is the complete list with links.

Achieving EMS mastery

Posted on May 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Find a mentor, start with what’s important and train like you fight to accelerate your EMS training and become an expert

NY Fire Union Head Asks for More Turnout Gear

Posted on May 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The president of Troy’s firefighters union is asking for a second set of turnout gear for crews following two massive fires that broke out in a single day.

Police: Video of NJ man urinating on police SUV is a ‘personal insult’

Posted on May 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

NEWARK, NJ — A New Jersey man has been charged with lewdness, criminal mischief and disorderly conduct for urinating on a police SUV on Saturday.

According to Fox News, viral video captured 22-year-old Tauqueer Boyd urinating on a police SUV while a crowd cheered him on. He was arrested on Sunday after police tracked him down at his home.

“We absolutely will not tolerate disrespect of our police,” said Newark Public Safety Director Anthony F. Ambrose. “We take this as a personal insult. When our department became aware of this, we moved quickly to apprehend the suspect.”

Boyd was previously arrested in October for burglarizing a police cruiser parked outside a police headquarters. Boyd and another man had rummaged through the cruiser, throwing summons books on the ground and unzipping a Narcan kit.

Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central IL Creates First Responder Room

Posted on May 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Peoria Ronald McDonald House Dax Wing announces creation of a First Responders Hero Room.

Blue Lunch Time

Posted on May 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

If you’re fueling with junk food, your performance and health may suffer.

Officials: County program has increased Polk Fire Rescue diversity

Posted on May 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Proactive Diversity Recruitment and Training Program was designed to help bring economically disadvantaged and minorities into the fire services

Video: NC Campus Chief Credits Training for Quick Shooting Response

Posted on May 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Chief Jeff Baker says that the speedy and successful response to the shooting on campus on Tuesday was the direct result of significant training his agency has conducted in recent years to deal with such threats.

Colorado Law Enforcement Officers Get Drugged Driving Training

Posted on May 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Law enforcement officers in the state have to apply to get the special training.

6 considerations for selecting a new duty weapon

Posted on April 29, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Mike Wood
Author: Mike Wood

There are few police acquisitions that receive as much scrutiny as the purchase of new duty firearms. Even though other equipment can have a powerful influence on officer and public safety – such as patrol vehicles, protective gear and communications equipment – it seems that the selection and purchase of new firearms always leads to heightened interest from officers, agency heads and civic leaders. As such, it’s critical to ensure agencies have a good process for evaluating and selecting a new duty firearm.

The California Highway Patrol (CHP) recently selected a new duty firearm and I was afforded an opportunity to learn about the CHP’s testing and evaluation process, as well as observe a class of officers go through the department’s transition training program. The CHP’s experience in bringing the new firearm onboard highlights some important lessons for agencies preparing to evaluate, purchase and issue new duty weapons.

1. Evaluate the current equipment.

The CHP requires all officers to carry a department-issued firearm on duty. Before they replaced thousands of handguns, they took a hard look at the currently issued handgun to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the system.

The CHP team evaluated shooting and other incident reports, and collected feedback from officers in the field, regional trainers, academy instructors and department gunsmiths. This review enabled the team to create a list of the things they liked and didn’t like about the current weapon, which allowed them to do a better job of drafting the specifications for the new firearm.

For example, the CHP liked the equipment rail and .40 S&W chambering of the current pistol but did not like the weight of the all-steel gun. Some negative experiences with the existing magazine disconnect safety encouraged them to abandon the feature on the next gun, but a desire for improved low light capability encouraged them to add a requirement for night sights.

When all the pros, cons, needs and wants were tallied, the CHP had the information necessary to write a detailed specification for a polymer-framed, .40 caliber duty pistol. Doing the homework up front gave them a better result in the end when the contract was awarded.

2. Insist on an established track record.

It was important to the CHP to ensure that candidate pistols had a suitable track record in police service. They had seen other agencies become unofficial “beta testers” after adopting new and unproven designs, and didn’t want to repeat the mistake, so they established a requirement that any candidate pistol must meet the following criteria:

The firearm must have been in commercial production for more than one year; The firearm must currently be in use by an agency with 500 or more sworn officers.

These criteria helped the CHP ensure the design was already “debugged” and the manufacturer had demonstrated the ability to meet the production, delivery and support requirements of a large agency contract.

3. Write a good contract, conduct a transparent evaluation.

The CHP worked closely with contracting professionals in the state’s Department of General Services (DGS) to ensure a quality solicitation was drafted for the new pistol. The solicitation clearly established the specifications for the new pistol, described the test protocol it would have to pass, and detailed how the selection process and bid award would be conducted.

The DGS used the pistol specifications and test protocol established by the CHP Academy Weapons Training Unit to draft the contract and solicit bids from industry. When the bids were received, they were ranked according to price, and the manufacturer with the lowest bid was asked to submit six commercial samples of the pistol for testing.

The CHP Academy Weapons Training Unit knew it was important to give these samples a thorough review, to ensure they would meet the specifications they’d established. The unit assembled a team of experienced shooters to evaluate the firearms, in accordance with the strict testing regimen outlined in the bid specs.

The pistols were first fired to measure accuracy with the issued duty ammunition (currently, Federal 180 grain HST). Then they were subjected to a carefully scripted, 6,000-round pass-fail reliability test. DGS representatives were present to monitor the testing. If a pistol design failed the objective measures of the test, DGS would disqualify it from consideration, and would ask the next lowest bidder to submit six samples of their pistol for a new round of testing.

By working closely with DGS contracting professionals, the CHP was able to conduct a transparent evaluation of the candidate pistol that eliminated any possible concerns about favoritism. The pistol that was awarded the contract met the CHP’s needs, and there were no protests from industry to delay the acquisition of the new equipment.

4. Insist on reliability.

Since a duty pistol is used in life-threatening emergencies, it’s important to choose a design that offers a high level of reliability. To that end, the CHP constructed a reliability test protocol that a candidate pistol was required to pass to be awarded the contract.

In the CHP test, two samples of a given firearm (one with a weapon-mounted light, and one without) would each be required to shoot 6,000 rounds of ammunition – 2,000 rounds of duty ammunition, followed by 2,000 rounds of frangible training ammunition, followed by 2,000 rounds of duty ammunition. The 6,000-round benchmark represented the minimum service life expectation for a duty pistol. The test protocol specified lubrication, maintenance and inspection intervals, and the results were carefully tracked and recorded

If a given pistol experienced a stoppage or a breakage, the test was halted, and the sample was evaluated to determine if the interruption was attributable to the gun. If the stoppage was of a certain type, it would be noted, and the pistol would be allowed to continue the test. However, if the stoppage met the criteria outlined in the bid specs for a “catastrophic failure,” the sample was withdrawn from testing. A second sample would replace the first and go through the 6,000-round test protocol from the start. If that sample experienced a catastrophic failure, then the manufacturer was given one more chance to complete the protocol with a third sample. If the third sample failed, the design would be disqualified by DGS and ineligible to win the award.

The design that was finally awarded the contract did an excellent job in testing. It completed the reliability test with only three stoppages in 12,000 rounds, and none of them were attributable to the gun (one stoppage was shooter-induced, and two stoppages were caused by faulty ammunition). It was unnecessary to put the second or third samples into the rotation.This kind of demonstrated performance encouraged confidence among the officers who were issued the new pistol.

5. Don’t forget the extras.

It’s natural to focus on the firearm itself, but it’s important to remember that it’s part of a system, and there are other pieces of the puzzle that merit attention. In example, the CHP has its own gunsmith operation to maintain the fleet of issued pistols, but it was important to include a manufacturer-support package as part of the contract, to ensure a ready supply of spare parts, technical information and warranty service.

The CHP contract specified that each pistol would be delivered with five duty magazines, to ensure that each officer would have the required duty load (one in the gun, two in a pouch) and an extra pair of magazines. Since magazines wear out with normal use and exposure to the abuses of the patrol environment, it was an excellent idea for the CHP to build some ready spares into the contract. Incidentally, the CHP encourages its officers to carry the extra magazines on their belt or in a “go bag” at the officer’s discretion, which is a great idea – particularly for officers who may be working remote areas without backup nearby.

Speaking of magazines, the contract also required the manufacturer to supply a large quantity of training magazines, to save wear and tear on the duty magazines issued to each officer. The training magazines are specially marked to separate them from duty magazines and include some variants with modified followers to allow officers to practice emergency and tactical reloads with an unloaded magazine, for safety.

The CHP was also wise to consider holsters and magazine pouches as part of its evaluation. There are several new pistol designs that are worthy considerations for police service, but the industry has not committed to supporting them yet with suitable duty holsters and pouches. Early on, the CHP made sure to include industry support as an evaluation item for each candidate firearm.

6. Build a good training plan.

The old CHP pistol was a traditional double-action with a slide-mounted decocker and a magazine safety. In contrast, the design that won the award is a striker-fired gun with no manual safety lever or magazine disconnect. The two guns have very different handling characteristics and manuals of arms, so it was important to the CHP to ensure that officers were properly trained on the new gun.

The CHP knew that other large agencies had experienced significant increases in negligent discharges after abbreviated transition training programs and was determined to avoid the same mistake. As such, they created a two-day transition training program to highlight the differences between the old and new guns and provide ample opportunity for the students to get hands-on training with the new equipment.

In the transition training, CHP officers receive two hours of classroom instruction on the following:

Firearms safety; Overview of the test and evaluation process; Pistol nomenclature and features; Basic operation of the pistol – loading, unloading, firing; Trigger manipulation techniques; Disassembly, maintenance and assembly; Emergency and tactical reload techniques; Malfunction clearing techniques; Department policies pertinent to the new firearm and support equipment.

Once the classroom portion is complete, the officers spend six hours on the range on day one, followed by another eight hours on the range on day two, where they can learn the new pistol under the supervision of a cadre of watchful instructors. The instructors ensure each officer builds safe, efficient and tactically sound habits with the new gun and issued holster, starting them with normal, two-handed operations, and eventually getting them to the point where they are performing one-handed draws, firing, reloads and malfunction clearances with both primary and support-side hands. Officers are challenged with a variety of drills and are required to pass the department’s qualification test with the new pistol before they are authorized to carry the weapon on duty.

In the training I observed, the students looked like they had established a solid foundation with the new pistol. They will certainly build increased skill and confidence with the pistol in future training, but the concentrated transition training gave them a good start and helped to overwrite old habits with new ones that will set them up for success with the new pistol.

Hard work pays off

A lot of effort was involved in this test and evaluation process, and even more in developing a sound training plan for the officers who received the new equipment. The hard work paid off for the CHP however, and they now have a pistol that will do a better job of meeting their needs. The officers are enthusiastic about the new firearm and are performing well with it in training.

Agencies who are considering a replacement for their duty firearms can learn a lot from the CHP experience. It takes a lot of work to do things right, but the result will be worth the effort.

LEO injured in Alton Sterling protests can sue organizer for negligence, court rules

Posted on April 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Heather Nolan NOLA Media Group

BATON ROUGE, La. — A Baton Rouge police officer who was injured during a protest over Alton Sterling’s death in 2016 can pursue a negligence claim against the protest’s organizer, a federal appeals court ruled. The ruling by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans reverses a federal judge’s earlier decision to toss the lawsuit.

The officer, who filed suit under the name “John Doe,” alleged Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson was negligent for organizing and leading the Baton Rouge protestors to illegally block a public highway.

The officer said he was struck in the face by a piece of concrete or rock-like object an unknown person threw at police making arrests. The officer said he was knocked to the ground and incapacitated, and that he lost teeth and suffered jaw, brain and head injuries.

The officer also cited lost wages and “other compensable losses” in his lawsuit.

Fifth Circuit judges said in their ruling Wednesday it was “patently foreseeable” that police would have to respond by clearing the road and possibly making arrests. Mckesson was arrested during the protests.

“Given the intentional lawlessness of this aspect of the demonstration, Mckesson should have known that leading the demonstrators onto a busy highway was most nearly certain to provoke a confrontation between police and the mass of demonstrators, and not withstanding, did so anyway,” the judges wrote. “By ignoring the foreseeable risk of violence that his actions created, Mckesson failed to exercise reasonable care in conducting his demonstration.”

The judges were clear in their ruling that they are not saying Mckesson is liable, only that the officer has a reasonable claim and the case should proceed to discovery.

Police arrested nearly 200 protestors during the July 10, 2016, demonstration, sparked by Sterling’s fatal shooting.

Sterling, a black man, was fatally shot by two white Baton Rouge police officers during a struggle outside a convenience store July 5. The officers were not charged in Sterling’s death.

©2019 NOLA Media Group, New Orleans

LEO injured in Alton Sterling protests can sue organizer for negligence, court rules

Posted on April 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Heather Nolan NOLA Media Group

BATON ROUGE, La. — A Baton Rouge police officer who was injured during a protest over Alton Sterling’s death in 2016 can pursue a negligence claim against the protest’s organizer, a federal appeals court ruled. The ruling by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans reverses a federal judge’s earlier decision to toss the lawsuit.

The officer, who filed suit under the name “John Doe,” alleged Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson was negligent for organizing and leading the Baton Rouge protestors to illegally block a public highway.

The officer said he was struck in the face by a piece of concrete or rock-like object an unknown person threw at police making arrests. The officer said he was knocked to the ground and incapacitated, and that he lost teeth and suffered jaw, brain and head injuries.

The officer also cited lost wages and “other compensable losses” in his lawsuit.

Fifth Circuit judges said in their ruling Wednesday it was “patently foreseeable” that police would have to respond by clearing the road and possibly making arrests. Mckesson was arrested during the protests.

“Given the intentional lawlessness of this aspect of the demonstration, Mckesson should have known that leading the demonstrators onto a busy highway was most nearly certain to provoke a confrontation between police and the mass of demonstrators, and not withstanding, did so anyway,” the judges wrote. “By ignoring the foreseeable risk of violence that his actions created, Mckesson failed to exercise reasonable care in conducting his demonstration.”

The judges were clear in their ruling that they are not saying Mckesson is liable, only that the officer has a reasonable claim and the case should proceed to discovery.

Police arrested nearly 200 protestors during the July 10, 2016, demonstration, sparked by Sterling’s fatal shooting.

Sterling, a black man, was fatally shot by two white Baton Rouge police officers during a struggle outside a convenience store July 5. The officers were not charged in Sterling’s death.

©2019 NOLA Media Group, New Orleans

911 dispatch protections bill passes Ohio Senate

Posted on April 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The bill would add 911 operators as one of the professions whose residential and familial information is exempted from public record in order to better protect them from harm and harassment

California Helicopter Crew Safely Makes Emergency Landing

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The agency said on Facebook, “The helicopter was being flown by a 10-year veteran pilot and his co-pilot. As they were flying, they experienced a major mechanical failure and radioed to John Wayne Airport to request permission for an emergency landing.”

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Massive Blaze Destroys NJ Shore Landmark

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Saturday’s five-alarm fire burned for nearly 12 hours and engulfed the North End Pavilion on the boardwalk in Ocean Grove on the Jersey Shore.

Firefighter Protections Bill Goes to MT Governor

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A bill that would increase protections for Montana firefighters who develop cancer or other illnesses has cleared its last legislative hurdle.

Teen Claims to be Illinois Boy Who was Abducted 7 Years Ago

Posted on April 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Authorities are investigating after reports surfaced Wednesday that Timmothy Pitzen, an Aurora boy who disappeared in 2011, might have escaped two kidnappers who have been holding him hostage for seven years.

2nd Texas chemical fire in 2 weeks kills worker

Posted on April 2, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The fire erupted about two weeks after a March 17 blaze at a petrochemical storage facility in Deer Park

Get Your Rugged Peripherals in 2 to 7 Days with ‘Real Fast’ Shipping

Posted on April 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

With iKey’s “Real Fast” shipping on standard products, iKey can typically ship rugged peripherals in just 2 to 7 days from date of order. Fast shipping is especially important for last-minute needs – especially keyboards for new workstations that…

The DLX-140BC Ultra Body Camera

Posted on March 31, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The DLX-140BC Ultra 1296P HD 64GB Wifi GPS Law Enforcement Grade Body Worn Camera with Night Vision from Deluxe CCTV Inc can capture up to 2304 x 1296 video at up to 30 fps for smooth and clear playback. The included alligator clip allows you to…

TX Paramedics Rescue Two From Burning Car After Wreck

Posted on March 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The efforts of the paramedics spared the victims of the Fort Worth crash from burning alive.

Lawsuit Claims Chicago Police Raided Wrong Home During 4th Birthday Party

Posted on March 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Chicago police turned a boy’s fourth birthday party into a traumatic memory of guns drawn, presents destroyed and parents handcuffed after officers raided the wrong home in the South Side Gresham neighborhood last month, a federal lawsuit claims.

Relationship Between Chicago Police and Prosecutors Tested by Dropping of Charges

Posted on March 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Both Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson and Mayor Rahm Emanuel were infuriated, not just because the charges against “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett were dismissed, but because prosecutors had not informed investigators first.

Relationship Between Chicago Police and Prosecutors Tested by Dropping of Charges

Posted on March 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Both Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson and Mayor Rahm Emanuel were infuriated, not just because the charges against “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett were dismissed, but because prosecutors had not informed investigators first.

Relationship Between Chicago Police and Prosecutors Tested by Dropping of Charges

Posted on March 27, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Both Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson and Mayor Rahm Emanuel were infuriated, not just because the charges against “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett were dismissed, but because prosecutors had not informed investigators first.

Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Shot Multiple Times During Traffic Stop

Posted on March 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An El Paso County Sheriff’s deputy was conducting a traffic stop for a light violation when he was shot multiple times in San Elizario early Friday morning.

Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Shot Multiple Times During Traffic Stop

Posted on March 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An El Paso County Sheriff’s deputy was conducting a traffic stop for a light violation when he was shot multiple times in San Elizario early Friday morning.

Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Shot Multiple Times During Traffic Stop

Posted on March 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An El Paso County Sheriff’s deputy was conducting a traffic stop for a light violation when he was shot multiple times in San Elizario early Friday morning.

Norvin Collins

Posted on March 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Norvin Collins has been fire chief of San Juan Island Fire & Rescue in Washington state since October 2018. The district is a combination emergency services organization with eight full-time staff and 50 paid on-call volunteers. He previously served…

MA Firefighters Save Five from Three-Story Blaze

Posted on March 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Seven people were taken to the hospital early Tuesday following the rescues from the burning building by Worcester firefighters.

Connecticut Officer Who Was Shot During Training, City at Odds Over Disability Pension

Posted on March 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Under the Norwalk Police Department’s collective bargaining agreement, the city has the right to retire an injured officer like Phillip Roselle, who was shot in a September 2017 training accident, after 18 months of receiving workers’ compensation.

NYC EMTs ask city to fix excessive OT

Posted on March 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An abundance of overtime is exhausting the city’s EMTs, forcing them to ask for a reprieve in the form of additional workers and more pay

Interim Label Taken Off CA Fire Chief

Posted on March 5, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Keith Aggson, a 30-year fire service veteran, was named the new chief for the San Luis Obispo Fire Department. He had been serving as the interim chief since October.

Interim Label Taken Off CA Fire Chief

Posted on March 5, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Keith Aggson, a 30-year fire service veteran, was named the new chief for the San Luis Obispo Fire Department. He had been serving as the interim chief since October.

At IWCE: 3D Location Platform Launched, Aims to Improve Indoor Situational Awareness

Posted on March 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A high-accuracy carrier-independent 3D location platform from Polaris Wireless should provide software developers ‘floor level accuracy’

Training Simulators: The Human Factor

Posted on March 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The most important element in simulator training is a qualified and knowledgeable instructor.

