February 22, 2019

GA Firefighter Charged in Silencer Theft from Fire Victim

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Coweta County firefighter Logan Thomas Bowden is accused of stealing a legal rifle silencer worth $1,600 from a person whose house had caught fire last month.

Prison Training Program Aims to Help Women Enter Tech Jobs

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Research shows that women make up 25 percent of workers in computer occupations. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is bringing coding training to women in prison.

Body Camera Shows Driver Fired at California Deputy First

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Napa County Sheriff’s Department on Wednesday released body-worn camera footage from a weekend police shooting that killed an armed motorist, and it appears to show that the motorist fired at the deputy first before she shot back and killed him.

Seven-Alarm Fire Destroys Historic New Orleans Mansion

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire officials called Wednesday’s damage “a catastrophic loss” as flames burned down the Victorian-style home that had been in the same family for more than 100 years.

Seven-Alarm Fire Destroys Historic New Orleans Mansion

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire officials called Wednesday’s damage “a catastrophic loss” as flames burned down the Victorian-style home that had been in the same family for more than 100 years.

Minneapolis Firefighters Escape Flashover

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Three firefighters were hurt as they climbed out windows to escape the flames that spread through the burning home Tuesday.

In Quarters: Harrisburg, NC, Fire Station #3

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Harrisburg Fire Station #3 also houses the Cabarrus County EMS Station No. 10, which both serve the rapidly growing suburb of Charlotte, NC.

In Quarters: Conroe, TX, Fire Station #7

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Conroe’s new 11,000-square-foot fire station is a beacon of safety for the community and a healthy facility for the firefighters who live and work within.

Colorado State Patrol Concerned About Flurry of Traffic Incidents Involving Troopers

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Being a Colorado state trooper is a dangerous job and that has been evidenced this month by four incidents in a four day period in which a trooper or his vehicle have been struck.

N.H. first responders to make house calls for drug treatment

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

NH Project FIRST enlists “quick response teams” to return after an overdose call and offer to connect individuals with services at their local treatment hub

Massachusetts Officer Talks Suicidal Man to Safety from 70-Foot Building

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in Uncategorized

According to the Sun Chronicle, Sergeant Jeffrey Peavey—a 32-year-veteran of the force—established a dialogue with the 21-year-old man, speaking with the distraught subject for 45 minutes before convincing the man to retreat from the precipice into safety.

Fake Fla. LEOs arrested after pulling over commissioner

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

MIAMI — Two men impersonating officers were arrested after pulling over a South Florida commissioner and former officer.

Miami-Dade Commissioner Joe Martinez became suspicious when he was pulled over by a sports utility vehicle with flashing lights on Wednesday, NBC News reports.

Martinez says the vehicle was too spiffy to be a police car. It also had temporary tags.

The commissioner refused to pull over and was able to flag down an officer in a squad car on the side of the road who radioed for help.

The men were taken into custody.

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Kansas Officer Found Dead in Patrol Vehicle

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation is investigating the death of a law enforcement officer with the Sac and Fox Police Department found deceased in his patrol vehicle near the Kansas-Nebraska border.

Public speaking: 3 things I learned from TEDx

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Ben Thompson, P1 Contributor

In October 2017, I walked out into an unusually warm winter morning. My hands were shaky and I could feel my heart beat pounding up into my throat.

This was the moment I learned I had been selected to speak at TEDx Birmingham 2018. I stared up to the blue sky with a big smile and imagined myself standing on the bright red dot in the middle of a dark stage.

Suddenly a chill shot through my body. I thought, “my God, what have I done?”

Public speaking is terrifying. Whether at your own TEDx event, reporting to local officials or speaking at a community meeting, the good news is that even if you feel like you are horrible at public speaking, there are some things you can do to make you look like a pro.

Trust the process

When I was selected to speak at TEDx Birmingham, I had to informally agree to follow the organizers’ “process.” This applied to everyone who speaks at the event, even those who do it professionally.

This is what sets a TEDx event apart from so many other conferences. There is a strong focus not just on the content, but on the delivery.

So what is the process?

The first step was to read the book TED Talks; The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking by Chris Anderson. This book gives a brief history of everything TED. But, more important, it also goes in depth about what can make or break a successful presentation. For anyone looking to bring that TED style into a presentation, this is a must read.

When I reflect on my experience of the process, I am reminded of these three takeaways on how to be a better public speaker:

Identify what it is you want the audience to remember; Watch yourself on video; Seek out honesty. 1. Identify what you want the audience to remember

At TEDx, I was one of about 15 other speakers split into three sessions. I was going to be lucky if they remembered my name, much less what I said that day. One of my first assignments was to type up what I wanted to the audience to remember in less than 140 characters; basically the length of a first generation tweet.

It seemed like a simple task, but for me, it proved to be one of the most difficult. It took me over three weeks and 47 different attempts before I finally narrowed it down to this:

The key to serving people lies in our willingness to step outside the boundaries of our job titles.

It seems like a lot of work for a line that was not uttered once during my talk. But during my preparations, this line acted as my guide, leading me toward the message to get through to the audience.

With each presentation I give now, I start by asking myself this simple question: “What do I want the audience to remember?”

By focusing on the answer, I am able to keep my presentations lean and to the point. In the world of public speaking, brevity is your best friend. It leaves the audience wanting to hear more, rather than sending them running for coffee.

2. Watch yourself on video

I have a confession to make. Since my TEDx video has posted to YouTube, I have not watched it a single time. Just the sound of my own voice is enough to make me cringe. But during the months leading up to the event, I practiced in front of the camera on my laptop many times.

And I watched all of them. It was excruciating.

Why does the side of my head look so weird? Do I always sound like that?

And it never got any easier. But each time I watched, I couldn’t deny that I was getting better. There were so many little things that I did at first that I didn’t even know I was doing. One example, I used the word “so” like many people use the word “uh.”

I was unconsciously using it as a placeholder while I gathered my thoughts between lines. Over the course of a 12-minute talk, I probably said the word “so” 30 times. Had I carried the habit on stage, the audience would have walked out wondering about my strange love affair with the word “so.”

So…before your big day, lock yourself in a room; record yourself, watch and repeat. Just be sure to destroy the evidence when you’re done.

3. Seek out honesty

It must be said again. Brevity is your best friend. Do not take 45 minutes to say what you could have said in five, although being brief while still being effective is not easy, especially when you are passionate about the subject.

It helps if you have someone who is not afraid to be brutally honest with you. During TEDx, I had a speaking coach as well as the organizers reviewing each draft of my talk. With each draft, I was forced to either cut out or defend whole sections that I had worked so hard to create.

The good news for those of us in public safety is that we do not have to look far for honesty. Every day we go to work, we are surrounded by people who love the chance to be brutally honest; sometimes, whether we ask for it or not.

If you can give your presentation to a station full of the world’s harshest critics and survive, doing the same for a room full of strangers will be a piece of cake.


About the author Ben Thompson is a lieutenant with the Birmingham (Ala.) Fire and Rescue Service. Since 2016, Lieutenant Thompson has served as the coordinator of the department’s mobile integrated health program, Birmingham Fire and Rescue C.A.R.E.S. He shared his experiences from building the program at TEDxBirmingham.

How to get the most out of your LE career: Self-assessment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Jerrod Hardy
Author: Jerrod Hardy

As I prepare to step away from my career as a law enforcement officer after 21 years, I felt an overwhelming need to share my experience with as many others as possible.

For me, there have been four steps I have taken during my police career that has allowed me to leave physically and mentally fit so that I can enjoy the next phase of my life.

In my previous articles, I wrote about remembering your purpose and stress management. This month I address the third step: self-assessment.

Step Three: Self-Assessment

Being honest with yourself is essential not only in law enforcement, but in life in general. It is critical to constantly take an inventory of your skills and remain humble enough to address deficiencies. Every police officer should ask themselves:

Am I shooting enough? Are my defensive tactics skills current? Is my fitness level where it needs to be? Am I still growing as a person and professional? What is my attitude toward the job? Am I counting down the days to step out the door instead of staying sharp to quickly recognize danger?

Over my career I made a conscious effort to frequently self-assess and make changes where needed to ensure I could walk away from law enforcement happy, healthy and prepared for the rest of my life. Here are three areas of self-assessment officers can focus on:

1. Take pride in your physical skills and preparation.

As someone who spent most of the last half of my career training officers and new recruits, it pained me greatly to see veteran officers approach training with dread and disgust. It was disappointing to see them arrive to class with little intention of improving their skills, focusing only on getting through the training with as little effort as possible.

Officers would ask why they should worry about being taken to the ground and defending their firearm against an assaultive subject when it had never happened to them. Similar questions were posed to me many times throughout training sessions.

My response was always the same: I would ask them what their family thought they were doing that day. I liked to let that question sit for a few seconds before giving them my answer: “They think you are training to get better at your profession today, to return home safely to them after every shift. So that’s why you’re going to work hard, sweat and get uncomfortable so that we can live up to their idea of what’s happening here today!”

Every day you put the badge on, you owe it to your family, co-workers and community to maintain the highest level of skills because you will never get a second chance to have properly trained and prepared when faced with an assaultive subject.

And if you are fortunate to have the privilege of leading training, you cannot accept complacency and allow your critical skills training to become a “going through the motions” event.

2. Be aware of the attitude you bring to work every day.

It’s incredibly easy to become cynical of just about everything in this career field. One day you may come to work and find everyone drives you crazy. You start to think that citizens, city council members, department heads, mid-level supervisors, immediate supervisors and maybe even your shift mates are all idiots, and no one has any idea how to do anything, except you! You have all the answers and all the great ideas. You are the only one who knows how to handle a particular call or create a new program, except you will not step forward with ideas because you don’t want any more work to do. Does that sound familiar? Maybe it sounds like some of your co-workers or people you associate with, or it could be the person looking back at you in the mirror.

The truth of the law enforcement profession is that it is exactly as it is advertised – there are many ways to be right, it will always be changing, it will always be a challenge, it will require you to deal with people and it will force you to grow. Yet for many officers, the very things they were seeking when embarking in policing are now the things they are most frustrated with. The hard truth here is that it is our personal attitude that has changed, not the job.

3. Ensure you continue to grow professionally and personally.

In 2003 I stumbled across a group of guys training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. I had no idea what they were doing or how to do it, but I knew I needed more training for ground encounters.

At my first class I was manhandled by men and women much smaller and far more skilled than me. I knew I had a lot to learn and continued my training by going once or twice a week while my family was younger. Over the last 16 years, it’s developed into much more.

By continuing to learn, being humble enough to admit I did not know everything and putting myself into situations where I was the student, I was able to obtain critical skills that enhanced my agency’s training program. I was able to share this knowledge with fellow officers and provide more peace of mind to them and their families.

While Brazilian Jiu Jitsu may not be your cup of tea, find something you are passionate about and immerse yourself in it. Make sure it is something outside of police work like coaching youth sports, joining a group focused on your favorite activity, or participating in anything that gets you into a different circle of people who will help you rebalance your attitude, grow and have some fun!

In my final article I will discuss step four: Life after the badge.

Memorial Grows For NYPD Detective Killed by Friendly Fire

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

New Yorkers are remembering NYPD Detective Detective Brian Simonsen as a “cop’s cop” who served the city for nearly 19 years until he was shot and killed by friendly fire while responding to a robbery in Queens.

Fla. county honors fallen firefighters by renaming road

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Todd Aldridge and Mark Benge, who died 30 years ago, are the only firefighters in Orange County fire Rescue’s history to have died in the line of duty

NY Fire Department Eyes ‘Quick Attack’ Apparatus

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in Uncategorized

The Mohawk Fire Department hopes the new truck with a pumper would extend the use of some of its existing vehicles.

Kentucky Police Pursuit Ends in Fatal Officer-Involved Shooting

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Kentucky State Police are working with the Ohio State Patrol to determine whether or not a fatal officer-involved shooting in Kentucky on Monday is connected with an ongoing kidnapping investigation in Ohio.

Federal Jury Finds in Favor of St. Louis County Police Officers

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A federal jury Friday found in favor of St. Louis County police officers who had been sued by a Ferguson protester who claimed they used excessive force.

One Year Later: Parkland Mass Shooting Spurred Changes in School Safety

Posted on February 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

In the realms of school safety, policing, civic participation, mental health and access to guns, the heinous act of the Parkland gunman motivated change — locally, statewide and nationally.

Dogs Training to Sniff Out Cancer in AR Firefighters

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Partnering with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, the North Little Rock Fire Department will be training service dogs to detect thyroid cancers in firefighters.

Conn. city’s search for new police chief comes as ranks shrink

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Mary E. O'Leary New Haven Register, Conn.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — Parochial and political decisions on choosing a police chief won’t bring the best candidate to the job.

John DeCarlo, a former police chief himself, and now chairman of the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of New Haven, said he has studied this and watched how decisions on such an important position across the country are narrowly focused with a hyper-local emphasis and no national standard.

The strong home rule concept explains a lot of that, leaving Connecticut with 102 police departments, part of more than 18,500 departments across the country, although other states with county government make regional cooperation and expense sharing more feasible.

Less than two years after it went through the trauma of replacing Dean Esserman as its chief in 2016 after a tumultuous tenure, New Haven will again be looking for a top cop following Chief Anthony Campbell’s abrupt decision last week to retire at the end of March over threatened medical benefit changes in stalled contract negotiations.

It is also an election year with a Democratic primary in September in a race that is expected to be Mayor Toni Harp’s toughest since she was elected in 2013. She won that three-way primary, but then was challenged by Justin Elicker, the primary runner-up, who is again running for mayor with a stronger network of supporters.

With the need for a new chief coming as the police contract remains in limbo in binding arbitration, DeCarlo said New Haven is in a no-win situation.

Harp has indicated that she is leaning toward hiring an internal officer, although the universe of experienced candidates is narrow and potentially getting more so as three of the four assistant chiefs are looking for new jobs.

DeCarlo said he would like to see the city take a chance on bringing in an experienced chief steeped in academic training. He referred to the acolytes trained under such leaders as Police Commissioner William Bratton in New York, and others, who spread the gospel of community policing and accountability across the country.

Looking at the universe of former New Haven chiefs, DeCarlo said two stand out as big picture thinkers. The first he mentioned was James Ahern, the author of “Police in Trouble; our freightening crisis in law enforcement,” who was in office from 1968 to 1970 during the Black Panther murder case and the 1970 May Day protests and calmed what could have been an explosive event. Ahern, who also was embroiled in a wiretapping scandal, was later named to the President’s Commision on Campus Arrest.

The second was Nicholas Pastore, who brought in community policing under Mayor John Daniels, a concept fostered by then Alderwoman Toni Harp.

Pastore’s tenure ended after complications in his personal life pushed him out, while Ahern’s reputation was hurt six years after he left office when Andrew Houlding broke the story in the New Haven Journal Courier about massive illegal wiretapping around the Black Panther trial. The wiretapping ended in 1971, but was the subject of a civil suit settled in 1984. James Ahern denied being part of the wiretapping with his brother, Police Inspector Stephen Ahern, both of whom paid the plaintiffs in a city settlement.

DeCarlo said the Bratton followers represented a renaissance of effective policing. “Where is the next generation of luminary police leaders? Where do they come from? How do we make them?” he asked. His advice to New Haven is to go find one.

DeCarlo, the former Branford police chief, said he realizes that goes against the tide, as the overwhelming majority of departments pick from within. “There is a reason why 95 percent of people (chiefs) are from the inside. The politicians and the troops know what they got,” he said.

“It’s a great profession, but we do it so poorly sometimes. The police are on the surface of this argument. I always say the police chief has three constituencies — the rank and file; the community and the politicians,” he said.

Right now the defining issue for police in New Haven is the lack of a contract for more than 21/2 years. The rank and file rejected a proposal 294 to 4 and the officers subsequently voted to go to binding arbitration.

On Feb. 1, Campbell announced that he would be leaving the department on March 29.

He said it was a decision he made after a discussion with aldermanic leadership on Jan. 17, where he asked if they would consider putting himself and the four assistant chiefs into the executive management plan because of a police contract proposal to remove the cap on the $540 monthly payment for retiree medical benefits.

Campbell said he wanted to give the alders a heads up that three of the chiefs were looking to leave. He was not among them at that time, although he was considering retiring by the end of the year.

If experienced management did leave, Campbell said the remaining officers with supervisory rank would only have had 11 years on the job, something that could put the city in a position of having to bring in the state police to help out.

Campbell, who has 21 years in the department, nearly three years as interim and then chief of the department, said his takeaway was that rejection of the chiefs’ executive management proposal by the leadership was final, although aldermanic President Tyisha Walker-Myers said that was not the case. It was the remark by Alder Dolores Colon, D-6, however, that he was “blackmailing” them with his predictions on the potential decimation of the top ranks that questioned his integrity. The chief said Colon told him if he gets an offer, he should take it.

Morale was already low among the rank and file, but the proposal by Campbell was seen by the union as a special carve-out. Campbell said the chiefs are not part of the union and have no one speaking for them. He said he has also advocated for raises for the force as essential to stemming the large numbers leaving.

New police union President Florencio Cotto Jr. said they don’t understand why the administration has not settled a contract. With $6 million in concessions in the last agreement that ended in 2016, Cotto said they can’t give anymore, particularly in light of the disparity between the salaries offered by other smaller departments.

“It is time that the Harp administration put the police as a priority,” he said. Cotto said praise for the job police are doing in lowering crime, is not matched by a contract that rewards them. Cotto said the high cost of training police is also generating little return with officers bolting for other opportunities.

Forty-nine officers retired from the department last year, while 10 more have put in for retirement in the past four weeks. Campbell said 39 more are in a position to retire.

In any calculation of a contract settlement. the city’s finances are a major factor the arbitrators will consider.

Harp raised the tax rate 11 percent for this fiscal year following a shortfall in state funds and has said her goal is not to raise taxes in fiscal 2020. Part of any budget decision is the problem of ever escalating medical costs, tackling a $30 million structural deficit and stabilizing two pension funds that are $700 million underfunded.

Sean Matteson, the interim chief administrative officer for the city, who oversees the public safety departments, said he thought it was important to bring the chiefs’ concerns to the aldermanic leadership, who ultimately will be voting on the 2019-20 budget that will be presented by the mayor in March.

Many outside the department are asking, with the stakes so high: can’t the parties step back from the arbitration process and fix the disagreement on their own, rather than allowing a panel of arbitrators to choose between the best package presented by each party? Neither side has yet put its best last offer on the table.

It could be months before that happens and then the panel needs time to render its decision.

“At any point in time, the parties could make a deal and stop binding arbitration,” Labor Relations Director Thomas McCarthy said.

That has not happened.

“Just as a general statement, it is better for us to make a deal because at least we make the decision — both sides — meaning the union and the city, as opposed to an outsider, deciding what is best,” he said.

Harp has said the same thing, as has Campbell. The chief said the uncertainty of what a future contract holds plays into people leaving the department.

Matteson said in negotiations you have to consider all the constituents in a bargaining unit, where there can be a split between the younger members interested in raises over benefits, while the seasoned members, such as the chiefs, stayed long enough to reap a benefit package they had counted on. New Haven currently has a young department.

Campbell is not in negotiations, but he said the city’s representative in those talks does come and ask what he needs to run the department. He said he told them the rank and file need to be better paid.

“I need them paid more and I need the steps reduced,” the chief said. He said it takes four years to get to the top pay. He said a new officer starts and stays at $44,400 for the first two years. In the third year, you get approximately $52,000 and in the fourth year, the salary is $68,000.

He said other departments start out at $68,000. Campbell said Yale University offers new recruits a starting salary in the upper $70,000 and tops out at $96,000. West Hartford starts at $67,000 and tops out at $90,000. Hamden starts higher than New Haven and tops out around $83,000. “How do I compete with that?” he said.

Given how expensive medical coverage is for the general population and the lack of pensions for most, what does the chief say to those who lack empathy for his concerns?

Campbell said the estimated 700,000 sworn police officers in this country are the “first line and only line of defense” for 350 million Americans. “All we ask is that our lives and the sacrifices that we make are honored in that way. Three-hundred and forty-nine million people don’t put on a bullet proof vest, strap on a gun and go out and say goodbye to their families, possibly for the last time and say I will lay down my life for a stranger to uphold the law and the Constitution of this land.”

He said if there is a terrorist attack, a plane crash, power goes out, someone breaks into home, they are the ones called to restore peace.

“If that doesn’t bear the honor of being respected with health care for you and your family, I don’t know what should,” Campbell said.

———

©2019 the New Haven Register (New Haven, Conn.)

IN Firefighter Hurt at Six-Car Crash Scene

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Wayne Township fire apparatus was hit by another vehicle while responding to a multiple vehicle accident Sunday.

New Haven’s search for new police chief comes as ranks shrink

Posted on February 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Feb. 10–NEW HAVEN — Parochial and political decisions on choosing a police chief won’t bring the best candidate to the job.
John DeCarlo, a former police chief himself, and now chairman of the Department of Criminal Justice at the Univer

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Witmer Public Safety Group Inc. has announced its recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

A clean change: Properly caring for firefighter turnout gear

Posted on February 8, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire departments must prioritize a second set of turnout gear and access to the equipment needed to clean their PPE

6 ways to defend yourself against verbal abuse

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A verbal attack can be personal; here’s how to deflect the blow

Tanker’s Batteries Stolen from TN Fire Station

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Hardin County firefighters discovered the firehouse break-in when they were trying to respond to a house fire at a colleague’s house.

Mayor Orders LAPD to Scale Back Vehicle Stops, Says Black Drivers Disproportionately Stopped

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The mayor wants the department to direct resources to other activities that will help build trust with the citizens of Los Angeles.

Philadelphia running club stops thief in foot pursuit

Posted on February 7, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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Stephanie Farr Philly.com

PHILADELPHIA — A theft suspect who made a run for it after allegedly swiping a laptop and cell phone from a University of Pennsylvania building last month ran straight into a running club during his getaway and was promptly chased down by the fleet-footed group.

“If this running club had been put on this earth for anything, it was that particular moment right there,” said Kyle Cassidy, a founding member of the Annenberg (Lunchtime) Running Group. “Running is typically a useless sport where you turn fat cells into heat, but occasionally it can be useful, and here was one of those opportunities.”

The running group began three years ago and is open to anyone who lives or works in West Philly.

The group meets at noon three days a week and, among other activities, hosts a “running lecture series” where one speaker will deliver a four-minute lecture — while running — followed by a 15-minute Q&A. Past topics include such hits as “Blockchain and Bitcoin as it relates to the extraction of the rare earth minerals necessary to produce the electricity to mine Bitcoin,” Cassidy said.

On Jan. 9, Cassidy and three other members of the group were gathered shortly before noon at the plaza at 36th Street and Locust Walk waiting for any stragglers to arrive when somebody sprinted right through them.

“We were all impressed with his speed,” said Cassidy, 52, of West Philly. “One of the runners said, ‘We should invite him to run with us. He’s very fast!' ”

Seconds later, Cassidy said, a second man came running up the street waving his arms and shouting for help, saying the first man had stolen his things.

Philadelphia police identified the suspect as Talib Adams, 26. Police said Adams stole a laptop and cell phone from a 28-year-old man at Steinberg-Dietrich Hall at Penn’s Wharton School.

Once the running club realized what was happening, the members sprinted off after the suspect. It only took them about 30 seconds to catch up, Cassidy said. The chase that took them through an active construction site at 37th and Chestnut Streets.

“A construction worker — appearing exactly as a construction worker in a movie would — said, ‘Hey! You can’t go in there. That’s an active construction site,’ ” Cassidy recalled. “He paid them no mind, and I ran up to the worker and asked him to dial 911.”

Then they lost sight of the suspect, and two Penn police officers arrived, Cassidy said.

Two of the other runners, Samantha Oliver and Natalie Herbert, surmised that if they were being chased they’d hide the stolen goods in the backyard of a nearby home. The runners knocked on the door of that home and when the owner answered, the suspect allegedly sprinted from a bush in the backyard right into the two officers, according to Cassidy and police.

Over the next 15 minutes, more officers showed up, Cassidy said.

“When they found out we were a running club out on an afternoon run, they were very amused," he said.

Adams, of the 300 block of Fountain Street, was taken into custody and charged with burglary, criminal trespass, theft, and receiving stolen property, police said. The laptop and cell phone were recovered in the backyard.

Adams’ attorney did not immediately return a request for comment. Court records indicate Adams posted bail in this case but is incarcerated in Delaware County Prison on unknown charges.

Cassidy tore a leg muscle during the chase and, after providing a statement at Penn’s police headquarters, was taken to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center.

“Every police officer at Presbyterian — and there seemed to be 500 — shook my hand while I was on the stretcher waiting to be seen,” he said.

Looking back on the ordeal, Cassidy said the person he’s most worried about is the suspect.

“I’m concerned we live in a society where people feel the need to steal laptops," he said. “I don’t think we’re taking good care of those people.”

———

©2019 Philly.com

NC official’s proposed EMS staffing change sparks controversy

Posted on February 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The conflict arose over a proposal to use existing part-time staff funding and overtime funds to hire a full-time staff for a previously part-time ambulance

Florida Chief Says Agency Gives No Special Favors to Scientology

Posted on February 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“For years the Clearwater Police Department has been thrust into the middle of a debate between a controversial religion and its critics, without a voice in the matter. We feel it important to publish some facts of our own to provide the city we serve and anyone else who may be interested with some perspective.”

The PREVADER Concealment Holster

Posted on February 6, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The ballistic-weave Model 4585 Prevader™ Concealment Holster features the exclusive Pinch® Retention Device (PRD™) which secures the holstered firearm by gripping both sides of the trigger guard when the gun is fully seated.The Bianchi Prevader…

City to take firefighters union to NY Supreme Court in arbitration case

Posted on February 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A court recently reversed a state Supreme Court judge’s ruling that the city can block arbitration in the contract dispute over a “minimum manning” clause

NVFC and IAFC Offer Webinar Detailing Actions to Prevent Firefighter Cancer

Posted on February 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

This webinar is part of a series to provide real world advice and examples of how to implement change at your department.

Tech Company Teaches Officers to Operate Drones

Posted on February 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Tampa tech company is helping law enforcement agencies how to operate drones to help people and catch suspects.

TX Fire Chief May Lose Job after Allegedly Pulling a Knife on Firefighter

Posted on February 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Celeste Vol. Fire Department’s fire chief allegedly got into a fight with one of his firefighters at the station which escalated to the chief making threats with a knife. He was recently honored as chief of the year for the region.

Fire Scene: Safe, Effective & Simple Radio Operations

Posted on February 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

John Salka explains how developing radio procedures and training on them will improve safety on the fireground.

How to avoid, survive an ambulance collision

Posted on January 30, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Ambulance collisions, which happen with frightening regularity, often result in injury and are occasionally fatal, especially for private vehicle drivers

WA Firefighter Reflects on 50 Years of Service

Posted on January 28, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Volunteer firefighter Ron Swanson recently retired at age 81 after dedicating 50 years to the fire service in various roles in Whatcom County.

WA Firefighter Reflects on 50 Years of Service

Posted on January 28, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Volunteer firefighter Ron Swanson recently retired at age 81 after dedicating 50 years to the fire service in various roles in Whatcom County.

Two People Watching Eclipse Run Over by Florida Police Cruiser

Posted on January 22, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Two people who police surmise lay in a dark roadway to watch Sunday night’s lunar eclipse were run over by a West Palm Beach police car, the agency said Monday.

Officers Surprise College Students With Scholarships

Posted on January 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Things looked grim as a police officer interrupted a college basketball team’s meeting. The stern-faced cop tells them he needs to speak to one particular player.

How to build the perfect clinical department

Posted on January 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Our co-hosts discuss what details make for a flawless, smoothly-run clinical department, and how you can achieve it at your agency

Police Advocacy Group’s Mission Gets Mobile Upgrade, Help From Retired Cop

Posted on January 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON (Newswire.com) – The national law enforcement advocacy group Blue H.E.L.P., which supports resources for the often unmentioned mental health status of our police, is taking their mission mobile through the creation of a smart device app. The…

Police Advocacy Group’s Mission Gets Mobile Upgrade, Help From Retired Cop

Posted on January 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON (Newswire.com) – The national law enforcement advocacy group Blue H.E.L.P., which supports resources for the often unmentioned mental health status of our police, is taking their mission mobile through the creation of a smart device app. The…

Ohio State University Police Swears in First Female Chief

Posted on January 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Ohio State University Police Department welcomed its first female police chief in a ceremony held late last week.

Former Chicago Police Officer Faces Sentencing

Posted on January 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Cook County judge will decide former Chicago Police Officer Jason Van Dyke’s fate later this week.

Vector Solutions Expands Capabilities with Acquisition of Oregon-based CrewSense

Posted on January 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Vector Solutions, the leader in industry-focused eLearning and performance support solutions, expands its capabilities with the acquisition of CrewSense.

Jet Pilot Named New CT Fire Chief

Posted on January 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

As Derby’s new chief, Robert Laskowski Jr., a 22-year veteran of the East End Hose company, wants to increase the number of volunteers training to be firefighters.

The Top Products of LEPN 2018

Posted on January 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Based on inquiries from readers like you, these were the most popular products Law Enforcement Product News published in 2018.