TX Chief Recalls Near Fatal Incident from 31 Years Ago

Posted on March 2, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Somervell County Fire Chief Mark Crawford was 18 when a large grass fire, caused by a downed powerline nearly took his life.

Driver Arrested After Hitting NYPD Officers

Posted on March 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A woman was arrested after she hit two NYPD officers with her car and led them on a chase down the FDR Drive in Manhattan Thursday night.

MN Chief Fired over ‘Angry Outbursts’

Posted on March 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Falcon Heights Fire Chief Rich Hinrichs was let go over violating “the policies of the city … specifically our policy related to having a respectful workplace,” according to the mayor.

MN Chief Fired over ‘Angry Outbursts’

Posted on March 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Falcon Heights Fire Chief Rich Hinrichs was let go over violating “the policies of the city … specifically our policy related to having a respectful workplace,” according to the mayor.

Public Service Motivation for Recruiting & Retaining Volunteer Firefighters

Posted on March 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

American culture has been steeped in volunteerism from the very early stages of the republic. Volunteers helped stem the tide of the American Revolution in favor of the colonists and continue to voluntarily serve in the armed forces. Volunteer fire…

Old Technology Makes Tracking of Most St. Louis Patrol Cars Unreliable

Posted on February 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Most St. Louis police patrol vehicles have outdated technology that interferes with the department’s ability to track their exact locations.

Troopers Seize 510 Pounds of Marijuana on Pennsylvania Turnpike

Posted on February 26, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

State police on Thursday seized 510 pounds of what they suspect to be marijuana from a box truck traveling on the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

Two sUAS Communicate By Wave Relay Mobile Ad Hoc Network

Posted on February 25, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Tethered drone solution provider Hoverfly to incorporate Embedded Module

9/11 First Responders Head to Washington

Posted on February 25, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

9/11 first responders and supporters will hold a rally Monday in Washington, D.C. They’re fighting to have the September 11th Victims Compensation Fund replenished after word the program is running out of money.

Pa. ambulance service looks for solutions to financial problems

Posted on February 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Based on revenue from 1,200 calls annually, the Topton Community Ambulance Service is losing about $150,000 a year

Learning to Find Teachable Moments

Posted on February 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Steven S. Greene explains that from the newest probie in the department all the way up to the chief, each of us should teach someone something, every day.

Boston Police Officer Shot; Suspect Dead

Posted on February 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Boston police officer was shot and wounded in Roxbury in an exchange of fire early Friday.

Ala. firefighter dies after on-duty medical episode

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Palmerdale Fire District firefighter Branden Pierce, 21, died at the hospital after suffering a medical event at the station

GA Firefighter Charged in Silencer Theft from Fire Victim

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Coweta County firefighter Logan Thomas Bowden is accused of stealing a legal rifle silencer worth $1,600 from a person whose house had caught fire last month.

Prison Training Program Aims to Help Women Enter Tech Jobs

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Research shows that women make up 25 percent of workers in computer occupations. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is bringing coding training to women in prison.

Body Camera Shows Driver Fired at California Deputy First

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Napa County Sheriff’s Department on Wednesday released body-worn camera footage from a weekend police shooting that killed an armed motorist, and it appears to show that the motorist fired at the deputy first before she shot back and killed him.

Seven-Alarm Fire Destroys Historic New Orleans Mansion

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire officials called Wednesday’s damage “a catastrophic loss” as flames burned down the Victorian-style home that had been in the same family for more than 100 years.

Seven-Alarm Fire Destroys Historic New Orleans Mansion

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire officials called Wednesday’s damage “a catastrophic loss” as flames burned down the Victorian-style home that had been in the same family for more than 100 years.

Minneapolis Firefighters Escape Flashover

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Three firefighters were hurt as they climbed out windows to escape the flames that spread through the burning home Tuesday.

In Quarters: Harrisburg, NC, Fire Station #3

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Harrisburg Fire Station #3 also houses the Cabarrus County EMS Station No. 10, which both serve the rapidly growing suburb of Charlotte, NC.

In Quarters: Conroe, TX, Fire Station #7

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Conroe’s new 11,000-square-foot fire station is a beacon of safety for the community and a healthy facility for the firefighters who live and work within.

Colorado State Patrol Concerned About Flurry of Traffic Incidents Involving Troopers

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Being a Colorado state trooper is a dangerous job and that has been evidenced this month by four incidents in a four day period in which a trooper or his vehicle have been struck.

N.H. first responders to make house calls for drug treatment

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

NH Project FIRST enlists “quick response teams” to return after an overdose call and offer to connect individuals with services at their local treatment hub

Massachusetts Officer Talks Suicidal Man to Safety from 70-Foot Building

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in Uncategorized

According to the Sun Chronicle, Sergeant Jeffrey Peavey—a 32-year-veteran of the force—established a dialogue with the 21-year-old man, speaking with the distraught subject for 45 minutes before convincing the man to retreat from the precipice into safety.

Fake Fla. LEOs arrested after pulling over commissioner

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

MIAMI — Two men impersonating officers were arrested after pulling over a South Florida commissioner and former officer.

Miami-Dade Commissioner Joe Martinez became suspicious when he was pulled over by a sports utility vehicle with flashing lights on Wednesday, NBC News reports.

Martinez says the vehicle was too spiffy to be a police car. It also had temporary tags.

The commissioner refused to pull over and was able to flag down an officer in a squad car on the side of the road who radioed for help.

The men were taken into custody.

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Kansas Officer Found Dead in Patrol Vehicle

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation is investigating the death of a law enforcement officer with the Sac and Fox Police Department found deceased in his patrol vehicle near the Kansas-Nebraska border.

Public speaking: 3 things I learned from TEDx

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Ben Thompson, P1 Contributor

In October 2017, I walked out into an unusually warm winter morning. My hands were shaky and I could feel my heart beat pounding up into my throat.

This was the moment I learned I had been selected to speak at TEDx Birmingham 2018. I stared up to the blue sky with a big smile and imagined myself standing on the bright red dot in the middle of a dark stage.

Suddenly a chill shot through my body. I thought, “my God, what have I done?”

Public speaking is terrifying. Whether at your own TEDx event, reporting to local officials or speaking at a community meeting, the good news is that even if you feel like you are horrible at public speaking, there are some things you can do to make you look like a pro.

Trust the process

When I was selected to speak at TEDx Birmingham, I had to informally agree to follow the organizers’ “process.” This applied to everyone who speaks at the event, even those who do it professionally.

This is what sets a TEDx event apart from so many other conferences. There is a strong focus not just on the content, but on the delivery.

So what is the process?

The first step was to read the book TED Talks; The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking by Chris Anderson. This book gives a brief history of everything TED. But, more important, it also goes in depth about what can make or break a successful presentation. For anyone looking to bring that TED style into a presentation, this is a must read.

When I reflect on my experience of the process, I am reminded of these three takeaways on how to be a better public speaker:

Identify what it is you want the audience to remember; Watch yourself on video; Seek out honesty. 1. Identify what you want the audience to remember

At TEDx, I was one of about 15 other speakers split into three sessions. I was going to be lucky if they remembered my name, much less what I said that day. One of my first assignments was to type up what I wanted to the audience to remember in less than 140 characters; basically the length of a first generation tweet.

It seemed like a simple task, but for me, it proved to be one of the most difficult. It took me over three weeks and 47 different attempts before I finally narrowed it down to this:

The key to serving people lies in our willingness to step outside the boundaries of our job titles.

It seems like a lot of work for a line that was not uttered once during my talk. But during my preparations, this line acted as my guide, leading me toward the message to get through to the audience.

With each presentation I give now, I start by asking myself this simple question: “What do I want the audience to remember?”

By focusing on the answer, I am able to keep my presentations lean and to the point. In the world of public speaking, brevity is your best friend. It leaves the audience wanting to hear more, rather than sending them running for coffee.

2. Watch yourself on video

I have a confession to make. Since my TEDx video has posted to YouTube, I have not watched it a single time. Just the sound of my own voice is enough to make me cringe. But during the months leading up to the event, I practiced in front of the camera on my laptop many times.

And I watched all of them. It was excruciating.

Why does the side of my head look so weird? Do I always sound like that?

And it never got any easier. But each time I watched, I couldn’t deny that I was getting better. There were so many little things that I did at first that I didn’t even know I was doing. One example, I used the word “so” like many people use the word “uh.”

I was unconsciously using it as a placeholder while I gathered my thoughts between lines. Over the course of a 12-minute talk, I probably said the word “so” 30 times. Had I carried the habit on stage, the audience would have walked out wondering about my strange love affair with the word “so.”

So…before your big day, lock yourself in a room; record yourself, watch and repeat. Just be sure to destroy the evidence when you’re done.

3. Seek out honesty

It must be said again. Brevity is your best friend. Do not take 45 minutes to say what you could have said in five, although being brief while still being effective is not easy, especially when you are passionate about the subject.

It helps if you have someone who is not afraid to be brutally honest with you. During TEDx, I had a speaking coach as well as the organizers reviewing each draft of my talk. With each draft, I was forced to either cut out or defend whole sections that I had worked so hard to create.

The good news for those of us in public safety is that we do not have to look far for honesty. Every day we go to work, we are surrounded by people who love the chance to be brutally honest; sometimes, whether we ask for it or not.

If you can give your presentation to a station full of the world’s harshest critics and survive, doing the same for a room full of strangers will be a piece of cake.


About the author Ben Thompson is a lieutenant with the Birmingham (Ala.) Fire and Rescue Service. Since 2016, Lieutenant Thompson has served as the coordinator of the department’s mobile integrated health program, Birmingham Fire and Rescue C.A.R.E.S. He shared his experiences from building the program at TEDxBirmingham.

How to get the most out of your LE career: Self-assessment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Jerrod Hardy
Author: Jerrod Hardy

As I prepare to step away from my career as a law enforcement officer after 21 years, I felt an overwhelming need to share my experience with as many others as possible.

For me, there have been four steps I have taken during my police career that has allowed me to leave physically and mentally fit so that I can enjoy the next phase of my life.

In my previous articles, I wrote about remembering your purpose and stress management. This month I address the third step: self-assessment.

Step Three: Self-Assessment

Being honest with yourself is essential not only in law enforcement, but in life in general. It is critical to constantly take an inventory of your skills and remain humble enough to address deficiencies. Every police officer should ask themselves:

Am I shooting enough? Are my defensive tactics skills current? Is my fitness level where it needs to be? Am I still growing as a person and professional? What is my attitude toward the job? Am I counting down the days to step out the door instead of staying sharp to quickly recognize danger?

Over my career I made a conscious effort to frequently self-assess and make changes where needed to ensure I could walk away from law enforcement happy, healthy and prepared for the rest of my life. Here are three areas of self-assessment officers can focus on:

1. Take pride in your physical skills and preparation.

As someone who spent most of the last half of my career training officers and new recruits, it pained me greatly to see veteran officers approach training with dread and disgust. It was disappointing to see them arrive to class with little intention of improving their skills, focusing only on getting through the training with as little effort as possible.

Officers would ask why they should worry about being taken to the ground and defending their firearm against an assaultive subject when it had never happened to them. Similar questions were posed to me many times throughout training sessions.

My response was always the same: I would ask them what their family thought they were doing that day. I liked to let that question sit for a few seconds before giving them my answer: “They think you are training to get better at your profession today, to return home safely to them after every shift. So that’s why you’re going to work hard, sweat and get uncomfortable so that we can live up to their idea of what’s happening here today!”

Every day you put the badge on, you owe it to your family, co-workers and community to maintain the highest level of skills because you will never get a second chance to have properly trained and prepared when faced with an assaultive subject.

And if you are fortunate to have the privilege of leading training, you cannot accept complacency and allow your critical skills training to become a “going through the motions” event.

2. Be aware of the attitude you bring to work every day.

It’s incredibly easy to become cynical of just about everything in this career field. One day you may come to work and find everyone drives you crazy. You start to think that citizens, city council members, department heads, mid-level supervisors, immediate supervisors and maybe even your shift mates are all idiots, and no one has any idea how to do anything, except you! You have all the answers and all the great ideas. You are the only one who knows how to handle a particular call or create a new program, except you will not step forward with ideas because you don’t want any more work to do. Does that sound familiar? Maybe it sounds like some of your co-workers or people you associate with, or it could be the person looking back at you in the mirror.

The truth of the law enforcement profession is that it is exactly as it is advertised – there are many ways to be right, it will always be changing, it will always be a challenge, it will require you to deal with people and it will force you to grow. Yet for many officers, the very things they were seeking when embarking in policing are now the things they are most frustrated with. The hard truth here is that it is our personal attitude that has changed, not the job.

3. Ensure you continue to grow professionally and personally.

In 2003 I stumbled across a group of guys training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. I had no idea what they were doing or how to do it, but I knew I needed more training for ground encounters.

At my first class I was manhandled by men and women much smaller and far more skilled than me. I knew I had a lot to learn and continued my training by going once or twice a week while my family was younger. Over the last 16 years, it’s developed into much more.

By continuing to learn, being humble enough to admit I did not know everything and putting myself into situations where I was the student, I was able to obtain critical skills that enhanced my agency’s training program. I was able to share this knowledge with fellow officers and provide more peace of mind to them and their families.

While Brazilian Jiu Jitsu may not be your cup of tea, find something you are passionate about and immerse yourself in it. Make sure it is something outside of police work like coaching youth sports, joining a group focused on your favorite activity, or participating in anything that gets you into a different circle of people who will help you rebalance your attitude, grow and have some fun!

In my final article I will discuss step four: Life after the badge.

Memorial Grows For NYPD Detective Killed by Friendly Fire

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

New Yorkers are remembering NYPD Detective Detective Brian Simonsen as a “cop’s cop” who served the city for nearly 19 years until he was shot and killed by friendly fire while responding to a robbery in Queens.

Fla. county honors fallen firefighters by renaming road

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Todd Aldridge and Mark Benge, who died 30 years ago, are the only firefighters in Orange County fire Rescue’s history to have died in the line of duty

NY Fire Department Eyes ‘Quick Attack’ Apparatus

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in Uncategorized

The Mohawk Fire Department hopes the new truck with a pumper would extend the use of some of its existing vehicles.

Kentucky Police Pursuit Ends in Fatal Officer-Involved Shooting

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Kentucky State Police are working with the Ohio State Patrol to determine whether or not a fatal officer-involved shooting in Kentucky on Monday is connected with an ongoing kidnapping investigation in Ohio.

Federal Jury Finds in Favor of St. Louis County Police Officers

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A federal jury Friday found in favor of St. Louis County police officers who had been sued by a Ferguson protester who claimed they used excessive force.

One Year Later: Parkland Mass Shooting Spurred Changes in School Safety

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

In the realms of school safety, policing, civic participation, mental health and access to guns, the heinous act of the Parkland gunman motivated change — locally, statewide and nationally.

Dogs Training to Sniff Out Cancer in AR Firefighters

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Partnering with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, the North Little Rock Fire Department will be training service dogs to detect thyroid cancers in firefighters.

Conn. city’s search for new police chief comes as ranks shrink

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Mary E. O'Leary New Haven Register, Conn.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — Parochial and political decisions on choosing a police chief won’t bring the best candidate to the job.

John DeCarlo, a former police chief himself, and now chairman of the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of New Haven, said he has studied this and watched how decisions on such an important position across the country are narrowly focused with a hyper-local emphasis and no national standard.

The strong home rule concept explains a lot of that, leaving Connecticut with 102 police departments, part of more than 18,500 departments across the country, although other states with county government make regional cooperation and expense sharing more feasible.

Less than two years after it went through the trauma of replacing Dean Esserman as its chief in 2016 after a tumultuous tenure, New Haven will again be looking for a top cop following Chief Anthony Campbell’s abrupt decision last week to retire at the end of March over threatened medical benefit changes in stalled contract negotiations.

It is also an election year with a Democratic primary in September in a race that is expected to be Mayor Toni Harp’s toughest since she was elected in 2013. She won that three-way primary, but then was challenged by Justin Elicker, the primary runner-up, who is again running for mayor with a stronger network of supporters.

With the need for a new chief coming as the police contract remains in limbo in binding arbitration, DeCarlo said New Haven is in a no-win situation.

Harp has indicated that she is leaning toward hiring an internal officer, although the universe of experienced candidates is narrow and potentially getting more so as three of the four assistant chiefs are looking for new jobs.

DeCarlo said he would like to see the city take a chance on bringing in an experienced chief steeped in academic training. He referred to the acolytes trained under such leaders as Police Commissioner William Bratton in New York, and others, who spread the gospel of community policing and accountability across the country.

Looking at the universe of former New Haven chiefs, DeCarlo said two stand out as big picture thinkers. The first he mentioned was James Ahern, the author of “Police in Trouble; our freightening crisis in law enforcement,” who was in office from 1968 to 1970 during the Black Panther murder case and the 1970 May Day protests and calmed what could have been an explosive event. Ahern, who also was embroiled in a wiretapping scandal, was later named to the President’s Commision on Campus Arrest.

The second was Nicholas Pastore, who brought in community policing under Mayor John Daniels, a concept fostered by then Alderwoman Toni Harp.

Pastore’s tenure ended after complications in his personal life pushed him out, while Ahern’s reputation was hurt six years after he left office when Andrew Houlding broke the story in the New Haven Journal Courier about massive illegal wiretapping around the Black Panther trial. The wiretapping ended in 1971, but was the subject of a civil suit settled in 1984. James Ahern denied being part of the wiretapping with his brother, Police Inspector Stephen Ahern, both of whom paid the plaintiffs in a city settlement.

DeCarlo said the Bratton followers represented a renaissance of effective policing. “Where is the next generation of luminary police leaders? Where do they come from? How do we make them?” he asked. His advice to New Haven is to go find one.

DeCarlo, the former Branford police chief, said he realizes that goes against the tide, as the overwhelming majority of departments pick from within. “There is a reason why 95 percent of people (chiefs) are from the inside. The politicians and the troops know what they got,” he said.

“It’s a great profession, but we do it so poorly sometimes. The police are on the surface of this argument. I always say the police chief has three constituencies — the rank and file; the community and the politicians,” he said.

Right now the defining issue for police in New Haven is the lack of a contract for more than 21/2 years. The rank and file rejected a proposal 294 to 4 and the officers subsequently voted to go to binding arbitration.

On Feb. 1, Campbell announced that he would be leaving the department on March 29.

He said it was a decision he made after a discussion with aldermanic leadership on Jan. 17, where he asked if they would consider putting himself and the four assistant chiefs into the executive management plan because of a police contract proposal to remove the cap on the $540 monthly payment for retiree medical benefits.

Campbell said he wanted to give the alders a heads up that three of the chiefs were looking to leave. He was not among them at that time, although he was considering retiring by the end of the year.

If experienced management did leave, Campbell said the remaining officers with supervisory rank would only have had 11 years on the job, something that could put the city in a position of having to bring in the state police to help out.

Campbell, who has 21 years in the department, nearly three years as interim and then chief of the department, said his takeaway was that rejection of the chiefs’ executive management proposal by the leadership was final, although aldermanic President Tyisha Walker-Myers said that was not the case. It was the remark by Alder Dolores Colon, D-6, however, that he was “blackmailing” them with his predictions on the potential decimation of the top ranks that questioned his integrity. The chief said Colon told him if he gets an offer, he should take it.

Morale was already low among the rank and file, but the proposal by Campbell was seen by the union as a special carve-out. Campbell said the chiefs are not part of the union and have no one speaking for them. He said he has also advocated for raises for the force as essential to stemming the large numbers leaving.