Federal shutdown has halted wildland firefighter training, other wildfire prep

Posted on January 13, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Experts say if the shutdown drags out, federal fire crews won’t be ready for the months ahead, following a 2018 fire season that killed scores of people

FFs Warn about Keyless Cars after FL Man Dies

Posted on January 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighters are cautioning residents about cars with keyless ignitions following the death of a Tampa man from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Maryland Man Sentenced to 195 Years for Opening Fire on Police Station

Posted on January 11, 2019 by in Uncategorized

A 25-year-old Maryland man will very probably live the rest of his life behind bars after being sentenced on Thursday to 195 years in prison.

Md. man who fired on police station sentenced to 195 years

Posted on January 11, 2019 by in Uncategorized

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Associated Press

UPPER MARLBORO, Md. — A gunman sentenced to 195 years in prison for an attack on a police station apologized Thursday to the parents of an undercover narcotics detective who was mistakenly shot and killed by a fellow officer during the ambush.

Before a judge sentenced him, Michael Ford said he didn't intend to harm anybody but himself when he opened fire on a Prince George's County police station in March 2016. In November, a jury convicted Ford, 25, of second-degree murder in the killing of Detective Jacai Colson even though he didn't fire the shot that killed the four-year veteran of the county's police department.

"That man does not deserve to be dead. I should be dead," Ford told Colson's parents.

Before hearing Ford's apology, James and Sheila Colson criticized authorities for not seeking criminal charges against the officer who killed their son. Jacai Colson exchanged gunfire with Ford before Officer Taylor Krauss fatally shot the 28-year-old plainclothes detective with a rifle, mistaking him for a threat.

Sheila Colson described Krauss as careless and reckless and said she believes her son was killed because he was black. Ford also is black. Krauss is white.

"Not once did I get an, 'I'm sorry,' from Taylor Krauss. Not once," she said.

She and her husband also accused police officials of lying to them about the circumstances of their son's death, misleading them to believe he was caught in a crossfire.

"To this day, no one can give me an explanation for why my son was shot," she said, fighting back tears.

Ford's two younger brothers, Malik and Elijah Ford, drove him to the police station and recorded video of the shooting with their cellphones. Though not accused of firing any shots, they pleaded guilty to related charges and were sentenced Thursday to 20 and 12 years in prison, respectively.

Circuit Court Judge Lawrence Hill Jr. told Malik and Elijah that they "sold their brother down the river out of greed" for the car he promised to leave them. The judge told Michael Ford he has no doubt he tried to kill officers and civilians even if he intended to die himself.

"You are responsible for the death of Jacai Colson," he said.

Ford testified he was trying to get himself killed by police when he fired his handgun nearly two dozen times outside the station. He said he didn't intend for anyone else to be harmed.

County prosecutor Joseph Ruddy argued Ford's actions created a "combat zone" and caused Colson's death even though he didn't fire the fatal shot. Ford didn't hit anybody when he fired 23 shots from a handgun, but bullets he fired struck two passing vehicles and an ambulance, according to Ruddy.

"That was no suicide mission. That was a mission to kill cops," the prosecutor had said in the trial's closing arguments.

Krauss testified that he never saw Colson hold up a badge or heard him identify himself as a police officer before shooting him once in the chest.

A grand jury declined to indict Krauss on any charges related to Colson's shooting. Colson's parents sued Krauss and Prince George's County.

County Executive Angela Alsobrooks, who was the county's top prosecutor when Michael Ford was charged and tried, said she "spent many hours walking the Colsons through every piece of evidence, walking the crime scene with them, and we answered every question they had."

"Ultimately a grand jury of 23 Prince Georgians reviewed that evidence and declined to indict Officer Krauss," Alsobrooks said in a statement. "I can never begin to understand what they feel as grieving parents, and my thoughts and prayers continue to be with the Colson family."

Ford's brothers recorded cellphone videos of the ambush after dropping him off at the station in Landover, a suburb of Washington, D.C. They agreed to film the shooting so the video could be sent to a website known for posting users' violent videos, a police detective testified in 2016.

One of the videos shows Ford screaming obscenities and shouting, "Do something!" in between shots. Ford, then 22, also dictated his last will and testament on video minutes earlier.

Ford said he was hearing voices in his head the day of the shooting.

Hill ruled before the trial that Ford couldn't present an insanity defense despite his serious mental health issues.

Antoini Jones, Ford's attorney, told jurors that Colson didn't match the gunman's description apart from his race. At the start of the trial, Jones said the evidence would show the detective was shot "because he was black."

Colson was a Boothwyn, Pennsylvania, native. He and Krauss worked in the narcotics unit together, seated at connecting desks.

Prince Georgia's County Police Chief Hank Stawinski issued a statement afterward that "the sentences as rendered today can never assuage the pain, loss and the years of healing that remain before us all."

He didn't address accusations by Colson's parents that police officials had lied to them but directed words to the family and others, saying, "I wish peace upon the Colson family, this institution, and our community."

Florida Trooper Struck by Distracted Driver Returns to Work

Posted on January 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Carlos Rosario made a grand entrance Wednesday for his first day back at work.

Artist thanks Duluth rescue crew with marble carving

Posted on January 5, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The marble piece is a gift to the station after a rescuer there pulled artist Eric Waller and a friend from a car wreck in June 2012

Troy Acoustics Expert to Present Range Noise Reduction Session at SHOT Show

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Shooting ranges nationwide, including law enforcement facilities, are being cited by health and safety officials for noise control violations. These citations have resulted in a reduction of operating hours, range shutdowns, and in some cases, fines for non-compliance of noise exposure limits.

Texas Man Comes to Aid of Troopers Before Collapsing and Dying

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Family members say Glenn “Bam Bam” Sanco always wanted to be a police officer, but the responsibilities of providing for his family kept him from returning to school. 

Trijicon to Offer Handgun Optics Class for Law Enforcement at 2019 SHOT Show

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The class will cover the practical use of reflex sights on handguns, how they work, and the advantages they offer in terms of tactical effectiveness, enhanced officer safety, and reduced officer and/or agency liability.

Active Shooter who Opened Fire on Texas Officers Killed in Gunfight

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

San Antonio Police Chief William McManus said that shell casings were found up and down the street for blocks.

12 traits of effective police leaders

Posted on January 4, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Althea Olson and Mike Wasilewski
Author: Althea Olson and Mike Wasilewski

The article, originally published June 2016, has been updated with current information.

For most law enforcement officers, being a cop is more than just a job, it is a lifestyle and an identity. The potential for law enforcement to be a deeply rewarding career is great and, for many officers, it is. Police officer testing is traditionally a keenly competitive process where literally hundreds of hopefuls can vie for each open spot on a highly sought after department.

Most applicants will never receive an offer but, for those who do, a front row seat to — and a starring role in — one of the greatest shows on earth awaits. The opportunity to do good directly and positively influence the quality of life in the small corner of the world under our protection, and tasting life in a way most people never will is gratifying and addicting. How many get to live out what is often a childhood dream?

So what happens then that so many law enforcement officers find themselves angry, burned out, and counting down to the first opportunity to grab their pension and bail? How is low morale and disillusionment so pervasive and universally understood among cops as to almost be expected? And why — when we’ve written about these very topics — do we receive more feedback from cops, through comments and email, verifying our points and recounting their own experiences? For far too many LEOs, something happens “between their hiring and retiring.”

Although some of the problem surely lies with what is seen on the street, a public perceived as unappreciative, and an unsupportive political culture, there is ample evidence that disillusionment with departmental administration and leadership is a powerful predictor of burnout and low morale among cops. Simply put, for a great many officers it is not so much the job that gets to them, but a psychologically harmful internal culture within their departments.

The Importance of Leadership

Effective leadership has the power to make or break a department and the best litmus test is to take a step back and look at those around you. Are you serving side-by-side with productive and motivated cops? When someone from the leadership hierarchy approaches, how do facial expressions and body language change? Do people become closed in body posture and more defensive in their words, or do they continue to smile and invite their supervisors into conversation? Is productivity contagious or is it a culture of resentment and pushback?

The beauty of effective leadership is once the skills are mastered a team can become a well-oiled machine. It literally functions without much supervision. When ineffective leadership skills are implemented, even just by one poor leader, the entire agency is infected with low morale, anger, low productivity until coerced, increased workers compensation claims, a higher risk of injuries, and abuse of sick time.

Our Leadership Challenge

For all of you who put on the badge every day, we want to challenge you to accept the Effective Leadership Challenge because you are all leaders in your communities 24 hours a day, whether on the job or at your child’s little league game. People look to you for guidance, safety, encouragement, and protection.

When you arrive to begin your watch, your coworkers depend on you to be an effective leader no matter your position within the agency, from patrol all the way up to chief. Everyone has the chance to lead daily whenever you are first to arrive on a call, confronted by a citizen angry with a decision you made, or when everything’s gone sideways and people look to you to make it right.

And for those of you in a designated supervisory role, examine your own behavior and attitudes against the traits of effective leaders that follow. View your efforts with a self-critical eye, with the goal of always improving and growing subordinates professionally and in their own leadership acumen.

According to Josh Maxwell in the book The 5 Levels of Leadership, “The bottom line is that an invitation to lead people is an invitation to make a difference. Good leadership changes individual’s lives. It forms teams. It builds organizations. It impacts communities. It has the potential to impact the world.”

Everyone reading this has the chance to step up and lead and our challenge to you is to do it effectively.

12 Traits of an Effective Leader

When studies are done on leadership, one thing holds true; effective leaders focus on developing a culture of rewards versus a culture of punishment. Here is how they do it:

    Live their values — Effective leaders have a strong moral compass and have defined their values. They have a code of ethics on how to treat others and their behaviors back up their words. Realize position does not define leadership — Leadership is not defined by a vertical position. Leaders who rely on their title or position to influence others just do not seem to work well with others. Leaders who lead by their hierarchal position do not lead well, according to Josh Maxwell, because they fail to acknowledge that leadership is about working with people. Set goals for interpersonal skill development — Personal development is ongoing, just like tactical skills, throughout our entire lives. Effective leaders see their personality strengths and talents and continually work on making them stronger. They also identify where they are not as strong and set achievable goals for improvement such as being slow to anger (less irritable) or listening more, instead of being defensive or treating others with contempt. Say “Thank You” often — Take the time to appreciate the strengths of others with an encouraging word or gesture. Of course, it is their responsibility and expected of them to do their job and do it well, but a word of acknowledgement and gratitude goes far. Admit their mistakes — Approach their mistakes with humility instead of justification and defensiveness. It allows the organization to move forward instead of being stuck on the blame and shame. Are mentors and coaches — They believe in duplicating themselves so that others can rise up to be better leaders themselves. High-level leaders encourage the people around them to soar to their highest potential; by doing this they minimize their necessity at the most basic operational level, freeing themselves to creatively move the organization forward. Accept influence — Look for opportunities to learn and grow from anyone instead of criticizing another person’s value or assuming they know it all. Hold people accountable — Are able to lead in tough situations and able to negotiate conflict with authority and decisiveness without degrading another person. Delegate to the expert in the room — Are able to hand over projects to the most qualified instead of letting their ego or political ambitions hurt the culture around them. A true leader knows how to follow first and then steps up to lead when there is a gap in knowledge or skill level. Vision cast goals — The ability to set goals for a team or an agency that are clear and concise and done in a way that generates momentum towards productivity. Most leaders approach goal setting as a dictator rather than a vision caster. A dictator generates resentment and low morale whereas a vision caster generates excitement and buy-in of the goals. Forgive — According to Robert Sutton, PhD, in Good Boss, Bad Boss, from the “Eleven Commandments for Wise Bosses”: “Do not hold grudges after losing an argument. Instead, help the victors implement their ideas with all your might.” Imagine how the police culture would be revolutionized if mistakes were learned from instead of held against someone for their career. A culture of forgiveness would heal a lot of angry cops. Are solution-oriented — Identifying the problem is easy. Finding the solution takes creativity and brain power. Effective leaders do not complain, instead they mull over the area that needs attention, involve others in brainstorming, and work it over until a feasible solution is found.

Conclusion True leadership is a lifestyle, not a position. Those who are effective know they are change agents and seek out to be “iron that sharpens iron.” To be an effective leader goes against human nature and definitely against standardized police culture for it takes humility, commitment, and a strong work ethic on personal development. So will you rise up and accept the challenge?

Ga. attorney general sues opioid manufacturers, distributors

Posted on January 3, 2019 by in Uncategorized

Attorney General Chris Carr filed a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers and distributors for their alleged role in fueling the opioid crisis

FF Vacuums CA Home after Emergency Call

Posted on January 3, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Santee fire captain was captured cleaning up tracked-in mud at home during a call New Year’s Day, and the photo has gone viral.

Apparatus Architect: Delivery Details & Schedules

Posted on January 1, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Tom Shand and Mike Wilbur explain what department fleet managers need to know about apparatus delivery time frames.

Knife-Wielding Suspect Dies Following Struggle with Massachusetts Officers

Posted on December 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The suspect—identified as 25-year-old Erich Stelzer—was taken into custody and was being transported to a nearby hospital by responding EMS when he reportedly became unresponsive and was pronounced dead.

Knife-Wielding Suspect Dies Following Struggle with Massachusetts Officers

Posted on December 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The suspect—identified as 25-year-old Erich Stelzer—was taken into custody and was being transported to a nearby hospital by responding EMS when he reportedly became unresponsive and was pronounced dead.

Calif. county’s mountain cameras link to statewide system to spot wildfires

Posted on December 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The cameras are linked to a growing network that spans five western states and a supercomputer in San Diego that may someday use AI to spot fires

FL Fire Department Lands Body Armor Grants

Posted on December 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Alachua County Fire Rescue and Emergency Medical Services has received three separate federal grants for body armor vests thanks to a coalition trying to reduce dangers for healthcare workers.

Minnesota Police Take Push to Recruit More Women to the Big Screen

Posted on December 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A video aimed at recruiting more women to the St. Paul Police Department began playing Friday and will run before every movie on all 94 screens at 11 Mann Theatres locations across Minnesota.

PA Department Mixes Career FFs with Volunteers

Posted on December 26, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Other fire departments are keeping an eye on Upper Merion Township after officials hired six career firefighters to reinforce the three volunteer fire squads.

Ohio Deputy Gives ‘Secret Santa’ Cards to Unsuspecting Drivers

Posted on December 26, 2018 by in Uncategorized

A Miami County Sheriff’s deputy gave out “Secret Santa” cards to unsuspecting drivers during the holiday.

Developing a successful grant strategy for a law enforcement agency Part I

Posted on December 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Linda Gilbertson
Author: Linda Gilbertson

A common dilemma for law enforcement agencies is that, more often than not, there isn’t a formal system in place for an effective police grants program. It’s a rare agency that actually has a grant professional on staff, someone who has the education, experience and expertise to find, apply for and manage grants.

The more typical scenario is that someone hears about a grant opportunity, or a need is discovered for equipment or technology that can’t be covered under your current budget, so someone is assigned to “work on it.” That officer may be put in that position because of his experience with the subject matter, such as information technology, cybercrime, traffic safety and enforcement, homeland security, or patrol. Or, and you may be surprised how often this happens, because he has been assigned to a position that includes desk time and a computer.

What could possibly go wrong?

As a grant professional, it almost hurts me to say this, but the reality is that you don’t have to hire a full-time grant person to have a good grants program. What is imperative, however, is that an agency develops a system that will support acquiring and managing grants effectively, even if a different person is put in the grant position on a routine basis. That commitment has to come from the top of the department.

Law enforcement agencies are very good at implementing and following procedures. Understanding expectations and ensuring follow-through is the essence of good policing. Thankfully, that works well for grants, too.

This cannot be overstated: In an agency without a dedicated grants office staff, everyone should be actively involved in the process. Make a discussion about grants – what you need, any opportunities that are available – part of the agenda for regularly scheduled staff meetings. When everyone is thinking about grant funding, you are more likely to find great opportunities.

How to find equipment for Police grant funding

There are actually two different types of research associated with grants for law enforcement. One is finding those things that will help you do your job better; the other is finding a way to fund it.

The first part is simple – just ask any officer who recently attended a conference or workshop. Most of them come away from these events with great ideas for improving how the agency does its job. From new technology to modern patrol equipment, there isn’t a shortage of items to spend money on or personnel with an interest in finding them. Some of the best ideas come from those who are doing the work on a daily basis. Let them be part of the process.

One way to harness this valuable energy is to develop a protocol for disseminating information up the chain of command to the decision makers. Develop a “Project Information” document that can be filled out by anyone in the agency. Put it out on the internal drive as a fillable document for ease of use. Information on the form should include:

Who is submitting the form (name, division, position) What is being requested Why is the item being requested (the problem and expected outcomes) How much does the item cost

The form should be routed for approval by direct supervisors up to a decision maker who can assess its potential to add value to the agency.

Finding a police grant funding source

Approving the project is just the first step. The next one is finding a funding source.

Anyone can find grant opportunities. For federal grants, look at grants.gov, which lists every available opportunity with links to the actual solicitation. Don’t overlook your local municipal government or even state funders. Private foundations, many associated with local or franchise businesses, are also good resources to look to. A simple online search should provide you with a wealth of information.

Approval to pursue a grant opportunity

Make sure the procedures set up to this point include not only Administration’s approval but also require approval from the budget and personnel divisions. Getting a grant is an obligation and, once it is awarded, a legally binding contract between the agency and the funder.

When a potential funding opportunity is found, someone within this process has to be responsible for tearing the solicitation apart to see what the requirements and obligations are before time is spent on developing the application.

If you don’t have a grant person in place to coordinate this part, you can request the department that would benefit from the funding work on putting this together. To make it easier to accomplish and more uniform in content, create a form that asks the funder’s name, when the application is due, the maximum amount available, if a match is required, and any specific performance measures and outcomes that are expected to be met. You definitely have to know this before you make the decision to apply.

It’s a good idea for someone in the budget department to read the full solicitation, just in case something is in there that may not seem important to another department but is very important when considering its impact on the agency’s finances.

Grant applications are deadline based

One important note: Most grant opportunities are time-sensitive, meaning the amount of time you have to approve the project and develop a full application is short (usually 4-6 weeks for a federal grant). So don’t let this part lag if there is an open opportunity you want to pursue.

Read part 2 of this series, Creating a grant application, and part 3, Managing an awarded grant.

This article, originally published October 15, 2013, has been updated

LAPD sheriff says he will remove immigration agents from jail

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The new Los Angeles County sheriff has said he is going to remove federal immigration agents from the county's jails.

Sheriff Alex Villanueva said at a Board of Supervisors meeting this week that he also plans to further limit the crimes that lead jail authorities to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

"We are going to physically remove ICE from the county jails," Villanueva told the board Tuesday during a forum on a California law aimed at increasing transparency surrounding police collaboration with immigration agents.

Villanueva won an upset victory in last month's election to run the nation's largest sheriff's department. During his campaign, the retired sheriff's lieutenant said he would remove immigration agents from the jails.

At Tuesday's meeting, Sheriff's Cmdr. Elier Morejon said the department will continue transferring inmates who committed more serious crimes to immigration authorities.

Morejon said authorities are working on the logistics of how those transfers will take place and are evaluating the department's policy of publishing online the release dates of all inmates — including immigrants who are wanted by federal agents for deportation.

About 1,200 inmates were transferred to ICE in 2017, he said.

An ICE spokeswoman declined to comment on the proposed changes.

Police responsibility to regularly maintain equipment and gear

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

In New Jersey, some 20,000 DUI arrests are in jeopardy because of false verifications due to aging and inaccurate equipment. Agencies are required to conduct regular maintenance of a variety of types of equipment, and yet it would appear that in some cases, that regular maintenance is not being conducted, putting not only convictions at risk, but possibly even lives. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the responsibility for agencies to check to be sure their gear is in good working order.

Learn more

8 steps for maintaining your duty gear

How to maintain safe and operational police firearms

How to take care of and maintain police body armor

Scenario-based training on a budget

Wisconsin Police Officer Honored 6 Decades After Death

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Six decades after a Wisconsin police officer’s death, he is finally getting the recognition he deserves.

Fallen North Carolina Police Officer Laid to Rest

Posted on December 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Lumberton Police Officer Jason Barton Quick was remembered Thursday as a family man, a man of God and a man who quietly helped others.

Man Accused of Dragging New York Trooper During Traffic Stop

Posted on December 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An Auburn man is accused of dragging a state trooper with his pickup truck during a traffic stop Tuesday evening in the city of Syracuse, according to New York State Police.

Georgia Police Officer Shot in the Head to be Home for Christmas

Posted on December 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Covington Police Officer Matt Cooper will be home for Christmas, about four months after fighting for his life after being shot in the head on Labor Day by a criminal suspect.

Michigan Officer Commandeers Kayak to Save Woman from Sinking Car

Posted on December 19, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A quick thinking sergeant with the Trenton (MI) Police Department commandeered a kayak at the edge of the Detroit River after a woman was seen in a sinking vehicle in the waterway.  

Agents Seize Nearly $7M in Illegal Drugs at US-Mexico Border

Posted on December 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Border agents at the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge cargo facility reportedly seized nearly $7 million worth of illegal narcotics, including 320 pounds of methamphetamine and 40 pounds of cocaine.

Georgia K-9 Shot During Traffic Stop Released from Hospital

Posted on December 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The K-9 with the DeKalb County (GA) Police Department shot during a gunfight at a traffic stop was released from a veterinary hospital on Saturday. Indi lost an eye during the confrontation, but is expected to otherwise recover.

Cottonwood, AZ, Fire & Medical Department Adds New Pumper to Fleet

Posted on December 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Cottonwood, AZ, Fire & Medical Department has taken delivery of a 2018 E-ONE pumper on a Cyclone II cab and chassis.

NY top court finds police disciplinary records can remain secret

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Robert Gavin Times Union, Albany, N.Y.

ALBANY, N.Y. — The state's top court has reaffirmed the scope of a law that keeps disciplinary decisions of police officers confidential and shields the records from public scrutiny.

In a 5-2 decision that upheld a lower court's conclusion, the Court of Appeals rejected arguments by the New York City Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), which tried to use the state's Freedom of Information Law to obtain disciplinary decisions of New York City police officers.

In August 2011, the NYCLU filed a Freedom of Information Law request to obtain the documents dating back to Jan. 1, 2001. The records related to NYPD disciplinary proceedings that arose from complaints to the city's Civilian Complaint Review Board, an independent agency that investigates complaints against police officers. If the Review Board substantiates a complaint, it refers the matter to the NYPD, which can try to discipline the officer with "charges and specifications."

In a decision authored by Associate Judge Michael Garcia, the Court of Appeals sided with the NYPD, finding its decisions to be "quintessential 'personnel records'" which cannot be disclosed under Civil Rights Law 50-a. The law, the decision noted, was designed to protect officers from being harassed or embarrassed by lawyers in cross-examination during litigation.

"These records are replete with factual details regarding misconduct allegations, hearing judges' impressions and findings, and any punishment imposed on officers — material ripe for degrading, embarrassing, harassing or impeaching the integrity of an officer," Garcia wrote. "The documents are, accordingly, protected from disclosure under Civil Rights Law 50-a."

Chief Judge Janet DiFiore and Associate Judges Eugene Fahey, Paul Feinman and Leslie Stein all concurred, although Stein wrote an opinion showing some differences of opinion. Associate Judges Jenny Rivera and Rowan Wilson disagreed, each authoring opinions.

Rivera stated the ruling was "an interpretation of our statutes that cloaks government activity in secrecy and undermines our state's public policy of open government."

Robert Freeman, executive director of the state's Committee on Open Government, said the ruling demonstrated a clear need to change the law. He said that, generally speaking, when a record indicates that a government employee engaged in misconduct or violated rules, that record is available to the public under FOIL.

"That would be so with respect to the great majority of public employees — whether they be clerical or administrative, teachers, even judges. But it's not so in the case of police and correction officers," Freeman told the Times Union. "It's ironic that those classes of public employees who have the most power and authority over peoples' lives are the least accountable, and reconsideration of section 50-a of the Civil Rights Law should be a priority in the upcoming legislative session."

In a statement, the Legal Aid Society said the decision "cements a dangerous precedent in a democracy that relies on access of information in order to hold public officials accountable." It said the ruling "will amplify harm to people abused by police, leave Black and Latinx communities vulnerable with even less recourse to hold police accountable, will support impunity by officers who will abuse the reliability of their anonymity, and will cause continued disruption in the justice system."

Several media outlets — The Hearst Corp., which operates the Times Union; Advance Publications; the Associated Press; Daily News; Dow Jones & Company; Gannett Co.; News 12 Networks, Newsday and NYP Holdings — filed a joint brief supporting the NYCLU's appeal. The New York City Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, the union that represents NYPD officers, filed one supporting the department.

Patrick Lynch, the president of the PBA, said in a statement he was grateful the Court of Appeals "reaffirmed the core principles behind the law protecting the confidential personnel records of public safety professionals."

Lynch said the court recognized the "tremendous potential for abusive exploitation of these records and the harassment — or worse — of police officers, firefighters and correction officers."

After the NYPD's initial rejection of the NYCLU's document request, the NYPD responded to the group's administrative appeal by releasing 700 pages of "disposition of charges" forms that contained redactions to conceal the names of the officers and nature of the complaints about them. The NYPD denied disclosure of "final opinions" of the cases.

After the NYCLU sued, a state Supreme Court justice ordered the NYPD to produce five decisions at random, but allowed the department to conceal identities of the officers and told the department to notify the officers. The department complied but argued the request, even with the redactions, violated Civil Rights Law 50-a.

The Appellate Division in Manhattan reversed the justice's ruling and found the court could not order the NYPD to disclose redacted versions of the disciplinary decisions. The Court of Appeals heard arguments on the case last month.

———

©2018 the Times Union (Albany, N.Y.)

West Virginia Man Accused of Battery on Officer and K-9 Partner

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

According to the Cabell County (WV) Sheriff’s Office, a 33-year-old man is accused of battery on an officer after an altercation with an officer and his K-9 on Thursday. Bradley Allen Moore has been charged with two counts of battery on an officer and obstruction.

NH police recruit charged for plotting to shoot fellow recruits at graduation

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: PoliceOne Members

By Kevin Landrigan The New Hampshire Union Leader, Manchester

LACONIA, New Hampshire — A 24-year-old Concord man being groomed to become a Laconia police officer was fired and charged with criminal threatening Wednesday for comments made about an upcoming police academy graduation ceremony a short time before he was to graduate, state police officials said.

State troopers with the special investigations unit and the mobile enforcement team arrested Noah Beaulieu on Interstate 93 in Concord Wednesday.

He will be arraigned on Thursday in Merrimack County Superior Court on one felony charge of criminal threatening.

Trooper First Class Tamara Hester has been investigating this case and the supervisor of the matter has been State Police Capt. Joseph M. Ebert.

Until Wednesday, Beaulieu had been a recruit with the Laconia Police Dept. studying at the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Academy, officials said.

State police officials did not offer further details.

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©2018 The New Hampshire Union Leader (Manchester, N.H.)

Officer demoted after giving retired K-9 to animal shelter

Posted on December 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

JACKSON, Miss. — A K-9 officer has been demoted after he gave his retired K-9 to an animal shelter, KCCI reports.

The dog, Ringo, was retired in November after serving as a narcotics K-9 for almost 10 years.

According to Randy Hare of the Alpha Canine Training Center, officers were expected to take care of Ringo after he retired from the force, but what happened to him isn’t uncommon.

“A lot of times they're treated like equipment, and when they're treated like equipment, sometimes they're disposed of like equipment," Hare said.

Hare, who originally trained Ringo, ended up adopting him after he found out he was at the animal shelter.

5 tips to boost to fire-based EMS training performance

Posted on December 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Setting the right objectives during firefighter training is the key to reaching them

Calif. man rescued 2 days after getting stuck in restaurant grease vent

Posted on December 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A would-be burglar had to be rescued from the grease vent of a vacant Chinese restaurant after being trapped for two days

St. Paul Police Launch Decoy Operation to Deter Package Thieves

Posted on December 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

St. Paul police will be dropping decoy packages across the city, hoping to catch thieves who steal them from doorsteps.

Texas firefighters save more than 100 snakes from house fire

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Authorities say that when firefighters arrived, they discovered a second-floor bedroom full of snakes and lizards

Judge Denies Ex-Deputy’s Motion to Dismiss Parkland Shooting Lawsuit

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The only armed deputy stationed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School the day of Nikolas Cruz’s deadly rampage asked a Broward judge on Wednesday to find he had “no legal duty” to protect the students and faculty from harm.

The judge rejected his argument.

Scot Peterson, who resigned from the Broward Sheriff’s Office in late February and is accused of shirking his responsibility by hiding instead of confronting Cruz, wanted Broward Circuit Judge Patti Englander Henning to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the family of Meadow Pollack, one of 17 people shot and killed in the Parkland school on Feb. 14.

“We want to say he had an obligation, but the law isn’t that,” said Peterson’s lawyer, Michael Piper. “From a legal standpoint, there was no duty.”

Englander Henning saw it differently, finding Peterson had a duty to the school community as someone whose job was security and who had an “obligation to act reasonably” under the circumstances of the shooting, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

 

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Judge Denies Ex-Deputy’s Motion to Dismiss Parkland Shooting Lawsuit

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The only armed deputy stationed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School the day of Nikolas Cruz’s deadly rampage asked a Broward judge on Wednesday to find he had “no legal duty” to protect the students and faculty from harm.

The judge rejected his argument.

Scot Peterson, who resigned from the Broward Sheriff’s Office in late February and is accused of shirking his responsibility by hiding instead of confronting Cruz, wanted Broward Circuit Judge Patti Englander Henning to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the family of Meadow Pollack, one of 17 people shot and killed in the Parkland school on Feb. 14.

“We want to say he had an obligation, but the law isn’t that,” said Peterson’s lawyer, Michael Piper. “From a legal standpoint, there was no duty.”

Englander Henning saw it differently, finding Peterson had a duty to the school community as someone whose job was security and who had an “obligation to act reasonably” under the circumstances of the shooting, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

 

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Teen Dies in Crash While Fleeing Maryland Police in Stolen Car

Posted on December 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The mother of 18-year-old Taiwan Linton spoke about the death of her son, who was riding in a stolen car that slammed into a tree while fleeing Baltimore County police.

Casa Grande, AZ, Fire Department Has a New Tanker

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Casa Grande, AZ, Fire Department has taken delivery of a Pierce tanker built on a Freightliner chassis.

California Police Fatally Shoot Suicidal Knife-Wielding Man

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officers with the Redwood City (CA) Police Department confronted by a man wielding a butcher knife on Monday were forced to open fire, fatally wounding him.

1 Deputy, 2 Officers Shot Serving Warrant in Texas

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in Uncategorized

According to KTRK News, one deputy and two officers from the Texas Attorney General’s Office were injured in a shooting while serving a felony warrant on Tuesday.

All three were transported to a nearby hospital with injuries that are believed to not be life threatenting.

The Harris County Sheriff’s Office says one suspect—identified as Daniel Trevino—may be barricaded inside a home. A second suspect has been taken into custody.

 

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Los Angeles school officer found dead at elementary school

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

null
Author: Terrence P. Dwyer, Esq.

By KTLA-TV, Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES — Coroner’s officials on Monday released the identity of a Los Angeles School Police Department officer found dead on the campus of a North Hollywood elementary school over the weekend.

Authorities investigate the death of a Los Angeles School Police Department officer at Valley View Elementary School in Hollywood Hills on Dec. 9, 2018.

The body of Douglas Campbell, 46, of Torrance was found about 4:15 p.m. Sunday at Valley View Elementary School, 6921 Woodrow Wilson Drive, school police officials said.

His cause of death will be determined by the Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner-Coroner, Los Angeles police Lt. Chris Ramirez said. Officials declined to comment on whether there were any obvious signs of trauma to the body.

There was not believed to be any threat to the public, Ramirez added.

According to Campbell’s online resume, posted to Linkedin.com, he was a Los Angeles School Police sergeant who had joined the department in 2005. He served with the U.S. Marine Corps from 1996 to 2000, and briefly worked as an officer with the Trinidad Police Department in Northern California before enlisting, the profile states.

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©2018 KTLA-TV, Los Angeles

Arrest Made in FDNY Road Rage Death

Posted on December 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A suspect was apprehended early Tuesday at a New Jersey motel, about 25 miles from where firefighter Faizal Coto was beaten to death with a baseball bat.

Autopsy: Eric Garner Did Not Die of Strangulation in Chokehold

Posted on December 10, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The New York Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association issued a press release stating that the autopsy report on the death of Eric Garner “demonstrates conclusively that Mr. Garner did not die of strangulation of the neck from a chokehold which would have caused a crushed larynx (windpipe) and a fractured hyoid bone.”

Former FF Dies in NY House Fire

Posted on December 10, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Larry Connolly, 74, had been a lifetime member of the volunteer fire department in Coxsackie.

Lift Assist Calls Taxing MN Firefighters

Posted on December 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire chiefs in Minnesota say that calls to lift people off the floor, including at senior care facilities, are taxing their crews.

MA Firefighter Dies after Getting Trapped in Building

Posted on December 9, 2018 by in Uncategorized

A Worcester firefighter died Sunday after being trapped inside a multiple alarm fire for an extended period of time.

Washington Police “Flirt” with Suspect Who Promised to Turn Himself in on Facebook

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Anthony Akers—a 38-year-old who has a history of drug abuse and protection order violations, according to Fox News—is presently wanted by the Washington Department of Corrections for Failure to Comply. Image courtesy of Richland PD / Facebook. </p>

“Dear Anthony, it is us?” the Richland (WA) Police Department said on its Facebook page earlier this week.

The department’s post went on, “Last Wednesday we reached out to you as ‘wanted.’ You replied and even said you were going to turn yourself in. We waited, but you didn’t show. After you stood us up, we reached out again- this time offering you a ride. You replied and said you needed 48 hours. The weekend came and went. We are beginning to think you are not coming. Please call us anytime and we will come to you.”

Anthony Akers—a 38-year-old who has a history of drug abuse and protection order violations, according to Fox News—is presently wanted by the Washington Department of Corrections for Failure to Comply.

Akers—playing along with the cheeky post—replied, “It’s not you. It’s me.” He then said that he has “commitment issues.”

Akers then posted a picture of himself outside the police station.

 

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Washington Police “Flirt” with Suspect Who Promised to Turn Himself in on Facebook

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Anthony Akers, a 38-year-old who has a history of drug abuse and protection order violations, is presently wanted by the Washington Department of Corrections for Failure to Comply.

MD Firefighters Train for Active Shooters

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Anne Arundel County firefighters joined local, county and state law enforcement agencies for an active shooter exercise Thursday in Annapolis.

Report: Nearly Half of Law Enforcement Agencies Have Acquired Body Cameras

Posted on December 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Nearly half of state and local law enforcement agencies in the United States had acquired body-worn cameras by 2016, the Bureau of Justice Statistics announced last month.

NYPD Officers Shoot, Wound Armed Man During Chase

Posted on December 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officers pursuing an armed man in the Bronx on Wednesday night shot and wounded the subject in a gun battle. A woman and a 12-year-old girl were also wounded in the exchange, although it was not immediately clear whether the bystanders had been struck by rounds fired by the police or by the gunman, according to the New York Times.

Chief Terence Monahan said that police were called when the subject was running down the street “indiscriminately firing” a 25-caliber firearm which was recovered at the scene.

When police approached the subject, he produced the gun and began firing at officers, who then returned fire.

The man was struck once in the neck and once in the foot, and is expected to survive.

The woman was struck by a single round in the stomach. The girl was struck by bullet fragments in her leg. Both were transported to a nearby hospital and were listed in stable condition.

 

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Bell Delivers First Law Enforcement Configured Bell 505 Jet Ranger X to Sacramento PD

Posted on December 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Bell Helicopter, a Textron Inc. company, announced the delivery of the first law enforcement-configured Bell 505 Jet Ranger X to the Sacramento (CA) Police Department.

ME Crews Rescue Woman after Bridge Jump

Posted on December 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Brunswick firefighters rescued a woman on Wednesday who apparently jumped from the Frank J. Wood Bridge into the Androscoggin River.

The ‘Best of What’s New: Security’

Posted on December 5, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Wouldn’t you know it, Popular Science’s Top 100 Innovations of 2018 includes a few for law enforcement.

NYPD investigate officer’s complaint that colleague masturbated in her water bottle

Posted on December 5, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Thomas Tracy and John Annese New York Daily News

NYPD Internal Affairs detectives are trying to determine if a cop masturbated into a female police officer’s water bottle at a Bronx precinct, the Daily News has learned.

The 44-year-old cop, assigned to the 52nd Precinct in Norwood, told investigators she brought the bottle from home on Nov. 14 and left it on her desk in the basement for about two weeks, sources said.

On Friday afternoon, she saw an offending goo — possibly semen — floating in the half-full, 32-ounce bottle.

She reported it the next morning, and the NYPD sent a Crime Scene Unit to retrieve the bottle and test its icky contents, sources said.

The cop believes someone put semen into the bottle — which is typically locked away when she’s not nearby — as a cruel prank, sources with knowledge of the case said.

An NYPD source said the cop’s complaint was “under investigation.”

The cop told her superiors she waited a day to report the sickening discovery because she was confused and embarrassed, and worried someone might retaliate against her.

The officer could not be reached for comment.

If true, the sick incident is hauntingly similar to the actions of former NYPD Sgt. Michael Iscenko, 56, who was convicted of throwing semen on a female co-worker at police headquarters.

In July 2017, a jury found Iscenko guilty of one count of sex abuse in the third degree after prosecutors argued at trial that the white substance he tossed on the 61-year-old victim's calf after she left the bathroom at One Police Plaza in lower Manhattan was seminal fluid. They also said his DNA was found on the shoe she wore that day.

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©2018 New York Daily News

Video: Responders rescue man clinging to tree in rain-swollen river

Posted on December 4, 2018 by in Uncategorized

A dramatic video shows a man who was “mid-stream, clinging to a tree and in need of immediate rescue” being hoisted to safety

Possible overdose patients ram Colo. fire truck before fleeing scene

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The driver of the car reversed into the fire truck several times and escaped after firefighters tried to approach the vehicle, but backed away after seeing a gun

Louisiana Officer Shot—Body Armor Sends Ricocheting Bullet Safely Away

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A deputy with the Ouachita Parish (LA) Sheriff’s Office was shot in his patrol vehicle as he was responding to a call of a theft of an ATV, according to KNOE-TV.

Sheriff Jay Russell said that the bullet struck the deputy in his body armor, the ricocheted into the back seat of the squad car.

Russell said that the deputy’s partner took him to the hospital where was to undergo a precautionary x-ray. Russell said that the deputy should be okay.

 

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Two Minneapolis Police Officers Under Fire Over Christmas Tree

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Two Minneapolis police officers have been placed on leave pending an internal affairs investigation into what Mayor Jacob Frey called a “racist display” in the form of Christmas tree decorations in the North Side precinct.

CHP Uses Autopilot to Stop a Tesla After Driver Falls Asleep

Posted on December 3, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The cameras and computer algorithms of the vehicle’s self-driving system did their job, slowing to avoid ramming the officer’s car.

Plane Crashes into FL Autism Center

Posted on December 2, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The pilot and passenger of a small plane are dead following a fiery crash into an occupied therapy center for children with autism in Ft. Lauderdale.

Couple awarded for saving crash victim while looking for fishing spot

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A couple was only looking for a fishing spot when they happened upon an injured and missing woman who had driven off a cliff and crashed some 200 feet below

For the Record 12/18

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

USFA Releases Annual Report on LODDs
The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) has released its annual report into firefighter line-of-duty deaths (LODDs) that includes a breakdown of the 87 lives lost in 2017.
The total number of LODDs last year was slightly…

Leadership Lessons: Get to Know Traffic Incident Management

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Steven Gillespie encourages all fire personnel to get reacquainted with their old friend, Traffic Incident Management (TIM).

Test & Evaluation: Ruger PC Carbine

Posted on December 1, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The purpose of the police carbine is to bridge the gap between the handgun and the precision rifle. The Ruger PC Carbine is simple to maintain and highly maneuverable.

Broncos donate $200K to LE nonprofit to protect first responders

Posted on November 30, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

KDVR-TV, Denver

DENVER — Broncos star Von Miller announced Thursday he would be donating $200,000 to Shield616 alongside about 20 teammates and the Broncos organization. Shield616 is a non-profit dedicated to supplying law enforcement with protective kits to keep them safer while on duty.

“The initiative will also include programming to improve law-enforcement relations in the community,” the Broncos said in a press release.

The Broncos will be joining the efforts of FOX31 and Channel 2 to Support the Shield, our effort to support local law enforcement following the loss of three deputies in the span of five weeks in early 2018.

The team said the donation will be enough to supply Colorado Springs-based Shield616 with 125 protective kits to first responders. Each kit includes a ballistic vest, ballistic helmet and a wound trauma kit. They are designed to better protect first responders against automatic weapons and assault rifles compared to standard protection equipment.

“When I heard there’s been more than 300 mass shootings in the last year alone, I felt like we needed to do something for those who protect us,” Miller said through Thursday’s press release. “I hope that we can all help bridge the gap and work to improve relationships with law enforcement in our communities.”

The team said once Miller began the effort, nearly 20 players decided to join him in donating. President and CEO Joe Ellis, President of Football Operations/General Manager John Elway and Head Coach Vance Joseph also contributed.

“Miller, his teammates and the Broncos will also maintain relationships with the selected first responders through volunteer opportunities, programming with area kids, roundtable discussions and other initiatives,” the Broncos said, explaining that each Shield616 donor will be paired with a first responder.

“It takes the unification of an entire community to not only better protect our first responders with physical armor, but to break down barriers between first responders and the citizens they serve,” Shield616 Founder and President Jake Skifstad said in the Broncos’ statement. “It’s priceless to see complete strangers invest in the safety of first responders, changing their lives and the lives of their families. We are humbled and proud to see that Von Miller, his teammates and the Broncos are utilizing their God-given leadership gifts and influence to not only better protect our protectors but to also help build positive community relations.”

The Broncos will present the protective kits to local police officers and firefighters after practice on Dec. 20 at UCHealth Training Center.

FOX31 and Channel 2’s “Support the Shield” initiative raised money for both Shield616 and C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors). During our partnership with Safeway, viewers raised $442,429 for the organizations. That is in addition to a phone-bank campaign that raised more than $240,000 early this year.

4 St. Louis Police Officers Accused of Beating an Undercover Colleague During Protests

Posted on November 30, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Four St. Louis police officers were indicted Thursday on federal charges claiming that three of them beat an undercover colleague during protests last year and all four then covered it up.

Training, development, performance: Take action

Posted on November 30, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

NIOSH Report cites crew integrity, lack of training in firefighter LODD

New Jersey AG Limits Immigration Enforcement Duties for Local Police

Posted on November 29, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal unveiled a new directive Thursday that restricts local law enforcement from participating in federal immigration operations, according to NorthJersey.com.

Under the new policy, police in New Jersey can no longer stop, search or detain any individual over immigration status and detain immigrants at the request of the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE—except in cases of serious or violent crimes or final deportation orders.

“No law-abiding resident of this great state should live in fear that a routine traffic stop by local police will result in his or her deportation from this country,” Grewal said.

Grewel said, however, that the new directive does not make New Jersey a “sanctuary state” for criminals.

“If you break the law in New Jersey we will go after you no matter your immigration status,” Grewel said.

Grewal—a former Bergen County Prosecutor—became the nation’s first Sikh attorney general when he was confirmed by New Jersey lawmakers in January.

 

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FL Teen Rescued from Abandoned Bank Vault

Posted on November 29, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The teen was trapped inside the vault in Hollywood for about three hours after his friend closed the door behind him.

California Sheriff Revered for Leadership in the Face of Disaster

Posted on November 29, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Sheriff Kory Honea has been the face of strength in Butte County.

NM Department Takes Action Against Cancer

Posted on November 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

With eight active members of Albuquerque Fire Rescue fighting various forms of cancer, steps are being taken to prevent that number from rising.

Retired New Jersey State Police Trooper Dies of 9/11-Related Cancer

Posted on November 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Retired New Jersey State Police Trooper Robert Nagle succumbed to complications from kidney cancer, which metastasized to his lungs, on Nov. 26 at Robert Wood Johnson Hospital.

Retired Va. firefighter suing city over discrimination

Posted on November 28, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A retired firefighter claims the city of Norfolk discriminated against him after learning he was gay when he married his husband in 2014

Dallas Firefighters OK after Mayday Event

Posted on November 27, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A fire broke out Tuesday morning at a condo building in Dallas that injured three firefighters who were briefly trapped and signaled a mayday.

Congresswoman takes up fight to classify 911 operators as first responders

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

EMS1 speaks with Rep. Norma Torres about her push to make the classification change at the federal level

Congresswoman takes up fight to classify 911 operators as first responders

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

EMS1 speaks with Rep. Norma Torres about her push to make the classification change at the federal level

North Carolina Trooper Helps Deliver Baby on Highway

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

After leaving his family’s home Saturday night North Carolina State Highway Patrol Sgt. Brian Maynard saw a couple going roughly 85 mph past him on the highway.

Virginia Officer Dies in Single-Vehicle Collision Responding to Call

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Police Officer Hunter Edwards was responding to the call several blocks away from his location when the crash occurred. He was transported to a nearby hospital where he was pronounced dead. Image courtesy of ODMP.</p>

A 30-year-old officer with the Winchester (VA) Police Department was killed in a single-vehicle collision on while responding to a fight call on Sunday, according to Fox News.

Police Officer Hunter Edwards was responding to the call several blocks away from his location when the crash occurred. He was transported to a nearby hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Officer Edwards had served with the Winchester Police Department for four years and was assigned to the Patrol Division, SWAT team, and Civil Disturbance Unit.

He is survived by his wife and stepson.

 

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Citizens Come to Aid of Florida Officer Shot by Felon Armed with a Rifle

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

An officer with the Daytona Beach (FL) Police Department was shot late Sunday after police said he and other officers responded to a call of a suspicious person with a rifle.

Officer Kevin Hird was struck in the right arm during a confrontation with the suspect, according to WFTV News.

Citizens immediately rushed to Hird’s aid, applying pressure to his wound until EMS responders arrived. Hird was then transported to a nearby hospital where he was said to be in good spirts and expected to make a full recovery.

The suspect—identified as 40-year-old Raymond Roberts—was taken into custody just minutes after the shooting.

Roberts reportedly has an extensive criminal record.

“He’s a convicted felon, a typical street maggot out here committing crimes shooting randomly especially at police officers,” Police Chief Craig Capri said.

 

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77-year-old Pa. constable delivers meals to homebound, first responders

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Patrick Buchnowski The Tribune-Democrat

JOHNSTOWN, Pa. — When he’s not rounding up lawbreakers, State Constable Sam Allison Sr. is delivering food to shut-ins and first responders who must work during the holidays or honoring fallen veterans.

Allison, 77, said he’s been delivering food to the homebound for 16 years. The meals are provided by St. Vincent de Paul’s Family Kitchen in Johnstown.

“It’s the joy of giving back to the people,” he said. “The look on their face when you knock on the door and you hand them a meal, and they look at you and say, ‘Thank you, Mr. Allison.’ ”

Allison said he delivers about 25 meals on both Thanksgiving and Christmas.

He serves meals to many of the same people each year. Some of those to whom he delivered in the past have passed away.

“It got to the point where the people that I’ve been doing this for have died,” he said. “I was very attached to them.”

Allison said his desire to serve the community took him in a new direction.

“During my experience in law enforcement, I’ve seen so many accidents and drug overdoses and different things,” he said. “I’ve witnessed firsthand what first responders do. They’re so critical in our society. I started a program two years ago for first responders.”

Now, Allison delivers holiday meals to members of 7th Ward Ambulance and West End Ambulance Service, and to Johnstown police and firefighters.

“It’s amazing,” said Ira Hart, manager of West End Ambulance Service. “Without Sam, a lot of times, our folks wouldn’t get to participate in a holiday meal. Sam never lets us down. He’s always there for them.”

Allison has been a state constable for 32 years, having been repeatedly elected to six-year terms by voters in Johnstown’s 8th Ward.

He has been a police officer in Johnstown, Dale Borough and Westmont Borough.

A retired sergeant major with the U.S. Army, Allison was involved in military operations in Vietnam, Bosnia, Panama and the Middle East.

Allison, a captain in the Pennsylvania Civil Air Patrol, was squadron commander for Johnstown Squadron 1501 and remains active with Indiana Squadron 1501.

“I have the mentality of a 20-year-old,” Allison said. “But, unfortunately, the body doesn’t always respond.”

More recently, Allison said he has purchased dozens of 18-by-12-inch American flags that he gives to families of military veterans during funeral services.

Deep respect for the fallen motivates him.

“Every time I find a brother who is deceased, I visit the funeral home in uniform and I tell the family who I am and what I’m there for,” he said.

He hands them a folded flag to honor their loved ones.

“People say, ‘Mr. Allison, why are you doing this?’ ” Allison said. “Because it’s a fallen brother.”

Allison has no intentions of slowing down, he said.

He still rides in a patrol car with Johnstown police two nights a week.

“The bad guys haven’t gotten me yet,” Allison said. "It doesn’t mean it can’t happen. I want to keep sharp at all times and not become complacent.”

Wounded Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Returns to Job

Posted on November 26, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

El Paso County Sheriff’s Deputy Scott Stone vowed to return to work after he was severely wounded in the February shootout that killed a fellow deputy.

Ala. fire chief retires after 30 years of service

Posted on November 23, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Chief Charles Gordon joined the department in January 1989 and rose through the ranks until he was appointed chief by former Mayor William Bell in September 2014

Police Agencies Deliver Thanksgiving Dinner to Needy Families

Posted on November 23, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police departments across the country spent some of the past few days delivering some holiday joy—in the form of Thanksgiving dinner—to families who desperately need it.

In McAllen (TX), police delivered dinners to 150 families for the 16th consecutive year, according to KVEO-TV. The families receiving the meals were pre-selected by the police department and McAllen ISD based on need. McAllen PD also hosted their 2nd annual Turkey or Ticket campaign where unsuspecting drivers are stopped and given a turkey instead of a ticket.

In Albany (NY) officers served an early Thanksgiving dinner to more than 300 individuals who lined up outside the James H. Gray Civic Center on Tuesday evening.

Albany Sergeant Kawaski Barnes told WALB News, “Tonight’s goal is to feed everybody we can and to have people leave with a smile on their face and just a positive feel about the police department overall.”

In Oklahoma City (OK) the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 123  surprised shoppers by purchasing their Thanksgiving groceries. According to KFOR-TV, FOP Lodge 123 Vice President Mark Nelson said, “The holidays can be a financially stressful time. We wanted to take this opportunity to give back and say thank you to the citizens of Oklahoma City for their support throughout the year.”

Turning the tables—so to speak—some citizens provided police with a Thanksgiving meal.

The Atlanta Braves baseball team wanted to show appreciation to those who sacrifice their time to protect Atlanta on holidays. The Braves provided a turkey dinner to 100 police officers who were scheduled to work on Thanksgiving Day, according to MLB.com.

 

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Free Online Course | Reducing Graffiti in Your Community

Posted on November 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Complete the form below to access this free course.

Graffiti, we have all seen it. It plagues our cities, leaving taxpayers and law enforcement to clean it up. Serial taggers deface public and private property, leaving law enforcement with the challenge of tracking and stopping these perpetrators. How do we identify and track these offenders? Some departments have graffiti specialists who track and identify common offenders and graffiti related to gangs, but there are additional resources and tools available. Tim Kephart is a expert and thought leader in the fight against graffiti. His company, Graffiti Tracker, is the sponsor of this course. In this course, learn about the different types of graffiti, how to identify each type, resolve cases, and seek restitution.

Complete the form below to access this free course.

Four Dead in Suspicious NJ Mansion Blaze

Posted on November 21, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Homicide is suspected after a family of four was found dead following a fire in their $1.5 million mansion in the upscale town of Colts Neck.

Detroit fire union files unfair labor charge over lights and sirens policy

Posted on November 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Detroit Fire Fighter Association claims a controversial policy that dictates when lights and sirens can be used is a “public safety failure”

Detroit fire union files unfair labor charge over lights and sirens policy

Posted on November 20, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Detroit Fire Fighter Association claims a controversial policy that dictates when lights and sirens can be used is a “public safety failure”

Washington Chief Says Officers Will Not Enforce New Gun Laws

Posted on November 19, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Chief Loren Culp of the Republic (WA) Police Department said on social media that he won’t allow his department to enforce new regulations under newly passed which he said are unconstitutional.

Initiative 1639 raises the age limit for some gun purchases and puts an enhanced background check and waiting period in place for people who want to buy a semi-automatic rifle, among other restrictions.

Chief Culp wrote on Facebook, “I’ve taken 3 public oaths, one in the US Army and Two as a police officer. All of them included upholding and defending the Constitution of the United States of America. The second amendment says the right to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

The post continued, “The second amendment says the right to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. As long as I am Chief of Police, no Republic Police Officer will infringe on citizens right to keep and Bear Arms, PERIOD!”

Further, Culp suggests that the city pass legislation that would make the City of Republic a “2nd Amendment Sanctuary City.”

Culp said in a separate Facebook post that he wants local legislation passed that that would “prevent federal and state infringement on the right to keep and bear arms; nullifying all federal and state acts in violation of the 2nd Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and Article 1 Section 24 of the Washington State Constitution.”

Initiative 1639 passed with a statewide approval of nearly 60 percent of the vote. In Ferry County—where the City of Republic is located—73 percent of voters said no to the measure.

 

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Okla. PD aims to recruit more women

Posted on November 19, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

TULSA, Okla. — The Tulsa Police Department hopes to make its ranks more gender-balanced with a push to recruit more women officers.

That’s how the department came up with “Women in Policing Day,” a truncated version of the police academy led by female officers to recruit more women into its ranks, KTUL reported.

Tulsa PD has 800 sworn officers, but only about 100 are women.

"We want to be more representative for the City of Tulsa," TPD recruiter Cpl. Billy White told KTUL.

Attendees will learn how to fire a gun, learn combat techniques and hear from female officers about their experiences in law enforcement.

"We want to show that anyone can do it," 14-year Tulsa PD veteran Ashley Kite said. "If you have the passion, there's nothing intimidating about it."

NH ambulance catches fire en route to the hospital

Posted on November 18, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Officials said the ambulance was transporting a patient when a reported mechanical issue caused the rig to go up in flames

DuraForce PRO 2 Smartphone

Posted on November 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Kyocera’s rugged DuraForce PRO 2 is a 4G LTE Android smartphone now available through Verizon Wireless. Designed for business and enterprise use, especially construction, public safety and transportation as well as adventure-seeking consumers,…

Pa. city votes to cut fire, police positions to fill budget hole

Posted on November 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Peoria City Council voted 8-3 Tuesday to approve eliminating 22 firefighter and 16 police positions as part of a move to close a $6 million budget hole

Echelon Materials Working on Ballistic Fabric to Defeat Rifle Rounds

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Echelon Materials has announced that it is working on the world’s first and only patented, lightweight, flexible fabric designed to shred high-powered conical/rifle rounds and be comfortably worn or carried all day.

The fabric called TiTek uses a defeat mechanism that is cutting-edge, according to Echelon. It’s a patented fabric that weaves tiny, sharp-edged titanium discs into the plane of the fabric using the very Kevlar threads that comprise the fabric. These discs present their sharp edges to the incoming round and cut it to shreds as it passes. Once shredded by the TiTek fabric, debris from the bullets is easily captured by the armor package’s backing layers that employ existing materials such as aramids or polyethylenes, Echelon says. Compared to traditional armor that “stops” the bullet by applying counter-force, TiTek-infused armor uses the bullet’s own energy to cut it apart, destroying it and making it easier to stop.

“In testing the TiTek material, we have seen 7.62 x 59 FMJ M80 rounds turned into shrapnel – not a piece over the size of a .17-caliber BB—with bits and pieces spread over a 9-inch diameter in an armor pack weighing 1.9 pounds per square foot,” said Bob Muller, Echelon Materials’ CEO. “This means that lightweight, flexible, breathable, rifle protection weighing up to 75% less than current Level IV+ plates is possible with TiTek, making that protection easier and more comfortable to wear.”

For more information about, visit www.echelonmaterials.com/.

 

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Echelon Materials Working on Ballistic Fabric to Defeat Rifle Rounds

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Echelon Materials has announced that it is working on the world’s first and only patented, lightweight, flexible fabric designed to shred high-powered conical/rifle rounds and be comfortably worn or carried all day.

The fabric called TiTek uses a defeat mechanism that is cutting-edge, according to Echelon. It’s a patented fabric that weaves tiny, sharp-edged titanium discs into the plane of the fabric using the very Kevlar threads that comprise the fabric. These discs present their sharp edges to the incoming round and cut it to shreds as it passes. Once shredded by the TiTek fabric, debris from the bullets is easily captured by the armor package’s backing layers that employ existing materials such as aramids or polyethylenes, Echelon says. Compared to traditional armor that “stops” the bullet by applying counter-force, TiTek-infused armor uses the bullet’s own energy to cut it apart, destroying it and making it easier to stop.

“In testing the TiTek material, we have seen 7.62 x 59 FMJ M80 rounds turned into shrapnel – not a piece over the size of a .17-caliber BB—with bits and pieces spread over a 9-inch diameter in an armor pack weighing 1.9 pounds per square foot,” said Bob Muller, Echelon Materials’ CEO. “This means that lightweight, flexible, breathable, rifle protection weighing up to 75% less than current Level IV+ plates is possible with TiTek, making that protection easier and more comfortable to wear.”

For more information about, visit www.echelonmaterials.com/.

 

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California Motor Officer Dies Following Collision with Vehicle

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>The Gardena (CA) Police Department posted on its Facebook page an announcement that Motor Officer Toshio Hirai has died from injuries he sustained in a traffic collision while riding his police motorcycle to work. Image courtesy of ODMP. </p>

The Gardena (CA) Police Department posted on its Facebook page an announcement that Motor Officer Toshio Hirai has died from injuries he sustained in a traffic collision while riding his police motorcycle to work.

Hirai was 34 years old, a devoted husband, and father of a 2-year-old son.

“A number of outstanding doctors, nurses, and other hospital staff members did all that they could to try to save Toshio. While doctors did their best to try and save him, he died at the hospital late this afternoon,” the post said.

“Toshio started working at the Gardena Police Department in 2006,” the department said. “Besides being a motor officer, he was on the SWAT team and was a traffic investigator. Toshio, was one of the smartest people in the room. He spoke five languages, loved life, had the best sense of humor. He worked hard for our community. Most of all he absolutely loved and cherished his wife and two-year-old son.”

The post continued, “He loved this community and the work he did here. The community loved him back. We lost a guardian today, and while we’ll never be able to replace Toshio, his memory will live on and his presence will always be felt.”