New police union President Florencio Cotto Jr. said they don’t understand why the administration has not settled a contract. With $6 million in concessions in the last agreement that ended in 2016, Cotto said they can’t give anymore, particularly in light of the disparity between the salaries offered by other smaller departments.

“It is time that the Harp administration put the police as a priority,” he said. Cotto said praise for the job police are doing in lowering crime, is not matched by a contract that rewards them. Cotto said the high cost of training police is also generating little return with officers bolting for other opportunities.

Forty-nine officers retired from the department last year, while 10 more have put in for retirement in the past four weeks. Campbell said 39 more are in a position to retire.

In any calculation of a contract settlement. the city’s finances are a major factor the arbitrators will consider.

Harp raised the tax rate 11 percent for this fiscal year following a shortfall in state funds and has said her goal is not to raise taxes in fiscal 2020. Part of any budget decision is the problem of ever escalating medical costs, tackling a $30 million structural deficit and stabilizing two pension funds that are $700 million underfunded.

Sean Matteson, the interim chief administrative officer for the city, who oversees the public safety departments, said he thought it was important to bring the chiefs’ concerns to the aldermanic leadership, who ultimately will be voting on the 2019-20 budget that will be presented by the mayor in March.

Many outside the department are asking, with the stakes so high: can’t the parties step back from the arbitration process and fix the disagreement on their own, rather than allowing a panel of arbitrators to choose between the best package presented by each party? Neither side has yet put its best last offer on the table.

It could be months before that happens and then the panel needs time to render its decision.

“At any point in time, the parties could make a deal and stop binding arbitration,” Labor Relations Director Thomas McCarthy said.

That has not happened.

“Just as a general statement, it is better for us to make a deal because at least we make the decision — both sides — meaning the union and the city, as opposed to an outsider, deciding what is best,” he said.

Harp has said the same thing, as has Campbell. The chief said the uncertainty of what a future contract holds plays into people leaving the department.

Matteson said in negotiations you have to consider all the constituents in a bargaining unit, where there can be a split between the younger members interested in raises over benefits, while the seasoned members, such as the chiefs, stayed long enough to reap a benefit package they had counted on. New Haven currently has a young department.

Campbell is not in negotiations, but he said the city’s representative in those talks does come and ask what he needs to run the department. He said he told them the rank and file need to be better paid.

“I need them paid more and I need the steps reduced,” the chief said. He said it takes four years to get to the top pay. He said a new officer starts and stays at $44,400 for the first two years. In the third year, you get approximately $52,000 and in the fourth year, the salary is $68,000.

He said other departments start out at $68,000. Campbell said Yale University offers new recruits a starting salary in the upper $70,000 and tops out at $96,000. West Hartford starts at $67,000 and tops out at $90,000. Hamden starts higher than New Haven and tops out around $83,000. “How do I compete with that?” he said.

Given how expensive medical coverage is for the general population and the lack of pensions for most, what does the chief say to those who lack empathy for his concerns?

Campbell said the estimated 700,000 sworn police officers in this country are the “first line and only line of defense” for 350 million Americans. “All we ask is that our lives and the sacrifices that we make are honored in that way. Three-hundred and forty-nine million people don’t put on a bullet proof vest, strap on a gun and go out and say goodbye to their families, possibly for the last time and say I will lay down my life for a stranger to uphold the law and the Constitution of this land.”

He said if there is a terrorist attack, a plane crash, power goes out, someone breaks into home, they are the ones called to restore peace.

“If that doesn’t bear the honor of being respected with health care for you and your family, I don’t know what should,” Campbell said.

———

©2019 the New Haven Register (New Haven, Conn.)

IN Firefighter Hurt at Six-Car Crash Scene

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Wayne Township fire apparatus was hit by another vehicle while responding to a multiple vehicle accident Sunday.

New Haven’s search for new police chief comes as ranks shrink

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Feb. 10–NEW HAVEN — Parochial and political decisions on choosing a police chief won’t bring the best candidate to the job.
John DeCarlo, a former police chief himself, and now chairman of the Department of Criminal Justice at the Univer

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

A clean change: Properly caring for firefighter turnout gear

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire departments must prioritize a second set of turnout gear and access to the equipment needed to clean their PPE

6 ways to defend yourself against verbal abuse

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A verbal attack can be personal; here’s how to deflect the blow

Tanker’s Batteries Stolen from TN Fire Station

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Hardin County firefighters discovered the firehouse break-in when they were trying to respond to a house fire at a colleague’s house.

Mayor Orders LAPD to Scale Back Vehicle Stops, Says Black Drivers Disproportionately Stopped

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The mayor wants the department to direct resources to other activities that will help build trust with the citizens of Los Angeles.

Philadelphia running club stops thief in foot pursuit

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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Stephanie Farr Philly.com

PHILADELPHIA — A theft suspect who made a run for it after allegedly swiping a laptop and cell phone from a University of Pennsylvania building last month ran straight into a running club during his getaway and was promptly chased down by the fleet-footed group.

“If this running club had been put on this earth for anything, it was that particular moment right there,” said Kyle Cassidy, a founding member of the Annenberg (Lunchtime) Running Group. “Running is typically a useless sport where you turn fat cells into heat, but occasionally it can be useful, and here was one of those opportunities.”

The running group began three years ago and is open to anyone who lives or works in West Philly.

The group meets at noon three days a week and, among other activities, hosts a “running lecture series” where one speaker will deliver a four-minute lecture — while running — followed by a 15-minute Q&A. Past topics include such hits as “Blockchain and Bitcoin as it relates to the extraction of the rare earth minerals necessary to produce the electricity to mine Bitcoin,” Cassidy said.

On Jan. 9, Cassidy and three other members of the group were gathered shortly before noon at the plaza at 36th Street and Locust Walk waiting for any stragglers to arrive when somebody sprinted right through them.

“We were all impressed with his speed,” said Cassidy, 52, of West Philly. “One of the runners said, ‘We should invite him to run with us. He’s very fast!' ”

Seconds later, Cassidy said, a second man came running up the street waving his arms and shouting for help, saying the first man had stolen his things.

Philadelphia police identified the suspect as Talib Adams, 26. Police said Adams stole a laptop and cell phone from a 28-year-old man at Steinberg-Dietrich Hall at Penn’s Wharton School.

Once the running club realized what was happening, the members sprinted off after the suspect. It only took them about 30 seconds to catch up, Cassidy said. The chase that took them through an active construction site at 37th and Chestnut Streets.

“A construction worker — appearing exactly as a construction worker in a movie would — said, ‘Hey! You can’t go in there. That’s an active construction site,’ ” Cassidy recalled. “He paid them no mind, and I ran up to the worker and asked him to dial 911.”

Then they lost sight of the suspect, and two Penn police officers arrived, Cassidy said.

Two of the other runners, Samantha Oliver and Natalie Herbert, surmised that if they were being chased they’d hide the stolen goods in the backyard of a nearby home. The runners knocked on the door of that home and when the owner answered, the suspect allegedly sprinted from a bush in the backyard right into the two officers, according to Cassidy and police.

Over the next 15 minutes, more officers showed up, Cassidy said.

“When they found out we were a running club out on an afternoon run, they were very amused," he said.

Adams, of the 300 block of Fountain Street, was taken into custody and charged with burglary, criminal trespass, theft, and receiving stolen property, police said. The laptop and cell phone were recovered in the backyard.

Adams’ attorney did not immediately return a request for comment. Court records indicate Adams posted bail in this case but is incarcerated in Delaware County Prison on unknown charges.

Cassidy tore a leg muscle during the chase and, after providing a statement at Penn’s police headquarters, was taken to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center.

“Every police officer at Presbyterian — and there seemed to be 500 — shook my hand while I was on the stretcher waiting to be seen,” he said.

Looking back on the ordeal, Cassidy said the person he’s most worried about is the suspect.

“I’m concerned we live in a society where people feel the need to steal laptops," he said. “I don’t think we’re taking good care of those people.”

———

©2019 Philly.com

NC official’s proposed EMS staffing change sparks controversy

Posted on February 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The conflict arose over a proposal to use existing part-time staff funding and overtime funds to hire a full-time staff for a previously part-time ambulance

Florida Chief Says Agency Gives No Special Favors to Scientology

Posted on February 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“For years the Clearwater Police Department has been thrust into the middle of a debate between a controversial religion and its critics, without a voice in the matter. We feel it important to publish some facts of our own to provide the city we serve and anyone else who may be interested with some perspective.”

The PREVADER Concealment Holster

Posted on February 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The ballistic-weave Model 4585 Prevader™ Concealment Holster features the exclusive Pinch® Retention Device (PRD™) which secures the holstered firearm by gripping both sides of the trigger guard when the gun is fully seated.The Bianchi Prevader…

City to take firefighters union to NY Supreme Court in arbitration case

Posted on February 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A court recently reversed a state Supreme Court judge’s ruling that the city can block arbitration in the contract dispute over a “minimum manning” clause

NVFC and IAFC Offer Webinar Detailing Actions to Prevent Firefighter Cancer

Posted on February 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

This webinar is part of a series to provide real world advice and examples of how to implement change at your department.

Tech Company Teaches Officers to Operate Drones

Posted on February 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Tampa tech company is helping law enforcement agencies how to operate drones to help people and catch suspects.

TX Fire Chief May Lose Job after Allegedly Pulling a Knife on Firefighter

Posted on February 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Celeste Vol. Fire Department’s fire chief allegedly got into a fight with one of his firefighters at the station which escalated to the chief making threats with a knife. He was recently honored as chief of the year for the region.

Fire Scene: Safe, Effective & Simple Radio Operations

Posted on February 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

John Salka explains how developing radio procedures and training on them will improve safety on the fireground.

How to avoid, survive an ambulance collision

Posted on January 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Ambulance collisions, which happen with frightening regularity, often result in injury and are occasionally fatal, especially for private vehicle drivers

WA Firefighter Reflects on 50 Years of Service

Posted on January 28, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Volunteer firefighter Ron Swanson recently retired at age 81 after dedicating 50 years to the fire service in various roles in Whatcom County.

WA Firefighter Reflects on 50 Years of Service

Posted on January 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Volunteer firefighter Ron Swanson recently retired at age 81 after dedicating 50 years to the fire service in various roles in Whatcom County.

Two People Watching Eclipse Run Over by Florida Police Cruiser

Posted on January 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Two people who police surmise lay in a dark roadway to watch Sunday night’s lunar eclipse were run over by a West Palm Beach police car, the agency said Monday.

Officers Surprise College Students With Scholarships

Posted on January 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Things looked grim as a police officer interrupted a college basketball team’s meeting. The stern-faced cop tells them he needs to speak to one particular player.

How to build the perfect clinical department

Posted on January 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Our co-hosts discuss what details make for a flawless, smoothly-run clinical department, and how you can achieve it at your agency

Police Advocacy Group’s Mission Gets Mobile Upgrade, Help From Retired Cop

Posted on January 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON (Newswire.com) – The national law enforcement advocacy group Blue H.E.L.P., which supports resources for the often unmentioned mental health status of our police, is taking their mission mobile through the creation of a smart device app. The…

Police Advocacy Group’s Mission Gets Mobile Upgrade, Help From Retired Cop

Posted on January 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON (Newswire.com) – The national law enforcement advocacy group Blue H.E.L.P., which supports resources for the often unmentioned mental health status of our police, is taking their mission mobile through the creation of a smart device app. The…

Ohio State University Police Swears in First Female Chief

Posted on January 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Ohio State University Police Department welcomed its first female police chief in a ceremony held late last week.

Former Chicago Police Officer Faces Sentencing

Posted on January 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Cook County judge will decide former Chicago Police Officer Jason Van Dyke’s fate later this week.

Vector Solutions Expands Capabilities with Acquisition of Oregon-based CrewSense

Posted on January 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Vector Solutions, the leader in industry-focused eLearning and performance support solutions, expands its capabilities with the acquisition of CrewSense.

Jet Pilot Named New CT Fire Chief

Posted on January 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

As Derby’s new chief, Robert Laskowski Jr., a 22-year veteran of the East End Hose company, wants to increase the number of volunteers training to be firefighters.

The Top Products of LEPN 2018

Posted on January 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Based on inquiries from readers like you, these were the most popular products Law Enforcement Product News published in 2018.

Federal shutdown has halted wildland firefighter training, other wildfire prep

Posted on January 13, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Experts say if the shutdown drags out, federal fire crews won’t be ready for the months ahead, following a 2018 fire season that killed scores of people

FFs Warn about Keyless Cars after FL Man Dies

Posted on January 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighters are cautioning residents about cars with keyless ignitions following the death of a Tampa man from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Maryland Man Sentenced to 195 Years for Opening Fire on Police Station

Posted on January 11, 2019 by in Uncategorized

A 25-year-old Maryland man will very probably live the rest of his life behind bars after being sentenced on Thursday to 195 years in prison.

Md. man who fired on police station sentenced to 195 years

Posted on January 11, 2019 by in Uncategorized

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Associated Press

UPPER MARLBORO, Md. — A gunman sentenced to 195 years in prison for an attack on a police station apologized Thursday to the parents of an undercover narcotics detective who was mistakenly shot and killed by a fellow officer during the ambush.

Before a judge sentenced him, Michael Ford said he didn't intend to harm anybody but himself when he opened fire on a Prince George's County police station in March 2016. In November, a jury convicted Ford, 25, of second-degree murder in the killing of Detective Jacai Colson even though he didn't fire the shot that killed the four-year veteran of the county's police department.

"That man does not deserve to be dead. I should be dead," Ford told Colson's parents.

Before hearing Ford's apology, James and Sheila Colson criticized authorities for not seeking criminal charges against the officer who killed their son. Jacai Colson exchanged gunfire with Ford before Officer Taylor Krauss fatally shot the 28-year-old plainclothes detective with a rifle, mistaking him for a threat.

Sheila Colson described Krauss as careless and reckless and said she believes her son was killed because he was black. Ford also is black. Krauss is white.

"Not once did I get an, 'I'm sorry,' from Taylor Krauss. Not once," she said.

She and her husband also accused police officials of lying to them about the circumstances of their son's death, misleading them to believe he was caught in a crossfire.

"To this day, no one can give me an explanation for why my son was shot," she said, fighting back tears.

Ford's two younger brothers, Malik and Elijah Ford, drove him to the police station and recorded video of the shooting with their cellphones. Though not accused of firing any shots, they pleaded guilty to related charges and were sentenced Thursday to 20 and 12 years in prison, respectively.

Circuit Court Judge Lawrence Hill Jr. told Malik and Elijah that they "sold their brother down the river out of greed" for the car he promised to leave them. The judge told Michael Ford he has no doubt he tried to kill officers and civilians even if he intended to die himself.

"You are responsible for the death of Jacai Colson," he said.

Ford testified he was trying to get himself killed by police when he fired his handgun nearly two dozen times outside the station. He said he didn't intend for anyone else to be harmed.

County prosecutor Joseph Ruddy argued Ford's actions created a "combat zone" and caused Colson's death even though he didn't fire the fatal shot. Ford didn't hit anybody when he fired 23 shots from a handgun, but bullets he fired struck two passing vehicles and an ambulance, according to Ruddy.

"That was no suicide mission. That was a mission to kill cops," the prosecutor had said in the trial's closing arguments.

Krauss testified that he never saw Colson hold up a badge or heard him identify himself as a police officer before shooting him once in the chest.

A grand jury declined to indict Krauss on any charges related to Colson's shooting. Colson's parents sued Krauss and Prince George's County.

County Executive Angela Alsobrooks, who was the county's top prosecutor when Michael Ford was charged and tried, said she "spent many hours walking the Colsons through every piece of evidence, walking the crime scene with them, and we answered every question they had."

"Ultimately a grand jury of 23 Prince Georgians reviewed that evidence and declined to indict Officer Krauss," Alsobrooks said in a statement. "I can never begin to understand what they feel as grieving parents, and my thoughts and prayers continue to be with the Colson family."

Ford's brothers recorded cellphone videos of the ambush after dropping him off at the station in Landover, a suburb of Washington, D.C. They agreed to film the shooting so the video could be sent to a website known for posting users' violent videos, a police detective testified in 2016.

One of the videos shows Ford screaming obscenities and shouting, "Do something!" in between shots. Ford, then 22, also dictated his last will and testament on video minutes earlier.

Ford said he was hearing voices in his head the day of the shooting.

Hill ruled before the trial that Ford couldn't present an insanity defense despite his serious mental health issues.

Antoini Jones, Ford's attorney, told jurors that Colson didn't match the gunman's description apart from his race. At the start of the trial, Jones said the evidence would show the detective was shot "because he was black."

Colson was a Boothwyn, Pennsylvania, native. He and Krauss worked in the narcotics unit together, seated at connecting desks.

Prince Georgia's County Police Chief Hank Stawinski issued a statement afterward that "the sentences as rendered today can never assuage the pain, loss and the years of healing that remain before us all."

He didn't address accusations by Colson's parents that police officials had lied to them but directed words to the family and others, saying, "I wish peace upon the Colson family, this institution, and our community."

Florida Trooper Struck by Distracted Driver Returns to Work

Posted on January 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Carlos Rosario made a grand entrance Wednesday for his first day back at work.

Artist thanks Duluth rescue crew with marble carving

Posted on January 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The marble piece is a gift to the station after a rescuer there pulled artist Eric Waller and a friend from a car wreck in June 2012

Troy Acoustics Expert to Present Range Noise Reduction Session at SHOT Show

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Shooting ranges nationwide, including law enforcement facilities, are being cited by health and safety officials for noise control violations. These citations have resulted in a reduction of operating hours, range shutdowns, and in some cases, fines for non-compliance of noise exposure limits.

Texas Man Comes to Aid of Troopers Before Collapsing and Dying

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Family members say Glenn “Bam Bam” Sanco always wanted to be a police officer, but the responsibilities of providing for his family kept him from returning to school. 

Trijicon to Offer Handgun Optics Class for Law Enforcement at 2019 SHOT Show

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The class will cover the practical use of reflex sights on handguns, how they work, and the advantages they offer in terms of tactical effectiveness, enhanced officer safety, and reduced officer and/or agency liability.

Active Shooter who Opened Fire on Texas Officers Killed in Gunfight

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

San Antonio Police Chief William McManus said that shell casings were found up and down the street for blocks.

12 traits of effective police leaders

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Althea Olson and Mike Wasilewski
Author: Althea Olson and Mike Wasilewski

The article, originally published June 2016, has been updated with current information.

For most law enforcement officers, being a cop is more than just a job, it is a lifestyle and an identity. The potential for law enforcement to be a deeply rewarding career is great and, for many officers, it is. Police officer testing is traditionally a keenly competitive process where literally hundreds of hopefuls can vie for each open spot on a highly sought after department.

Most applicants will never receive an offer but, for those who do, a front row seat to — and a starring role in — one of the greatest shows on earth awaits. The opportunity to do good directly and positively influence the quality of life in the small corner of the world under our protection, and tasting life in a way most people never will is gratifying and addicting. How many get to live out what is often a childhood dream?

So what happens then that so many law enforcement officers find themselves angry, burned out, and counting down to the first opportunity to grab their pension and bail? How is low morale and disillusionment so pervasive and universally understood among cops as to almost be expected? And why — when we’ve written about these very topics — do we receive more feedback from cops, through comments and email, verifying our points and recounting their own experiences? For far too many LEOs, something happens “between their hiring and retiring.”

Although some of the problem surely lies with what is seen on the street, a public perceived as unappreciative, and an unsupportive political culture, there is ample evidence that disillusionment with departmental administration and leadership is a powerful predictor of burnout and low morale among cops. Simply put, for a great many officers it is not so much the job that gets to them, but a psychologically harmful internal culture within their departments.

The Importance of Leadership

Effective leadership has the power to make or break a department and the best litmus test is to take a step back and look at those around you. Are you serving side-by-side with productive and motivated cops? When someone from the leadership hierarchy approaches, how do facial expressions and body language change? Do people become closed in body posture and more defensive in their words, or do they continue to smile and invite their supervisors into conversation? Is productivity contagious or is it a culture of resentment and pushback?

The beauty of effective leadership is once the skills are mastered a team can become a well-oiled machine. It literally functions without much supervision. When ineffective leadership skills are implemented, even just by one poor leader, the entire agency is infected with low morale, anger, low productivity until coerced, increased workers compensation claims, a higher risk of injuries, and abuse of sick time.

Our Leadership Challenge

For all of you who put on the badge every day, we want to challenge you to accept the Effective Leadership Challenge because you are all leaders in your communities 24 hours a day, whether on the job or at your child’s little league game. People look to you for guidance, safety, encouragement, and protection.

When you arrive to begin your watch, your coworkers depend on you to be an effective leader no matter your position within the agency, from patrol all the way up to chief. Everyone has the chance to lead daily whenever you are first to arrive on a call, confronted by a citizen angry with a decision you made, or when everything’s gone sideways and people look to you to make it right.

And for those of you in a designated supervisory role, examine your own behavior and attitudes against the traits of effective leaders that follow. View your efforts with a self-critical eye, with the goal of always improving and growing subordinates professionally and in their own leadership acumen.

According to Josh Maxwell in the book The 5 Levels of Leadership, “The bottom line is that an invitation to lead people is an invitation to make a difference. Good leadership changes individual’s lives. It forms teams. It builds organizations. It impacts communities. It has the potential to impact the world.”

Everyone reading this has the chance to step up and lead and our challenge to you is to do it effectively.

12 Traits of an Effective Leader

When studies are done on leadership, one thing holds true; effective leaders focus on developing a culture of rewards versus a culture of punishment. Here is how they do it:

    Live their values — Effective leaders have a strong moral compass and have defined their values. They have a code of ethics on how to treat others and their behaviors back up their words. Realize position does not define leadership — Leadership is not defined by a vertical position. Leaders who rely on their title or position to influence others just do not seem to work well with others. Leaders who lead by their hierarchal position do not lead well, according to Josh Maxwell, because they fail to acknowledge that leadership is about working with people. Set goals for interpersonal skill development — Personal development is ongoing, just like tactical skills, throughout our entire lives. Effective leaders see their personality strengths and talents and continually work on making them stronger. They also identify where they are not as strong and set achievable goals for improvement such as being slow to anger (less irritable) or listening more, instead of being defensive or treating others with contempt. Say “Thank You” often — Take the time to appreciate the strengths of others with an encouraging word or gesture. Of course, it is their responsibility and expected of them to do their job and do it well, but a word of acknowledgement and gratitude goes far. Admit their mistakes — Approach their mistakes with humility instead of justification and defensiveness. It allows the organization to move forward instead of being stuck on the blame and shame. Are mentors and coaches — They believe in duplicating themselves so that others can rise up to be better leaders themselves. High-level leaders encourage the people around them to soar to their highest potential; by doing this they minimize their necessity at the most basic operational level, freeing themselves to creatively move the organization forward. Accept influence — Look for opportunities to learn and grow from anyone instead of criticizing another person’s value or assuming they know it all. Hold people accountable — Are able to lead in tough situations and able to negotiate conflict with authority and decisiveness without degrading another person. Delegate to the expert in the room — Are able to hand over projects to the most qualified instead of letting their ego or political ambitions hurt the culture around them. A true leader knows how to follow first and then steps up to lead when there is a gap in knowledge or skill level. Vision cast goals — The ability to set goals for a team or an agency that are clear and concise and done in a way that generates momentum towards productivity. Most leaders approach goal setting as a dictator rather than a vision caster. A dictator generates resentment and low morale whereas a vision caster generates excitement and buy-in of the goals. Forgive — According to Robert Sutton, PhD, in Good Boss, Bad Boss, from the “Eleven Commandments for Wise Bosses”: “Do not hold grudges after losing an argument. Instead, help the victors implement their ideas with all your might.” Imagine how the police culture would be revolutionized if mistakes were learned from instead of held against someone for their career. A culture of forgiveness would heal a lot of angry cops. Are solution-oriented — Identifying the problem is easy. Finding the solution takes creativity and brain power. Effective leaders do not complain, instead they mull over the area that needs attention, involve others in brainstorming, and work it over until a feasible solution is found.

Conclusion True leadership is a lifestyle, not a position. Those who are effective know they are change agents and seek out to be “iron that sharpens iron.” To be an effective leader goes against human nature and definitely against standardized police culture for it takes humility, commitment, and a strong work ethic on personal development. So will you rise up and accept the challenge?

Ga. attorney general sues opioid manufacturers, distributors

Posted on January 3, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Attorney General Chris Carr filed a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers and distributors for their alleged role in fueling the opioid crisis

FF Vacuums CA Home after Emergency Call

Posted on January 3, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Santee fire captain was captured cleaning up tracked-in mud at home during a call New Year’s Day, and the photo has gone viral.

Apparatus Architect: Delivery Details & Schedules

Posted on January 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Tom Shand and Mike Wilbur explain what department fleet managers need to know about apparatus delivery time frames.

Knife-Wielding Suspect Dies Following Struggle with Massachusetts Officers

Posted on December 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The suspect—identified as 25-year-old Erich Stelzer—was taken into custody and was being transported to a nearby hospital by responding EMS when he reportedly became unresponsive and was pronounced dead.

Knife-Wielding Suspect Dies Following Struggle with Massachusetts Officers

Posted on December 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The suspect—identified as 25-year-old Erich Stelzer—was taken into custody and was being transported to a nearby hospital by responding EMS when he reportedly became unresponsive and was pronounced dead.

Calif. county’s mountain cameras link to statewide system to spot wildfires

Posted on December 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The cameras are linked to a growing network that spans five western states and a supercomputer in San Diego that may someday use AI to spot fires

FL Fire Department Lands Body Armor Grants

Posted on December 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Alachua County Fire Rescue and Emergency Medical Services has received three separate federal grants for body armor vests thanks to a coalition trying to reduce dangers for healthcare workers.

Minnesota Police Take Push to Recruit More Women to the Big Screen

Posted on December 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A video aimed at recruiting more women to the St. Paul Police Department began playing Friday and will run before every movie on all 94 screens at 11 Mann Theatres locations across Minnesota.

PA Department Mixes Career FFs with Volunteers

Posted on December 26, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Other fire departments are keeping an eye on Upper Merion Township after officials hired six career firefighters to reinforce the three volunteer fire squads.

Ohio Deputy Gives ‘Secret Santa’ Cards to Unsuspecting Drivers

Posted on December 26, 2018 by in Uncategorized

A Miami County Sheriff’s deputy gave out “Secret Santa” cards to unsuspecting drivers during the holiday.

Developing a successful grant strategy for a law enforcement agency Part I

Posted on December 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Linda Gilbertson
Author: Linda Gilbertson

A common dilemma for law enforcement agencies is that, more often than not, there isn’t a formal system in place for an effective police grants program. It’s a rare agency that actually has a grant professional on staff, someone who has the education, experience and expertise to find, apply for and manage grants.

The more typical scenario is that someone hears about a grant opportunity, or a need is discovered for equipment or technology that can’t be covered under your current budget, so someone is assigned to “work on it.” That officer may be put in that position because of his experience with the subject matter, such as information technology, cybercrime, traffic safety and enforcement, homeland security, or patrol. Or, and you may be surprised how often this happens, because he has been assigned to a position that includes desk time and a computer.

What could possibly go wrong?

As a grant professional, it almost hurts me to say this, but the reality is that you don’t have to hire a full-time grant person to have a good grants program. What is imperative, however, is that an agency develops a system that will support acquiring and managing grants effectively, even if a different person is put in the grant position on a routine basis. That commitment has to come from the top of the department.

Law enforcement agencies are very good at implementing and following procedures. Understanding expectations and ensuring follow-through is the essence of good policing. Thankfully, that works well for grants, too.

This cannot be overstated: In an agency without a dedicated grants office staff, everyone should be actively involved in the process. Make a discussion about grants – what you need, any opportunities that are available – part of the agenda for regularly scheduled staff meetings. When everyone is thinking about grant funding, you are more likely to find great opportunities.

How to find equipment for Police grant funding

There are actually two different types of research associated with grants for law enforcement. One is finding those things that will help you do your job better; the other is finding a way to fund it.

The first part is simple – just ask any officer who recently attended a conference or workshop. Most of them come away from these events with great ideas for improving how the agency does its job. From new technology to modern patrol equipment, there isn’t a shortage of items to spend money on or personnel with an interest in finding them. Some of the best ideas come from those who are doing the work on a daily basis. Let them be part of the process.

One way to harness this valuable energy is to develop a protocol for disseminating information up the chain of command to the decision makers. Develop a “Project Information” document that can be filled out by anyone in the agency. Put it out on the internal drive as a fillable document for ease of use. Information on the form should include:

Who is submitting the form (name, division, position) What is being requested Why is the item being requested (the problem and expected outcomes) How much does the item cost

The form should be routed for approval by direct supervisors up to a decision maker who can assess its potential to add value to the agency.

Finding a police grant funding source

Approving the project is just the first step. The next one is finding a funding source.

Anyone can find grant opportunities. For federal grants, look at grants.gov, which lists every available opportunity with links to the actual solicitation. Don’t overlook your local municipal government or even state funders. Private foundations, many associated with local or franchise businesses, are also good resources to look to. A simple online search should provide you with a wealth of information.

Approval to pursue a grant opportunity

Make sure the procedures set up to this point include not only Administration’s approval but also require approval from the budget and personnel divisions. Getting a grant is an obligation and, once it is awarded, a legally binding contract between the agency and the funder.

When a potential funding opportunity is found, someone within this process has to be responsible for tearing the solicitation apart to see what the requirements and obligations are before time is spent on developing the application.

If you don’t have a grant person in place to coordinate this part, you can request the department that would benefit from the funding work on putting this together. To make it easier to accomplish and more uniform in content, create a form that asks the funder’s name, when the application is due, the maximum amount available, if a match is required, and any specific performance measures and outcomes that are expected to be met. You definitely have to know this before you make the decision to apply.

It’s a good idea for someone in the budget department to read the full solicitation, just in case something is in there that may not seem important to another department but is very important when considering its impact on the agency’s finances.

Grant applications are deadline based

One important note: Most grant opportunities are time-sensitive, meaning the amount of time you have to approve the project and develop a full application is short (usually 4-6 weeks for a federal grant). So don’t let this part lag if there is an open opportunity you want to pursue.

Read part 2 of this series, Creating a grant application, and part 3, Managing an awarded grant.

This article, originally published October 15, 2013, has been updated

LAPD sheriff says he will remove immigration agents from jail

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The new Los Angeles County sheriff has said he is going to remove federal immigration agents from the county's jails.

Sheriff Alex Villanueva said at a Board of Supervisors meeting this week that he also plans to further limit the crimes that lead jail authorities to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

"We are going to physically remove ICE from the county jails," Villanueva told the board Tuesday during a forum on a California law aimed at increasing transparency surrounding police collaboration with immigration agents.

Villanueva won an upset victory in last month's election to run the nation's largest sheriff's department. During his campaign, the retired sheriff's lieutenant said he would remove immigration agents from the jails.

At Tuesday's meeting, Sheriff's Cmdr. Elier Morejon said the department will continue transferring inmates who committed more serious crimes to immigration authorities.

Morejon said authorities are working on the logistics of how those transfers will take place and are evaluating the department's policy of publishing online the release dates of all inmates — including immigrants who are wanted by federal agents for deportation.

About 1,200 inmates were transferred to ICE in 2017, he said.

An ICE spokeswoman declined to comment on the proposed changes.

Police responsibility to regularly maintain equipment and gear

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

In New Jersey, some 20,000 DUI arrests are in jeopardy because of false verifications due to aging and inaccurate equipment. Agencies are required to conduct regular maintenance of a variety of types of equipment, and yet it would appear that in some cases, that regular maintenance is not being conducted, putting not only convictions at risk, but possibly even lives. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the responsibility for agencies to check to be sure their gear is in good working order.

Learn more

8 steps for maintaining your duty gear

How to maintain safe and operational police firearms

How to take care of and maintain police body armor

Scenario-based training on a budget

Wisconsin Police Officer Honored 6 Decades After Death

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Six decades after a Wisconsin police officer’s death, he is finally getting the recognition he deserves.

Fallen North Carolina Police Officer Laid to Rest

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Lumberton Police Officer Jason Barton Quick was remembered Thursday as a family man, a man of God and a man who quietly helped others.

Man Accused of Dragging New York Trooper During Traffic Stop

Posted on December 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An Auburn man is accused of dragging a state trooper with his pickup truck during a traffic stop Tuesday evening in the city of Syracuse, according to New York State Police.

Georgia Police Officer Shot in the Head to be Home for Christmas

Posted on December 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Covington Police Officer Matt Cooper will be home for Christmas, about four months after fighting for his life after being shot in the head on Labor Day by a criminal suspect.

Michigan Officer Commandeers Kayak to Save Woman from Sinking Car

Posted on December 19, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A quick thinking sergeant with the Trenton (MI) Police Department commandeered a kayak at the edge of the Detroit River after a woman was seen in a sinking vehicle in the waterway.  

Agents Seize Nearly $7M in Illegal Drugs at US-Mexico Border

Posted on December 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Border agents at the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge cargo facility reportedly seized nearly $7 million worth of illegal narcotics, including 320 pounds of methamphetamine and 40 pounds of cocaine.

Georgia K-9 Shot During Traffic Stop Released from Hospital

Posted on December 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The K-9 with the DeKalb County (GA) Police Department shot during a gunfight at a traffic stop was released from a veterinary hospital on Saturday. Indi lost an eye during the confrontation, but is expected to otherwise recover.

Cottonwood, AZ, Fire & Medical Department Adds New Pumper to Fleet

Posted on December 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Cottonwood, AZ, Fire & Medical Department has taken delivery of a 2018 E-ONE pumper on a Cyclone II cab and chassis.

NY top court finds police disciplinary records can remain secret

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Robert Gavin Times Union, Albany, N.Y.

ALBANY, N.Y. — The state's top court has reaffirmed the scope of a law that keeps disciplinary decisions of police officers confidential and shields the records from public scrutiny.

In a 5-2 decision that upheld a lower court's conclusion, the Court of Appeals rejected arguments by the New York City Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), which tried to use the state's Freedom of Information Law to obtain disciplinary decisions of New York City police officers.

In August 2011, the NYCLU filed a Freedom of Information Law request to obtain the documents dating back to Jan. 1, 2001. The records related to NYPD disciplinary proceedings that arose from complaints to the city's Civilian Complaint Review Board, an independent agency that investigates complaints against police officers. If the Review Board substantiates a complaint, it refers the matter to the NYPD, which can try to discipline the officer with "charges and specifications."

In a decision authored by Associate Judge Michael Garcia, the Court of Appeals sided with the NYPD, finding its decisions to be "quintessential 'personnel records'" which cannot be disclosed under Civil Rights Law 50-a. The law, the decision noted, was designed to protect officers from being harassed or embarrassed by lawyers in cross-examination during litigation.

"These records are replete with factual details regarding misconduct allegations, hearing judges' impressions and findings, and any punishment imposed on officers — material ripe for degrading, embarrassing, harassing or impeaching the integrity of an officer," Garcia wrote. "The documents are, accordingly, protected from disclosure under Civil Rights Law 50-a."

Chief Judge Janet DiFiore and Associate Judges Eugene Fahey, Paul Feinman and Leslie Stein all concurred, although Stein wrote an opinion showing some differences of opinion. Associate Judges Jenny Rivera and Rowan Wilson disagreed, each authoring opinions.

Rivera stated the ruling was "an interpretation of our statutes that cloaks government activity in secrecy and undermines our state's public policy of open government."

Robert Freeman, executive director of the state's Committee on Open Government, said the ruling demonstrated a clear need to change the law. He said that, generally speaking, when a record indicates that a government employee engaged in misconduct or violated rules, that record is available to the public under FOIL.

"That would be so with respect to the great majority of public employees — whether they be clerical or administrative, teachers, even judges. But it's not so in the case of police and correction officers," Freeman told the Times Union. "It's ironic that those classes of public employees who have the most power and authority over peoples' lives are the least accountable, and reconsideration of section 50-a of the Civil Rights Law should be a priority in the upcoming legislative session."

In a statement, the Legal Aid Society said the decision "cements a dangerous precedent in a democracy that relies on access of information in order to hold public officials accountable." It said the ruling "will amplify harm to people abused by police, leave Black and Latinx communities vulnerable with even less recourse to hold police accountable, will support impunity by officers who will abuse the reliability of their anonymity, and will cause continued disruption in the justice system."

Several media outlets — The Hearst Corp., which operates the Times Union; Advance Publications; the Associated Press; Daily News; Dow Jones & Company; Gannett Co.; News 12 Networks, Newsday and NYP Holdings — filed a joint brief supporting the NYCLU's appeal. The New York City Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, the union that represents NYPD officers, filed one supporting the department.

Patrick Lynch, the president of the PBA, said in a statement he was grateful the Court of Appeals "reaffirmed the core principles behind the law protecting the confidential personnel records of public safety professionals."

Lynch said the court recognized the "tremendous potential for abusive exploitation of these records and the harassment — or worse — of police officers, firefighters and correction officers."

After the NYPD's initial rejection of the NYCLU's document request, the NYPD responded to the group's administrative appeal by releasing 700 pages of "disposition of charges" forms that contained redactions to conceal the names of the officers and nature of the complaints about them. The NYPD denied disclosure of "final opinions" of the cases.

After the NYCLU sued, a state Supreme Court justice ordered the NYPD to produce five decisions at random, but allowed the department to conceal identities of the officers and told the department to notify the officers. The department complied but argued the request, even with the redactions, violated Civil Rights Law 50-a.

The Appellate Division in Manhattan reversed the justice's ruling and found the court could not order the NYPD to disclose redacted versions of the disciplinary decisions. The Court of Appeals heard arguments on the case last month.

———

©2018 the Times Union (Albany, N.Y.)

West Virginia Man Accused of Battery on Officer and K-9 Partner

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

According to the Cabell County (WV) Sheriff’s Office, a 33-year-old man is accused of battery on an officer after an altercation with an officer and his K-9 on Thursday. Bradley Allen Moore has been charged with two counts of battery on an officer and obstruction.

NH police recruit charged for plotting to shoot fellow recruits at graduation

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: PoliceOne Members

By Kevin Landrigan The New Hampshire Union Leader, Manchester

LACONIA, New Hampshire — A 24-year-old Concord man being groomed to become a Laconia police officer was fired and charged with criminal threatening Wednesday for comments made about an upcoming police academy graduation ceremony a short time before he was to graduate, state police officials said.

State troopers with the special investigations unit and the mobile enforcement team arrested Noah Beaulieu on Interstate 93 in Concord Wednesday.

He will be arraigned on Thursday in Merrimack County Superior Court on one felony charge of criminal threatening.

Trooper First Class Tamara Hester has been investigating this case and the supervisor of the matter has been State Police Capt. Joseph M. Ebert.

Until Wednesday, Beaulieu had been a recruit with the Laconia Police Dept. studying at the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Academy, officials said.