The other driver involved in the collision stayed at the scene and was talking to investigators, according to the KTLA-TV. The driver’s identity has not been released.

 

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The Next Generation of Ballistic Protection

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TiTek is a lightweight, flexible fabric that employs a new mechanism to defeat bullets by shredding them into shrapnel and easy capture within an armor package that is up to 75% lighter than current rifle protection. Echelon is seeking your support to…

Criticized deputy refuses to testify about Parkland massacre

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

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By Terry Spencer and David Fischer Associated Press

SUNRISE, Fla. — For months, members of the panel investigating Florida's high school massacre have called the sheriff's deputy assigned to guard the campus "a coward" for hiding and not rushing inside in an attempt to stop the shooter.

Given an opportunity to confront his critics Thursday, now-retired Broward Sheriff's Deputy Scot Peterson sent his attorney instead before the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission. Attorney Joseph DiRuzzo III told the 14-member panel he had filed a lawsuit hours earlier attempting to block their subpoena. DiRuzzo dropped a copy on the lectern and then walked away.

Fred Guttenberg, whose child Jaime died along with 16 others, said to DiRuzzo as he passed: "He didn't do his job. My daughter should be alive."

Peterson, the longtime deputy assigned to Stoneman Douglas, has become the second-most vilified person surrounding the Feb. 14 shooting after suspect Nikolas Cruz.

Security video shows Peterson arrived outside the three-story building where the killings happened shortly after the shooting began, about the same time the gunman finished slaying 11 people on the first-floor. Peterson drew his handgun, but retreated to cover next to the neighboring building. The video shows Peterson never left that spot for 50 minutes, even after other deputies and police officers arrived on campus and went inside.

Panel members have said they believe Peterson's inaction allowed Cruz to climb to the third floor, where five students, including Jamie Guttenberg, and one teacher were killed. They believe if Peterson, 55, had confronted Cruz, who authorities say was armed with an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, and engaged him in a shootout he could have killed him or given others more time to reach safety.

"Other than the person sitting in a jail cell right now for murdering my daughter, the only other person who comes close to pissing me off as much is Peterson because Peterson could have saved my daughter. My daughter was the second-to-last to be shot … a few more seconds and she would be alive," Fred Guttenberg told The Associated Press after DiRuzzo left.

Peterson, a decorated 32-year veteran of the sheriff's office, retired shortly after the shooting rather than accept a suspension while his actions were investigated. He is now receiving a $100,000 annual pension. There had been speculation Peterson might attend the meeting but invoke the Fifth Amendment, as a criminal investigation of law enforcement's response continues.

Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, the panel's chairman, said Thursday he wanted to ask Peterson, "Why the hell did he go hide and run away and not do his job?"

Peterson told investigators shortly after the shooting and reporters last spring from the "Today" show and The Washington Post that he heard only two or three shots and didn't know whether they were coming from inside the building.

That is contradicted by radio calls in which he correctly identifies the building as the shooter's location. Bullets also came out a window almost directly above where he took cover. About 150 shots were fired and were heard by others a quarter-mile away.

Cruz, a 20-year-old former Stoneman Douglas student, is charged with the slayings. He has pleaded not guilty, but his attorneys have said he would plead guilty in exchange for a life sentence. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty.

The panel also heard Thursday from two other Broward County officials criticized for their actions before and after the shooting: Sheriff Scott Israel and school Superintendent Robert Runcie.

Israel, whose triplet sons graduated from Stoneman Douglas a few years ago, was asked why his agency's policy on engaging an active shooter says a deputy "may" confront a shooter rather than "shall."

The sheriff said deputies are trained to engage immediately, but "I want an effective tactical response, not a suicide response."

Israel said a different policy wouldn't have prompted Peterson to rush into the building, saying "you can't train courage."

Runcie said he's focusing on the recovery and well-being of students, improving school safety and holding administrators accountable.

Runcie outlined security improvements, including single points of entry and armed guardians or police officers at all schools, and expanded mental health resources for students.

Commission members then grilled Runcie on the district's communication with law enforcement and procedures for dealing with active shooters. Several pointed out that the district still hadn't created a policy mandating the marking of "hard corners," areas in a classroom a shooter can't hit from the door's window.

The panel has been meeting periodically since April. It's required to file a report by Jan. 1 to Florida Gov. Rick Scott on its findings on the shooting's causes and recommendations for avoiding future school massacres. The panel includes law enforcement, education and mental health officials, a legislator and the fathers of two dead students.

Thousands honor slain Calif. sergeant at funeral

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Christopher Weber and John Rogers The Associated Press

WESTLAKE VILLAGE, Calif. — The sheriff's sergeant who gave his life saving others during a mass shooting last week was remembered warmly Thursday as a deeply religious man devoted to family who could be counted on to never hesitate a moment to put his own life on the line if it meant helping others.

Several thousand people, including hundreds of law enforcement officers from throughout California, packed the Calvary Community Church in Westlake Village for the emotional, 90-minute service honoring the life of Ron Helus.

The 54-year-old sheriff's sergeant was shot to death during a Nov. 7 gunfight with a man who was raking a popular Southern California country bar with bullets when Helus ran in to try to stop him.

The gunman killed 12 people before shooting himself to death. But authorities say Helus — the first officer into the bar — saved numerous others by immediately exchanging gunfire with the shooter, giving patrons and employees time to flee.

Among Thursday's mourners was musician Billy Ray Cyrus who said he told the family before the service, "I'm probably going to have to change the definition of hero. From now on it can just be a picture of Ron Helus."

Then, accompanying himself on guitar, Cyrus dedicated his song "Some Gave All" to Helus, singing the words, "Some stood through for the red, white and blue. And some had to fall. And if you ever think of me, think of all your liberties. And recall, some gave all."

The emotional message left the audience in stunned silence until Pastor Steven Day said, "If you'd like to, you can thank him," and the crowd erupted in applause. The audience had also given Helus a standing ovation at the beginning of the service.A casket with the body of Ventura County Sheriff's Sgt. Ron Helus is carried into the Calvary Community Church Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018

Mourners included hundreds of officers from police agencies across the state who stood solemnly outside the church hall as the 54-year-old sheriff's sergeant's flag-draped coffin was wheeled inside. Each offered a crisp salute as it passed by, then joined hundreds of other mourners inside.

Still more people, including many who had never met Helus, stood outside in the parking lot or lined nearby streets. Others lingered by a huge makeshift memorial featuring flowers, messages and stuffed animals.

"I heard he was a hero. He went in there in the line of duty to try and save people and deal with a crazed man," said Peter Orr of Malibu, who has been staying in a nearby hotel with his dog since his home burned down in one of California's ongoing wildfires. He took off work Thursday to pay his respects.

Inside the church, Day told stories passed on to him by Helus' friends, family and co-workers.

They described an avid fisherman, hiker and dirt biker rider who loved his family, God and fly fishing and sharing nature with his 24-year-old son, Jordan. A niece, Lauren Smith recalled how Helus helped teach her to drive, letting her get behind the wheel of his brand new truck and, after she accidentally smashed a side mirror parking it, told her, "Let's just keep this our secret."

Although the 29-year veteran of the Ventura County Sheriff's Department took on some of the agency's toughest assignments, working in SWAT, narcotics and investigations, friends said he could often show a playful side as well.

Sometimes, Day said, he'd pull someone over for a minor traffic violation and explain to them what they'd done wrong.

"Then, with his pad in his hand and his pen, he'd say 'OK, you tell me a good joke and I won't write you a ticket.' "

Other times he'd approach young men with powerful sports cars and tell them not to worry, this avid dirt biker just wanted to look under the hoods and check out their engines. His real reason, Day explained, was to give them a chance to get to know a sheriff's deputy.

Day also read letters from family members, including one who wrote, "If you called him a hero he'd probably laugh at you and say he was doing his job."

His wife, Karen, called him her personal hero.

"You were my husband and best friend. You were always the one who made me laugh and who protected me from all that tried to harm me," she wrote.

The two had met in a college anatomy class when Helus helped her dissect a cat. He would ask her to marry him a few years later when they dined at a popular restaurant in Thousand Oaks called Charlie Brown's.

That restaurant has since transitioned into a country bar called the Borderline Bar and Grill, the place packed with young people on last week's "college night" when a gunman opened fire and Helus ran in to save them.

"I know that when God saw you enter heaven he said, 'Well done, faithful servant,' " Karen Helus told her husband.

Body Camera Footage Shows Fatal Oklahoma Police Shooting

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in Uncategorized

The Muskogee Police Department released body cam footage Thursday for three officers involved in a fatal shooting Monday at I Don’t Care Bar and Grill.

2 dead after three-way car crash involving ambulance

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A three-vehicle crash involving an ambulance left two people dead after a driver lost control and crossed the center line

Firefighters, paramedics fight back fire to save woman who just gave birth

Posted on November 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Heather Roebuck said goodbye to her newborn daughter as she was evacuated by ambulance after a C-section, only to have the ambulance catch fire

Firehouse-adopted, Instagram-famous cat gets stuck in drain pipe

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The fire department-adopted cat, known as the “Arson Cat,” was rescued by firefighters after they discovered he was stuck in a drain pipe

Video: Ohio Police Disarm Suicidal 11-Year-Old Knife Wielding Boy

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in Uncategorized

VIDEO: Ohio Police Disarm Suicidal 11-Year-Old Knife Wielding Boy

Officers with the Grove City (OH) Police Department responded to a call of an 11-year-old boy wielding two butcher knives stolen from a local Dollar Tree store, and holding the knives to his throat threatening suicide.

Newly-released video from the Division of Police shows an officer sneaking up behind the boy and grabbing his arms, according to ABC News.

The boy then dropped the knives, and officers were able to take the boy into custody without further incident.

According to police, the boy assaulted a staff member at Buckeye Ranch Client & Mental Health Services and escaped the facility.

The boy is charged with assault, menacing and theft. He was taken for a mental health evaluation, then transferred to the Juvenile Detention Center in Columbus.

 

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Report: Some Deputies Don’t Remember Active Shooter Training Prior to Parkland Massacre

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

The investigation into the police response to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas School in Parkland continues, and new revelations indicate that some of the deputies responding may not have been completely up to date on active shooter response tactics.

According to a new report obtained by the Sun Sentinel, some deputies with the Broward County (FL) Sheriff’s Office couldn’t remember the last time they attended mass-shooter training—others couldn’t recall what they’d learned when they did attend.

The report said that “during interviews, it was not uncommon for deputies to have difficulty remembering when their last active-shooter training took place or what type of training they received…”

In contrast, the Coral Springs officers who rushed into the high school consistently praised their training and “had no difficulty in explaining the proper response to an active shooter.”

 

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Kyocera Launches Rugged, Military-Grade, Waterproof Smartphone with Verizon Wireless

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Waterproof, Drop and Scratch Proof, with Built-In Super Wide View 4K Action Camera, Enhanced Speakers and Noise-Cancelling Mics, DuraForce PRO 2 is Ideal for Construction, Public Safety and Transportation Industries

Illinois State Police: Officer Told Security Guard ‘Multiple’ Times to Drop Gun

Posted on November 15, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Midlothian, Ill., police officer gave “multiple verbal commands” to security officer Jemel Roberson to drop his gun and get on the ground before fatally shooting Roberson at a Robbins bar Sunday morning, according to a preliminary report.

Police: Half-naked woman found in road assaults Ohio EMT

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police said they found Denise Molina, who was found rolling around with her pants and underwear pulled down, kicked an EMT in the throat

Trial Begins for Man Charged with Shooting South Carolina Officer in 2013

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Mark Blake Jr. is acting as his own lawyer—although he does have a public defender at his side in case he wants legal advice—as he stands accused of attempted murder of a police officer during a 2013 traffic stop.

Blake faces up to 30 years in prison for attempted murder in the March 13, 2013, shooting of Charleston Police Officer Cory Goldstein, according to WCSC-TV.

Goldstein—who no longer works for the Charleston Police Department—took the stand to recount the night of the shooting. He told the jury that during the foot chase, Blake kept looking over his shoulder to see how close Goldstein was to him.

He said that after Blake had stopped, he ordered Blake not to move, and Blake responded, “You don’t move [expletive],” and opened fire.

Blake then had the opportunity to cross-examine the officer he is accused of trying to kill.

 

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Police Officer – Town of Palm Beach

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Job Description Police Officers are responsible for providing protection of life and property within the municipal boundaries of the Town of Palm Beach. Work activities include responding to calls for service and/or emergencies, including calls which are...

Verizon announces 5G First Responder Lab

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON — Verizon launched an innovation lab to develop 5G solutions for first responders.

In a recent press release, Verizon unveiled the 5G First Responder Lab, which is described as a “first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety.”

The network is partnering with Responder Corp. for the project and hopes to accelerate 5G technology for first responders.

Verizon announced the launch of its 5G First Responder Lab, a first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety. https://t.co/eJAIFq3Nf0 pic.twitter.com/tX15Mxxmo0

— Verizon News (@VerizonNews) November 8, 2018

“First responders should have the absolute best, most effective technologies available to them as they protect our communities and respond to emergencies large and small,” Verizon SVP of Strategy, Innovation and Product Development Toby Redshaw said. “Our 5G First Responder Lab will give technology innovators the opportunity to develop applications and use cases that leverage the unique capabilities of 5G, and to bring those solutions to market more quickly.”

The press release said Verizon is seeking 15 innovators to “develop public safety solutions over a one-year period.”

The lab will be broken up into three cohorts lasting three months each, and technology developers will have “the opportunity to collaborate with Verizon and Responder Corp on 5G use case testing, insight creation and go-to-market strategies.”

"As Verizon deploys 5G, it is critical that we look beyond the launch for consumers and consider how users in public safety can leverage this revolutionary technology," Verizon’s Director of Public Sector Product Strategy Nick Nilan said. “5G will enable technology for first responders that hasn’t been imagined yet, and this 5G First Responder Lab will help lead the creation of life-saving innovations.”

Verizon and Responder Corp. announced a 5G First Responder Lab to help maximize 5G applications for public safety. This lab will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology via https://t.co/nNuX83JFt6#ResponderVentures #5G #Verizon #publicsafety pic.twitter.com/MW5hHKA4FQ

— Responder Corp, LLC (@ResponderVC) November 14, 2018

Verizon announces 5G First Responder Lab

Posted on November 14, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

WASHINGTON — Verizon launched an innovation lab to develop 5G solutions for first responders.

In a recent press release, Verizon unveiled the 5G First Responder Lab, which is described as a “first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety.”

The network is partnering with Responder Corp. for the project and hopes to accelerate 5G technology for first responders.

Verizon announced the launch of its 5G First Responder Lab, a first-of-its-kind innovation incubator that will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology to develop, test and refine 5G solutions for public safety. https://t.co/eJAIFq3Nf0 pic.twitter.com/tX15Mxxmo0

— Verizon News (@VerizonNews) November 8, 2018

“First responders should have the absolute best, most effective technologies available to them as they protect our communities and respond to emergencies large and small,” Verizon SVP of Strategy, Innovation and Product Development Toby Redshaw said. “Our 5G First Responder Lab will give technology innovators the opportunity to develop applications and use cases that leverage the unique capabilities of 5G, and to bring those solutions to market more quickly.”

The press release said Verizon is seeking 15 innovators to “develop public safety solutions over a one-year period.”

The lab will be broken up into three cohorts lasting three months each, and technology developers will have “the opportunity to collaborate with Verizon and Responder Corp on 5G use case testing, insight creation and go-to-market strategies.”

"As Verizon deploys 5G, it is critical that we look beyond the launch for consumers and consider how users in public safety can leverage this revolutionary technology," Verizon’s Director of Public Sector Product Strategy Nick Nilan said. “5G will enable technology for first responders that hasn’t been imagined yet, and this 5G First Responder Lab will help lead the creation of life-saving innovations.”

Verizon and Responder Corp. announced a 5G First Responder Lab to help maximize 5G applications for public safety. This lab will give startups and other innovators access to 5G technology via https://t.co/nNuX83JFt6#ResponderVentures #5G #Verizon #publicsafety pic.twitter.com/MW5hHKA4FQ

— Responder Corp, LLC (@ResponderVC) November 14, 2018

Firefighters from around the U.S. travel to help in Calif. wildfires

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Firefighters from 17 states are answering the call for help in wildfires that are consuming the state of California

Colo. paramedics equipped with stroke neurointervention tool

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Teller County paramedics can now effectively halt blood clotting by providing a tissue plasminogen activator

California Officer Fatally Shoots Knife-Wielding Former Police Captain

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Officers with the Fresno (CA) Police Department responded to a call Monday from a woman who feared a man in her home—reportedly with a history of recent mental health issues—might try to kill himself.

A veteran FTO and his rookie partner arrived to the scene and quickly discovered a pool of blood on the floor and a man with a knife with a 12-inch blade coming at them, according to the Fresno Bee.

One officer deployed a TASER, but one of the darts failed to take hold, and the man advanced. The other officer then opened fire, fatally shooting 63-year-old Marty West, who had a 32-year career in the Fresno Police Department before retiring from the Fresno PD in 2007 to become the chief of police in Oakdale.

West was chief of police in Oakdale for five years before retiring in March 2012.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said, “Both of them were absolutely shocked and surprised when the door opened and Marty came charging out, covered in blood, armed with a knife, and was within a few feet of the officers.”

“I lost a friend and a family member; he’ll be missed,” Dyer said.

 

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Family Sues After Security Guard Fatally Shot by Illinois Police Officer

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Midlothian police officer used excessive force when he fatally shot an on-duty security guard while responding to a shots fired call at a bar in Robbins Sunday, a lawsuit filed Monday against the officer and the Village of Midlothian alleges.

Team Safariland’s Rob Leatham and Scott Carnahan Win Top Titles at 2018 USPSA’s Nine Days of Nationals in Polk County, Florida

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Leatham takes 6th Overall in Carry Optics and 3rd Overall in Single Stack; Carnahan takes 2nd Overall in Pistol Caliber Carbine

Team Safariland’s Rob Leatham and Scott Carnahan Win Top Titles at 2018 USPSA’s Nine Days of Nationals in Polk County, Florida

Posted on November 13, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Leatham takes 6th Overall in Carry Optics and 3rd Overall in Single Stack; Carnahan takes 2nd Overall in Pistol Caliber Carbine

Death toll in Northern Calif. wildfire rises to 42

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Search and recovery teams looked for human remains from a Northern California wildfire that killed at least 42, making it the deadliest in state history

Woman Falsely Accuses Florida Deputy of Rape

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A woman arrested for shoplifting falsely accused a Palm Beach County (FL) Sheriff’s Office deputy of rape earlier this year, authorities say.

According to the arrest report, 23-year-old Marley Barberian is now facing charges of a false report of sexual battery, a false report of crime and perjury (not in an official proceeding.)

Barberian, who was in county jail after being arrested at a Target for shoplifting, told an intake nurse that a PBSO deputy sexually battered her while bringing her in to the jail. In a sworn statement with a detective, she claimed the deputy raped her anally after they left the Greenacres Police Department. She also accused the deputy of groping her earlier in a patdown during her arrest at the Target, reports CBS 12.

However, after investigating her statement, authorities found holes in her story. One male deputy said the accused deputy did not touch Barberian inappropriately, and that a female deputy actually patted her down. He also told authorities that the accused deputy only drove her to the Greenacres police station, and then a female deputy took her to the Palm Beach County jail.

Investigators also looked at the in-car video and surveillance video, all of which refuted her claims.

The sheriff’s office found probable cause to arrest Barberian and charge her for making the false accusation. Barberian remains at the Palm Beach County Jail on $3,000 bond.

 

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Load-bearing vest vs. duty belt: Ergonomic researchers determine the winner

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

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Author: Therese Matthews

Reprinted with permission from University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

By Judy Berthiaume

The Eau Claire Police Department is making a significant change to how officers carry their equipment after a UW-Eau Claire research team determined that load-bearing vests are a safe and healthier alternative to the traditional duty belt.

Officers who carry most of their equipment – which often weighs close to 30 pounds – on vests rather than duty belts experience significantly less hip and lower-back pain, the study found.

“The findings are clear and they are significant,” said Dr. Jeff Janot, a professor of kinesiology and the faculty lead on a six-month study that involved UW-Eau Claire, ECPD and Mayo Clinic Health System. “While the vests weigh more, the weight is more evenly distributed so there is less strain on the hips and lower back.”

Researchers also determined that the vests do not limit the officers’ range of motion or create other issues that would be problematic for the officers from a safety standpoint, said Chantal Bougie, a senior kinesiology major from Oshkosh and the student lead on the research project.

“We didn’t find any unintended consequences from wearing the load-bearing vest that would cause health or safety issues for the officers,” Bougie said.

Given the study results, the ECPD already has begun to transition some of its 100 sworn officers from the duty belts to the load-bearing vests, said Matt Rokus, deputy chief of police for the ECPD.

“The health and well-being of our officers is our priority,” said Rokus, noting that lower-back pain is a significant health issue for law enforcement personnel everywhere. “This study shows empirically that transitioning to the load-bearing vests is the right thing to do for our officers and our community.”

ECPD officers still will wear duty belts, but they will hold only guns and TASERs. The radio, hand cuffs, flashlight and other gear officers always have on them will be carried on the vests instead, Rokus said.

Fifteen Eau Claire police officers volunteered to be part of the university’s study. For three months, some officers wore load-bearing vests while the others carried gear on the duty belts. The officers wearing belts then switched to vests, and those wearing vests went back to belts for three months.

After every shift, the officers self-reported and self-recorded any discomfort and rated the level of lower-back discomfort, giving researchers extensive data from a six-month period.

The 15 officers who participated in the study already have been issued their vests and began wearing them immediately. The research partners in the study – UW-Eau Claire, the city of Eau Claire and Mayo Clinic Health System – shared the costs of the 15 vests being used by the officers who volunteered to participate in the research. As funding allows, the ECPD will purchase additional vests so every officer will have one, Rokus said, noting that vests cost $300 each so it will take some time to purchase them all.

All officers go through extensive use-of-force training, which results in muscle memory that they rely on when accessing their equipment. As officers transition to the vests, they will be retrained to create that same reflexive response, Rokus said.

“This is a significant investment given the costs of the vests and the training,” Rokus said. “It’s an investment we will make because we have the information from UW-Eau Claire’s research to support our decision. We know this is good for the health of our officers.”

That’s good news for Cory Reeves, who said that after five years as an officer with the ECPD he’s already experiencing hip and lower-back pain from long hours of sitting in his squad car, walking his beat or apprehending suspects, all while carrying the heavy gear around his waist.

“As soon as I put the vest on, I noticed the difference,” said Reeves. “I wore the duty belt the first three months, and noticed an immediate difference when I put on the vest for the last three months. It’s a lot more comfortable. It was easier to spend long hours on the job when I was wearing the vest.”

Officer Breanna Montgomery said the vest allows her to sit up straight in her squad car, something that isn’t possible with the fully equipped belt. Since she spends many hours in her vehicle completing paperwork and other tasks, the awkward sitting position strains her back, she says.

“When I have the vest on, instead of sitting curved forward, I can sit up straight,” said Montgomery, who has been an Eau Claire police officer for more than three years. “Also, when I’m on calls, if I’m standing for a long time, I don’t have extra weight on my waist so it’s more comfortable and easier on my back.”

While it is impossible to eliminate all the health-related challenges that police officers face, the vest does address issues with lower-back pain, which is among the most common health problem reported by officers, especially patrol officers, Rokus said.

“Policing is a physically demanding profession,” said Rokus. “Officers spend a lot of time in their vehicles because they use them as their offices. They also often stand to talk to people or hold suspects, or chase a combative suspect, all while carrying 30 pounds of police equipment on their waists.”

As a result, many officers experience constant back pain, diminishing the quality of their lives, Rokus said. They also miss patrol shifts because of back issues, which leads to staffing shortages, overtime costs and worker comp claims, he said.

“The health improvement for our officers is important,” Rokus said of the vests. “But there also should be a reduction in health care cost and lost time due to injury, which is good for our community.”

Knowing the strain that the heavy belt puts onto officers’ backs during their 10-hour shifts, the researchers anticipated that their study would find that the vests would ease back pain, Bougie said.

“But we were surprised by just how big of a difference the vests made in how the officers rated their pain,” Bougie said. “When the officers went from the vest to the belt, there were really big jumps up in the levels of pain they reported.”

Other than a study in Sweden, Janot said he doesn’t know of any other research on this issue.

Given its importance and the limited research done, interest in UW-Eau Claire’s findings is significant and widespread among law enforcement agencies, Janot said.

“The vest-versus-belt issue sounds like a fairly simple question but it’s actually very complicated,” said Janot. “Law enforcement agencies all over want to know if the vests can help address officers’ back problems. Like in Eau Claire, they want data that will help them make an informed decision.”

Since the study was announced in the spring, Janot has been contacted by dozens of law enforcement agencies from across the country asking about the results.

This winter, the UW-Eau Claire research team will present its findings to top law enforcement officials from agencies across Wisconsin.

“It’s exciting to partner with our community, but it’s also exciting to know that our work may make a difference far beyond Eau Claire,” Janot said.

Bougie said it's incredible to know that her work as a student researcher will make a positive difference in the quality of the lives of police officers here and elsewhere.

“Knowing I am helping these police officers who keep us safe is pretty special,” said Bougie, who plans to work as a physical therapist after graduate school. “It feels like I am giving them something in return for what they do for all of us. That’s an amazing feeling.”

While the vests-versus-belts question is at the center of their project, the researchers also built a biometric profile of more than three dozen active-duty police officers, giving the ECPD a look at the overall health status of its officers, Janot said.

The biometric screenings tested things like the officers’ flexibility, spinal mobility, core endurance, aerobic fitness, upper-body endurance and lower-body strength.

These screenings give the ECPD a baseline that they can use to identify strategies to improve the overall health, well-being and readiness of their officers, and to identify possible underlying issues that contribute to officers’ health issues, Janot said.

“Having the answers to a lot of small questions can be used to make a big difference,” Janot said.

The information gained from the screenings will be used as part of the ECPD’s ongoing wellness programming, Rokus said.

By expanding its research to include the biometric screenings, researchers provided the ECPD with important information about the health of its officers, and UW-Eau Claire students gained valuable experience using high-end equipment as part of a real-world study, Janot said.

Given the success of the project with the ECPD, Janot hopes to continue to work with the department and to partner with other local agencies to help them solve problems.

“We have the students, cutting-edge technology and expertise to gather the information the ECPD and other agencies need to address a variety of problems,” Janot said. “We’ve shared our data with the ECPD, but we’re not done yet. Interest in this study is extremely high so we will share what we learned, but also are looking for ways to build on it.”

UW-Eau Claire faculty involved in the vest research include Janot; Dr. Nick Beltz, assistant professor; Dr. Saori Braun, assistant professor; and Dr. Marquell Johnson, associate professor. Student researchers include Bougie, Anna Kohler, Sierra Freid, Maddy Downing, Jessica Nagel and Lindsey Opelt. Dr. Andrew Floren of Mayo Clinic Health System helped UW-Eau Claire researchers design the study.

For more information about the police vest research, contact Dr. Jeff Janot, professor of kinesiology, at 715-836-5333 or janotjm@uwec.edu, or Matt Rokus, deputy chief of police, at 715-839-4979 or Matt.Rokus@eauclairewi.gov.


About the author Judy Berthiaume is the IMC's chief storyteller, sharing stories about the many exceptional people that make UW-Eau Claire such a phenomenal place. She talks with students, faculty, staff and alumni to find and to share their successes, initiatives, challenges and dreams with the campus community and the world beyond.

Calif. LEOs lose homes while responding to wildfire

Posted on November 12, 2018 by in Uncategorized

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By Tony Bizjak, Kevin Valine and Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee

PARADISE, Calif. — As they worked this week to save lives, firefighters and police officers in Paradise had their own personal fear in the back of their minds:

Will my home survive the onslaught of the Camp Fire?

For many, the unfortunate answer is no. The massive wind-whipped fire that roared through Butte mountain towns and hamlets on Thursday appears to have spared little, including homes owned by Cal Fire crews, Paradise police and county sheriff’s deputies.

Paradise Mayor Jody Jones confirmed on Sunday that 17 Paradise police officers lost their homes in the Thursday inferno.

Some 33 current and former firefighters have lost their homes as well, and fire officials say they fear that number could be much higher. Butte Sheriff Kory Honea estimated about 30 members of his department have lost their homes, too. Chico officials say eight of their police department employees also lost their homes.

“Everybody has a story to tell,” he said.

Paradise Mayor Jones, a retired Caltrans executive who has lived in Paradise for 14 years, found her house burned to the ground Friday when she returned to take a look. She had barely escaped the day before, saying she felt the heat of the flames around her, burning on both sides of Clark Road, one of two routes of out the secluded town.

“Every member of the town council lost their home,” she said. “If you think about it too much, it can overwhelm you.“

Butte College Police Chief Casey Carlson worked for 48 hours straight at the emergency command post, figuring – correctly, as it turned out – that his home of 10 years was gone too. Three members of his staff lost their homes as well.

“When we got the evacuation order, I went up to grab a few things, and houses (on the block) were on fire when I was leaving,” he said. “You kind of have to accept it. You know you are helping folks, and that is what matters.”

He’s decided, he said, that possessions are not that important. “I have my kids, the family and the dog. That’s what counts.”

Ray Johnson, a Butte County volunteer fire captain, stopped his fire engine Sunday at the Skyway Memorial Park cemetery and snapped a photo of the American flag that was rippling in the breeze. The flag was spotless and untouched by the fire that scorched just about everything else for miles around.