State police officials did not offer further details.

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©2018 The New Hampshire Union Leader (Manchester, N.H.)

Officer demoted after giving retired K-9 to animal shelter

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

JACKSON, Miss. — A K-9 officer has been demoted after he gave his retired K-9 to an animal shelter, KCCI reports.

The dog, Ringo, was retired in November after serving as a narcotics K-9 for almost 10 years.

According to Randy Hare of the Alpha Canine Training Center, officers were expected to take care of Ringo after he retired from the force, but what happened to him isn’t uncommon.

“A lot of times they're treated like equipment, and when they're treated like equipment, sometimes they're disposed of like equipment," Hare said.

Hare, who originally trained Ringo, ended up adopting him after he found out he was at the animal shelter.

5 tips to boost to fire-based EMS training performance

Posted on December 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Setting the right objectives during firefighter training is the key to reaching them

Calif. man rescued 2 days after getting stuck in restaurant grease vent

Posted on December 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A would-be burglar had to be rescued from the grease vent of a vacant Chinese restaurant after being trapped for two days

St. Paul Police Launch Decoy Operation to Deter Package Thieves

Posted on December 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

St. Paul police will be dropping decoy packages across the city, hoping to catch thieves who steal them from doorsteps.

Texas firefighters save more than 100 snakes from house fire

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Authorities say that when firefighters arrived, they discovered a second-floor bedroom full of snakes and lizards

Judge Denies Ex-Deputy’s Motion to Dismiss Parkland Shooting Lawsuit

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The only armed deputy stationed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School the day of Nikolas Cruz’s deadly rampage asked a Broward judge on Wednesday to find he had “no legal duty” to protect the students and faculty from harm.

The judge rejected his argument.

Scot Peterson, who resigned from the Broward Sheriff’s Office in late February and is accused of shirking his responsibility by hiding instead of confronting Cruz, wanted Broward Circuit Judge Patti Englander Henning to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the family of Meadow Pollack, one of 17 people shot and killed in the Parkland school on Feb. 14.

“We want to say he had an obligation, but the law isn’t that,” said Peterson’s lawyer, Michael Piper. “From a legal standpoint, there was no duty.”

Englander Henning saw it differently, finding Peterson had a duty to the school community as someone whose job was security and who had an “obligation to act reasonably” under the circumstances of the shooting, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

 

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Judge Denies Ex-Deputy’s Motion to Dismiss Parkland Shooting Lawsuit

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The only armed deputy stationed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School the day of Nikolas Cruz’s deadly rampage asked a Broward judge on Wednesday to find he had “no legal duty” to protect the students and faculty from harm.

The judge rejected his argument.

Scot Peterson, who resigned from the Broward Sheriff’s Office in late February and is accused of shirking his responsibility by hiding instead of confronting Cruz, wanted Broward Circuit Judge Patti Englander Henning to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the family of Meadow Pollack, one of 17 people shot and killed in the Parkland school on Feb. 14.

“We want to say he had an obligation, but the law isn’t that,” said Peterson’s lawyer, Michael Piper. “From a legal standpoint, there was no duty.”

Englander Henning saw it differently, finding Peterson had a duty to the school community as someone whose job was security and who had an “obligation to act reasonably” under the circumstances of the shooting, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

 

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Teen Dies in Crash While Fleeing Maryland Police in Stolen Car

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The mother of 18-year-old Taiwan Linton spoke about the death of her son, who was riding in a stolen car that slammed into a tree while fleeing Baltimore County police.

Casa Grande, AZ, Fire Department Has a New Tanker

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Casa Grande, AZ, Fire Department has taken delivery of a Pierce tanker built on a Freightliner chassis.

California Police Fatally Shoot Suicidal Knife-Wielding Man

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officers with the Redwood City (CA) Police Department confronted by a man wielding a butcher knife on Monday were forced to open fire, fatally wounding him.

1 Deputy, 2 Officers Shot Serving Warrant in Texas

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in Uncategorized

According to KTRK News, one deputy and two officers from the Texas Attorney General’s Office were injured in a shooting while serving a felony warrant on Tuesday.

All three were transported to a nearby hospital with injuries that are believed to not be life threatenting.

The Harris County Sheriff’s Office says one suspect—identified as Daniel Trevino—may be barricaded inside a home. A second suspect has been taken into custody.

 

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Los Angeles school officer found dead at elementary school

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

null
Author: Terrence P. Dwyer, Esq.

By KTLA-TV, Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES — Coroner’s officials on Monday released the identity of a Los Angeles School Police Department officer found dead on the campus of a North Hollywood elementary school over the weekend.

Authorities investigate the death of a Los Angeles School Police Department officer at Valley View Elementary School in Hollywood Hills on Dec. 9, 2018.

The body of Douglas Campbell, 46, of Torrance was found about 4:15 p.m. Sunday at Valley View Elementary School, 6921 Woodrow Wilson Drive, school police officials said.

His cause of death will be determined by the Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner, Los Angeles police Lt. Chris Ramirez said. Officials declined to comment on whether there were any obvious signs of trauma to the body.

There was not believed to be any threat to the public, Ramirez added.

According to Campbell’s online resume, posted to Linkedin.com, he was a Los Angeles School Police sergeant who had joined the department in 2005. He served with the U.S. Marine Corps from 1996 to 2000, and briefly worked as an officer with the Trinidad Police Department in Northern California before enlisting, the profile states.

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©2018 KTLA-TV, Los Angeles

Arrest Made in FDNY Road Rage Death

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A suspect was apprehended early Tuesday at a New Jersey motel, about 25 miles from where firefighter Faizal Coto was beaten to death with a baseball bat.

Autopsy: Eric Garner Did Not Die of Strangulation in Chokehold

Posted on December 10, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The New York Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association issued a press release stating that the autopsy report on the death of Eric Garner “demonstrates conclusively that Mr. Garner did not die of strangulation of the neck from a chokehold which would have caused a crushed larynx (windpipe) and a fractured hyoid bone.”

Former FF Dies in NY House Fire

Posted on December 10, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Larry Connolly, 74, had been a lifetime member of the volunteer fire department in Coxsackie.

Lift Assist Calls Taxing MN Firefighters

Posted on December 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire chiefs in Minnesota say that calls to lift people off the floor, including at senior care facilities, are taxing their crews.

MA Firefighter Dies after Getting Trapped in Building

Posted on December 9, 2018 by in Uncategorized

A Worcester firefighter died Sunday after being trapped inside a multiple alarm fire for an extended period of time.

Washington Police “Flirt” with Suspect Who Promised to Turn Himself in on Facebook

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Anthony Akers—a 38-year-old who has a history of drug abuse and protection order violations, according to Fox News—is presently wanted by the Washington Department of Corrections for Failure to Comply. Image courtesy of Richland PD / Facebook. </p>

“Dear Anthony, it is us?” the Richland (WA) Police Department said on its Facebook page earlier this week.

The department’s post went on, “Last Wednesday we reached out to you as ‘wanted.’ You replied and even said you were going to turn yourself in. We waited, but you didn’t show. After you stood us up, we reached out again- this time offering you a ride. You replied and said you needed 48 hours. The weekend came and went. We are beginning to think you are not coming. Please call us anytime and we will come to you.”

Anthony Akers—a 38-year-old who has a history of drug abuse and protection order violations, according to Fox News—is presently wanted by the Washington Department of Corrections for Failure to Comply.

Akers—playing along with the cheeky post—replied, “It’s not you. It’s me.” He then said that he has “commitment issues.”

Akers then posted a picture of himself outside the police station.

 

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Washington Police “Flirt” with Suspect Who Promised to Turn Himself in on Facebook

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Anthony Akers, a 38-year-old who has a history of drug abuse and protection order violations, is presently wanted by the Washington Department of Corrections for Failure to Comply.

MD Firefighters Train for Active Shooters

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Anne Arundel County firefighters joined local, county and state law enforcement agencies for an active shooter exercise Thursday in Annapolis.

Report: Nearly Half of Law Enforcement Agencies Have Acquired Body Cameras

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Nearly half of state and local law enforcement agencies in the United States had acquired body-worn cameras by 2016, the Bureau of Justice Statistics announced last month.

NYPD Officers Shoot, Wound Armed Man During Chase

Posted on December 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officers pursuing an armed man in the Bronx on Wednesday night shot and wounded the subject in a gun battle. A woman and a 12-year-old girl were also wounded in the exchange, although it was not immediately clear whether the bystanders had been struck by rounds fired by the police or by the gunman, according to the New York Times.

Chief Terence Monahan said that police were called when the subject was running down the street “indiscriminately firing” a 25-caliber firearm which was recovered at the scene.

When police approached the subject, he produced the gun and began firing at officers, who then returned fire.

The man was struck once in the neck and once in the foot, and is expected to survive.

The woman was struck by a single round in the stomach. The girl was struck by bullet fragments in her leg. Both were transported to a nearby hospital and were listed in stable condition.

 

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Bell Delivers First Law Enforcement Configured Bell 505 Jet Ranger X to Sacramento PD

Posted on December 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Bell Helicopter, a Textron Inc. company, announced the delivery of the first law enforcement-configured Bell 505 Jet Ranger X to the Sacramento (CA) Police Department.

ME Crews Rescue Woman after Bridge Jump

Posted on December 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Brunswick firefighters rescued a woman on Wednesday who apparently jumped from the Frank J. Wood Bridge into the Androscoggin River.

The ‘Best of What’s New: Security’

Posted on December 5, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Wouldn’t you know it, Popular Science’s Top 100 Innovations of 2018 includes a few for law enforcement.

NYPD investigate officer’s complaint that colleague masturbated in her water bottle

Posted on December 5, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Thomas Tracy and John Annese New York Daily News

NYPD Internal Affairs detectives are trying to determine if a cop masturbated into a female police officer’s water bottle at a Bronx precinct, the Daily News has learned.

The 44-year-old cop, assigned to the 52nd Precinct in Norwood, told investigators she brought the bottle from home on Nov. 14 and left it on her desk in the basement for about two weeks, sources said.

On Friday afternoon, she saw an offending goo — possibly semen — floating in the half-full, 32-ounce bottle.

She reported it the next morning, and the NYPD sent a Crime Scene Unit to retrieve the bottle and test its icky contents, sources said.

The cop believes someone put semen into the bottle — which is typically locked away when she’s not nearby — as a cruel prank, sources with knowledge of the case said.

An NYPD source said the cop’s complaint was “under investigation.”

The cop told her superiors she waited a day to report the sickening discovery because she was confused and embarrassed, and worried someone might retaliate against her.

The officer could not be reached for comment.

If true, the sick incident is hauntingly similar to the actions of former NYPD Sgt. Michael Iscenko, 56, who was convicted of throwing semen on a female co-worker at police headquarters.

In July 2017, a jury found Iscenko guilty of one count of sex abuse in the third degree after prosecutors argued at trial that the white substance he tossed on the 61-year-old victim's calf after she left the bathroom at One Police Plaza in lower Manhattan was seminal fluid. They also said his DNA was found on the shoe she wore that day.

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©2018 New York Daily News

Video: Responders rescue man clinging to tree in rain-swollen river

Posted on December 4, 2018 by in Uncategorized

A dramatic video shows a man who was “mid-stream, clinging to a tree and in need of immediate rescue” being hoisted to safety

Possible overdose patients ram Colo. fire truck before fleeing scene

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The driver of the car reversed into the fire truck several times and escaped after firefighters tried to approach the vehicle, but backed away after seeing a gun

Louisiana Officer Shot—Body Armor Sends Ricocheting Bullet Safely Away

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A deputy with the Ouachita Parish (LA) Sheriff’s Office was shot in his patrol vehicle as he was responding to a call of a theft of an ATV, according to KNOE-TV.

Sheriff Jay Russell said that the bullet struck the deputy in his body armor, the ricocheted into the back seat of the squad car.

Russell said that the deputy’s partner took him to the hospital where was to undergo a precautionary x-ray. Russell said that the deputy should be okay.

 

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Two Minneapolis Police Officers Under Fire Over Christmas Tree

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Two Minneapolis police officers have been placed on leave pending an internal affairs investigation into what Mayor Jacob Frey called a “racist display” in the form of Christmas tree decorations in the North Side precinct.

CHP Uses Autopilot to Stop a Tesla After Driver Falls Asleep

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The cameras and computer algorithms of the vehicle’s self-driving system did their job, slowing to avoid ramming the officer’s car.

Plane Crashes into FL Autism Center

Posted on December 2, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The pilot and passenger of a small plane are dead following a fiery crash into an occupied therapy center for children with autism in Ft. Lauderdale.

Couple awarded for saving crash victim while looking for fishing spot

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A couple was only looking for a fishing spot when they happened upon an injured and missing woman who had driven off a cliff and crashed some 200 feet below

For the Record 12/18

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

USFA Releases Annual Report on LODDs
The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) has released its annual report into firefighter line-of-duty deaths (LODDs) that includes a breakdown of the 87 lives lost in 2017.
The total number of LODDs last year was slightly…

Leadership Lessons: Get to Know Traffic Incident Management

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Steven Gillespie encourages all fire personnel to get reacquainted with their old friend, Traffic Incident Management (TIM).

Test & Evaluation: Ruger PC Carbine

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The purpose of the police carbine is to bridge the gap between the handgun and the precision rifle. The Ruger PC Carbine is simple to maintain and highly maneuverable.

Broncos donate $200K to LE nonprofit to protect first responders

Posted on November 30, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

KDVR-TV, Denver

DENVER — Broncos star Von Miller announced Thursday he would be donating $200,000 to Shield616 alongside about 20 teammates and the Broncos organization. Shield616 is a non-profit dedicated to supplying law enforcement with protective kits to keep them safer while on duty.

“The initiative will also include programming to improve law-enforcement relations in the community,” the Broncos said in a press release.

The Broncos will be joining the efforts of FOX31 and Channel 2 to Support the Shield, our effort to support local law enforcement following the loss of three deputies in the span of five weeks in early 2018.

The team said the donation will be enough to supply Colorado Springs-based Shield616 with 125 protective kits to first responders. Each kit includes a ballistic vest, ballistic helmet and a wound trauma kit. They are designed to better protect first responders against automatic weapons and assault rifles compared to standard protection equipment.

“When I heard there’s been more than 300 mass shootings in the last year alone, I felt like we needed to do something for those who protect us,” Miller said through Thursday’s press release. “I hope that we can all help bridge the gap and work to improve relationships with law enforcement in our communities.”

The team said once Miller began the effort, nearly 20 players decided to join him in donating. President and CEO Joe Ellis, President of Football Operations/General Manager John Elway and Head Coach Vance Joseph also contributed.

“Miller, his teammates and the Broncos will also maintain relationships with the selected first responders through volunteer opportunities, programming with area kids, roundtable discussions and other initiatives,” the Broncos said, explaining that each Shield616 donor will be paired with a first responder.

“It takes the unification of an entire community to not only better protect our first responders with physical armor, but to break down barriers between first responders and the citizens they serve,” Shield616 Founder and President Jake Skifstad said in the Broncos’ statement. “It’s priceless to see complete strangers invest in the safety of first responders, changing their lives and the lives of their families. We are humbled and proud to see that Von Miller, his teammates and the Broncos are utilizing their God-given leadership gifts and influence to not only better protect our protectors but to also help build positive community relations.”

The Broncos will present the protective kits to local police officers and firefighters after practice on Dec. 20 at UCHealth Training Center.

FOX31 and Channel 2’s “Support the Shield” initiative raised money for both Shield616 and C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors). During our partnership with Safeway, viewers raised $442,429 for the organizations. That is in addition to a phone-bank campaign that raised more than $240,000 early this year.

4 St. Louis Police Officers Accused of Beating an Undercover Colleague During Protests

Posted on November 30, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Four St. Louis police officers were indicted Thursday on federal charges claiming that three of them beat an undercover colleague during protests last year and all four then covered it up.

Training, development, performance: Take action

Posted on November 30, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

NIOSH Report cites crew integrity, lack of training in firefighter LODD

New Jersey AG Limits Immigration Enforcement Duties for Local Police

Posted on November 29, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal unveiled a new directive Thursday that restricts local law enforcement from participating in federal immigration operations, according to NorthJersey.com.

Under the new policy, police in New Jersey can no longer stop, search or detain any individual over immigration status and detain immigrants at the request of the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE—except in cases of serious or violent crimes or final deportation orders.

“No law-abiding resident of this great state should live in fear that a routine traffic stop by local police will result in his or her deportation from this country,” Grewal said.

Grewel said, however, that the new directive does not make New Jersey a “sanctuary state” for criminals.

“If you break the law in New Jersey we will go after you no matter your immigration status,” Grewel said.

Grewal—a former Bergen County Prosecutor—became the nation’s first Sikh attorney general when he was confirmed by New Jersey lawmakers in January.

 

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FL Teen Rescued from Abandoned Bank Vault

Posted on November 29, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The teen was trapped inside the vault in Hollywood for about three hours after his friend closed the door behind him.

California Sheriff Revered for Leadership in the Face of Disaster

Posted on November 29, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Sheriff Kory Honea has been the face of strength in Butte County.

NM Department Takes Action Against Cancer

Posted on November 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

With eight active members of Albuquerque Fire Rescue fighting various forms of cancer, steps are being taken to prevent that number from rising.

Retired New Jersey State Police Trooper Dies of 9/11-Related Cancer

Posted on November 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Retired New Jersey State Police Trooper Robert Nagle succumbed to complications from kidney cancer, which metastasized to his lungs, on Nov. 26 at Robert Wood Johnson Hospital.

Retired Va. firefighter suing city over discrimination

Posted on November 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A retired firefighter claims the city of Norfolk discriminated against him after learning he was gay when he married his husband in 2014

Dallas Firefighters OK after Mayday Event

Posted on November 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A fire broke out Tuesday morning at a condo building in Dallas that injured three firefighters who were briefly trapped and signaled a mayday.

Congresswoman takes up fight to classify 911 operators as first responders

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

EMS1 speaks with Rep. Norma Torres about her push to make the classification change at the federal level

Congresswoman takes up fight to classify 911 operators as first responders

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

EMS1 speaks with Rep. Norma Torres about her push to make the classification change at the federal level

North Carolina Trooper Helps Deliver Baby on Highway

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

After leaving his family’s home Saturday night North Carolina State Highway Patrol Sgt. Brian Maynard saw a couple going roughly 85 mph past him on the highway.

Virginia Officer Dies in Single-Vehicle Collision Responding to Call

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Police Officer Hunter Edwards was responding to the call several blocks away from his location when the crash occurred. He was transported to a nearby hospital where he was pronounced dead. Image courtesy of ODMP.</p>

A 30-year-old officer with the Winchester (VA) Police Department was killed in a single-vehicle collision on while responding to a fight call on Sunday, according to Fox News.

Police Officer Hunter Edwards was responding to the call several blocks away from his location when the crash occurred. He was transported to a nearby hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Officer Edwards had served with the Winchester Police Department for four years and was assigned to the Patrol Division, SWAT team, and Civil Disturbance Unit.

He is survived by his wife and stepson.

 

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Citizens Come to Aid of Florida Officer Shot by Felon Armed with a Rifle

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Daytona Beach (FL) Police Department was shot late Sunday after police said he and other officers responded to a call of a suspicious person with a rifle.

Officer Kevin Hird was struck in the right arm during a confrontation with the suspect, according to WFTV News.

Citizens immediately rushed to Hird’s aid, applying pressure to his wound until EMS responders arrived. Hird was then transported to a nearby hospital where he was said to be in good spirts and expected to make a full recovery.

The suspect—identified as 40-year-old Raymond Roberts—was taken into custody just minutes after the shooting.

Roberts reportedly has an extensive criminal record.

“He’s a convicted felon, a typical street maggot out here committing crimes shooting randomly especially at police officers,” Police Chief Craig Capri said.

 

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77-year-old Pa. constable delivers meals to homebound, first responders

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Patrick Buchnowski The Tribune-Democrat

JOHNSTOWN, Pa. — When he’s not rounding up lawbreakers, State Constable Sam Allison Sr. is delivering food to shut-ins and first responders who must work during the holidays or honoring fallen veterans.

Allison, 77, said he’s been delivering food to the homebound for 16 years. The meals are provided by St. Vincent de Paul’s Family Kitchen in Johnstown.

“It’s the joy of giving back to the people,” he said. “The look on their face when you knock on the door and you hand them a meal, and they look at you and say, ‘Thank you, Mr. Allison.’ ”

Allison said he delivers about 25 meals on both Thanksgiving and Christmas.

He serves meals to many of the same people each year. Some of those to whom he delivered in the past have passed away.

“It got to the point where the people that I’ve been doing this for have died,” he said. “I was very attached to them.”

Allison said his desire to serve the community took him in a new direction.

“During my experience in law enforcement, I’ve seen so many accidents and drug overdoses and different things,” he said. “I’ve witnessed firsthand what first responders do. They’re so critical in our society. I started a program two years ago for first responders.”

Now, Allison delivers holiday meals to members of 7th Ward Ambulance and West End Ambulance Service, and to Johnstown police and firefighters.

“It’s amazing,” said Ira Hart, manager of West End Ambulance Service. “Without Sam, a lot of times, our folks wouldn’t get to participate in a holiday meal. Sam never lets us down. He’s always there for them.”

Allison has been a state constable for 32 years, having been repeatedly elected to six-year terms by voters in Johnstown’s 8th Ward.

He has been a police officer in Johnstown, Dale Borough and Westmont Borough.

A retired sergeant major with the U.S. Army, Allison was involved in military operations in Vietnam, Bosnia, Panama and the Middle East.

Allison, a captain in the Pennsylvania Civil Air Patrol, was squadron commander for Johnstown Squadron 1501 and remains active with Indiana Squadron 1501.

“I have the mentality of a 20-year-old,” Allison said. “But, unfortunately, the body doesn’t always respond.”

More recently, Allison said he has purchased dozens of 18-by-12-inch American flags that he gives to families of military veterans during funeral services.

Deep respect for the fallen motivates him.

“Every time I find a brother who is deceased, I visit the funeral home in uniform and I tell the family who I am and what I’m there for,” he said.

He hands them a folded flag to honor their loved ones.

“People say, ‘Mr. Allison, why are you doing this?’ ” Allison said. “Because it’s a fallen brother.”

Allison has no intentions of slowing down, he said.

He still rides in a patrol car with Johnstown police two nights a week.

“The bad guys haven’t gotten me yet,” Allison said. "It doesn’t mean it can’t happen. I want to keep sharp at all times and not become complacent.”

Wounded Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Returns to Job

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

El Paso County Sheriff’s Deputy Scott Stone vowed to return to work after he was severely wounded in the February shootout that killed a fellow deputy.

Ala. fire chief retires after 30 years of service

Posted on November 23, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Chief Charles Gordon joined the department in January 1989 and rose through the ranks until he was appointed chief by former Mayor William Bell in September 2014

Police Agencies Deliver Thanksgiving Dinner to Needy Families

Posted on November 23, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police departments across the country spent some of the past few days delivering some holiday joy—in the form of Thanksgiving dinner—to families who desperately need it.

In McAllen (TX), police delivered dinners to 150 families for the 16th consecutive year, according to KVEO-TV. The families receiving the meals were pre-selected by the police department and McAllen ISD based on need. McAllen PD also hosted their 2nd annual Turkey or Ticket campaign where unsuspecting drivers are stopped and given a turkey instead of a ticket.

In Albany (NY) officers served an early Thanksgiving dinner to more than 300 individuals who lined up outside the James H. Gray Civic Center on Tuesday evening.

Albany Sergeant Kawaski Barnes told WALB News, “Tonight’s goal is to feed everybody we can and to have people leave with a smile on their face and just a positive feel about the police department overall.”

In Oklahoma City (OK) the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123  surprised shoppers by purchasing their Thanksgiving groceries. According to KFOR-TV, FOP Lodge 123 Vice President Mark Nelson said, “The holidays can be a financially stressful time. We wanted to take this opportunity to give back and say thank you to the citizens of Oklahoma City for their support throughout the year.”

Turning the tables—so to speak—some citizens provided police with a Thanksgiving meal.

The Atlanta Braves baseball team wanted to show appreciation to those who sacrifice their time to protect Atlanta on holidays. The Braves provided a turkey dinner to 100 police officers who were scheduled to work on Thanksgiving Day, according to MLB.com.

 

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Free Online Course | Reducing Graffiti in Your Community

Posted on November 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Complete the form below to access this free course.

Graffiti, we have all seen it. It plagues our cities, leaving taxpayers and law enforcement to clean it up. Serial taggers deface public and private property, leaving law enforcement with the challenge of tracking and stopping these perpetrators. How do we identify and track these offenders? Some departments have graffiti specialists who track and identify common offenders and graffiti related to gangs, but there are additional resources and tools available. Tim Kephart is a expert and thought leader in the fight against graffiti. His company, Graffiti Tracker, is the sponsor of this course. In this course, learn about the different types of graffiti, how to identify each type, resolve cases, and seek restitution.

Complete the form below to access this free course.

Four Dead in Suspicious NJ Mansion Blaze

Posted on November 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Homicide is suspected after a family of four was found dead following a fire in their $1.5 million mansion in the upscale town of Colts Neck.

Detroit fire union files unfair labor charge over lights and sirens policy

Posted on November 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Detroit Fire Fighter Association claims a controversial policy that dictates when lights and sirens can be used is a “public safety failure”

Detroit fire union files unfair labor charge over lights and sirens policy

Posted on November 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Detroit Fire Fighter Association claims a controversial policy that dictates when lights and sirens can be used is a “public safety failure”

Washington Chief Says Officers Will Not Enforce New Gun Laws

Posted on November 19, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Chief Loren Culp of the Republic (WA) Police Department said on social media that he won’t allow his department to enforce new regulations under newly passed which he said are unconstitutional.

Initiative 1639 raises the age limit for some gun purchases and puts an enhanced background check and waiting period in place for people who want to buy a semi-automatic rifle, among other restrictions.

Chief Culp wrote on Facebook, “I’ve taken 3 public oaths, one in the US Army and Two as a police officer. All of them included upholding and defending the Constitution of the United States of America. The second amendment says the right to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

The post continued, “The second amendment says the right to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. As long as I am Chief of Police, no Republic Police Officer will infringe on citizens right to keep and Bear Arms, PERIOD!”

Further, Culp suggests that the city pass legislation that would make the City of Republic a “2nd Amendment Sanctuary City.”

Culp said in a separate Facebook post that he wants local legislation passed that that would “prevent federal and state infringement on the right to keep and bear arms; nullifying all federal and state acts in violation of the 2nd Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and Article 1 Section 24 of the Washington State Constitution.”

Initiative 1639 passed with a statewide approval of nearly 60 percent of the vote. In Ferry County—where the City of Republic is located—73 percent of voters said no to the measure.

 

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Okla. PD aims to recruit more women

Posted on November 19, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

TULSA, Okla. — The Tulsa Police Department hopes to make its ranks more gender-balanced with a push to recruit more women officers.

That’s how the department came up with “Women in Policing Day,” a truncated version of the police academy led by female officers to recruit more women into its ranks, KTUL reported.

Tulsa PD has 800 sworn officers, but only about 100 are women.

"We want to be more representative for the City of Tulsa," TPD recruiter Cpl. Billy White told KTUL.

Attendees will learn how to fire a gun, learn combat techniques and hear from female officers about their experiences in law enforcement.

"We want to show that anyone can do it," 14-year Tulsa PD veteran Ashley Kite said. "If you have the passion, there's nothing intimidating about it."

NH ambulance catches fire en route to the hospital

Posted on November 18, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officials said the ambulance was transporting a patient when a reported mechanical issue caused the rig to go up in flames

DuraForce PRO 2 Smartphone

Posted on November 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Kyocera’s rugged DuraForce PRO 2 is a 4G LTE Android smartphone now available through Verizon Wireless. Designed for business and enterprise use, especially construction, public safety and transportation as well as adventure-seeking consumers,…

Pa. city votes to cut fire, police positions to fill budget hole

Posted on November 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Peoria City Council voted 8-3 Tuesday to approve eliminating 22 firefighter and 16 police positions as part of a move to close a $6 million budget hole

Echelon Materials Working on Ballistic Fabric to Defeat Rifle Rounds

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Echelon Materials has announced that it is working on the world’s first and only patented, lightweight, flexible fabric designed to shred high-powered conical/rifle rounds and be comfortably worn or carried all day.

The fabric called TiTek uses a defeat mechanism that is cutting-edge, according to Echelon. It’s a patented fabric that weaves tiny, sharp-edged titanium discs into the plane of the fabric using the very Kevlar threads that comprise the fabric. These discs present their sharp edges to the incoming round and cut it to shreds as it passes. Once shredded by the TiTek fabric, debris from the bullets is easily captured by the armor package’s backing layers that employ existing materials such as aramids or polyethylenes, Echelon says. Compared to traditional armor that “stops” the bullet by applying counter-force, TiTek-infused armor uses the bullet’s own energy to cut it apart, destroying it and making it easier to stop.

“In testing the TiTek material, we have seen 7.62 x 59 FMJ M80 rounds turned into shrapnel – not a piece over the size of a .17-caliber BB—with bits and pieces spread over a 9-inch diameter in an armor pack weighing 1.9 pounds per square foot,” said Bob Muller, Echelon Materials’ CEO. “This means that lightweight, flexible, breathable, rifle protection weighing up to 75% less than current Level IV+ plates is possible with TiTek, making that protection easier and more comfortable to wear.”

For more information about, visit www.echelonmaterials.com/.

 

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Echelon Materials Working on Ballistic Fabric to Defeat Rifle Rounds

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Echelon Materials has announced that it is working on the world’s first and only patented, lightweight, flexible fabric designed to shred high-powered conical/rifle rounds and be comfortably worn or carried all day.

The fabric called TiTek uses a defeat mechanism that is cutting-edge, according to Echelon. It’s a patented fabric that weaves tiny, sharp-edged titanium discs into the plane of the fabric using the very Kevlar threads that comprise the fabric. These discs present their sharp edges to the incoming round and cut it to shreds as it passes. Once shredded by the TiTek fabric, debris from the bullets is easily captured by the armor package’s backing layers that employ existing materials such as aramids or polyethylenes, Echelon says. Compared to traditional armor that “stops” the bullet by applying counter-force, TiTek-infused armor uses the bullet’s own energy to cut it apart, destroying it and making it easier to stop.

“In testing the TiTek material, we have seen 7.62 x 59 FMJ M80 rounds turned into shrapnel – not a piece over the size of a .17-caliber BB—with bits and pieces spread over a 9-inch diameter in an armor pack weighing 1.9 pounds per square foot,” said Bob Muller, Echelon Materials’ CEO. “This means that lightweight, flexible, breathable, rifle protection weighing up to 75% less than current Level IV+ plates is possible with TiTek, making that protection easier and more comfortable to wear.”

For more information about, visit www.echelonmaterials.com/.

 

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California Motor Officer Dies Following Collision with Vehicle

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>The Gardena (CA) Police Department posted on its Facebook page an announcement that Motor Officer Toshio Hirai has died from injuries he sustained in a traffic collision while riding his police motorcycle to work. Image courtesy of ODMP. </p>

The Gardena (CA) Police Department posted on its Facebook page an announcement that Motor Officer Toshio Hirai has died from injuries he sustained in a traffic collision while riding his police motorcycle to work.

Hirai was 34 years old, a devoted husband, and father of a 2-year-old son.

“A number of outstanding doctors, nurses, and other hospital staff members did all that they could to try to save Toshio. While doctors did their best to try and save him, he died at the hospital late this afternoon,” the post said.

“Toshio started working at the Gardena Police Department in 2006,” the department said. “Besides being a motor officer, he was on the SWAT team and was a traffic investigator. Toshio, was one of the smartest people in the room. He spoke five languages, loved life, had the best sense of humor. He worked hard for our community. Most of all he absolutely loved and cherished his wife and two-year-old son.”

The post continued, “He loved this community and the work he did here. The community loved him back. We lost a guardian today, and while we’ll never be able to replace Toshio, his memory will live on and his presence will always be felt.”

The other driver involved in the collision stayed at the scene and was talking to investigators, according to the KTLA-TV. The driver’s identity has not been released.

 

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The Next Generation of Ballistic Protection

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TiTek is a lightweight, flexible fabric that employs a new mechanism to defeat bullets by shredding them into shrapnel and easy capture within an armor package that is up to 75% lighter than current rifle protection. Echelon is seeking your support to…

Criticized deputy refuses to testify about Parkland massacre

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

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By Terry Spencer and David Fischer Associated Press

SUNRISE, Fla. — For months, members of the panel investigating Florida's high school massacre have called the sheriff's deputy assigned to guard the campus "a coward" for hiding and not rushing inside in an attempt to stop the shooter.

Given an opportunity to confront his critics Thursday, now-retired Broward Sheriff's Deputy Scot Peterson sent his attorney instead before the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission. Attorney Joseph DiRuzzo III told the 14-member panel he had filed a lawsuit hours earlier attempting to block their subpoena. DiRuzzo dropped a copy on the lectern and then walked away.

Fred Guttenberg, whose child Jaime died along with 16 others, said to DiRuzzo as he passed: "He didn't do his job. My daughter should be alive."

Peterson, the longtime deputy assigned to Stoneman Douglas, has become the second-most vilified person surrounding the Feb. 14 shooting after suspect Nikolas Cruz.

Security video shows Peterson arrived outside the three-story building where the killings happened shortly after the shooting began, about the same time the gunman finished slaying 11 people on the first-floor. Peterson drew his handgun, but retreated to cover next to the neighboring building. The video shows Peterson never left that spot for 50 minutes, even after other deputies and police officers arrived on campus and went inside.

Panel members have said they believe Peterson's inaction allowed Cruz to climb to the third floor, where five students, including Jamie Guttenberg, and one teacher were killed. They believe if Peterson, 55, had confronted Cruz, who authorities say was armed with an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, and engaged him in a shootout he could have killed him or given others more time to reach safety.

"Other than the person sitting in a jail cell right now for murdering my daughter, the only other person who comes close to pissing me off as much is Peterson because Peterson could have saved my daughter. My daughter was the second-to-last to be shot … a few more seconds and she would be alive," Fred Guttenberg told The Associated Press after DiRuzzo left.

Peterson, a decorated 32-year veteran of the sheriff's office, retired shortly after the shooting rather than accept a suspension while his actions were investigated. He is now receiving a $100,000 annual pension. There had been speculation Peterson might attend the meeting but invoke the Fifth Amendment, as a criminal investigation of law enforcement's response continues.

Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, the panel's chairman, said Thursday he wanted to ask Peterson, "Why the hell did he go hide and run away and not do his job?"

Peterson told investigators shortly after the shooting and reporters last spring from the "Today" show and The Washington Post that he heard only two or three shots and didn't know whether they were coming from inside the building.

That is contradicted by radio calls in which he correctly identifies the building as the shooter's location. Bullets also came out a window almost directly above where he took cover. About 150 shots were fired and were heard by others a quarter-mile away.

Cruz, a 20-year-old former Stoneman Douglas student, is charged with the slayings. He has pleaded not guilty, but his attorneys have said he would plead guilty in exchange for a life sentence. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty.

The panel also heard Thursday from two other Broward County officials criticized for their actions before and after the shooting: Sheriff Scott Israel and school Superintendent Robert Runcie.

Israel, whose triplet sons graduated from Stoneman Douglas a few years ago, was asked why his agency's policy on engaging an active shooter says a deputy "may" confront a shooter rather than "shall."

The sheriff said deputies are trained to engage immediately, but "I want an effective tactical response, not a suicide response."

Israel said a different policy wouldn't have prompted Peterson to rush into the building, saying "you can't train courage."

Runcie said he's focusing on the recovery and well-being of students, improving school safety and holding administrators accountable.

Runcie outlined security improvements, including single points of entry and armed guardians or police officers at all schools, and expanded mental health resources for students.

Commission members then grilled Runcie on the district's communication with law enforcement and procedures for dealing with active shooters. Several pointed out that the district still hadn't created a policy mandating the marking of "hard corners," areas in a classroom a shooter can't hit from the door's window.

The panel has been meeting periodically since April. It's required to file a report by Jan. 1 to Florida Gov. Rick Scott on its findings on the shooting's causes and recommendations for avoiding future school massacres. The panel includes law enforcement, education and mental health officials, a legislator and the fathers of two dead students.

Thousands honor slain Calif. sergeant at funeral

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Christopher Weber and John Rogers The Associated Press

WESTLAKE VILLAGE, Calif. — The sheriff's sergeant who gave his life saving others during a mass shooting last week was remembered warmly Thursday as a deeply religious man devoted to family who could be counted on to never hesitate a moment to put his own life on the line if it meant helping others.

Several thousand people, including hundreds of law enforcement officers from throughout California, packed the Calvary Community Church in Westlake Village for the emotional, 90-minute service honoring the life of Ron Helus.

The 54-year-old sheriff's sergeant was shot to death during a Nov. 7 gunfight with a man who was raking a popular Southern California country bar with bullets when Helus ran in to try to stop him.

The gunman killed 12 people before shooting himself to death. But authorities say Helus — the first officer into the bar — saved numerous others by immediately exchanging gunfire with the shooter, giving patrons and employees time to flee.

Among Thursday's mourners was musician Billy Ray Cyrus who said he told the family before the service, "I'm probably going to have to change the definition of hero. From now on it can just be a picture of Ron Helus."

Then, accompanying himself on guitar, Cyrus dedicated his song "Some Gave All" to Helus, singing the words, "Some stood through for the red, white and blue. And some had to fall. And if you ever think of me, think of all your liberties. And recall, some gave all."

The emotional message left the audience in stunned silence until Pastor Steven Day said, "If you'd like to, you can thank him," and the crowd erupted in applause. The audience had also given Helus a standing ovation at the beginning of the service.A casket with the body of Ventura County Sheriff's Sgt. Ron Helus is carried into the Calvary Community Church Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018

Mourners included hundreds of officers from police agencies across the state who stood solemnly outside the church hall as the 54-year-old sheriff's sergeant's flag-draped coffin was wheeled inside. Each offered a crisp salute as it passed by, then joined hundreds of other mourners inside.

Still more people, including many who had never met Helus, stood outside in the parking lot or lined nearby streets. Others lingered by a huge makeshift memorial featuring flowers, messages and stuffed animals.

"I heard he was a hero. He went in there in the line of duty to try and save people and deal with a crazed man," said Peter Orr of Malibu, who has been staying in a nearby hotel with his dog since his home burned down in one of California's ongoing wildfires. He took off work Thursday to pay his respects.

Inside the church, Day told stories passed on to him by Helus' friends, family and co-workers.

They described an avid fisherman, hiker and dirt biker rider who loved his family, God and fly fishing and sharing nature with his 24-year-old son, Jordan. A niece, Lauren Smith recalled how Helus helped teach her to drive, letting her get behind the wheel of his brand new truck and, after she accidentally smashed a side mirror parking it, told her, "Let's just keep this our secret."