His eyes heavy with exhaustion and his yellow firefighting clothing smudged with soot, he fought back tears as he described saving homes while his home in Paradise burned to the ground. He said he hoped the flag would inspire people to know that all is not lost.

“This means a lot to me that this flag is still here,” he said.

“A lot of my friends’ houses were lost. I’m really sad. I’m sad for my community, but there’s hope. There’s so much generosity in this country and in Paradise. There’s hope. There’s a lot of good people here.”

The International Association of Fire Fighters has set up a help center in Chico for firefighters who lost homes, offering them financial assistance, help with filing insurance claims and emotional support.

IAFF state service representative Tim Aboudara Jr. said losing a home is devastating for everyone but it poses challenges for firefighters who find themselves in an unfamiliar role of needing help.

“Like so many people in these communities the loss is devastating to our members,” said Aboudara, who is a Santa Rosa firefighter.

“And it’s particularly insulting because they have spent so much time fighting fire and protecting homes and to be out on the line and doing their job and not know the status of their family and the status of their home is very difficult. But they never back down.”

The IAFF is working with the California Professional Firefighters and the CDF Firefighters Benevolent Foundation in the effort to assist the firefighters and their families who have lost their homes.

Abourdara said the IAFF started this effort 13 months ago after the Santa Rosa fire and it’s modeled on IAFF efforts done elsewhere in the United States. He said as many as 58 other firefighters may also have lost their homes to the Camp Fire.

Paradise mayor Jones estimated that 90 percent of the town’s houses are now gone, and that about half of downtown has been destroyed.

Still standing are Town Hall, the high school, the hospital, two if the three fire stations, and two of the three grocery stores.

She said that she and everyone she has talked to plans to rebuild, despite the ongoing threat of fires.

“It doesn’t matter where you live,“ she said. “You can be in harm’s way anywhere. I never want to live my life in fear.”

Sheriff Honea did not lose his home, he said. But the fire caused him some moments of personal worry. His daughter, Kassidy Honea, is a rookie Paradise police officer. She and he were directing evacuee traffic in Paradise Thursday when he got an emergency call and had to leave.

He hugged his daughter and said, “Kiddo, I love you,” before heading off.

Two Tools for Field Communications

Posted on November 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>If they don&#39;t respond to Ask and Tell, Make them comply, using your full and legal authority to do so. (Photo: Getty Images)</p>

How, when, and why you talk to people in the field is all about the context, the setting, and the seriousness or the urgency of the issue at hand. Most conversations between citizens and the police, which are not initiated by 9-1-1-driven radio calls or getting flagged down as you pass (“Hurry! He’s beating her over on the next block!”), are fairly routine. They usually involve saying hello, passing on information, or hearing about some situation that could bear looking into.

Talking to people who are under extreme stress, or giving commands when you are, is difficult and we tend to fall back on habits where we use the same conversational patterns. Saying “Calm down!” to someone who is not calm and will not become calm just because you shouted that command is a perfect example of what not to try.

Let’s make a few assumptions. Most people hate being told what to do, especially if it embarrasses them in front of their peers, families, or spouse/boyfriend/girlfriend. Most people are not good listeners, especially under stress, which means you usually have to repeat things you just said. And most people who think they might be arrested or actually are being arrested really don’t listen too much after they see or feel your matching silver bracelets. It’s this latter category that gets us into arguments as to who is “righter,” at a minimum, or foot pursuits or fights, at the worst.

Two models may help your field conversations. Which one you use will depend on if you are talking to cooperative people; could or could not be cooperative people; or uncooperative people. In days of old we referred to these three types as Yes-Maybe-No people. Our biggest challenge is trying not to turn Maybe people into No people, because that’s what usually leads to us having to get physical.

Introduce-Explain-Ask

One choice is the communications concept known as Introduce-Explain-Ask. This is a service-oriented approach for relatively low-stress encounters and it comes from my pal who was an East Coast police detective and now works as the director of security for a West Coast megachurch. He teaches it to his ushers and security staff.

The model starts with Introducing yourself to the person, who at the start could be a good guy, a bad guy, a friend of the bad guy, or a witness. Let’s follow along:

“I’m Officer Whomever, from the Local Police Department.” Followed by some version of “Who are you?” “What’s your name, sir/ma’am?” “Tell me who I’m talking to here?” Your choice of tone will depend on if you’re standing in front of a citizen, a gangster, a known crook, or a witness who you know nothing about.

<p>Introduce-Explain-Ask is simple for someone to hear and fulfill, and works best when the stakes are low. (Photo: POLICE File)</p>

The benefit to this first step is two-fold: You have clearly identified yourself (and badged them if you’re in plainclothes), so there can be no doubt later that they were talking to the real-deal police. And you can get his or her name early, while things are still fairly low-key.

Explain why you came over, why you are there, what you are about to do, and why you are about to do it: “I pulled over because it looked like you were having a problem with X, Y, or Z.” “The reason I stopped you was…” or “What I need you to do for me is …”

And then Ask for their compliance, which, of course, you may or may not get. If they don’t comply, remember that people don’t think, speak, or listen well under stress, and even a routine conversation with a cop can raise their pulse rates. In this case, repeat the Explain and Ask steps again, knowing that you may need to use repetition to be fully understood. The value to this model is that it’s simple for you to say, simple for them to hear and fulfill, and works best when the stakes are low.

Ask-Tell-Make

For tougher, more volatile situations, especially with known suspects or people who are about to become suspects in your mind, you can use Ask-Tell-Make. You may or may not want to Introduce yourself, depending on the urgency or seriousness of the situation, but you will Ask the person to comply and if they do, thank them for it. If they don’t, you move to the next step, which adds a sterner tone and suggests they are near the end of your last offer of voluntary compliance. If they don’t respond to Ask and Tell, Make them comply, using your full and legal authority to do so.

You get a call to contact the staff at the library for help with a threatening person who appears high on drugs or alcohol, or mentally ill, but potentially combative. Let’s follow along:

“I’m Officer Whomever, from the Local Police Department. What’s your name, sir?”

“Larry!”

“Okay, Larry. Thanks for that. I got called here and it looks like it’s time for you to leave the library. I’m going to Ask you to gather up your stuff, so we can head outside to talk some more. You hear what I’m Asking you?”

“You can’t tell me what to do! I know my civil rights! I’m not leaving!”

“I hear you, Larry. But at this point, I’ve already made up my mind that you’re trespassing and they have warned you in the past that you can’t be here. So now, I’m Telling you, you have to leave. Let’s head to the door.”

“F— you!” (Or some variation of the Universal Police Challenge to your legal authority.)

“OK, Larry. I’ve Asked you to leave, I’ve Told you to leave, so you need to leave. Now, you’ve given me no choice, so I will have to Make you leave.”

If Library Larry squares off and challenges you to fight, then you take the necessary steps (with a cover officer, preferably) to Make him leave with you, via an arrest for trespass, public intoxication, warrants, civil order violation, or whatever the situation dictates.

The value to repeating the steps in Ask-Tell-Make is not just for Larry’s benefit; it’s for the library staffers and civilians who are gathered around watching and listening to your encounter. Even the most anti-police types in the room will have to grudgingly admit that you gave Larry several chances to go along with the program and he didn’t. (For those of you who wear body cameras, the benefit to this approach should be obvious.)

No need to use Introduce-Explain-Ask during a felony hot stop or a shots fired call, of course. It has its uses during mostly lower-risk encounters. And Ask-Tell-Make works best in those situations where the suspect needs to know you have given him options and now those are over. You will not back down or change your mind about using arrest and control force to take him into custody.

Once you reach the Make stage, it’s no longer up for discussion, it’s not a debate, and you will have to take action because he has failed to comply. Don’t keep repeating the ATM model or it will lose its power. Once you decide to Make, put hands on.

Both of these models give you a range of semantic choices from Officer Friendly to Officer Assertive. You can always skip steps if you need to, but these communication approaches can help you “sell” what you’re doing in the field, to citizens, witnesses, and suspects alike.

Steve Albrecht worked for the San Diego Police Department for 15 years. His books include Albrecht on Guns; Patrol Cop, Streetwork, Contact and Cover, and Tactical Perfection for Street Cops. He can be reached at drsteve@drstevealbrecht.com or on Twitter @DrSteveAlbrecht.

 

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$100K Donated to Florida LEOs, Volunteers Affected by Hurricane Michael

Posted on November 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Bay County, FL, officials have accepted donations totaling $100,000 to go toward volunteers and law enforcement officers Thursday in what they hope will be continuing outpouring of support from corporations.

Scientific Games, a technology-based gaming company, donated the money, the News Herald reports.

With a mound of supplies donated to local law enforcement as the backdrop, Bay County Sheriff Tommy Ford said the funds will go directly to deputies and staff who suffered losses from Hurricane Michael.

“This storm hit us very hard,” Ford said, noting about 60 staff members and deputies lost their homes. “Their resolve has been inspiring. They didn’t skip a beat in serving their community.”

 

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Nebraska Deputies Buy 2 Child Safety Seats for Mom they Stopped for Speeding

Posted on November 6, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Dash-cam footage shows two Nebraska deputies installing two brand new child safety seats in an SUV at a traffic stop.Deputy Jason Jones had pulled over the vehicle for speeding when he noticed that the two children in the back seat were not in proper safety seats. He radioed for help, and soon thereafter, Deputy Jessica Manning arrived at the scene, with two newly purchased child safety seats. More Here.

Digital Signature – Automatic Digital Hashing of Scan Data

Posted on October 24, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

FARO’s Digital Signature is the automatic digital hashing of scan data on FARO’s line of Focus Laser Scanners.FARO’s Digital Signature provides encrypted security to all raw scans by hashing data at the time of capture. With this new automatic…

Increasing sensitivity to firefighter PTSD

Posted on October 23, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Educating friends about firefighter PTSD can prevent innocent questions that can undo years of mental health work and progress

Chicago fire organization donates $30K to train young EMTs

Posted on August 8, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Through the Black Fire Brigade’s donation, 30 young adults from the inner city will start EMT training with tuition, books and uniform covered

Colorado Springs Police K-9 Dies After Spinal Injury

Posted on July 18, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Colorado Springs police K-9 Unit bid farewell to a furry friend and officer, Remme, after he was injured early Friday.

Police: Woman Stabbed Man After He Exposed Himself

Posted on July 18, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Police arrested a woman on suspicion of stabbing a man after he indecently exposed himself to her in Redlands.

California Supreme Court to Decide What Officers Must Do to Escape Liability in Pursuit Crashes

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in Uncategorized

The California Supreme Court will soon decide whether a lawsuit can go forward or whether the Gardena Police Department has immunity because it has a pursuit policy and provides training.

FOP President: Portland a “Cesspool” Amid “Failed” Homeless Policies

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

The president of the Portland Police Association posted a lengthy statement on Facebook on Monday in which he slammed the city’s mayor for his response to the homelessness crisis, saying Oregon’s largest city has “become a cesspool.”

Officer Daryl Turner — who has been a police officer for 27 years — wrote, “Aggressive panhandlers block the sidewalks, storefronts, and landmarks like Pioneer Square, discouraging people from enjoying our City. Garbage-filled RVs and vehicles are strewn throughout our neighborhoods. Used needles, drug paraphernalia, and trash are common sights lining the streets and sidewalks of the downtown core area, under our bridges, and freeway overpasses. That’s not what our families, business owners, and tourists deserve.”

Turner said further that Mayor Ted Wheeler uses “rhetoric to smokescreen his own failed policies,” referring to Wheeler’s comment that, when told of the high number of arrests of homeless people, the police have “some sort of implicit bias.”

“The Portland Police Bureau has not been given nearly enough resources to fulfill its small piece in addressing the homelessness crisis,” Turner wrote. “We are understaffed. Officers are unable to spend the time needed to connect our homeless to necessary services, whether it be housing, mental health services, drug rehabilitation, or other resources. It’s a recipe for failure to put the burden of the homelessness solution on the Police Bureau’s shoulders and then give us insufficient resources to do the work.”

 

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Deadly wildfire near Yosemite poses danger of rapid expansion

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The dead or dying fuels mixed with fire poses an amplified hazard for firefighters

More Details Released in Kansas City Shootout That Left Three Officers Wounded

Posted on July 17, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Marlin Mack was identified Monday as the gunman killed in a firefight with Kansas City police after wounding three police officers.

Georgia K-9 Officer Shares Emotional Prayer With Boy Before His Brain Surgery

Posted on July 16, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A K-9 officer in Georgia offered an emotional prayer for a young boy who was about to have brain surgery.

Minnesota Cop Killer Released to Halfway House

Posted on July 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The man convicted of killing Minneapolis Police Officer Richard Miller in 1981 has been released from jail and sent to a halfway house as part of a work-release program.

Isaac Brown — who was suspected of auto theft when Officer Miller encountered him — used a stolen police revolver to shoot Miller several times in the chest.

Former Minneapolis Police Chief Tony Bouza told WCCO-TV, “If he has rehabilitated himself and confronted his crime, and admitted it and acknowledged it, he ought to be released because justice ought to be tempered with mercy.”

Brown had served 37 years behind bars.

 

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FLIR Announces identiFINDER R200-GN Personal Radiation Detector

Posted on July 12, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>FLIR has announced the FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN spectroscopic personal radiation detector (SPRD). (Photo: FLIR)</p>

FLIR has announced the FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN spectroscopic personal radiation detector (SPRD), the latest addition to its identiFINDER R200-Series handheld radiation security solutions. The rugged, pager-sized FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN SPRD is designed to detect and identify neutrons, in addition to gamma radiation, allowing front-line responders to quickly determine whether there is a true radiation threat for safe, informed decision making.

Since neutrons penetrate material and travel distances greater than any other form of radiation, the FLIR identiFINDER R200-GN with neutron identification is an important early warning system for the detection of malicious material and an additional safety feature for responders, according to the company.

The device meets the 1.5M drop criteria required by ANSI N42.32, one of the key performance standards for alarming PRDs in Homeland Security. The IP67 rating assures the R200-GN is protected against dust and immersion in water up to 1M depth. The R200-GN enclosure is also MIL-STD-810G compliant to protect against salt and fog. The unit features integrated Bluetooth Smart wireless technology, which facilitates recording and sending real-time dose rates and geotag information via a companion mobile app.

The identiFINDER R200-GN is currently shipping worldwide with pricing starting at $3,850 USD. To learn more about the identiFINDER R200-GN, visit http://www.flir.com/r200.

 

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FL County Approves First-Year FF Raises

Posted on July 12, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Polk County has approved immediate raises for first-year firefighters rather than fight a grievance filed in June by the firefighters union.

Two Dead after Altercation at Philadelphia Home

Posted on July 11, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Witnesses said there was an altercation at the home before the fire and believe the fire was deliberate.

Suspect Who Fled From Pennsylvania Police Found Dead Under Bulldozer

Posted on July 11, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The death occurred Monday during an incident involving two suspects, a Pennsylvania State Game Commission worker, state and local police, and marijuana plants.

Texas Officer on Desk Duty After Drawing Gun on “Young Boys”

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in Uncategorized

An El Paso (TX) police officer has been relegated to desk duty after reports that he drew his service weapon and pointed at a group of children, according to ABC News.

A video — which was uploaded to an individual’s personal Facebook page — appears to show the officer “pushing one of the boys against a wall with his knee while the other boys taunt the officer and hurl profanity at him,” said ABC. The boys recoil and the officer quickly re-holsters his gun.

The El Paso Police Department said on Saturday they had launched an internal investigation of the incident.

 

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Ohio Officer Collapses, Dies During Training in 90-Degree Heat

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Patrolman Vu Nguyen passed away four days after collapsing during a 1.5-mile timed run that was part of the agency's canine handler eligibility process. Image courtesy of ODMP.</p>

Patrolman Vu Nguyen passed away four days after collapsing during a 1.5-mile timed run that was part of the agency’s canine handler eligibility process.

Vu Nguyen died at the Cleveland Clinic, where he had been approved for a liver transplant, according to Cleveland.com.

“He and other candidates were participating in the physical fitness portion of the process in 90+ degree heat when he collapsed during the run on July 2nd, 2018,” ODMP said.

Nguyen has been a Cleveland police officer since 1998. He is survived by his wife and two children.

 

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Florida Department Extends Test of Amazon’s Facial Recognition Software

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

The Orlando Police Department plans to continue its test of Amazon’s controversial “Rekognition” facial recognition software, despite opposition from civil rights groups such as the ACLU and even company employees and investors.

Rekognition can identify a person in a crowd matching an image uploaded to the system and track their movements in real time. The department had been using a free “proof of concept” trial of the system with seven police officers who volunteered to participate having images uploaded.

According to the Orlando Sentinel, the department informed Mayor Buddy Dyer and the city council that more time was needed to make a “thoughtful, precise and comprehensive recommendation” on whether or not the city should eventually purchase the technology.

 

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Train Slams Into Disabled Kansas Sheriff’s Patrol Car

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A Sedgwick County Sheriff’s deputy was en route to a 911 call when he lost control of his patrol car and got struck on railroad tracks.

Texas Deputies Find Gym Bag Full of Cats

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Harris County Precinct 5 Constable’s Office didn’t know what to expect when they were called to inspect a suspicious gym bag abandoned on the side of the road earlier this week.

Memorial Events Mark 2-Year Anniversary of 5 Officers Killed In Dallas Ambush

Posted on July 9, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Events that included a motorcycle ride, 5K race and a fundraiser marked the two-year anniversary of the July 7, 2016 ambush that killed five police officers in Dallas.

Are Law Enforcement Stand-offs / Barricades Increasing?

Posted on July 8, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

July 07–BUTLER COUNTY — Since January, there have been five police standoffs in the area, including the two incidents that happened this week in Middletown and Franklin Twp. Here is a quick recap of the incidents so far in 2018:

Are Law Enforcement Stand-offs / Barricades Increasing?

Posted on July 8, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

July 07–BUTLER COUNTY — Since January, there have been five police standoffs in the area, including the two incidents that happened this week in Middletown and Franklin Twp. Here is a quick recap of the incidents so far in 2018:

Fentanyl use as pain medication in ambulances down in Mass. cities

Posted on July 7, 2018 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

According to figures provided by Acushnet Fire Chief Kevin Gallagher, fentanyl administrations are down 51 percent in New Bedford, Fairhaven and Acushnet

Communication in action and action in communication

Posted on July 6, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Effective communication is the fuel that feeds momentum and action in achieving progress in the fire service

Updated: NC Firefighter Dies Responding to Call

Posted on July 4, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Liberty VFD firefighter Michael Goodnight, who was responding to an emergency, died in a crash between a pickup and a car.

Parking officer, suspect killed on Calif. college campus

Posted on June 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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Associated Press

POMONA, Calif. — Police say a parking officer at a Southern California college has been killed and the suspect was fatally shot by police.

Pomona Police Chief Michael Olivieri says on Twitter that a police parking officer was killed Friday at Cal Poly Pomona. He says a police officer fatally shot the suspect.

The chief said that police do not believe there are any additional suspects but officers were conducting a search as a precaution.

A spokeswoman for the college said it was an "active, on-going investigation" but that police had determined there is no threat to the campus.

Los Angeles County sheriff's homicide detectives were headed to the scene.

The public polytechnic university, east of Los Angeles, has more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students.

A campus police parking officer has been killed & suspect fatally wounded in an officer-involved shooting at Cal Poly Pomona, according to Pomona Police Dept. Chief Michael Olivieri. The parking officer was stabbed, according to broadcast reports. W. Temple Ave and Valley Blvd. pic.twitter.com/AoFPyPPQTl

— C yamanaka (@Cyamanaka7) June 30, 2018

Fatal involvement of Pomona parking enforcement Cal Poly Pomona suspect killed in officer-involved shooting #CalPolyPomona #pomona pic.twitter.com/cSzq6STZZ0

— julian Lucas (@Julian__Lucas) June 30, 2018

Why your mic placement matters

Posted on June 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Duane Wolfe
Author: Duane Wolfe

There’s an old cop saying, “If dispatch doesn’t know where you are then only God can help you.” The link between you and the rest of the world is your lifeline. That lifeline needs to be kept as strong as possible. By the same token, don’t let that lifeline be the cause of your injury or death.

For those of us who lived through the days of having to take our radio off our belts every time we wanted to call dispatch on our portables, the lapel mic was a real blessing. Many of you have never had to work without one, but that blessing can also be a curse.

If you wear a mic that is wired to your radio, remind yourself that you are wearing a weapon that a suspect intent on harming you can use against you. You don’t want to find it wrapped around your neck while an assailant attempts to strangle you with it.

Consider how you attach the mic to your uniform and where you have the cord. In order to take up the slack in the cord and keep it out of the way of the equipment on your duty belt, many officers put the cord behind them and the mic on the shoulder.

This can cause several problems that can affect your safety:

The cord can be used by an attacker to strangle you. In this method of carry, officers lack the ability to retain and control the mic if someone grabs it from behind and tries to prevent you from calling dispatch. In a physical confrontation, if the mic comes off, where will it end up? How many videos have you seen of cops fighting with a mic cord dragging behind them, out of reach and useless? A mic located on your shoulder can cause officers to turn their head towards the mic, potentially away from a suspect. It may also cause you to raise your elbow up which can compromise the security of your baton, TASER and firearm.

Look up the Trooper Coates video if you aren’t familiar with it. In this case the suspect was shot five times with a .357 and survived. Trooper Coates was shot with a .22 several times, all of which struck his vest, except for one that hit him in his raised upper arm as he called for assistance on his portable. That round turned and traveled into his heart and proved fatal.

All officers should consider using a method I first learned from Bob Hindi, who developed the Hindi Duty Belt S.A.F.E.T.Y. System. Hindi did extensive research on body mechanics, physiology, ergonomics and kinesiology as it relates to police officers and their equipment. He recommends threading the cord under your shirt and then out between the top and second button or under your external carrier. By placing the mic in this location, you achieve several goals:

The cord is out of the way of interfering with any of your duty belt equipment. The cord is less accessible to be used to strangle you. The cord is contained inside your shirt so someone cannot use it to take the mic away. When the mic comes loose, it ends up hanging right in front of you, where you can access it. The mic is centered so it is equally accessible to both hands to retain it when someone tries to take it away and either hand can key the mic. Having the mic centered doesn’t cause you to turn your head when you transmit.

Obviously, new wireless mics can reduce the problems mentioned, and you should count your blessings if you are fortunate enough to have one, but you have a greater concern for retention. With no cord, you have much less to hang onto in order to retain the mic if someone tries to take it from you.

Regardless of the type of mic you use, the use of a mic loop or clip will also aid in keeping it where you want it. By attaching the mic loop or clip to a shirt button or your vest you provide a more solid base than just clipping it to your shirt or jacket.

Mic placement might seem like a little thing, but it could cause a big problem for you. Where and how you choose to wear your mic, or any other piece of equipment, is a personal decision that should be tactically thought out. You can come to the best conclusion when you are aware of the strengths and weaknesses of different locations.

All equipment placement is critical to maintaining your operational readiness. All your equipment must be accessible and placed so that you can protect it.

Maryland Gunman Charged with 5 Counts of Murder

Posted on June 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

The suspect in Thursday’s mass shooting at the offices of the Capital Gazette newspaper in Maryland newspaper has been charged with five counts of first-degree murder in the shooting, according to NBC News.

Five people were killed and several others “gravely injured” during the attack in Annapolis.

The 38-year-old suspected shooter had a history with the paper, filing a defamation suit against it in 2012. The suit was in relation to a story about a harassment case in which Ramos was the defendant.

During the attack, journalists crawled under desks to avoid being seen, listening to the gunman’s footsteps and blasts from his pump-action shotgun.

Ramos reportedly refused to cooperate with police, and had “filed off” his fingerprints to avoid being identified. Investigators used facial recognition software to identify Ramos, according to ABC News.

 

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911 Call of Man Clinging to Car Hood: ‘Someone’s Trying to Steal My Car’

Posted on June 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The 911 call made from a South Florida man desperately hanging from the hood of a car speeding at 70 miles an hour has been released.

Video shows chaos during NJ arts festival shooting

Posted on June 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Bruce Shipkowski Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. — Body camera footage from officers responding to a shooting at a New Jersey all-night arts festival shows police telling people to go home shortly before shots rang out, sending people scrambling.

The footage released by the Mercer County Prosecutor's Office shows festivalgoers seeking safety as gunfire erupted and wounded people seeking help in the chaotic aftermath at the historic Roebling Wire Works Building, a former factory that once supplied cables for bridges, including the Golden Gate.

The agency also released 911 calls about the June 17 shooting that left a suspect dead and nearly two dozen people injured. The 17 people treated for gunshot wounds included a 13-year-old boy and another suspect.

About 1,000 people were attending the Art All Night Trenton festival when the gunfire erupted in the early morning hours of June 17. The event showcases local art, music, food and films.

Authorities have said several neighborhood gangs had a dispute, and multiple suspects began shooting at each other, with police returning fire.

The released footage begins as police were trying to shut down the festival only halfway in. One officer can be heard saying "Go home, folks! It's over," shortly before the shooting starts.

Police said they had been planning on shutting down the event early because several fights had broken out.

At one point, an officer can be seen on video angrily ordering an attendee to stop taking photographs of the frantic scene in the warehouse, where artwork lined the walls. A man is soon seen running up to police screaming: "My boy got hit! My boy got hit!" An officer tells him "Get him on the ground. Put pressure on him."

The footage later shows several officers helping a man who had been shot multiple times until the paramedics arrive.

"Stay with us, big guy. Stay with us," they can be heard saying to the victim.

Another officer who drove a shooting victim to a hospital is seen there yelling for help. As staffers rush to get the wounded man inside, the officer warns them there will be many more injured people

Judge Overturns Missouri Trooper’s Firing

Posted on June 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A Cole County judge has ruled that the head of the Missouri Highway Patrol did not have the authority to fire trooper Anthony Piercy and sent the case back to the agency for consideration of a new, lesser punishment.

Judge cites substantial progress in Ferguson consent decree

Posted on June 27, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Jim Salter Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — The federal judge overseeing a reform agreement between Ferguson, Missouri, and the U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday that she has seen substantial progress in efforts to eliminate bias in the St. Louis suburb's law enforcement system.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry heard a quarterly update on progress in Ferguson, where the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown was a catalyst for the Black Lives Matter movement.

"All signs are pointing toward progress," Perry said. She said the effort so far "is how the court system is supposed to work and the process is supposed to work."

Brown, a black and unarmed 18-year-old, was fatally shot by white officer Darren Wilson on Aug. 9, 2014, setting off months of often violent protests in Ferguson and throughout the St. Louis area. Wilson was not charged and resigned in November 2014.

But the shooting prompted a Justice Department investigation that found troubling evidence that Ferguson police targeted poor and black residents, and that fines and court costs subsidized city operations.

A 2016 consent agreement requires significant changes.

Some residents complained that the reform process is often lacking in transparency, particularly in alerting residents to community meetings. One woman cited a meeting at an apartment complex that drew just one resident.

Another Ferguson resident, Justin Idleburg, wondered why nearly four years after Brown's death, police policies on body cameras, accountability and other matters are still only in the development stage.

"Four years?" he asked. "Can we speed this process up?"

Officials from both the Justice Department and the city, though, cited progress.

Ferguson City Attorney Apollo Carey said the city has completed a review of 7,900 unresolved municipal court cases that dated back prior to 2014. An amnesty program has dismissed about 6,200 of those cases, while 1,704 will be prosecuted, mostly for cases involving more serious crimes.

Justice Department attorney Jude Volek said the city is nearing completion on a new stop, search and arrest policy, and a new policy on the use of body-worn cameras. A mediation process is being established for residents who have complaints about mistreatment by police. A community policing plan is expected to be finalized next month.

Mildred Clines, a Ferguson resident and a member of the community group called the Ferguson Collaborative, said progress has been slower than many residents would like, largely because while new policies are nearing completion, they haven't yet been implemented.

"The majority of the citizens of Ferguson really don't feel any different," Clines said. "That's when you can say you've seen progress — when the citizens say they've seen it."

Fallen firefighter’s husband fighting for benefits

Posted on June 27, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The family of Margaret Roberts, a 21-year fire veteran who died of cancer, is fighting with the city of Houston about whether her cancer was caused by her career

San Jose Officers Union Wants Police Auditor Ousted

Posted on June 26, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

After spending the past month denouncing his fitness for the job, the San Jose police union is formally seeking to oust Independent Police Auditor Aaron Zisser over an annual report that made “misleading” claims about racial disparities in use of force.

Two Killed in Plane Crash near Detroit Airport

Posted on June 25, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Two people were killed and another critically injured Sunday when a small plane crashed in a neighborhood west of Coleman A. Young Airport.

Two Killed in Plane Crash near Detroit Airport

Posted on June 25, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Two people were killed and another critically injured Sunday when a small plane crashed in a neighborhood west of Coleman A. Young Airport.

CA Fire Chief Says Department is in ‘Dire Straits’

Posted on June 23, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Sutter County Fire Chief John Shalowitz says his department is short staffed and has decades old apparatus that breaks down too often.

CA Fire Chief Says Department is in ‘Dire Straits’

Posted on June 23, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Sutter County Fire Chief John Shalowitz says his department is short staffed and has decades old apparatus that breaks down too often.

Police, other first responders give boy with disorder a memorable birthday

Posted on June 23, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By PoliceOne Staff

BRADENTON, Fla. — A boy who suffers from a disorder was surprised with a first responder-themed birthday party.