Although the 29-year veteran of the Ventura County Sheriff's Department took on some of the agency's toughest assignments, working in SWAT, narcotics and investigations, friends said he could often show a playful side as well.

Sometimes, Day said, he'd pull someone over for a minor traffic violation and explain to them what they'd done wrong.

"Then, with his pad in his hand and his pen, he'd say 'OK, you tell me a good joke and I won't write you a ticket.' "

Other times he'd approach young men with powerful sports cars and tell them not to worry, this avid dirt biker just wanted to look under the hoods and check out their engines. His real reason, Day explained, was to give them a chance to get to know a sheriff's deputy.

Day also read letters from family members, including one who wrote, "If you called him a hero he'd probably laugh at you and say he was doing his job."

His wife, Karen, called him her personal hero.

"You were my husband and best friend. You were always the one who made me laugh and who protected me from all that tried to harm me," she wrote.

The two had met in a college anatomy class when Helus helped her dissect a cat. He would ask her to marry him a few years later when they dined at a popular restaurant in Thousand Oaks called Charlie Brown's.

That restaurant has since transitioned into a country bar called the Borderline Bar and Grill, the place packed with young people on last week's "college night" when a gunman opened fire and Helus ran in to save them.

"I know that when God saw you enter heaven he said, 'Well done, faithful servant,' " Karen Helus told her husband.

Body Camera Footage Shows Fatal Oklahoma Police Shooting

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in Uncategorized

The Muskogee Police Department released body cam footage Thursday for three officers involved in a fatal shooting Monday at I Don’t Care Bar and Grill.

2 dead after three-way car crash involving ambulance

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A three-vehicle crash involving an ambulance left two people dead after a driver lost control and crossed the center line

Firefighters, paramedics fight back fire to save woman who just gave birth

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Heather Roebuck said goodbye to her newborn daughter as she was evacuated by ambulance after a C-section, only to have the ambulance catch fire

Firehouse-adopted, Instagram-famous cat gets stuck in drain pipe

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The fire department-adopted cat, known as the “Arson Cat,” was rescued by firefighters after they discovered he was stuck in a drain pipe

Video: Ohio Police Disarm Suicidal 11-Year-Old Knife Wielding Boy

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in Uncategorized

VIDEO: Ohio Police Disarm Suicidal 11-Year-Old Knife Wielding Boy

Officers with the Grove City (OH) Police Department responded to a call of an 11-year-old boy wielding two butcher knives stolen from a local Dollar Tree store, and holding the knives to his throat threatening suicide.

Newly-released video from the Division of Police shows an officer sneaking up behind the boy and grabbing his arms, according to ABC News.

The boy then dropped the knives, and officers were able to take the boy into custody without further incident.

According to police, the boy assaulted a staff member at Buckeye Ranch Client & Mental Health Services and escaped the facility.

The boy is charged with assault, menacing and theft. He was taken for a mental health evaluation, then transferred to the Juvenile Detention Center in Columbus.

 

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Report: Some Deputies Don’t Remember Active Shooter Training Prior to Parkland Massacre

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

The investigation into the police response to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas School in Parkland continues, and new revelations indicate that some of the deputies responding may not have been completely up to date on active shooter response tactics.

According to a new report obtained by the Sun Sentinel, some deputies with the Broward County (FL) Sheriff’s Office couldn’t remember the last time they attended mass-shooter training—others couldn’t recall what they’d learned when they did attend.

The report said that “during interviews, it was not uncommon for deputies to have difficulty remembering when their last active-shooter training took place or what type of training they received…”

In contrast, the Coral Springs officers who rushed into the high school consistently praised their training and “had no difficulty in explaining the proper response to an active shooter.”

 

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Kyocera Launches Rugged, Military-Grade, Waterproof Smartphone with Verizon Wireless

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Waterproof, Drop and Scratch Proof, with Built-In Super Wide View 4K Action Camera, Enhanced Speakers and Noise-Cancelling Mics, DuraForce PRO 2 is Ideal for Construction, Public Safety and Transportation Industries

Illinois State Police: Officer Told Security Guard ‘Multiple’ Times to Drop Gun

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Midlothian, Ill., police officer gave “multiple verbal commands” to security officer Jemel Roberson to drop his gun and get on the ground before fatally shooting Roberson at a Robbins bar Sunday morning, according to a preliminary report.

Police: Half-naked woman found in road assaults Ohio EMT

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police said they found Denise Molina, who was found rolling around with her pants and underwear pulled down, kicked an EMT in the throat

Trial Begins for Man Charged with Shooting South Carolina Officer in 2013

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Mark Blake Jr. is acting as his own lawyer—although he does have a public defender at his side in case he wants legal advice—as he stands accused of attempted murder of a police officer during a 2013 traffic stop.

Blake faces up to 30 years in prison for attempted murder in the March 13, 2013, shooting of Charleston Police Officer Cory Goldstein, according to WCSC-TV.

Goldstein—who no longer works for the Charleston Police Department—took the stand to recount the night of the shooting. He told the jury that during the foot chase, Blake kept looking over his shoulder to see how close Goldstein was to him.

He said that after Blake had stopped, he ordered Blake not to move, and Blake responded, “You don’t move [expletive],” and opened fire.

Blake then had the opportunity to cross-examine the officer he is accused of trying to kill.

 

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Police Officer – Town of Palm Beach

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Job Description Police Officers are responsible for providing protection of life and property within the municipal boundaries of the Town of Palm Beach. Work activities include responding to calls for service and/or emergencies, including calls which are...

Verizon announces 5G First Responder Lab

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON — Verizon launched an innovation lab to develop 5G solutions for first responders.

In a recent press release, Verizon unveiled the 5G First Responder Lab, which is described as a “first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety.”

The network is partnering with Responder Corp. for the project and hopes to accelerate 5G technology for first responders.

Verizon announced the launch of its 5G First Responder Lab, a first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety. https://t.co/eJAIFq3Nf0 pic.twitter.com/tX15Mxxmo0

— Verizon News (@VerizonNews) November 8, 2018

“First responders should have the absolute best, most effective technologies available to them as they protect our communities and respond to emergencies large and small,” Verizon SVP of Strategy, Innovation and Product Development Toby Redshaw said. “Our 5G First Responder Lab will give technology innovators the opportunity to develop applications and use cases that leverage the unique capabilities of 5G, and to bring those solutions to market more quickly.”

The press release said Verizon is seeking 15 innovators to “develop public safety solutions over a one-year period.”

The lab will be broken up into three cohorts lasting three months each, and technology developers will have “the opportunity to collaborate with Verizon and Responder Corp on 5G use case testing, insight creation and go-to-market strategies.”

"As Verizon deploys 5G, it is critical that we look beyond the launch for consumers and consider how users in public safety can leverage this revolutionary technology," Verizon’s Director of Public Sector Product Strategy Nick Nilan said. “5G will enable technology for first responders that hasn’t been imagined yet, and this 5G First Responder Lab will help lead the creation of life-saving innovations.”

Verizon and Responder Corp. announced a 5G First Responder Lab to help maximize 5G applications for public safety. This lab will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology via https://t.co/nNuX83JFt6#ResponderVentures #5G #Verizon #publicsafety pic.twitter.com/MW5hHKA4FQ

— Responder Corp, LLC (@ResponderVC) November 14, 2018

Verizon announces 5G First Responder Lab

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON — Verizon launched an innovation lab to develop 5G solutions for first responders.

In a recent press release, Verizon unveiled the 5G First Responder Lab, which is described as a “first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety.”

The network is partnering with Responder Corp. for the project and hopes to accelerate 5G technology for first responders.

Verizon announced the launch of its 5G First Responder Lab, a first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety. https://t.co/eJAIFq3Nf0 pic.twitter.com/tX15Mxxmo0

— Verizon News (@VerizonNews) November 8, 2018

“First responders should have the absolute best, most effective technologies available to them as they protect our communities and respond to emergencies large and small,” Verizon SVP of Strategy, Innovation and Product Development Toby Redshaw said. “Our 5G First Responder Lab will give technology innovators the opportunity to develop applications and use cases that leverage the unique capabilities of 5G, and to bring those solutions to market more quickly.”

The press release said Verizon is seeking 15 innovators to “develop public safety solutions over a one-year period.”

The lab will be broken up into three cohorts lasting three months each, and technology developers will have “the opportunity to collaborate with Verizon and Responder Corp on 5G use case testing, insight creation and go-to-market strategies.”

"As Verizon deploys 5G, it is critical that we look beyond the launch for consumers and consider how users in public safety can leverage this revolutionary technology," Verizon’s Director of Public Sector Product Strategy Nick Nilan said. “5G will enable technology for first responders that hasn’t been imagined yet, and this 5G First Responder Lab will help lead the creation of life-saving innovations.”

Verizon and Responder Corp. announced a 5G First Responder Lab to help maximize 5G applications for public safety. This lab will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology via https://t.co/nNuX83JFt6#ResponderVentures #5G #Verizon #publicsafety pic.twitter.com/MW5hHKA4FQ

— Responder Corp, LLC (@ResponderVC) November 14, 2018

Firefighters from around the U.S. travel to help in Calif. wildfires

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighters from 17 states are answering the call for help in wildfires that are consuming the state of California

Colo. paramedics equipped with stroke neurointervention tool

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Teller County paramedics can now effectively halt blood clotting by providing a tissue plasminogen activator

California Officer Fatally Shoots Knife-Wielding Former Police Captain

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Officers with the Fresno (CA) Police Department responded to a call Monday from a woman who feared a man in her home—reportedly with a history of recent mental health issues—might try to kill himself.

A veteran FTO and his rookie partner arrived to the scene and quickly discovered a pool of blood on the floor and a man with a knife with a 12-inch blade coming at them, according to the Fresno Bee.

One officer deployed a TASER, but one of the darts failed to take hold, and the man advanced. The other officer then opened fire, fatally shooting 63-year-old Marty West, who had a 32-year career in the Fresno Police Department before retiring from the Fresno PD in 2007 to become the chief of police in Oakdale.

West was chief of police in Oakdale for five years before retiring in March 2012.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said, “Both of them were absolutely shocked and surprised when the door opened and Marty came charging out, covered in blood, armed with a knife, and was within a few feet of the officers.”

“I lost a friend and a family member; he’ll be missed,” Dyer said.

 

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Family Sues After Security Guard Fatally Shot by Illinois Police Officer

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Midlothian police officer used excessive force when he fatally shot an on-duty security guard while responding to a shots fired call at a bar in Robbins Sunday, a lawsuit filed Monday against the officer and the Village of Midlothian alleges.

Team Safariland’s Rob Leatham and Scott Carnahan Win Top Titles at 2018 USPSA’s Nine Days of Nationals in Polk County, Florida

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Leatham takes 6th Overall in Carry Optics and 3rd Overall in Single Stack; Carnahan takes 2nd Overall in Pistol Caliber Carbine

Team Safariland’s Rob Leatham and Scott Carnahan Win Top Titles at 2018 USPSA’s Nine Days of Nationals in Polk County, Florida

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Leatham takes 6th Overall in Carry Optics and 3rd Overall in Single Stack; Carnahan takes 2nd Overall in Pistol Caliber Carbine

Death toll in Northern Calif. wildfire rises to 42

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Search and recovery teams looked for human remains from a Northern California wildfire that killed at least 42, making it the deadliest in state history

Woman Falsely Accuses Florida Deputy of Rape

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A woman arrested for shoplifting falsely accused a Palm Beach County (FL) Sheriff’s Office deputy of rape earlier this year, authorities say.

According to the arrest report, 23-year-old Marley Barberian is now facing charges of a false report of sexual battery, a false report of crime and perjury (not in an official proceeding.)

Barberian, who was in county jail after being arrested at a Target for shoplifting, told an intake nurse that a PBSO deputy sexually battered her while bringing her in to the jail. In a sworn statement with a detective, she claimed the deputy raped her anally after they left the Greenacres Police Department. She also accused the deputy of groping her earlier in a patdown during her arrest at the Target, reports CBS 12.

However, after investigating her statement, authorities found holes in her story. One male deputy said the accused deputy did not touch Barberian inappropriately, and that a female deputy actually patted her down. He also told authorities that the accused deputy only drove her to the Greenacres police station, and then a female deputy took her to the Palm Beach County jail.

Investigators also looked at the in-car video and surveillance video, all of which refuted her claims.

The sheriff’s office found probable cause to arrest Barberian and charge her for making the false accusation. Barberian remains at the Palm Beach County Jail on $3,000 bond.

 

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Load-bearing vest vs. duty belt: Ergonomic researchers determine the winner

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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Author: Therese Matthews

Reprinted with permission from University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

By Judy Berthiaume

The Eau Claire Police Department is making a significant change to how officers carry their equipment after a UW-Eau Claire research team determined that load-bearing vests are a safe and healthier alternative to the traditional duty belt.

Officers who carry most of their equipment – which often weighs close to 30 pounds – on vests rather than duty belts experience significantly less hip and lower-back pain, the study found.

“The findings are clear and they are significant,” said Dr. Jeff Janot, a professor of kinesiology and the faculty lead on a six-month study that involved UW-Eau Claire, ECPD and Mayo Clinic Health System. “While the vests weigh more, the weight is more evenly distributed so there is less strain on the hips and lower back.”

Researchers also determined that the vests do not limit the officers’ range of motion or create other issues that would be problematic for the officers from a safety standpoint, said Chantal Bougie, a senior kinesiology major from Oshkosh and the student lead on the research project.

“We didn’t find any unintended consequences from wearing the load-bearing vest that would cause health or safety issues for the officers,” Bougie said.

Given the study results, the ECPD already has begun to transition some of its 100 sworn officers from the duty belts to the load-bearing vests, said Matt Rokus, deputy chief of police for the ECPD.

“The health and well-being of our officers is our priority,” said Rokus, noting that lower-back pain is a significant health issue for law enforcement personnel everywhere. “This study shows empirically that transitioning to the load-bearing vests is the right thing to do for our officers and our community.”

ECPD officers still will wear duty belts, but they will hold only guns and TASERs. The radio, hand cuffs, flashlight and other gear officers always have on them will be carried on the vests instead, Rokus said.

Fifteen Eau Claire police officers volunteered to be part of the university’s study. For three months, some officers wore load-bearing vests while the others carried gear on the duty belts. The officers wearing belts then switched to vests, and those wearing vests went back to belts for three months.

After every shift, the officers self-reported and self-recorded any discomfort and rated the level of lower-back discomfort, giving researchers extensive data from a six-month period.

The 15 officers who participated in the study already have been issued their vests and began wearing them immediately. The research partners in the study – UW-Eau Claire, the city of Eau Claire and Mayo Clinic Health System – shared the costs of the 15 vests being used by the officers who volunteered to participate in the research. As funding allows, the ECPD will purchase additional vests so every officer will have one, Rokus said, noting that vests cost $300 each so it will take some time to purchase them all.

All officers go through extensive use-of-force training, which results in muscle memory that they rely on when accessing their equipment. As officers transition to the vests, they will be retrained to create that same reflexive response, Rokus said.

“This is a significant investment given the costs of the vests and the training,” Rokus said. “It’s an investment we will make because we have the information from UW-Eau Claire’s research to support our decision. We know this is good for the health of our officers.”

That’s good news for Cory Reeves, who said that after five years as an officer with the ECPD he’s already experiencing hip and lower-back pain from long hours of sitting in his squad car, walking his beat or apprehending suspects, all while carrying the heavy gear around his waist.

“As soon as I put the vest on, I noticed the difference,” said Reeves. “I wore the duty belt the first three months, and noticed an immediate difference when I put on the vest for the last three months. It’s a lot more comfortable. It was easier to spend long hours on the job when I was wearing the vest.”

Officer Breanna Montgomery said the vest allows her to sit up straight in her squad car, something that isn’t possible with the fully equipped belt. Since she spends many hours in her vehicle completing paperwork and other tasks, the awkward sitting position strains her back, she says.

“When I have the vest on, instead of sitting curved forward, I can sit up straight,” said Montgomery, who has been an Eau Claire police officer for more than three years. “Also, when I’m on calls, if I’m standing for a long time, I don’t have extra weight on my waist so it’s more comfortable and easier on my back.”

While it is impossible to eliminate all the health-related challenges that police officers face, the vest does address issues with lower-back pain, which is among the most common health problem reported by officers, especially patrol officers, Rokus said.

“Policing is a physically demanding profession,” said Rokus. “Officers spend a lot of time in their vehicles because they use them as their offices. They also often stand to talk to people or hold suspects, or chase a combative suspect, all while carrying 30 pounds of police equipment on their waists.”

As a result, many officers experience constant back pain, diminishing the quality of their lives, Rokus said. They also miss patrol shifts because of back issues, which leads to staffing shortages, overtime costs and worker comp claims, he said.

“The health improvement for our officers is important,” Rokus said of the vests. “But there also should be a reduction in health care cost and lost time due to injury, which is good for our community.”

Knowing the strain that the heavy belt puts onto officers’ backs during their 10-hour shifts, the researchers anticipated that their study would find that the vests would ease back pain, Bougie said.

“But we were surprised by just how big of a difference the vests made in how the officers rated their pain,” Bougie said. “When the officers went from the vest to the belt, there were really big jumps up in the levels of pain they reported.”

Other than a study in Sweden, Janot said he doesn’t know of any other research on this issue.

Given its importance and the limited research done, interest in UW-Eau Claire’s findings is significant and widespread among law enforcement agencies, Janot said.

“The vest-versus-belt issue sounds like a fairly simple question but it’s actually very complicated,” said Janot. “Law enforcement agencies all over want to know if the vests can help address officers’ back problems. Like in Eau Claire, they want data that will help them make an informed decision.”

Since the study was announced in the spring, Janot has been contacted by dozens of law enforcement agencies from across the country asking about the results.

This winter, the UW-Eau Claire research team will present its findings to top law enforcement officials from agencies across Wisconsin.

“It’s exciting to partner with our community, but it’s also exciting to know that our work may make a difference far beyond Eau Claire,” Janot said.

Bougie said it's incredible to know that her work as a student researcher will make a positive difference in the quality of the lives of police officers here and elsewhere.

“Knowing I am helping these police officers who keep us safe is pretty special,” said Bougie, who plans to work as a physical therapist after graduate school. “It feels like I am giving them something in return for what they do for all of us. That’s an amazing feeling.”

While the vests-versus-belts question is at the center of their project, the researchers also built a biometric profile of more than three dozen active-duty police officers, giving the ECPD a look at the overall health status of its officers, Janot said.

The biometric screenings tested things like the officers’ flexibility, spinal mobility, core endurance, aerobic fitness, upper-body endurance and lower-body strength.

These screenings give the ECPD a baseline that they can use to identify strategies to improve the overall health, well-being and readiness of their officers, and to identify possible underlying issues that contribute to officers’ health issues, Janot said.

“Having the answers to a lot of small questions can be used to make a big difference,” Janot said.

The information gained from the screenings will be used as part of the ECPD’s ongoing wellness programming, Rokus said.

By expanding its research to include the biometric screenings, researchers provided the ECPD with important information about the health of its officers, and UW-Eau Claire students gained valuable experience using high-end equipment as part of a real-world study, Janot said.

Given the success of the project with the ECPD, Janot hopes to continue to work with the department and to partner with other local agencies to help them solve problems.

“We have the students, cutting-edge technology and expertise to gather the information the ECPD and other agencies need to address a variety of problems,” Janot said. “We’ve shared our data with the ECPD, but we’re not done yet. Interest in this study is extremely high so we will share what we learned, but also are looking for ways to build on it.”