FOX13 reported that Jamie Sprout, 12, was born with a mitochondrial disorder and was supposed to be on a ventilator by the age of 10.

Jamie’s mother, Nicole, said he loves first responders, which is why personnel from several different agencies around the county surprised him at his birthday party.

Detective Moyett and School Resource Officer Moore celebrated Jamie Sprout's 12th birthday today! Jamie has been actively fighting a mitochondria disease, a form of Muscular Dystrophy, affecting his organs. Jamie loves law enforcement and we love him! #OneCityOneTeam pic.twitter.com/FjAMAdK0nA

— Bradenton Police (@BradentonPolice) June 20, 2018

“He’s just so grateful for everything we do for him, the police department, anyone. He’s just very thankful for life,” Cedar Hammock Fire Rescue firefighter Marc Massella said.

Nicole said she is very thankful for how the first responders have become a part of their family.

“Very loved, they’ve been by our side pretty much since day one when we met them. We need anything, we call them, they’re there,” she said. “The sheriff’s department has been a huge help and inspiration in more ways than one.”

"There’s sheriffs and police here and everything, and I’ve got a table full of presents, so I think that’s pretty cool,” Jamie said.

Shootings Caught on Tape in NYC Gang Takedown

Posted on June 22, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A mall shooting that sent terrified shoppers running and filled busy streets with gun blasts was how trigger-happy goons amused themselves, according to shocking footage released in a Brooklyn gang takedown.

14 milestones that transformed emergency communications

Posted on June 21, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

From the first introduction in 1876 to present, emergency communications have evolved greatly. What are some of the most important milestones in dispatch history?

Video: Dashcam Footage Shows OIS that Injured Michigan Deputy

Posted on June 20, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: Dashcam Footage Shows OIS that Injured Michigan Deputy

A recently released dashcam video shows an officer-involved shooting in Jackson, MI, that left one officer injured and a suspect dead.

On the afternoon of April 1, Easter Sunday, officers from the Jackson Police Department were called out to a domestic dispute. Investigators say Christopher Hall walked out of his house and immediately started shooting at officers, reports WLNS.

Officials say 36 shots were fired, 15 of them by Hall. One of the bullets hit Officer Thomas Tinklepaugh in the leg. Hall was fatally shot.

Last week, Jackson County Prosecuting Attorney Jerry Jarzynka released his final review of the shooting, clearing all three officers involved of any wrongdoing.

Jarzynka found the actions from police were justified because Hall shot first, refused to drop his weapon after hearing commands from officers, and posed a clear threat to officers, who acted in self-defense.

Officer Tinklepaugh is now recovering from his leg injury and is expected to return to the police force.

 

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Girl Gives New York Officer Elmo Doll to Keep Him Company on Duty

Posted on June 20, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A young girl in western New York went out of her way for a police officer to make sure he’ll never be alone while on patrol, reports Fox News.

<p>After gifting her doll to a Blasdell (NY) PD officer, Gabby now has Elmo back in her room and she says she wants to be a police officer when she grows up. (Photo: Blasdell PD)</p>

The Blasdell (NY) Police Department said in a Facebook post last Tuesday that a 3-year-old girl named Gabby stopped by to drop off thin blue and red line flags to police and fire officials.

“Blasdell Police and Fire Departments thank Gabby, a 3 year old village resident who gave the thin blue and red line flags and Elmo to the departments,” the post read. “We thank Gabby and her family for the support and nice gesture.”

Gabby’s mom said the little girl wanted to give the officer Elmo because he “works all alone. He needs a friend.” 

Blasdell PD then returned Elmo to the girl, saying he had completed the police academy and was going to live with her to keep her safe.

Elmo is now back in Gabby’s room and the girl says she wants to be a police officer when she grows up.

 

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Girl Gives New York Officer Elmo Doll to Keep Him Company on Duty

Posted on June 20, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A young girl in western New York went out of her way for a police officer to make sure he’ll never be alone while on patrol, reports Fox News.

<p>After gifting her doll to a Blasdell (NY) PD officer, Gabby now has Elmo back in her room and she says she wants to be a police officer when she grows up. (Photo: Blasdell PD)</p>

The Blasdell (NY) Police Department said in a Facebook post last Tuesday that a 3-year-old girl named Gabby stopped by to drop off thin blue and red line flags to police and fire officials.

“Blasdell Police and Fire Departments thank Gabby, a 3 year old village resident who gave the thin blue and red line flags and Elmo to the departments,” the post read. “We thank Gabby and her family for the support and nice gesture.”

Gabby’s mom said the little girl wanted to give the officer Elmo because he “works all alone. He needs a friend.” 

Blasdell PD then returned Elmo to the girl, saying he had completed the police academy and was going to live with her to keep her safe.

Elmo is now back in Gabby’s room and the girl says she wants to be a police officer when she grows up.

 

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Report: Federal Officials Likely Lost Track of Nearly 6,000 Unaccompanied Migrant Children

Posted on June 19, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The Trump administration has likely lost track of nearly 6,000 unaccompanied migrant children, thousands more than lawmakers were alerted to last month, a review of federal data found.

Report: Federal Officials Likely Lost Track of Nearly 6,000 Unaccompanied Migrant Children

Posted on June 19, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The Trump administration has likely lost track of nearly 6,000 unaccompanied migrant children, thousands more than lawmakers were alerted to last month, a review of federal data found.

North Carolina Trooper Delivers Baby On Side of the Road

Posted on June 19, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

North Carolina Highway Patrol Sgt. W.C. Johnson was traveling south on Capital Boulevard when he saw a silver SUV in the median with its lights flashing.

1 dead, 22 injured in NJ arts festival shooting

Posted on June 17, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Gunfire erupted in a crowd, sending people stampeding and leaving one suspect dead and 22 people injured

Photo of Kid in Cuffs Posted on Social Media Sparks Debate

Posted on June 14, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A picture of a Pennsylvania boy in handcuffs went viral, causing people to question police tactics with regard to school children, according to a report by Philly.com.

Lancaster Chief of Police Jarrad Berkihiser said that the officer was called to the school because the boy was in some manner of crisis, and that the handcuffs were needed to protect the student from harming himself or others and were removed once he was safely in the ambulance.

The school district was quick to issue a brief statement offering clarification about the incident.

“Police determined restraining the child in this manner was the best course of action for the child’s safety under the circumstances. Although this was a last resort, they used their best judgment to manage this medical situation and protect the child and staff. The school district will continue to collaborate with the police department with respect to medical emergencies for our students. We appreciate the coordinated effort between the Lancaster City Police Department, school building officials, and the child’s family to ensure the actions taken were in the best interest of the student’s safety and well-being.”

Chief Berkihiser said he will meet with the district’s superintendent, Damaris Rau, “to determine what can be learned from the incident.”

 

 

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Fallen Connecticut State Police Trooper Remembered

Posted on June 13, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Hundreds of police officers from across the tri-state area gathered Tuesday morning to mourn State Police Trooper First Class Walter Greene — who contracted cancer after serving as a first responder in wake of the terror attacks on 9/11.

10 lessons from the Pulse nightclub shooting

Posted on June 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Mike Wood
Author: Mike Wood

In the early morning hours of June 12, 2016, a lone terrorist who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) killed 49 people and wounded 58 others in an attack on the Pulse nightclub, in Orlando, Florida. At the time, the Pulse nightclub attack was the deadliest mass shooting in the United States by a single assailant, later exceeded only by the Route 91 Harvest music festival attack in Las Vegas, Nevada, on October 1, 2017.

Lieutenant Scott Smith of the Orlando Police Department led an entry team that confronted the shooter, and served as the Orlando tactical team commander that morning. This past December, he debriefed the attendees of the California Association of Tactical Officers (CATO) conference about the attack, sharing valuable insights about the operation and lessons learned.

Some of the lessons identified by Lieutenant Smith, or derived from his briefing, include the following:

1. Don’t leave critical equipment behind.

Upon his arrival, Lieutenant Smith was immediately confronted by a chaotic scene, with a swarm of victims fleeing from the shooter’s gunfire inside. Without delay, Smith grabbed his rifle, organized a hasty team, and made entry, leaving his rifle plates, helmet, spare ammunition and other vital equipment behind in his rush to stop the threat. Lieutenant Smith would later take a position down a short hallway from the rifle-armed attacker, and engage him with rifle fire, without the benefit of his protective equipment or spare ammunition for his primary weapon.

Officers should recognize that when they arrive at a high-threat scene, they may get ambushed, come under immediate fire, or be forced by circumstances – as Lieutenant Smith was – to react immediately without donning all of their equipment. Officers might consider making a momentary stop before reaching the scene to don protective equipment (helmet, plates), and access enhanced equipment and weaponry (active shooter bag, IFAK, tactical vest, long guns from the trunk or rack) so they’re mission ready upon arrival and protected to the maximum extent from ambush threats.

2. Hardening targets deters attacks.

It appears that the Pulse nightclub was not the primary target of the attacker, who had previously reconnoitered the Disney World theme park and other locations, but was deterred by the security measures at those sites. The Pulse nightclub was ostensibly chosen because it appeared to be a soft target, offering a high probability of success.

We have seen this behavior prior to other active shooter attacks, such as in the Aurora, Colorado theater shooting, where the attacker bypassed targets that were closer to his home and which offered a larger population of victims to attack, to target the only theater in the area with a restrictive “gun free zone” policy that disarmed patrons, thereby reducing the chance he would be opposed.

3. Victim considerations.

As in the Paris Bataclan Theater and San Bernardino terror attacks that preceded it, the Pulse attack demonstrated how quickly responding officers could be overwhelmed by the sheer number of victims that needed medical attention and rescue.

Because mass casualty incidents can quickly overwhelm responding forces, a robust mutual aid program is essential to deal with the volume of victims. Additionally, agencies must ensure that officers on contact teams understand their principal concern is ending the threat, not rescuing the victims they encounter. Any delay in shutting down the killer could generate additional victims. The Orlando Police showed how putting rapid pressure on the killer can change this calculus, since the Pulse killer shot no additional victims after the entry team closed on his position and fired at him.

4. Police and fire-EMS coordination is critical.

Fire-EMS forces were prohibited from responding to the Pulse nightclub by their chain of command, delaying critically needed treatment for victims. Even when the threat had been contained in a corner of the building, and police leaders requested assistance, fire-EMS crews were prevented from going to the casualty collection point located outside and across the street, or opening the doors to a fire station several blocks away from the incident to aid the victims that fled there. To their credit, two paramedics violated protocol to aid victims outside the club, but took a professional risk to do so.

Better communication and coordination at the command level between police and fire-EMS is essential beforehand to ensure a smooth integration of assets during a critical event.

5. Active shooter protocols require further study and refinement.

We’ve made a lot of progress in the development of active shooter protocols since the 1999 Columbine High School attack, but the Pulse nightclub shooting shows we still haven’t anticipated all the possibilities.

When the active shooter event transitioned into a barricaded hostage situation, the Orlando Police Department was left in an unanticipated predicament. The operation’s tempo, tactics and objectives suddenly changed, leaving no clear path to follow. The law enforcement community needs to consider the impact of unpredictable suspect actions on active shooter protocols, and ensure those protocols are flexible enough to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances.

6. Law enforcement transport of victims.

With fire-EMS assets withheld, law enforcement officers elected to transport victims directly to the hospital in patrol cars and trucks. The two paramedics who self-deployed to the scene transported 13 victims that morning, but police transported an estimated 15-20 victims to the hospital, including a SWAT officer who had been shot in the helmet by the suspect.

Because law enforcement transport of victims has become a common theme in recent incidents (such as the San Bernardino terror attack and the Dallas sniper attack), agencies should develop protocols for how to do this most efficiently and safely.

7. Long guns need slings.

Lieutenant Smith reported that many officers deployed long guns at the scene, and were later burdened by them when they needed to assist with rescues, first aid and other tasks that required two hands.

Every law enforcement long gun needs a sling so as to allow the free use of both hands while maintaining control of the weapon and immediate access to it. A sling is essential for a long gun in the same manner that a holster is essential for a pistol.

8. Explosives considerations.

The Orlando Police SWAT team did not have an integrated EOD capability, which complicated the scenario when developments indicated a possible IED threat. Concerns about standoff distances and blast mitigation required the team to consult mutual aid resources, and the team also had to ask for help from the Sheriff’s Department when it was decided to attempt an explosive breach of the outer wall.

In this modern age of terror activity, where IED technology and knowledge have proliferated, and explosive breaching capabilities have become more important, it’s essential for a tactical team to have an integrated EOD component, or at least enhanced IED awareness training.

9. Operations Tempo.

The day following the event, the Orlando PD SWAT team began working a 12 on/12 off schedule for an extended period, as dignitaries traveled to the city, investigative warrants were executed and concerns about secondary attacks were raised. The team kept up this exhausting pace for weeks after the attack, and it became a stressor on the team’s health and capabilities. The same thing happened with the French BRI team in the wake of the 2015 Paris terror attacks.

Agencies need to consider that in the wake of a critical incident, they may need to rely heavily on mutual aid agreements – for an extended period of time – to ease the burden, until the status quo is achieved again.

10. Critical Incident Stress Management.

In the wake of the attack, the Orlando Police Department conducted critical incident debriefings for affected personnel and provided counseling services. This kind of assistance is absolutely necessary, and must be ongoing to ensure that the mental and emotional health of personnel is maintained. Even resolute SWAT cops can benefit from this help – Lieutenant Smith reports that the SWAT team-only debriefing was expected to last about 90 minutes, but lasted approximately five hours to meet the needs of the team members.

I would like to thank Lieutenant Smith and the Orlando Police Department for sharing these valuable lessons with the greater law enforcement community. I would also like to thank CATO for the incredible learning opportunity provided by the 2017 Tactical Conference. To learn more about the 2018 CATO conference in Reno, Nevada, on 5-8 Nov 2018, visit http://catonews.org/conference-2018/.

God bless you all and be safe out there!

Distracted Driver Caused Crash With Michigan State Trooper

Posted on June 12, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Police are reminding drivers to avoid distractions when behind the wheel after a two-vehicle crash sent a state trooper and a civilian driver to the hospital.

Orlando Officer Shot in Head, Suspect Barricaded with 4 Children

Posted on June 11, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>The suspect in the shooting of an Orlando officer has been identified as Gary Wayne Lindsey Jr.</p><p>Lindsey is currently on probation stemming from a 2008 arrest in Volusia County on charges of arson of a dwelling and willful fleeing or eluding law enforcement. (Photo: Volusia County SO)</p>

Orlando police have identified the man suspected of shooting an officer before taking several children hostage inside an apartment near Universal Orlando as 35-year-old Gary Wayne Lindsey Jr. The wounded officer has also been identified.

Officer Kevin Valencia was taken to Orlando Regional Medical Center where he underwent surgery. Police Chief John Mina told reporters the officer,who is in his late 20s, was in critical condition but was expected to live. There are reports Valencia was shot in the temple.

Mina said the shooting happened after officers responded at about 11:45 p.m. Sunday to a woman who reported being battered by Lindsey at the Westbrook Apartments.

Mina gave an update on the case at 3 p.m. as the standoff stretched beyond 14 hours. Mina said hostage negotiators had been in contact with Lindsey about five times since the early hours of Monday morning, but hadn’t been able to convince him to surrender.

“We are urging him to release those children and help this situation come to a peaceful resolution,” Mina said.

The Orlando Police Department said the suspect currently has four children as hostages, ages 1, 6, 10 and 11, the Orlando Sentinel reports. Initial information was that two of the children are Lindsey’s, while two are the victim’s, the police chief said.

 

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Vehicle fire call reveals series of major crimes

Posted on June 10, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Firefighters discovered a major crime scene involving assault, arson, burglary and auto theft, according to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office

Iowa fire dept. establishes rapid entry program for homes

Posted on June 9, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The Burlington Fire Department is participating in a program designed to allow firefighters and paramedics gain rapid entry into a person’s home without damage

Minneapolis police halt low-level marijuana stings, citing racial disparities

Posted on June 9, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Libor Jany and Randy Furst Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

MINNEAPOLIS — Minneapolis police abruptly ended the practice of targeting small-scale marijuana sellers downtown after revelations that nearly every one arrested was black.

In a series of rushed announcements Thursday, authorities said that police would no longer conduct sting operations targeting low-level marijuana sales, and charges against 47 people arrested in the first five months of 2018 would be dismissed.

The extraordinary turnaround came after Hennepin County's chief public defender contacted Mayor Jacob Frey to complain about what looked like blatant racial profiling. Frey then directed Chief Medaria Arradondo to stop the stings.

"I believe strongly that marijuana should be a lowest-level enforcement priority and that it should be fully legalized at the state level," Frey said in a statement Thursday.

"The fact that racial disparities are so common nationwide in the enforcement of marijuana laws is one of the reasons I support full legalization."

Thursday's announcement by the chief signals a shift toward a more lenient approach pursued in other major U.S. cities. Drug-related arrests by Minneapolis police have already fallen nearly two thirds from 2007 to 2016, police records show.

But in recent years, Minneapolis police have stepped up their presence on Hennepin Avenue in response to concerns about safety downtown. Using undercover officers posing as buyers, they arrested 47 people for selling marijuana on Hennepin between 5th and 6th streets.

The Hennepin County Public Defender's office determined that 46 of those arrested were black. All were charged as felonies. Some were put in diversion programs, some were convicted and at least one man went to prison.

"Almost all of those cases involve a sale of 1-2 grams of marijuana for a total of $10-$20," assistant county public defender Jess Braverman wrote in a May 31 court document.

Hennepin County Chief Public Defender Mary Moriarty said she called Frey last week about the racial disparities, and she said the mayor pledged to have them halted.

"Approaching black men and women who are low income and homeless and then having the county attorney charge them with felony drug sales makes me very angry and disappointed," Moriarty said in an interview Thursday.

Arradondo announced Thursday in a 12:30 p.m. news conference that he had discontinued stings targeting low-level marijuana sales at the request of Frey. "While the intention was good, it had an unintended consequence," he said.

He said that during the downtown police effort, officers arrested other people who were in possession of illegal guns and other drugs such as opioids, although that was separate from the marijuana arrests.

Arradondo defended his officers, saying they were acting professionally and not targeting black people because of their race. A police spokesman said that while the undercover stings were being stopped, police would still make arrests for marijuana sales.

At 3 p.m., Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman issued a news release that said he had informed Arradondo that he would not charge any more people arrested in the stings and that he was reviewing the remaining cases.

An hour later, his office notified Moriarty that all the cases were being dismissed.

"These undercover drug stings by the Minneapolis Police Department occurred without our knowledge," Freeman said in a statement. "Because they occurred over a period of months and were distributed to about a half-dozen of our attorneys for prosecution, we did not detect any pattern."

Though his office was alerted about the problem earlier, Freeman said he only learned about the situation Tuesday and "took immediate steps." He said he told Arradondo he "would not be charging these types of cases" and began an immediate review of the remaining cases brought to his office's attention.

Besides getting the cases dismissed, Moriarty pressed Freeman's office to free one person who had been imprisoned, whom she did not identify, and asked the county attorney's office to join her office in a motion to expunge the arrests from her clients' records.

Chuck Laszewski, a spokesman for Freeman, said the county attorney's office was focused on dismissing the cases and had not considered the issue of expungement. He said that the case of the person imprisoned as a result of the sting is being reviewed.

In a court document, Braverman wrote that the arrests "have resulted in felony convictions for numerous black defendants who had been targeted, and all the devastating collateral consequences that go along with such convictions: jail time, prison time, and even deportation proceedings."

Details about the stings were described in a case involving the arrest of one suspect, Shauntez Palmer, who was charged with fifth degree sale of 1.6 grams of marijuana.

An undercover officer stated in her report that she purchased marijuana from another person, Ameir Davis on Hennepin Avenue between N. 5th Street and N. 6th Street, while Palmer acted as a lookout.

Both men were arrested and brought to jail.

The department's First Precinct in conjunction with other precincts and the Metro Transit police sent undercover officers to that block on Jan. 24, Feb. 13, Feb. 28, March 15, April 11 and May 24, resulting in 47 arrests.

"On the dates of the stings, officers are approaching people of color, individuals and groups, and asking to buy drugs," Braverman wrote. "Officers have directly asked black men to facilitate drug deals with other black men, and have then requested that the facilitator be charged with sale. They are submitting the cases for felony charges."

Moriarty said that the only white person arrested was not approached by police, but had himself approached an undercover officer about selling some marijuana.

In a letter to Arradondo on May 29, Moriarty wrote, "A review of the cases received by our office strongly suggests a trend of racial profiling under the guise of a 'livability' detail."

Mel Reeves, a human rights activist who lives in Minneapolis, said he was cheered by the decision to halt the stings. "It's not news that black people are targeted by law enforcement on marijuana charges," he said. "It's good news they are recognizing the disparities and doing something about it."

As a council member, Frey championed an ordinance that brought city penalties for small-scale marijuana possession in line with state law, reducing the crime from a misdemeanor to petty misdemeanor.

Frey said in his statement that while he supports the legalization of marijuana, it "does not negate the need for our officers to make the necessary arrests to get guns off our streets and end the sale of life-threatening narcotic drugs like heroin."

©2018 the Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Video: 1 Officer Killed, 1 Injured in Rollover Crash in Milwaukee

Posted on June 8, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

One police officer was killed and one was hospitalized after a Milwaukee, WI, police squad car was involved in a rollover crash during a pursuit Thursday evening, reports WTMJ.

Officer Charles Irvine Jr., 23, was killed when his squad car rolled over during a pursuit of a reckless driver that ended just after 5:00 p.m. Thursday. Footage from Chopper 4 shows heavy damage to the squad car, which rolled off the road until it was wedged near an overpass.

Irvine Jr. was a police aide for two years, and an officer for nearly two years, beginning his service with the Milwaukee Police Department at 19.

The other officer injured in the crash suffered serious injuries, police say. He’s a 36-year-old with four years of service. Police say he is in stable condition.

HTML:

<p><a href=”http://www.policemag.com/videos/channel/patrol/2018/06/1-officer-killed-1-injured-in-rollover-crash-in-milwaukee.aspx”><img src=”http://images.policemag.com/news/M-Norm-Lewis-1.jpg” border=”0″ /></a></p>

<p><a href=”http://www.policemag.com/videos/channel/patrol/2018/06/1-officer-killed-1-injured-in-rollover-crash-in-milwaukee.aspx”>VIDEO: 1 Officer Killed, 1 Injured in Rollover Crash in Milwaukee</a></p>

 

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City to replace sheriff’s commander who oversaw Parkland shooting response

Posted on June 8, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Nicholas Nehamas Miami Herald

PARKLAND, Fla. — The city of Parkland wants to replace the Broward Sheriff's Office commander who led the agency's response to the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

In a statement, Parkland City Manager Bob Payton said he has asked BSO to replace Capt. Jan Jordan with a commander who holds the rank of major as part of a series of changes to the way Parkland is policed.

“In coordination with this comprehensive public safety evaluation process, I have proactively requested that Sheriff Scott Israel provide three recommendations to fulfill the upgraded role of Major,” Payton said. “Capt. Jordan has provided great leadership to the City of Parkland and I am truly thankful for her service."

Jordan was in charge when Nikolas Cruz attacked the school on Feb. 14, killing 17 people in a span of just six minutes.

Several of her deputies, most infamously the school resource officer, Scot Peterson, were unable to locate where the shooting was happening. That wasn't the only problem with how law enforcement handled the situation: Jordan also faced criticism from special teams of Coral Springs paramedics who were not allowed into the school to treat victims because Cruz was still on the loose, even though they had been trained to operate in active shooter situations. One Coral Springs deputy fire chief said Jordan's command post was too crowded and chaotic to function effectively. And radio logs show Jordan focusing on ordering her deputies to set up a perimeter rather than enter the school and find Cruz or help victims.

But a Thursday news release from Parkland mentions none of that. Instead, the city says it has hired a private firm, the Center for Public Safety Management, to evaluate its contract with BSO to provide law enforcement services, as well as related issues like how the city handles 911 calls. The 911 system complicated the response to the rampage because frantic calls made on cellphones from the school went to neighboring Coral Springs instead of BSO, the agency responsible for policing Parkland.

The BSO contract expires Sept. 30, 2019. The city commission voted to bring on the firm Wednesday night.

In an interview with the Miami Herald Thursday, Payton said BSO had agreed to the request to replace Jordan, although it's not clear when the change will happen. He said Parkland city leaders and residents are "looking for more services from BSO," especially for heightened security in public parks and additional school resource officers.

"We’re focused on moving forward and making sure the community feels safe and building that trust back," Payton said.

He declined to comment specifically on how Jordan handled the shooting and would not say whether the city's decision was in part tied to her performance, pointing to the ongoing state investigations into law enforcement's response.

"This wasn’t one person," Payton said. "There were multiple failures."

Veda Coleman-Wright, a spokeswoman for BSO, said the move was "Parkland's decision." Parkland Mayor Christine Hunschofsky did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Jordan, who has served as Parkland district commander since March 2017, could not be reached. She had been on the shortlist for the police chief job in Tequesta before the shooting. And she's not the only one whose career has been altered by the tragedy at Parkland. Peterson resigned and retired after it became clear he didn't go into the building where students and staff were dying. And two Stoneman Douglas security monitors on duty that day have also been reassigned after the fathers of two murdered victims said they asked for them to be fired, according to the Sun Sentinel.

©2018 Miami Herald

White Powder Mailed to ESPN’s CT Campus

Posted on June 8, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Bristol firefighters and police were called to the ESPN campus on Thursday afternoon when white powder was found in a piece of mail.

New Jersey Trooper Meets Retired Officer Who Delivered Him as a Baby

Posted on June 8, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A New Jersey state trooper had a chance encounter with the former police officer who helped bring him into the world 27 years ago.

SRO critically wounded in Texas school shooting discharged from hospital

Posted on June 7, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By John D. Harden Houston Chronicle

GALVESTON, Texas — The Santa Fe High School officer injured during a shooting at the school was discharged from the hospital Wednesday night, according to the University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston

Officer John Barnes, who had been in intensive care since the shooting last month, was admitted to the hospital after confronting 17-year-old Dimitrios Pagourtzis, the student accused of shooting and killing 10 students and two teachers.

According to authorities, Pagourtzis fired his Remington shotgun at Barnes.

The blast hit his right elbow, shredding veins and bone and sending blood spraying out onto the ground, according to reports.

A fellow officer pulled him out of harm's way and applied a tourniquet to try to stanch the bleeding.

Paramedics arrived soon after and rushed Barnes to UTMB. He flatlined on the way to the hospital, and again in surgery, where doctors rushed to restart his heart, stop the bleeding and reconnect blood vessels.

©2018 the Houston Chronicle

Study: If First Officer at Mass Shooting Hears Gunfire, Go In

Posted on June 7, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A law enforcement officer who’s the first to arrive at a mass shooting, and who hears gunfire, should not wait for backup before rushing in, a consultant has recommended in a study.

Seattle Police Develop New Tactics to Counter “Sleeping Dragon” Protests

Posted on June 7, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Protesters in Seattle often deploy a tactic known as the “sleeping dragon” in which they lay down in the street to block traffic with their arms linked while inside a piece of PVC tubing. The tactic makes it difficult for police to clear the street and make arrests.

Sometimes protesters in sleeping dragons are handcuffed to one another inside the tubing, which can be encased in concrete — or wrapped in chicken wire and duct tape, as was the case on Tuesday morning when people opposing immigration policies employed the technique while lying in the street at Second Avenue and Madison Street.

Simply cutting off the tubing runs the risk of injuring protesters, slowing the removal so much that it can take six or more hours to clear the street and take the protesters into custody.

But members of the Seattle PD’s new Apparatus Removal Team (ART) were able to  separate the nine protesters Tuesday and arrest them in about an hour and a half, the Seattle Times reports.

Seattle police spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb said members of  ART are specially trained officers who have the knowledge, experience and equipment to cut through plastic and metal without hurting protesters. Because sleeping dragons vary in composition, the team relies on different tools, he said.

 

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No charges for NJ officers in controversial beach arrest

Posted on June 6, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Amy S. Rosenberg Philly.com

WILDWOOD, N.J. — The Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office said Tuesday that no criminal charges would be filed against the Wildwood police officers who were recorded arresting a 20-year-old Philadelphia woman, including the officer who twice punched the woman in a video seen by millions.

Instead, the Wildwood Police Department’s internal affairs unit will continue an administrative investigation into the May 26 arrest of Emily Weinman, officials said, “with monitoring by the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office Professional Standards Unit.”

The three officers involved in the arrest are Class II officers, temporary officers typically hired for the summer season. They are trained at the police academy and carry guns.

Prosecutor Jeffrey Sutherland said the preliminary investigation by his office consisted of reviewing police body-camera footage from the arresting officer, review of video taken by an onlooker of the later part of the altercation, additional body-cam footage of the officer who transported Weinman, police vehicle video, internal affairs interviews of witnesses, arrest reports and other police documents.

“As county prosecutor, I recognize that the video footage has raised a lot of questions regarding the officers’ actions,” Sutherland said in a news release. “A decision such as this is not based on emotion; it is based upon applying the proper laws, policies and directives that govern law enforcement.”

He added: “Members of the public should understand that no matter what your opinion is regarding the subject event, it is not based on a full review of the evidence.”

Stephen Dicht, Weinman’s attorney, said he was “not surprised” by the prosecutor’s decision. Weinman is facing multiple charges stemming from the incident, including aggravated assault on a police officer and spitting at a police officer. She passed a breathalyzer test, and told the officers the unopened Twisted Teas near her on the beach belonged to an aunt. She then cursed at and insulted the officers, and refused to give her name.

“It’s ironic, the officer who said ‘You’re about to get dropped’ isn’t charged,” Dicht said. “The one who beat her on the head wasn’t charged. The only person charged is the one who was dropped and beaten on the head.”

Wildwood police identified the three police officers as Class II Patrolmen Thomas Cannon, John Hillman, and Robert Jordan.

The video sparked outrage over the officers’ actions toward Weinman and criticism of Weinman’s treatment of the officers, as well as questions over Wildwood’s use of portable breathalyzers, with officers going blanket to blanket policing underaged drinking.

Mayor Ernie Troiano, who has been outspoken about the video and described the woman as “the aggressor,” declined to comment on the prosecutor’s findings Tuesday and said his office would issue a statement.

©2018 Philly.com

Axon and DJI Announce Drone Partnership for Public Safety

Posted on June 5, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Axon and DJI today announced an exclusive partnership, within the digital evidence management industry, to sell DJI drones directly to public safety and law enforcement agencies worldwide through the new Axon Air program. The partnership was announced at the third annual Axon Accelerate conference for more than 1,500 police, security, legal and technology professionals from around the world.

More than 900 American public safety agencies use drones to improve officer safety, support tactical actions, reconstruct traffic collisions, support public safety at large events and perform search-and-rescue missions. At least 130 people around the world have been rescued from peril by drones, proving their value in life-or-death situations.

The Axon Air program is designed to allow law enforcement agencies to purchase drones from a trusted partner and link DJI’s drone technology with Axon’s connected data network and Evidence.com services – the same platform that more than 200,000 public safety professionals use today. Axon says Evidence.com provides the same rigorous data management system, chain-of-custody controls, and security protocols that law enforcement agencies rely on to preserve and protect data from body cameras and in-car video systems. Within Evidence.com the integrity of drone videos is preserved for the protection of police agencies and the public they serve. Drones currently available for sale through the Axon Air program include: Phantom 4 Pro and Matrice 210.

“As the requirements and demands of unmanned aircraft programs grow, Axon is partnering with agencies to build out solutions that meet the complexities and requirements of public safety,” says Axon’s EVP of Worldwide Products, Todd Basche. “Together, we will focus on creating situational awareness, advanced evidence collection and program management tools that will allow agencies to manage their drone program alongside their body camera and in-car video systems.”

“DJI’s partnership with Axon allows law enforcement agencies to add drone capabilities and data services through the same trusted provider they rely on for the tools, data and support they need to do their jobs safely and effectively,” said Michael Perry, Managing Director of North America at DJI. “Law enforcement agencies are rapidly adopting drones for their work, and often need guidance on how to establish a drone program and integrate it into their departments. DJI’s Axon Air partnership will strengthen and enhance law enforcement’s ability to protect public safety, respond to emergencies and save lives.”

Axon will partner with public safety agencies to identify the solutions that meet the demands of their communities and will bring drone video into the Axon Network of people, devices and apps. Interested agencies should reach out to their Axon sales representatives to learn more about how they can adopt this technology today.

 

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Houston ambulance assigned to President Trump’s motorcade breaks down

Posted on June 4, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The ALS ambulance, which was one of two assigned to the motorcade, highlighted the equipment issues the Houston Fire Department is facing

Woman arrested after firing shots in San Diego near marathon

Posted on June 3, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Julie Watson Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — San Diego police arrested a woman Sunday who held a gun to her head and fired off rounds in a parking structure in downtown, not far from an annual marathon that was well underway, authorities said.

In announcing the arrest, police said the scene was secure and there was no threat to the community.

The incident began shortly before 11 a.m. as a call about a misdemeanor hit and run, Sgt. Tom Sullivan said. Officers later found a woman underneath a parked car on the 8th level of the parking structure, Sullivan told the Union-Tribune . She was taken into custody after she fired several shots, he said.

Hearing reports of an active shooter at a Civic Plaza parking structure. I see Broadway & 3rd is now full of cop cars and firetrucks. #downtown #SanDiego pic.twitter.com/CJllWz6FKC

— P.J Quezada (@PJQuezada1) June 3, 2018

A number of streets surrounding the parking structure were closed as officers responded in the area near City Hall. Police didn't immediately say if there were any injuries.

The shooting was near the finish line of the San Diego Rock 'n' Roll Marathon. The incident halted the race for about 10 minutes as police investigated, marathon officials said.

Leilani Sandan and her 7-year-old son were playing music from "Les Miserables" on their way to see the musical at the San Diego Civic Theater on Sunday afternoon when they were suddenly passed by more than a dozen police cars, sirens blaring. The shooting had just occurred in the parking garage they were headed to next to the theater.

"It was crazy," Sandan said as she stood with hundreds of other ticketholders behind police tape. "It was like police, police, police, siren, siren, siren."

She said she was glad to hear the marathon runners were OK. They were later escorted into the theater with the others, who shuffled past the yellow police tape.

Sara Wehr, 31, also was headed to the show with her family.

"It is a little nerve wracking that this just happened not long ago," said Wehr as she lined up for roll call next to the flashing police cars. "We're safe, right?"

The 26.2 mile (42.2 kilometer) course weaves its way through the city and also includes a half-marathon and a 5K run. More than 25,000 runners were expected to participate.

Dallas Agrees to $173M Settlement with First Responders in Back Pay Dispute

Posted on June 1, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

An executive committee representing nearly 8,700 current and former Dallas police officers and firefighters has agreed to a $173.3 million settlement in their decades-old class-action lawsuits against City Hall over years of back-pay claims.

The figure is an agreed-upon price that comes with caveats because it’s not yet a done deal. But the agreement in such a massive case is a significant milestone — one that, while pricey, comes without a tax increase and would remove the biggest fiscal threat hanging over local government.

The agreement comes almost seven months after the Dallas City Council voted to spend $61.7 million to settle four lawsuits in Collin County over the language of a 1979 pay referendum that was pushed by police and firefighters and approved by voters, the Dallas Morning News reports. 

The city has argued that voters believed the language, which requires the pay differential between the ranks to be maintained, was only meant to apply to the one-time raises called for by the ballot initiative. But police and firefighters long insisted evidence obtained during subsequent years — in which city officials appeared to have interpreted the language as binding in all future raises — showed they were owed money they never received.

 

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Maryland Trooper Injured in Crash Involving Tractor-Trailer

Posted on June 1, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A Maryland State Police trooper suffered minor injuries after a multi-vehicle crash Thursday on northbound Interstate 270 near exit 26 that also involved a tractor-trailer and a State Highway Administration emergency vehicle.

Product of the Day: A.H. Stock Mfg — Newton Kwik Dump and Accessories

Posted on June 1, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

For almost 50 years A.H. Stock Mfg. has been the world leader of quality constructed Newton Kwik Dump Valves and Accessories.

How one cloud-based provider is helping law enforcement agencies with CJIS workloads

Posted on May 31, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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Sponsored by Amazon Web Services

By James Careless for PoliceOne BrandFocus

The FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division is an invaluable resource for all U.S. law enforcement agencies, thanks to the wealth of computerized criminal investigational information and records that the CJIS Division makes available to authorized users.

The value and sensitivity of this information cannot be overstated. This is why the FBI sets strict compliance standards for all authorized CJIS users under the CJIS Security Policy.

The CJIS Security Policy requires an ongoing commitment by authorized U.S. law enforcement agencies when operating and securing criminal justice information. To make this happen in a traditional data center environment, law enforcement agencies are tasked with performing laborious data center infrastructure development and maintenance, provisioning new servers and other infrastructure to help meet increased demand or storage/compute/database requirements, creating and accessing new products and features, and conducting background checks on covered employees.

To say the least, achieving and maintaining CJIS standards is a tall order for any law enforcement agency, particularly for smaller police departments that may not have the resources to do this in house.

This is where Amazon Web Services (AWS) can help. In order to serve the justice and public safety community's most sensitive CJIS workloads in the cloud – and to help law enforcement agencies with CJIS requirements – AWS offers a wide range of services to police agencies in the AWS GovCloud (US) Region.

The AWS GovCloud (US) Region helps law enforcement agencies follow CJIS Security Policy by providing secure processing tools and storage that meet the FBI’s requirements for accessing this mission-critical information. The AWS GovCloud (US) Region is isolated from other AWS regions and was designed to allow government agencies to move sensitive workloads into the cloud by addressing their specific regulatory and compliance requirements.

How Amazon Web Services can help

AWS services support customer CJIS requirements by addressing the CJIS Security Policy Areas. AWS infrastructure and services have been reviewed by state and federal law enforcement agencies, which confirm AWS’s competence in supporting customer CJIS workloads.

Law enforcement agencies can feel comfortable deploying workloads on AWS GovCloud (US) as the region is explicitly designed for sensitive workloads. Beyond the assurance programs available to all commercial regions, AWS GovCloud (US) allows customers at the state, local and federal level to adhere to ITAR, FedRamp/FISMA High and DoD SRG impact levels 2, 4 and 5.

Law enforcement customers (and partners who manage criminal justice information) are taking advantage of AWS services to dramatically improve the security and protection of CJI data, using the advanced security services and features of AWS, such as:

Activity logging (AWS CloudTrail). Encryption of data in motion and at rest (Amazon S3’s Server-Side Encryption with the option to bring your own key) Comprehensive key management and protection (AWS Key Management Service and CloudHSM). Integrated permission management (IAM federated identity management, multi-factor authentication). Making a quick start

AWS provides training to state CJIS systems agencies (or their functional equivalents) to get them up to speed in this new environment. To help inform new CJIS customers, AWS offers a Quick Start software package. A Quick Start is automated and helps agencies create a cloud-based work environment using customizable templates and scripts that help users build and configure CJI workloads in about 30 minutes.

Drugged Driving Deaths Spike With Spread of Legal Marijuana, Opioid Abuse

Posted on May 31, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

As legal marijuana spreads and the opioid epidemic rages on, the number of drugged drivers killed in car crashes is rising dramatically, according to a report released Thursday.

Drugged Driving Deaths Spike With Spread of Legal Marijuana, Opioid Abuse

Posted on May 31, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

As legal marijuana spreads and the opioid epidemic rages on, the number of drugged drivers killed in car crashes is rising dramatically, according to a report released Thursday.

Drugged Driving Deaths Spike With Spread of Legal Marijuana, Opioid Abuse

Posted on May 31, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

As legal marijuana spreads and the opioid epidemic rages on, the number of drugged drivers killed in car crashes is rising dramatically, according to a report released Thursday.

Houston FFs Mark Five Years Since Tragedy

Posted on May 31, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The Houston Fire Department on Thursday marked five years since the tragic Southwest Inn fire that claimed the lives of five firefighters.

3 Honored for Assisting Connecticut Officer After Stabbing

Posted on May 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Hartford Police Chief David Rosado credited three civilians—Jacqueline Marciano, Marvin Dixon and Jose Casanova—with saving officer Jill Kidik’s life. (Photo: Screen Shot from Hartford Courant Video)</p>

It began like any other Thursday morning for the property manager and the two maintenance workers, but by 9 a.m. it had pitched into a surreal, bloody scene. The maintenance men found themselves prying a knife-wielding assailant off a police officer, the property manager with her fingers pressed to the officer’s throat, trying to stop the blood.

On Tuesday, Hartford Police Chief David Rosado credited the three employees — Jacqueline Marciano, Marvin Dixon and Jose Casanova — with saving officer Jill Kidik’s life after she was stabbed in the throat while responding to a landlord-tenant dispute May 17, the Hartford Courant reports. Rosado presented Marciano, Dixon and Casanova with the department’s Distinguished Citizens Award, and Mayor Luke Bronin and the city council thanked the three, calling them heroes “who will always be remembered in the city of Hartford.”

Kidik was released from the hospital last week after several rounds of surgery and is expected to make a full recovery. But “without a shadow of a doubt,” Deputy Chief Joseph Buyak said, “had Ms. Marciano, Mr. Dixon and Mr. Casanova not taken the action they did, Officer Kidik would have died.”

 

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Musical director uses paramedic skills to help hurt audience member

Posted on May 30, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Jason Gross, who is a flight paramedic, said he used a pillow, cardboard and tape to fashion a splint for the woman

Musical director uses paramedic skills to help injured audience member

Posted on May 30, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Jason Gross, who is a flight paramedic, said he used a pillow, cardboard and tape to fashion a splint for the woman

Dallas Set to Pay $173M in Police, Firefighter Lawsuits

Posted on May 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

An executive committee representing nearly 8,700 current and former Dallas police officers and firefighters has agreed to a $173.3 million settlement in their decades-old class-action lawsuits against City Hall over years of back-pay claims.

Firefighter who lost hands, feet to flu released from hospital

Posted on May 30, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Will McCue, 19, started feeling ill in January; he was hospitalized with the flu, pneumonia and sepsis

Massachusetts Police K-9 Continues to Get Healthier, Stronger

Posted on May 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Six weeks after being shot by the man also charged with killing a Yarmouth Police Officer Sean Gannon, K-9 Nero is continuing to get healthier and stronger.

Texas ATF agent dies after suffering heart attack during training

Posted on May 27, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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The Herald Banner, Greenville, Texas

GRAPEVINE, Texas — Rockwall resident Paul “Scott” Ragsdale, a special agent with the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, died of an apparent heart attack on Thursday morning while participating in an ATF training exercise.

Ragsdale was immediately transferred to the Baylor Scott & White Medical Center in Grapevine.

He was 41 years old.

Ragsdale’s career with ATF covered more than 16 years and he was serving as the Dallas Field Division’s senior operations officer at the time of his death.

His survivors include a wife and two children.

An ATF press release quoted Jeffrey C. Bostick II, special agent in charge of the Dallas office, as saying “If you knew Scott, you knew laughter, you knew how much he loved his family… you knoew a great guy.”

Funeral arrangements are pending.

©2018 The Herald Banner (Greenville, Texas)

IL Chief Lauds Firefighters for Halting Church Fire

Posted on May 26, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Effingham Fire Chief Joseph Holomy said engine officer Tasha Hoffman decided to use a deck gun to knock down a fire in the church’s steeple.

IL Chief Lauds Firefighters for Halting Church Fire

Posted on May 26, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Effingham Fire Chief Joseph Holomy said engine officer Tasha Hoffman decided to use a deck gun to knock down a fire in the church’s steeple.

Firefighter-paramedic returns late firefighter’s helmet to widow

Posted on May 26, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Firefighter-paramedic Scott Moder presented 98-year-old Jo Miller with her late husband Ben’s helmet, which Moder’s mother found online

Neb. troopers make one of the largest fentanyl busts in US

Posted on May 26, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Kaitlyn Alanis The Wichita Eagle

BUFFALO COUNTY, Neb. — One of the largest fentanyl busts in the U.S. — and the largest in Nebraska — was confirmed by the Nebraska State Patrol on Thursday.

The 118 pounds of opiates seized was "entirely fentanyl" the department posted to Twitter.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says as little as two milligrams of fentanyl is a lethal dosage in most people. Using that calculation, the 118 pounds of fentanyl could kill about 26,761,928 people.

Two milligrams is equal to about a few grains of table salt.

Fentanyl is a white powder — similar in size to grains of salt — according to the DEA. A very small amount can cause a severe or potentially fatal reaction not just to users, but also to those who are exposed to it.

The state troopers announced the drug bust on May 1. In the news release, troopers said 117 pounds of narcotics were seized after a traffic stop on I-80, near Kearney, at about 10:30 a.m. on April 26.

The semi was driving near the shoulder, and when stopped, "the trooper became suspicious of criminal activity."

After searching the truck, troopers found a "false compartment" in the empty trailer.

They found "42 foil-wrapped packages containing 73 pounds of cocaine and 44 pounds of an unknown powder suspected to be fentanyl."

Breaking: The 118 pounds of opiates seized by troopers in April has been confirmed as the NSP Crime Lab as entirely fentanyl. The largest seizure of fentanyl in Nebraska history and one of the largest ever in the US. pic.twitter.com/kHrv3lnyGH

— NEStatePatrol (@NEStatePatrol) May 24, 2018

The troopers did not perform a field test due to "the dangerous nature of the substance." The anesthetic is 30-50 times more potent than heroin and 50-100 times more deadly than morphine, according to the DEA.

A test at the crime lab confirmed the troopers actually seized 118 pounds of fentanyl, according to the tweet.

The driver of the truck, Felipe Genao-Minaya, 46, and passenger, Nelson Nunez, 52 — both of New Jersey — were arrested on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver and no Drug Tax stamp.

The men were booked into the Buffalo County Jail. The Lincoln Journal-Star reported earlier this month that the men were being held on a $100,000 bond.

In January, two men were sentenced to prison after they were found with 100 pounds of fentanyl in New Jersey, CNN reported. Authorities said that bust contained about 18 million lethal doses.

©2018 The Wichita Eagle (Wichita, Kan.)

Neb. troopers make one of the largest fentanyl busts in US

Posted on May 26, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Kaitlyn Alanis The Wichita Eagle

BUFFALO COUNTY, Neb. — One of the largest fentanyl busts in the U.S. — and the largest in Nebraska — was confirmed by the Nebraska State Patrol on Thursday.

The 118 pounds of opiates seized was "entirely fentanyl" the department posted to Twitter.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says as little as two milligrams of fentanyl is a lethal dosage in most people. Using that calculation, the 118 pounds of fentanyl could kill about 26,761,928 people.

Two milligrams is equal to about a few grains of table salt.

Fentanyl is a white powder — similar in size to grains of salt — according to the DEA. A very small amount can cause a severe or potentially fatal reaction not just to users, but also to those who are exposed to it.

The state troopers announced the drug bust on May 1. In the news release, troopers said 117 pounds of narcotics were seized after a traffic stop on I-80, near Kearney, at about 10:30 a.m. on April 26.

The semi was driving near the shoulder, and when stopped, "the trooper became suspicious of criminal activity."

After searching the truck, troopers found a "false compartment" in the empty trailer.

They found "42 foil-wrapped packages containing 73 pounds of cocaine and 44 pounds of an unknown powder suspected to be fentanyl."

Breaking: The 118 pounds of opiates seized by troopers in April has been confirmed as the NSP Crime Lab as entirely fentanyl. The largest seizure of fentanyl in Nebraska history and one of the largest ever in the US. pic.twitter.com/kHrv3lnyGH

— NEStatePatrol (@NEStatePatrol) May 24, 2018

The troopers did not perform a field test due to "the dangerous nature of the substance." The anesthetic is 30-50 times more potent than heroin and 50-100 times more deadly than morphine, according to the DEA.

A test at the crime lab confirmed the troopers actually seized 118 pounds of fentanyl, according to the tweet.

The driver of the truck, Felipe Genao-Minaya, 46, and passenger, Nelson Nunez, 52 — both of New Jersey — were arrested on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver and no Drug Tax stamp.

The men were booked into the Buffalo County Jail. The Lincoln Journal-Star reported earlier this month that the men were being held on a $100,000 bond.

In January, two men were sentenced to prison after they were found with 100 pounds of fentanyl in New Jersey, CNN reported. Authorities said that bust contained about 18 million lethal doses.

©2018 The Wichita Eagle (Wichita, Kan.)

Georgia Police Officer Killed While Responding to Crash

Posted on May 25, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Savannah Police Officer Anthony Christie was killed while responding to an initial crash Friday.

Georgia Police Officer Killed While Responding to Crash

Posted on May 25, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Savannah Police Officer Anthony Christie was killed while responding to an initial crash Friday.

2 killed, including off-duty LEO, after man drives car into restaurant

Posted on May 20, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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Author: The Office of Justice Programs’ National Institute of Justice (NIJ)

Associated Press

BESSEMER CITY, N.C. — A man intentionally rammed a vehicle into a North Carolina restaurant busy serving Sunday lunch, killing his daughter and another person and injuring several others, authorities said.

Bessemer City Police said in a statement that preliminary evidence indicates Roger Self, 62, purposely smashed his way into the Surf and Turf Lodge where reports say families were eating a relaxed midday meal.

Footage from the scene showed emergency responders treating people on the ground outside the restaurant as shocked patrons milled about in the aftermath of the crash. Killed was 26-year-old Katelyn Tyler Self, the daughter of the driver and a Gaston County Sheriff's Office deputy. Authorities haven't released the name of the second person fatally injured, saying they were still notifying relatives.

Dep. Katelyn Self killed when police say her father rammed SUV into a restaurant in Bessemer City. One other person killed, several injured. Turn on @WCCBCharlotte at 6 for the latest information on this tragic situation. pic.twitter.com/525csqGahW

— courtney francisco (@cjfranciscowccb) May 20, 2018

Police said Roger Self was arrested after the vehicle had fully slammed its way inside the steak and seafood restaurant in Bessemer City, about 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Charlotte. Jail records show he's been charged with two counts of first-degree murder.

The Gaston Gazette identified Roger Self as a businessman from Dallas, North Carolina.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg police spokesman Rob Tufano called the crash a "mass casualty" incident, and reports said some of the victims were flown by helicopter to Carolinas Medical Center. There was no immediate count on the number of injured or the extent of the injuries.

"He drove his car into the building, killing people, so that's why we took him into custody immediately," Bessemer City Police Chief Thomas Ellis Jr. said. He gave no indication what might have prompted the crash.

Photographs from the scene showed a shattered opening in a restaurant wall, where the car had smashed inside the building.

The Gaston Gazette identified the vehicle as a sports utility vehicle.

JUST IN: suspect is Roger Self. He drove into the business and killed his daughter, Katelyn and one other person. #WBTV pic.twitter.com/SCRbY71N8f

— WBTV Ben Williamson (@benlwilliamson) May 20, 2018

Caleb Martin, a 14-year-old who busses tables at the restaurant, told a broadcast outlet that he saw the vehicle suddenly smash through a wall into the restaurant.

"I walked over to my station and I heard a loud boom," he told WSOC-TV. "It went straight through."

He added, "The one guy I could help in back, he was pretty hurt." He said he was stunned but managed to help paramedics move tables off the person and debris out of the way so the injured could be treated.

Katelyn Self was a four-year veteran of the Gaston County Sheriff's Office, Sheriff Alan Cloninger told The Charlotte Observer. The sheriff said the deputy had worked as a corporal in the jail and was off duty when she was fatally injured.

Cloninger choked up as he spoke about the crash.

"Tragic, tragic loss of life," he told reporters. "I'm asking people just to keep the family in your prayers, and the sheriff's office, because we're suffering right now."

The sheriff's office later tweeted a photograph of the deputy via social media, adding "Our hearts are broken" and that the agency was asking for thoughts and prayers not only for the deputy's family and friends but also for her "brothers and sisters in uniform."

A 2017 profile in the Gazette said Roger Self ran a private investigations business called Southeastern Loss Management. It said the business opened in 1989 and mostly helped companies investigate employees' wrongdoing.

Authorities said the family was requesting privacy and referred any questions to the family's pastor. Messages left at the phone of the pastor by The Associated Press were not immediately returned.

BREAKING: Officers are getting ready to give the media an update on a deadly situation in Bessemer City, NC. One person died when a car crashed into a restaurant this afternoon. pic.twitter.com/WHF4kih7YH

— Amber Roberts (@AmberFOX46) May 20, 2018

Dozens Injured in NYC Tunnel Bus Collision

Posted on May 18, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Two New Jersey Transit buses collided in the north tube of the Lincoln Tunnel on Friday morning, injuring at least 32 people.

Video: Charlotte Councilwoman Calls Police “Homegrown Terrorists”

Posted on May 17, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: Charlotte Councilwoman Calls Police “Homegrown Terrorists”

Charlotte City Councilwoman Lawana Mayfield who is known for controversial tweets is under fire for a recently uncovered March tweet in which she described police as “homegrown terrorist wearing blue uniforms.”

The tweet was posted in response to the Stephon Clark shooting in Sacramento, WSOC TV reports.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department officers said the tweet from Mayfield was inappropriate, especially as they are asking the City Council for a pay raise and are trying to recruit more officers.

Mayfield has been criticized for social media posts in the past. Last month, she shared an article about a conspiracy theory and questioned whether the 9/11 terrorist attack was a controlled demolition.

On Thursday morning, she tweeted, “I have and continue to be one of the strongest supporters of law enforcement but I will NOT turn a blind eye to corruption, assaults, and the killings of unarmed black & brown people. If you are offended by my comments and not the situation YOU need to re-evaluate.”

In response to Mayfield’s tweet, the president of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 9 released the following:

Councilwoman Mayfield,

I’m sure you have anticipated a response from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #9 regarding your comments made on March 26th, 2018 stating “Being Black in America under #45 has created homegrown terrorist wearing blue uniforms. #AReckoningIsComing.”

I would like to know your intention for distributing that message through social media. What exactly did you intend to gain from such a ridiculous statement? Please, educate me!

Being the President of Charlotte Mecklenburg FOP Lodge #9 and a Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Officer for almost twenty-four years I understand that I am held to a higher standard than other citizens. My actions AND words are critically analyzed every single minute of my day. You need to be held to just as high of a standard as I am. You were elected as a City of Charlotte leader.

FOP Lodge #9 has been working tirelessly over the past several months to work with Charlotte City Council to improve the compensation and benefits of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Officers. With the release of this statement by you, it takes away from the focus that we have worked on so hard to bring forward.

To make this incident even more unbearable, I heard about this yesterday while traveling back from Washington, D.C. after participating in the National Peace Officer’s Memorial Service. During a time when we focus on Peace Officers who gave their lives for the citizens, community, and Country I am forced to respond to this statement.

Are you seriously labeling all Peace Officers as terrorists? If so, you are also classifying all those Peace Officers, their parents, spouses, children, and relatives as terrorists. To say the least, you have upset the entire law enforcement community on this ridiculous statement. We are a family and when offended, we are all offended.

I would love to discuss this with you further and invite you to one of our membership meetings. We hold meetings on the first Tuesday of each month with the next one being Tuesday June 5th, 2018 at 6:00 pm.

Thank you,

Mark Michalec

President

Charlotte-Mecklenburg FOP Lodge 9

 

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Sheriff to Trump: Calif. sanctuary city laws are a ‘disgrace’

Posted on May 17, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Franco Ordonez McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — The Fresno, Calif., sheriff looked across the table toward President Donald Trump and asked him for direction and clarity.

Sheriff Margaret Mims told the president that California’s sanctuary laws have put sheriffs like herself in “an untenable position,” caught between conflicting state and federal laws.

“It’s a disgrace,” Mims said about her department’s inability to work with federal agents..

Mims joined a group of more than 15 local law enforcement officials, lawmakers and administration officials from California, including Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christianson and El Dorado Sheriff John D’Agostini for a roundtable discussion with Trump, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and ICE Director Thomas Homan on their opposition to California’s sanctuary state policies.

In February, the Trump administration filed suit against a California law that restricts how and when state law enforcement can interact with federal immigration authorities. The administration has been highly critical of the state laws describing them as “radical” policies that endanger the lives of local law enforcement and the immigrant communities themselves.

Sessions promised that prosecutions of criminal immigrants would likely double. Homan pushed back against criticism that the administration was hurting immigrant families. Homan said sanctuary laws allow criminal immigrants to return back to immigrant communities where they can prey on the vulnerable.

“You’re not protecting immigrant communities,” Homan said to a roomful of like-minded people. “You’re putting them at greater risk,” he said.

Several of the lawmakers present, including Republicans House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Supervisor Kristin Gaspar of San Diego County — who is vying to replace Rep. Darrell Issa in Congress — took digs at California Gov. Jerry Brown and the California legislature for failing to stand up for the Constitution.

“We’ve created a situation where Governor Brown makes San Diego a great place to commit a crime because you can either be across the border in a matter of minutes and shielded by Mexico or you have the option of staying put,” Gaspar said.

Brown responded to Trump’s roundtable remarks in a tweet.

“Trump is lying on immigration, lying about crime and lying about the laws of California,” Brown said. “Flying in a dozen Republican politicians to flatter him and praise his reckless policies changes nothing. We, the citizens of the fifth largest economy in the world, are not impressed.”

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., accused Trump of “fanning the flames of division.”

“The Trump administration is once again attempting to divide Californians and all Americans with today’s White House meeting,” Feinstein said in a statement. “Their decision to convene this meeting is about fueling fear of immigrants and scapegoating entire communities.”

Christianson was the last law enforcement officer to speak. He echoed the sentiments of many of the other public officials, thanking Trump for his work. He said the state’s sanctuary laws are interfering with his deputies’ ability to work with federal agents to keep his community safe. He said he was privileged to live in the Central Valley where agriculture was a multibillion-dollar industry and promised that ICE was not sweeping through the fields grabbing hard working immigrants.

“We’re looking for the people who are criminals,” Christianson said. “Not the people who are seeking a better life in America.”

Responding to Mims’s concerns, Trump emphasized the dangers of immigrant gang members.

“You wouldn’t believe how bad these people are,” Trump said. “These aren’t people. These are animals, and we’re taking them out of the country at a rate that’s never happened before.”

And he assured the sheriff the administration would continue working.

“We’ll take care it, Margaret,” Trump said.

©2018 McClatchy Washington Bureau

WI Fire Chief Pushing for Regional Agency

Posted on May 16, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

A fire call Saturday in the town of Campbell sparked La Crosse’s fire chief to ignite the conversation on forming a regional department.