UW-Eau Claire faculty involved in the vest research include Janot; Dr. Nick Beltz, assistant professor; Dr. Saori Braun, assistant professor; and Dr. Marquell Johnson, associate professor. Student researchers include Bougie, Anna Kohler, Sierra Freid, Maddy Downing, Jessica Nagel and Lindsey Opelt. Dr. Andrew Floren of Mayo Clinic Health System helped UW-Eau Claire researchers design the study.

For more information about the police vest research, contact Dr. Jeff Janot, professor of kinesiology, at 715-836-5333 or janotjm@uwec.edu, or Matt Rokus, deputy chief of police, at 715-839-4979 or Matt.Rokus@eauclairewi.gov.


About the author Judy Berthiaume is the IMC's chief storyteller, sharing stories about the many exceptional people that make UW-Eau Claire such a phenomenal place. She talks with students, faculty, staff and alumni to find and to share their successes, initiatives, challenges and dreams with the campus community and the world beyond.

Calif. LEOs lose homes while responding to wildfire

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in Uncategorized

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By Tony Bizjak, Kevin Valine and Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee

PARADISE, Calif. — As they worked this week to save lives, firefighters and police officers in Paradise had their own personal fear in the back of their minds:

Will my home survive the onslaught of the Camp Fire?

For many, the unfortunate answer is no. The massive wind-whipped fire that roared through Butte mountain towns and hamlets on Thursday appears to have spared little, including homes owned by Cal Fire crews, Paradise police and county sheriff’s deputies.

Paradise Mayor Jody Jones confirmed on Sunday that 17 Paradise police officers lost their homes in the Thursday inferno.

Some 33 current and former firefighters have lost their homes as well, and fire officials say they fear that number could be much higher. Butte Sheriff Kory Honea estimated about 30 members of his department have lost their homes, too. Chico officials say eight of their police department employees also lost their homes.

“Everybody has a story to tell,” he said.

Paradise Mayor Jones, a retired Caltrans executive who has lived in Paradise for 14 years, found her house burned to the ground Friday when she returned to take a look. She had barely escaped the day before, saying she felt the heat of the flames around her, burning on both sides of Clark Road, one of two routes of out the secluded town.

“Every member of the town council lost their home,” she said. “If you think about it too much, it can overwhelm you.“

Butte College Police Chief Casey Carlson worked for 48 hours straight at the emergency command post, figuring – correctly, as it turned out – that his home of 10 years was gone too. Three members of his staff lost their homes as well.

“When we got the evacuation order, I went up to grab a few things, and houses (on the block) were on fire when I was leaving,” he said. “You kind of have to accept it. You know you are helping folks, and that is what matters.”

He’s decided, he said, that possessions are not that important. “I have my kids, the family and the dog. That’s what counts.”

Ray Johnson, a Butte County volunteer fire captain, stopped his fire engine Sunday at the Skyway Memorial Park cemetery and snapped a photo of the American flag that was rippling in the breeze. The flag was spotless and untouched by the fire that scorched just about everything else for miles around.

His eyes heavy with exhaustion and his yellow firefighting clothing smudged with soot, he fought back tears as he described saving homes while his home in Paradise burned to the ground. He said he hoped the flag would inspire people to know that all is not lost.

“This means a lot to me that this flag is still here,” he said.

“A lot of my friends’ houses were lost. I’m really sad. I’m sad for my community, but there’s hope. There’s so much generosity in this country and in Paradise. There’s hope. There’s a lot of good people here.”

The International Association of Fire Fighters has set up a help center in Chico for firefighters who lost homes, offering them financial assistance, help with filing insurance claims and emotional support.

IAFF state service representative Tim Aboudara Jr. said losing a home is devastating for everyone but it poses challenges for firefighters who find themselves in an unfamiliar role of needing help.

“Like so many people in these communities the loss is devastating to our members,” said Aboudara, who is a Santa Rosa firefighter.

“And it’s particularly insulting because they have spent so much time fighting fire and protecting homes and to be out on the line and doing their job and not know the status of their family and the status of their home is very difficult. But they never back down.”

The IAFF is working with the California Professional Firefighters and the CDF Firefighters Benevolent Foundation in the effort to assist the firefighters and their families who have lost their homes.

Abourdara said the IAFF started this effort 13 months ago after the Santa Rosa fire and it’s modeled on IAFF efforts done elsewhere in the United States. He said as many as 58 other firefighters may also have lost their homes to the Camp Fire.

Paradise mayor Jones estimated that 90 percent of the town’s houses are now gone, and that about half of downtown has been destroyed.

Still standing are Town Hall, the high school, the hospital, two if the three fire stations, and two of the three grocery stores.

She said that she and everyone she has talked to plans to rebuild, despite the ongoing threat of fires.

“It doesn’t matter where you live,“ she said. “You can be in harm’s way anywhere. I never want to live my life in fear.”

Sheriff Honea did not lose his home, he said. But the fire caused him some moments of personal worry. His daughter, Kassidy Honea, is a rookie Paradise police officer. She and he were directing evacuee traffic in Paradise Thursday when he got an emergency call and had to leave.

He hugged his daughter and said, “Kiddo, I love you,” before heading off.

Two Tools for Field Communications

Posted on November 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>If they don&#39;t respond to Ask and Tell, Make them comply, using your full and legal authority to do so. (Photo: Getty Images)</p>

How, when, and why you talk to people in the field is all about the context, the setting, and the seriousness or the urgency of the issue at hand. Most conversations between citizens and the police, which are not initiated by 9-1-1-driven radio calls or getting flagged down as you pass (“Hurry! He’s beating her over on the next block!”), are fairly routine. They usually involve saying hello, passing on information, or hearing about some situation that could bear looking into.

Talking to people who are under extreme stress, or giving commands when you are, is difficult and we tend to fall back on habits where we use the same conversational patterns. Saying “Calm down!” to someone who is not calm and will not become calm just because you shouted that command is a perfect example of what not to try.

Let’s make a few assumptions. Most people hate being told what to do, especially if it embarrasses them in front of their peers, families, or spouse/boyfriend/girlfriend. Most people are not good listeners, especially under stress, which means you usually have to repeat things you just said. And most people who think they might be arrested or actually are being arrested really don’t listen too much after they see or feel your matching silver bracelets. It’s this latter category that gets us into arguments as to who is “righter,” at a minimum, or foot pursuits or fights, at the worst.

Two models may help your field conversations. Which one you use will depend on if you are talking to cooperative people; could or could not be cooperative people; or uncooperative people. In days of old we referred to these three types as Yes-Maybe-No people. Our biggest challenge is trying not to turn Maybe people into No people, because that’s what usually leads to us having to get physical.

Introduce-Explain-Ask

One choice is the communications concept known as Introduce-Explain-Ask. This is a service-oriented approach for relatively low-stress encounters and it comes from my pal who was an East Coast police detective and now works as the director of security for a West Coast megachurch. He teaches it to his ushers and security staff.

The model starts with Introducing yourself to the person, who at the start could be a good guy, a bad guy, a friend of the bad guy, or a witness. Let’s follow along:

“I’m Officer Whomever, from the Local Police Department.” Followed by some version of “Who are you?” “What’s your name, sir/ma’am?” “Tell me who I’m talking to here?” Your choice of tone will depend on if you’re standing in front of a citizen, a gangster, a known crook, or a witness who you know nothing about.

<p>Introduce-Explain-Ask is simple for someone to hear and fulfill, and works best when the stakes are low. (Photo: POLICE File)</p>

The benefit to this first step is two-fold: You have clearly identified yourself (and badged them if you’re in plainclothes), so there can be no doubt later that they were talking to the real-deal police. And you can get his or her name early, while things are still fairly low-key.

Explain why you came over, why you are there, what you are about to do, and why you are about to do it: “I pulled over because it looked like you were having a problem with X, Y, or Z.” “The reason I stopped you was…” or “What I need you to do for me is …”

And then Ask for their compliance, which, of course, you may or may not get. If they don’t comply, remember that people don’t think, speak, or listen well under stress, and even a routine conversation with a cop can raise their pulse rates. In this case, repeat the Explain and Ask steps again, knowing that you may need to use repetition to be fully understood. The value to this model is that it’s simple for you to say, simple for them to hear and fulfill, and works best when the stakes are low.

Ask-Tell-Make

For tougher, more volatile situations, especially with known suspects or people who are about to become suspects in your mind, you can use Ask-Tell-Make. You may or may not want to Introduce yourself, depending on the urgency or seriousness of the situation, but you will Ask the person to comply and if they do, thank them for it. If they don’t, you move to the next step, which adds a sterner tone and suggests they are near the end of your last offer of voluntary compliance. If they don’t respond to Ask and Tell, Make them comply, using your full and legal authority to do so.

You get a call to contact the staff at the library for help with a threatening person who appears high on drugs or alcohol, or mentally ill, but potentially combative. Let’s follow along:

“I’m Officer Whomever, from the Local Police Department. What’s your name, sir?”

“Larry!”

“Okay, Larry. Thanks for that. I got called here and it looks like it’s time for you to leave the library. I’m going to Ask you to gather up your stuff, so we can head outside to talk some more. You hear what I’m Asking you?”

“You can’t tell me what to do! I know my civil rights! I’m not leaving!”

“I hear you, Larry. But at this point, I’ve already made up my mind that you’re trespassing and they have warned you in the past that you can’t be here. So now, I’m Telling you, you have to leave. Let’s head to the door.”

“F— you!” (Or some variation of the Universal Police Challenge to your legal authority.)

“OK, Larry. I’ve Asked you to leave, I’ve Told you to leave, so you need to leave. Now, you’ve given me no choice, so I will have to Make you leave.”

If Library Larry squares off and challenges you to fight, then you take the necessary steps (with a cover officer, preferably) to Make him leave with you, via an arrest for trespass, public intoxication, warrants, civil order violation, or whatever the situation dictates.

The value to repeating the steps in Ask-Tell-Make is not just for Larry’s benefit; it’s for the library staffers and civilians who are gathered around watching and listening to your encounter. Even the most anti-police types in the room will have to grudgingly admit that you gave Larry several chances to go along with the program and he didn’t. (For those of you who wear body cameras, the benefit to this approach should be obvious.)

No need to use Introduce-Explain-Ask during a felony hot stop or a shots fired call, of course. It has its uses during mostly lower-risk encounters. And Ask-Tell-Make works best in those situations where the suspect needs to know you have given him options and now those are over. You will not back down or change your mind about using arrest and control force to take him into custody.

Once you reach the Make stage, it’s no longer up for discussion, it’s not a debate, and you will have to take action because he has failed to comply. Don’t keep repeating the ATM model or it will lose its power. Once you decide to Make, put hands on.

Both of these models give you a range of semantic choices from Officer Friendly to Officer Assertive. You can always skip steps if you need to, but these communication approaches can help you “sell” what you’re doing in the field, to citizens, witnesses, and suspects alike.

Steve Albrecht worked for the San Diego Police Department for 15 years. His books include Albrecht on Guns; Patrol Cop, Streetwork, Contact and Cover, and Tactical Perfection for Street Cops. He can be reached at drsteve@drstevealbrecht.com or on Twitter @DrSteveAlbrecht.

 

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$100K Donated to Florida LEOs, Volunteers Affected by Hurricane Michael

Posted on November 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Bay County, FL, officials have accepted donations totaling $100,000 to go toward volunteers and law enforcement officers Thursday in what they hope will be continuing outpouring of support from corporations.

Scientific Games, a technology-based gaming company, donated the money, the News Herald reports.

With a mound of supplies donated to local law enforcement as the backdrop, Bay County Sheriff Tommy Ford said the funds will go directly to deputies and staff who suffered losses from Hurricane Michael.

“This storm hit us very hard,” Ford said, noting about 60 staff members and deputies lost their homes. “Their resolve has been inspiring. They didn’t skip a beat in serving their community.”

 

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Nebraska Deputies Buy 2 Child Safety Seats for Mom they Stopped for Speeding

Posted on November 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Dash-cam footage shows two Nebraska deputies installing two brand new child safety seats in an SUV at a traffic stop.Deputy Jason Jones had pulled over the vehicle for speeding when he noticed that the two children in the back seat were not in proper safety seats. He radioed for help, and soon thereafter, Deputy Jessica Manning arrived at the scene, with two newly purchased child safety seats. More Here.

Digital Signature – Automatic Digital Hashing of Scan Data

Posted on October 24, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

FARO’s Digital Signature is the automatic digital hashing of scan data on FARO’s line of Focus Laser Scanners.FARO’s Digital Signature provides encrypted security to all raw scans by hashing data at the time of capture. With this new automatic…

Increasing sensitivity to firefighter PTSD

Posted on October 23, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Educating friends about firefighter PTSD can prevent innocent questions that can undo years of mental health work and progress

The Old Guy League

Posted on September 4, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

This old guy league is a collection of distinguished and often colorful characters; take time to get to know a few. It is very important for the older generations to pass on the institutional knowledge and share the hard lessons learned for this profession to progress.

Off-Duty Safety Tips

Posted on August 30, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

It’s no secret that groups like Antifa and Anonymous are simpatico, and when you add BLM activists to the mix, you have a troika of anti-police groups that is not to be underestimated. Consequently, officers must maintain vigilant watch for threats while off duty.

Chicago fire organization donates $30K to train young EMTs

Posted on August 8, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Through the Black Fire Brigade’s donation, 30 young adults from the inner city will start EMT training with tuition, books and uniform covered

Colorado Springs Police K-9 Dies After Spinal Injury

Posted on July 18, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Colorado Springs police K-9 Unit bid farewell to a furry friend and officer, Remme, after he was injured early Friday.

Police: Woman Stabbed Man After He Exposed Himself

Posted on July 18, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police arrested a woman on suspicion of stabbing a man after he indecently exposed himself to her in Redlands.

California Supreme Court to Decide What Officers Must Do to Escape Liability in Pursuit Crashes

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in Uncategorized

The California Supreme Court will soon decide whether a lawsuit can go forward or whether the Gardena Police Department has immunity because it has a pursuit policy and provides training.

FOP President: Portland a “Cesspool” Amid “Failed” Homeless Policies

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

The president of the Portland Police Association posted a lengthy statement on Facebook on Monday in which he slammed the city’s mayor for his response to the homelessness crisis, saying Oregon’s largest city has “become a cesspool.”

Officer Daryl Turner — who has been a police officer for 27 years — wrote, “Aggressive panhandlers block the sidewalks, storefronts, and landmarks like Pioneer Square, discouraging people from enjoying our City. Garbage-filled RVs and vehicles are strewn throughout our neighborhoods. Used needles, drug paraphernalia, and trash are common sights lining the streets and sidewalks of the downtown core area, under our bridges, and freeway overpasses. That’s not what our families, business owners, and tourists deserve.”

Turner said further that Mayor Ted Wheeler uses “rhetoric to smokescreen his own failed policies,” referring to Wheeler’s comment that, when told of the high number of arrests of homeless people, the police have “some sort of implicit bias.”

“The Portland Police Bureau has not been given nearly enough resources to fulfill its small piece in addressing the homelessness crisis,” Turner wrote. “We are understaffed. Officers are unable to spend the time needed to connect our homeless to necessary services, whether it be housing, mental health services, drug rehabilitation, or other resources. It’s a recipe for failure to put the burden of the homelessness solution on the Police Bureau’s shoulders and then give us insufficient resources to do the work.”

 

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Deadly wildfire near Yosemite poses danger of rapid expansion

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The dead or dying fuels mixed with fire poses an amplified hazard for firefighters

More Details Released in Kansas City Shootout That Left Three Officers Wounded

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Marlin Mack was identified Monday as the gunman killed in a firefight with Kansas City police after wounding three police officers.

Georgia K-9 Officer Shares Emotional Prayer With Boy Before His Brain Surgery

Posted on July 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A K-9 officer in Georgia offered an emotional prayer for a young boy who was about to have brain surgery.

Minnesota Cop Killer Released to Halfway House

Posted on July 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The man convicted of killing Minneapolis Police Officer Richard Miller in 1981 has been released from jail and sent to a halfway house as part of a work-release program.

Isaac Brown — who was suspected of auto theft when Officer Miller encountered him — used a stolen police revolver to shoot Miller several times in the chest.

Former Minneapolis Police Chief Tony Bouza told WCCO-TV, “If he has rehabilitated himself and confronted his crime, and admitted it and acknowledged it, he ought to be released because justice ought to be tempered with mercy.”

Brown had served 37 years behind bars.

 

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FLIR Announces identiFINDER R200-GN Personal Radiation Detector

Posted on July 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>FLIR has announced the FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN spectroscopic personal radiation detector (SPRD). (Photo: FLIR)</p>

FLIR has announced the FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN spectroscopic personal radiation detector (SPRD), the latest addition to its identiFINDER R200-Series handheld radiation security solutions. The rugged, pager-sized FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN SPRD is designed to detect and identify neutrons, in addition to gamma radiation, allowing front-line responders to quickly determine whether there is a true radiation threat for safe, informed decision making.

Since neutrons penetrate material and travel distances greater than any other form of radiation, the FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN with neutron identification is an important early warning system for the detection of malicious material and an additional safety feature for responders, according to the company.

The device meets the 1.5M drop criteria required by ANSI N42.32, one of the key performance standards for alarming PRDs in Homeland Security. The IP67 rating assures the R200-GN is protected against dust and immersion in water up to 1M depth. The R200-GN enclosure is also MIL-STD-810G compliant to protect against salt and fog. The unit features integrated Bluetooth Smart wireless technology, which facilitates recording and sending real-time dose rates and geotag information via a companion mobile app.

The identiFINDER R200-GN is currently shipping worldwide with pricing starting at $3,850 USD. To learn more about the identiFINDER R200-GN, visit http://www.flir.com/r200.

 

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FL County Approves First-Year FF Raises

Posted on July 12, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Polk County has approved immediate raises for first-year firefighters rather than fight a grievance filed in June by the firefighters union.

Two Dead after Altercation at Philadelphia Home

Posted on July 11, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Witnesses said there was an altercation at the home before the fire and believe the fire was deliberate.

Suspect Who Fled From Pennsylvania Police Found Dead Under Bulldozer

Posted on July 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The death occurred Monday during an incident involving two suspects, a Pennsylvania State Game Commission worker, state and local police, and marijuana plants.

Texas Officer on Desk Duty After Drawing Gun on “Young Boys”

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in Uncategorized

An El Paso (TX) police officer has been relegated to desk duty after reports that he drew his service weapon and pointed at a group of children, according to ABC News.

A video — which was uploaded to an individual’s personal Facebook page — appears to show the officer “pushing one of the boys against a wall with his knee while the other boys taunt the officer and hurl profanity at him,” said ABC. The boys recoil and the officer quickly re-holsters his gun.

The El Paso Police Department said on Saturday they had launched an internal investigation of the incident.

 

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Ohio Officer Collapses, Dies During Training in 90-Degree Heat

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Patrolman Vu Nguyen passed away four days after collapsing during a 1.5-mile timed run that was part of the agency's canine handler eligibility process. Image courtesy of ODMP.</p>

Patrolman Vu Nguyen passed away four days after collapsing during a 1.5-mile timed run that was part of the agency’s canine handler eligibility process.

Vu Nguyen died at the Cleveland Clinic, where he had been approved for a liver transplant, according to Cleveland.com.

“He and other candidates were participating in the physical fitness portion of the process in 90+ degree heat when he collapsed during the run on July 2nd, 2018,” ODMP said.

Nguyen has been a Cleveland police officer since 1998. He is survived by his wife and two children.

 

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Florida Department Extends Test of Amazon’s Facial Recognition Software

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in