5 things to know about Ill. SRO Mark Dallas

Posted on May 16, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

A 19-year-old suspect who was recently expelled from his school attempted to carry out a mass killing on Wednesday, only to be thwarted by the brave actions of a school resource officer on scene. The suspect opened fire near the gymnasium of Dixon High School in Illinois, where seniors were rehearsing for their upcoming graduation ceremony. Here are five things to know about SRO Mark Dallas, who took down the gunman and saved lives.

1. DALLAS BRAVED GUNFIRE TO STOP THE SHOOTER

After alerting authorities about the incident, Dallas ran toward the shots and spotted the gunman, who attempted to flee. When the SRO gave chase, the suspect fired several shots at him. Dallas, who was unharmed, returned fire and hit the suspect in the shoulder, then took him into custody. No students or faculty were hurt in the incident.

This isn’t the first story of an SRO’s heroic actions stopping a school shooting this year. In March, Maryland SRO Blaine Gaskill confronted a shooter who killed one student and wounded another, preventing further bloodshed.

Both of these incidents happened mere months after an SRO’s inactions during the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, drew nationwide criticism and sparked questions about the effectiveness of SRO programs.

2. THE SRO IS CREDITED FOR SAVING COUNTLESS LIVES

Dallas immediately received praise for his brave actions.

"A lot of things went right today when a great many of them could have gone wrong," Dixon Mayor Liandro Arellano Jr. told NBC 5.

Dixon Police Chief Steve Howell said Dallas’ quick actions saved lives.

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This is Dixon Police SRO officer Mark Dallas, whom students are crediting with stopping an ex-student armed with a gun at Dixon High School this morning.

Posted by WQAD on Wednesday, May 16, 2018

"With shots ringing out through the hallways of the school, he charged towards the suspect and confronted him head on," Howell said. "Because of his heroic actions, countless lives were saved. We are forever indebted to him for his service and his bravery."

“Today, we should all be very thankful to school resource officer Mark Dallas for his bravery and quick action to immediately diffuse a dangerous situation at Dixon High School,” Governor Bruce Rauner said in a tweet.

3. DALLAS IS A FORMER K-9 HANDLER

According to the North American Police Work Dog Association, Dallas is a former Dixon PD K-9 handler.

It isn’t clear when Dallas joined Dixon High School as an SRO, but according to the city’s website, the SRO program was started in 2000. It was originally funded by the COPS federal grant to prevent school violence. The SROs in the Dixon PD’s program spend the majority of their workday at the school but are still full-time sworn officers. In addition to regular police duties, the SROs also help teach classes and counsel students.

Hey @DixonPolice , a big happy birthday to one of your own! We won't talk about how old he is… pic.twitter.com/NN9YaSilrL

— Dixon High School (@dukesduchesses) March 2, 2018

4. STUDENTS AND FACULTY FOLLOWED THEIR ACTIVE SHOOTER TRAINING

In addition to Dallas’ quick response to the shooting, Howell praised students and faculty for their actions during the attack. At a press conference, he told reporters the school had recently held active shooter training drills, and students knew to barricade doors and take cover as a result of that training.

5. LEARN MORE

For more information about the roles of SROs and police response to active shooters in schools, check out the following articles. And if you want to learn more, PoliceOne Academy has a number of courses on active shooter training and school safety. You can schedule a free demo here.

When does planning and preparing a school shooting become a crime?

7 common active shooter training mistakes

How can we solve the problem of active shooters?

School shooting response: 5 action items for every police leader

An action plan for school safety

Why solo-officer active shooter response should be trained

Active shooters in schools: The enemy is denial

Active shooters in schools: An options-based active-shooter policy for schools

Study: Virtual cops could be better at interviewing eyewitnesses than real ones

Posted on May 16, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

LONDON — A new study suggests that virtual police officers could help improve witness recollections.

In a study conducted by the University of Westminster, London, researchers recruited 38 adults and had them watch a video of a staged car theft before asking them to return two days later. When the subjects returned, they were either interviewed face-to-face with a research assistant, or wore a virtual reality helmet in order to be interviewed by a humanoid avatar.

Both groups were asked the same series of questions used by law enforcement investigators. The first part of the interview asked the subjects to detail what they remembered about the crime, which is known as a free-recall task.

While both groups were about as accurate as the other during this phase, there were some differences noted during the second phase. The subjects were asked specific questions about the crime, such as what color jacket the thief was wearing.

The virtual group was about 60 percent better at the second part of the interview, and got an average of 37 details correct. The face-to-face group got an average of 30 details correct. The virtual group also provided fewer inaccurate details and less conflated information.

“These novel findings, and our pattern of retrieval results indicates the potential of avatar-to-avatar communication in virtual environments,” the authors of the study wrote.

In surveys taken after the experiment, the subjects interviewed by the avatar reported having an easier time talking and were more comfortable admitting they didn’t remember something. The study did note that the group was less confident that their memories were correct than the face-to-face group.

While the study is meant to be a proof-of-concept experiment, Julia Shaw, a psychologist at the University College London who specializes in memory, told Gizmodo the findings make perfect sense. Shaw, who wasn’t involved with the study, said that when humans interact with each other, “we constantly manage the impression we are making—controlling how we move, speak, what we say.”

“This has two effects. First, it takes a lot of effort, effort that could otherwise be used for remembering what happened,” Shaw said. “Second, the nature of a social interaction can affect how and what we remember. A particularly attractive or friendly interviewer may encourage you to mention more details than you are sure you remember, while a judgmental or distracted interviewer may make you keep your responses too short.”

The researchers said they plan to conduct more trials of this interviewing technique.

“Virtual environments allow interviews to be conducted quickly and remotely—and, our research suggests, more effectively,” study author Coral Dando said in a statement. “It would be nice if our research program starts a conversation about the real possibilities for remote, yet effective, witness interviewing.”

First black multi-generational FDNY families celebrate legacy

Posted on May 16, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The Hargett family is one of only two black FDNY families where three generations—grandfather, father and son—have served in the department

8 ways GearGrid solves PPE and equipment storage problems

Posted on May 15, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

GearGrid built-in firefighter lockers provide ample storage space and options for customization

California Deputy Shot by Suspect Mistakenly Reported as Having BB Gun

Posted on May 14, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A Sonoma County, CA, Sheriff’s deputy was shot Sunday morning after responding to a call from a gas station manager about his employee being armed with a BB gun and acting erratically. But it turned out that the gun was a 9mm firearm.

The deputy, working as a police officer for the city of Sonoma, suffered nonfatal wounds and was reported in stable condition Sunday night at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, reports the Press-Democrat.

Officials said Pritel drew a 9mm semiautomatic handgun and fired at one of two responding deputies.

Sonoma Police Chief Bret Sackett said the deputy was hit with a round of “snake shot,” a bullet whose projectile is made up of small pellets.

The deputy was hit in various parts of his upper torso, including his hands, arms, and face near his left eye, officials said. “He appears to be in good shape and should have a full recovery,” Sackett said during an interview with media at the scene.

Deputies arrested Ryan Joseph Pritel, 20, of Sonoma. He was booked into the Sonoma County Jail on suspicion of attempted murder and carrying a loaded firearm in public.

 

 

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Police probe whether Autopilot feature was on in Tesla crash

Posted on May 14, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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Associated Press

SOUTH JORDAN, Utah — Police are investigating whether a Tesla sedan's semi-autonomous Autopilot feature was engaged when it rear-ended a fire department truck in Utah.

The Tesla Model S crashed into the truck at 60 mph (97 kph) apparently without braking before impact, according to police in South Jordan, a suburb of Salt Lake City. The fire department mechanic truck had been stopped at a red light.

The crash comes as federal safety agencies investigate the performance of Tesla's semi-autonomous driving system.

The Tesla's air bags were activated in the crash, South Jordan police Sgt. Samuel Winkler said. The Tesla's driver suffered a broken right ankle, and the driver of the Unified Fire Authority mechanic truck did not require treatment, Winkler said.

There was no indication the Tesla's driver was under the influence of any substance, and information on what the driver may have told investigators about the circumstances of the crash likely would not be available before Monday, Winkler said by telephone.

There was light rain falling and roads were wet when the crash occurred, police said in a statement.

"Witnesses indicated the Tesla Model S did not brake prior to impact," the statement said.

Tesla's Autopilot system uses cameras, radar and computers to keep speed, change lanes and automatically stop vehicles. The company, which is based in Palo Alto, California, and has a huge battery factory in the Reno, Nevada, area, tells drivers the system requires them to keep their eyes on the road and their hands on the wheel so they can take control to avoid accidents.

"Tesla has not yet received any data from the car and thus does not know the facts of what occurred, including whether Autopilot was engaged," a Tesla spokesperson said in a statement on Sunday.

News of the crash came as a top Tesla official who had been the main technical contact with U.S. safety investigators left the company to join rival Waymo.

Waymo, Google's self-driving car spinoff, confirmed that Matthew Schwall had joined the company.

Schwall had been Tesla's director of field performance engineering, according to his LinkedIn page, which said he served as Tesla's primary technical contact with safety regulatory agencies such as the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

There was no immediate comment from Tesla about Schwall.

Police said they had been in contact with the National Transportation Safety Board about the crash. NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said he did not know whether the agency would get involved.

The NTSB and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are investigating at least two other crashes involving Tesla vehicles. In March, a Tesla Model X SUV crashed on a California highway, killing the driver, and investigators are looking into the performance of the semi-autonomous driving system in that crash.

Deadly Plane Crash Sparks Brush Fire on CA Mountain

Posted on May 14, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

A team from the San Diego County Sheriff’s Office recovered three bodies from the plane crash wreckage on Volcan Mountain Sunday.

2018 Police Unity Tour Arrives at National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial

Posted on May 14, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

One of the most impressive sights of National Police Week is the Police Unity Tour with thousands of bicyclists riding through Washington, D.C.

2018 Police Unity Tour Arrives at National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial

Posted on May 14, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

One of the most impressive sights of National Police Week is the Police Unity Tour with thousands of bicyclists riding through Washington, D.C.

4 Oklahoma Troopers Injured in Gunfight and Explosion Serving Warrant, Suspect Killed

Posted on May 11, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Firefighter sprays down the ruins of a home in Talihina, OK. The home burned after a booby trap exploded while law enforcement tried to serve a warrant to the resident. Four officers were injured in the explosion; the gunman was killed in a shootout with offficers. (Photo: News9 Screen Shot)</p>

Officers from multiple agencies, including the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, were met with gunfire Friday morning when they tried to serve a warrant in the town of Talihina. The gunman was killed in the ensuing gunfight and an explosion destroyed his business/residence. Four troopers were injured by gunfire or by shrapnel. A fifth officer was shot and the bullet was stopped by body armor.

Law enforcement officials say officers from multiple agencies were involved in serving the warrant for a drug offense due to the man’s criminal history and at the request of the Le Flore County Sheriff’s Office.

Troopers said the building appeared to be wired with explosives and at least one detonated. The building was consumed by the fire. Troopers used a flash bang during the encounter, but they said it did not start the fire.

The injured troopers are expected to recover, News9 reports.


 

 

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Watch: 1st Annual National Police K-9 Memorial Service

Posted on May 11, 2018 by in Uncategorized

The National Police Dog Foundation, FOP DC Lodge #1, LA Rescued, and United for Blue hosted the 1st Annual Police K-9 Memorial Service Friday afternoon at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Failed to File Taxes

Posted on May 11, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Federal prosecutors say they have charged Baltimore Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa with three misdemeanor counts of failing to file federal taxes.

FBI Releases Police Line-of-Duty Death Statistics for 2017

Posted on May 10, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A total of 93 officers were killed in the line of duty last year, according to a portion of the FBI’s Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted, 2017 (LEOKA) report released Thursday.

Dashboard Camera Video Shows Florida Deputy Save Baby’s Life

Posted on May 10, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Marion County Sheriff’s K-9 Deputy Jeremie Nix was on his way home from work when a woman in another car flagged him down at a red light.

Inside EMS Podcast: What it takes to work in the EMS field

Posted on May 10, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Co-hosts Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss Chris’ latest project — writing a book

Fallen officer’s son sends special message to father

Posted on May 9, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The 5-year-old son of a slain Indiana officer shared a special message to his father, who was fatally shot last week.

WTHI reports that Officer Rob Pitts’ son, Dakota, has been visiting his father’s patrol vehicle outside the Terre Haute Police Headquarters ever since it was converted into a memorial. Dakota had a special message his mother, Josie Huff, said his father will see from heaven.

"Dear Dad, I love you and I miss you so much,” Dakota said.

On May 4, Officer Pitts and four other officers were fired on when they approached a murder suspect at an apartment complex. Pitts was wounded in the shooting and was taken to a hospital, where he was later pronounced dead.

Huff said her son likes to visit his father’s memorial because he and his father “really liked the car.” She said while Dakota’s heart hurts, he’s been watching the news and enjoys seeing people honoring his father, according to FOX 8.

Officer Pitts’ funeral was held Wednesday, according to the Tribune Star.

FDNY Names First Female Officer to Elite Squad

Posted on May 7, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Lt. Adrienne Walsh is making history again as the first female officer assigned to one of the FDNY’s five elite technical rescue squads.

Houston firefighter hospitalized, pumper catches fire at warehouse blaze

Posted on May 6, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The engine underwent a mechanical issue while firefighters relayed water from hydrants that were further away

Houston firefighter hospitalized, pumper catches fire at warehouse blaze

Posted on May 6, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The engine underwent a mechanical issue while firefighters relayed water from hydrants that were further away

Houston firefighter hospitalized, pumper catches fire at warehouse blaze

Posted on May 6, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The engine underwent a mechanical issue while firefighters relayed water from hydrants that were further away

Child offers allowance after Texas officer’s funeral

Posted on May 6, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Mike Parker Austin American-Statesman

ROUND ROCK, Texas — The morning after a procession led fallen Round Rock police officer Charles Whites through downtown to his final resting place, a child offered a small gesture to show her gratitude to law enforcement.

Police found a small envelope slid under the front door of Round Rock police headquarters early Thursday morning, police spokesman Nick Olivier said. Inside was a letter written in pencil with four one-dollar bills.

“Thank you for everything you do,” it reads. “I’m sorry to hear about officer Whites. I wanted to donate my allowance. Love, Ximena.”

With no return address on the letter, the Police Department thanked Ximena on Twitter.

Olivier said the Police Department has received numerous well wishes and donations following the untimely death of Whites, who died on April 27 from wounds suffered while serving at a traffic incident on Feb. 25.

A driver later identified as Raul Martinez drove into Whites while he was directing traffic, according to an arrest affidavit. Martinez faces a charge of intoxication assault causing bodily injury.

Law enforcement from throughout Texas paid final respects to Whites during his funeral service on Wednesday at Shoreline Church. The service followed by police honors and a procession through downtown Round Rock.

Olivier said police Chief Allen Banks saw Ximena’s note and said, “It’s why we do what we do.”

“The outpouring of support has been tremendous,” Olivier said.

Thank you Ximena and everyone else in the Round Rock community who expressed their support. This is why we do what we do. We love our city! ???? #keeptheallowance pic.twitter.com/jGsYsjF02h

— Round Rock Police (@roundrockpolice) May 3, 2018

©2018 Austin American-Statesman, Texas

Child offers allowance after Texas officer’s funeral

Posted on May 6, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Mike Parker Austin American-Statesman

ROUND ROCK, Texas — The morning after a procession led fallen Round Rock police officer Charles Whites through downtown to his final resting place, a child offered a small gesture to show her gratitude to law enforcement.

Police found a small envelope slid under the front door of Round Rock police headquarters early Thursday morning, police spokesman Nick Olivier said. Inside was a letter written in pencil with four one-dollar bills.

“Thank you for everything you do,” it reads. “I’m sorry to hear about officer Whites. I wanted to donate my allowance. Love, Ximena.”

With no return address on the letter, the Police Department thanked Ximena on Twitter.

Olivier said the Police Department has received numerous well wishes and donations following the untimely death of Whites, who died on April 27 from wounds suffered while serving at a traffic incident on Feb. 25.

A driver later identified as Raul Martinez drove into Whites while he was directing traffic, according to an arrest affidavit. Martinez faces a charge of intoxication assault causing bodily injury.

Law enforcement from throughout Texas paid final respects to Whites during his funeral service on Wednesday at Shoreline Church. The service followed by police honors and a procession through downtown Round Rock.

Olivier said police Chief Allen Banks saw Ximena’s note and said, “It’s why we do what we do.”

“The outpouring of support has been tremendous,” Olivier said.

Thank you Ximena and everyone else in the Round Rock community who expressed their support. This is why we do what we do. We love our city! ???? #keeptheallowance pic.twitter.com/jGsYsjF02h

— Round Rock Police (@roundrockpolice) May 3, 2018

©2018 Austin American-Statesman, Texas

Indiana Police Officer Fatally Shot

Posted on May 5, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Terre Haute Police Officer Rob Pitts was fatally wounded after officers were fired upon from a second-story window at an apartment complex Friday evening.

Indiana Police Officer Fatally Shot

Posted on May 5, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Terre Haute Police Officer Rob Pitts was fatally wounded after officers were fired upon from a second-story window at an apartment complex Friday evening.

Station Design Supplement: Commercial Furniture 101

Posted on May 5, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Raegan Porter shares key factors for researching and procuring commercial furniture.

Ind. officer fatally shot while investigating homicide

Posted on May 5, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Associated Press

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — An Indiana officer was killed Friday evening in an exchange of gunfire between police and a homicide suspect, who barricaded himself inside an apartment complex and later died from injuries sustained during the shootout, authorities said.

Terre Haute police spokesman Ryan Adamson said the police officer's investigation of a homicide led him the apartment complex on the city's south side. Authorities did not reveal when the homicide under investigation occurred.

Adamson said the suspect in that homicide opened fire when he was approached by four investigators, wounding the officer who was later pronounced dead at Terre Haute Regional Hospital. No additional information was immediately available on the male officer who was killed.

"It is another tragic loss for the Wabash Valley and the Terre Haute Police Department," Indiana State Police spokesman Joe Watts said in announcing the officer's death.

Terre Haute Police Chief John Plasse said the suspect was wounded in a shootout with officers from the city and other agencies, then barricaded himself inside the building. The wounded suspect was treated by medics who responded to the scene, but the suspect later died, Plasse said.

The suspect's identity wasn't immediately released.

During the standoff officials called the area dangerous and urged residents to avoid it. Watt said state police will conduct an investigation into the events leading up to the fatal shooting.

The death of the police officer is the first of officer with the Terre Haute Police Department since July 11, 2011. That is when Officer Brent D. Long was killed while serving an arrest warrant with a U.S. Marshal's Fugitive Task Force.

The 34-year-old Long worked for the department for six years.

On behalf of the residents of Clark County our Sheriff's Office is keeping the Terre Haute Police Department and their families in our thoughts and prayers. We grieve for our brothers and sisters, their families, and our neighbors, the entire Vigo County Community.

— Clark Co. IL Sheriff (@SheriffOfClark) May 5, 2018

We sincerely appreciate all of the kind messages. We are deeply saddened by the loss of our officer, and ask that you keep our entire community in your prayers. @THPolice1

— Officer Ryan Adamson (@THPDPIO) May 5, 2018

Criminals Used a Drone Swarm To Obstruct an FBI Hostage Raid

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

 

Last winter, on the outskirts of a large U.S. city, an FBI hostage rescue team set up an elevated observation post to assess an unfolding situation. Soon they heard the buzz of small drones — and then the tiny aircraft were all around them, swooping past in a series of “high-speed low passes at the agents in the observation post to flush them,” the head of the agency’s operational technology law unit told attendees of the AUVSI Xponential conference here. Result: “We were then blind,” said Joe Mazel, meaning the group lost situational awareness of the target. “It definitely presented some challenges.”

The incident remains “law enforcement-sensitive,” Mazel said Wednesday, declining to say just where or when it took place. But it shows how criminal groups are using small drones for increasingly elaborate crimes, Defense One reports.

Mazel said the suspects had backpacked the drones to the area in anticipation of the FBI’s arrival. Not only did they buzz the hostage rescue team, they also kept a continuous eye on the agents, feeding video to the group’s other members via YouTube. “They had people fly their own drones up and put the footage to YouTube so that the guys who had cellular access could go to the YouTube site and pull down the video,” he said.

Mazel said counter surveillance of law enforcement agents is the fastest-growing way that organized criminals are using drones.

 

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Criminals Used a Drone Swarm To Obstruct an FBI Hostage Raid

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

 

Last winter, on the outskirts of a large U.S. city, an FBI hostage rescue team set up an elevated observation post to assess an unfolding situation. Soon they heard the buzz of small drones — and then the tiny aircraft were all around them, swooping past in a series of “high-speed low passes at the agents in the observation post to flush them,” the head of the agency’s operational technology law unit told attendees of the AUVSI Xponential conference here. Result: “We were then blind,” said Joe Mazel, meaning the group lost situational awareness of the target. “It definitely presented some challenges.”

The incident remains “law enforcement-sensitive,” Mazel said Wednesday, declining to say just where or when it took place. But it shows how criminal groups are using small drones for increasingly elaborate crimes, Defense One reports.

Mazel said the suspects had backpacked the drones to the area in anticipation of the FBI’s arrival. Not only did they buzz the hostage rescue team, they also kept a continuous eye on the agents, feeding video to the group’s other members via YouTube. “They had people fly their own drones up and put the footage to YouTube so that the guys who had cellular access could go to the YouTube site and pull down the video,” he said.

Mazel said counter surveillance of law enforcement agents is the fastest-growing way that organized criminals are using drones.

 

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Criminals Used a Drone Swarm To Obstruct an FBI Hostage Raid

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

 

Last winter, on the outskirts of a large U.S. city, an FBI hostage rescue team set up an elevated observation post to assess an unfolding situation. Soon they heard the buzz of small drones — and then the tiny aircraft were all around them, swooping past in a series of “high-speed low passes at the agents in the observation post to flush them,” the head of the agency’s operational technology law unit told attendees of the AUVSI Xponential conference here. Result: “We were then blind,” said Joe Mazel, meaning the group lost situational awareness of the target. “It definitely presented some challenges.”

The incident remains “law enforcement-sensitive,” Mazel said Wednesday, declining to say just where or when it took place. But it shows how criminal groups are using small drones for increasingly elaborate crimes, Defense One reports.

Mazel said the suspects had backpacked the drones to the area in anticipation of the FBI’s arrival. Not only did they buzz the hostage rescue team, they also kept a continuous eye on the agents, feeding video to the group’s other members via YouTube. “They had people fly their own drones up and put the footage to YouTube so that the guys who had cellular access could go to the YouTube site and pull down the video,” he said.

Mazel said counter surveillance of law enforcement agents is the fastest-growing way that organized criminals are using drones.

 

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What are crisis actors?

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Crisis actors do exist – just not the ones popularized by conspiracy Twitter

If Facial Recognition Comes to Body Cameras, How Will L.E. Agencies Respond?

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Adding facial recognition capabilities to its body camera technology raises questions whether law enforcement agencies will impose policies and requirements tied to such technology.

PA Fire Chief Praises County’s Opioid Efforts

Posted on May 4, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Beaver Falls Fire Chief Mark Stowe has praised the proactive stance of Beaver County leaders in reducing the number of overdose deaths.

Feds Capture Handcuffed Prisoner Following Brief Escape

Posted on May 3, 2018 by in Uncategorized

For the second time in less than a week, a handcuffed prisoner managed to slither away from custody in New York City.

Video: 3 Killed, 1 Critically Injured in Ohio Stabbing; Suspect Fatally Shot

Posted on May 2, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: 3 Killed, 1 Critically Injured in Ohio Stabbing; Suspect Fatally Shot

Three people were killed and one critically injured after a stabbing in north Columbus, OH. The suspect was fatally shot by responding police officers.

It happened just after 9:00am Monday in the 4300 block of Walford Street.

Police told NBC4 officers were called to a home at that location on a report of a stabbing. The officers entered the residence and found three people stabbed inside. Two of the female victims were pronounced dead at a local hospital. A third stabbing victim was listed in stable condition at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

Witnesses say the officers confronted a man with a knife outside of the residence. Police told NBC4 the officers on scene were ultimately forced to shoot him. The male suspect was pronounced dead at a local hospital.

No officers were injured.

As part of the investigation on Walford, officers went to an address on Fitzroy nearby where they discovered another body. Officers say the male victim had died from apparent stab wounds.

 

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AmpliVox Introduces Two New Powerful Product Series

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

AmpliVox has two new product series—AirVox and Mega Hailer—for better-than-ever sound at great distance or in big spaces.  

All Mega Hailer products come with a sturdy horn speaker, horizontally aligned for great sound dispersion. All AirVox products come with a traditional acoustic speaker, for exceptional sound clarity and balanced audio quality.

Features include:

  • Outstanding sound clarity up to a half-mile away
  • Optional companion wireless speaker to expand range and audience reach
  • Battery-powered convenience
  • Wireless microphone models to provide speaking versatility
  • Built-in Bluetooth capability

For more information, visit www.ampli.com.

 

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Fire Chief Moving on to Another MA City

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Fire Chief William Carrico, who improved response times during his time in Sandwich, is moving on to lead the fire department in Medfield.

Quiz: How well do you know ‘Stop the Bleed’?

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

One of the most important things police officers need to have when it comes to saving a life is knowledge of bleeding control techniques. In the event of a mass casualty incident, there may be a number of victims who require immediate treatment to stop life-threatening hemorrhaging. From proper use of tourniquets to treating blood loss with a trauma kit, here’s a quick quiz on bleeding control. Most of this information comes from Stop the Bleed, a national awareness campaign aimed at encouraging bystanders to become trained in bleeding control techniques in the event of an MCI or other mass emergency.

Want to learn even more? Check out the PoliceOne Academy, which features multiple online courses on the use of tourniquets and other tactical medical topics. You can schedule a free P1A demo here.

How did you do? Make sure to share your results and challenge your colleagues to match or beat your score, and check out the following articles to further expand your knowledge:

6 bleeding control products to assist prehospital treatment

How a 'bleed-safe' community can help during an active violence event

How Boston Marathon led to widespread adoption of tourniquets

Saving lives in the tactical space: Training to use tourniquets

A review of tactical tourniquets

Why every cop should carry a tourniquet

Quiz: How well do you know ‘Stop the Bleed’?

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

One of the most important things police officers need to have when it comes to saving a life is knowledge of bleeding control techniques. In the event of a mass casualty incident, there may be a number of victims who require immediate treatment to stop life-threatening hemorrhaging. From proper use of tourniquets to treating blood loss with a trauma kit, here’s a quick quiz on bleeding control. Most of this information comes from Stop the Bleed, a national awareness campaign aimed at encouraging bystanders to become trained in bleeding control techniques in the event of an MCI or other mass emergency.

Want to learn even more? Check out the PoliceOne Academy, which features multiple online courses on the use of tourniquets and other tactical medical topics. You can schedule a free P1A demo here.

How did you do? Make sure to share your results and challenge your colleagues to match or beat your score, and check out the following articles to further expand your knowledge:

6 bleeding control products to assist prehospital treatment

How a 'bleed-safe' community can help during an active violence event

How Boston Marathon led to widespread adoption of tourniquets

Saving lives in the tactical space: Training to use tourniquets

A review of tactical tourniquets

Why every cop should carry a tourniquet

Wounded Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Back on the Job

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Seventeen weeks after being wounded in a shooting that claimed the life of one of his comrades, Douglas County Sheriff’s
Deputy Jeff Pelle is back on the job.

Osprey Holster

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The DeSantis Gunhide Osprey is a trailing slot OWB/IWB holster built from premium tan saddle leather. The belt slots will fit belts up to 1 1/2″ wide. The IWB strap is “cantable” and easily removed without tools. The #159 is available for medium and large autoloaders.

 

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Back on the streets: An old paramedic’s return to patient care

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

It’s important to brush up on protocols, equipment and other areas of EMS after taking some time away from the field

Man flees from police with toddler in back of ambulance

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Police responded to a hospital after a woman reported that her boyfriend had assaulted her; he fled in an ambulance with his 18-month-old son

5 Taiwan firefighters killed, 7 hurt in factory blaze

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in Uncategorized

The firefighters died after becoming trapped by falling objects inside the factory; seven other firefighters suffered injuries

The need for objective alcohol consumption assessment in EMS

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Without a standard, objective-based assessment of patient sobriety levels, situations may arise that test the limits of EMS personnel

Here’s How Streamlining Data Helps Public Safety Workers

Posted on April 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Streamlining data collection and administrative work is a top priority for many public safety agencies, but finding the right solution can be challenging.

Fla. firefighter cleared of wrongdoing in off-duty fire response

Posted on April 29, 2018 by in Uncategorized

“Based on what we know after reviewing official reports … it would appear more likely that we should issue Capt. Jay Schwartz a commendation”

Before shooting, Dallas officers shared ‘car full of laughs’ as partners, best friends

Posted on April 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Naheed Rajwani The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — Dallas police Officers Rogelio Santander and Crystal Almeida were just rookies, but even veteran cops were envious of their chemistry.

He was the one who cracked the jokes. She was the shy one.

The best friends were inseparable as they patrolled the streets of northeast Dallas in one squad car. Santander did most of the driving. Almeida took the lead on writing reports.

“It was a car full of laughs every day,” said Senior Cpl. John Arnold, their class adviser and fellow northeast patrol division officer.

The partnership ended Tuesday afternoon, when police say a suspected shoplifter with no history of violence shot them and a Home Depot loss-prevention officer as they tried to arrest him.

Santander, 27, died on Wednesday. Almeida and Scott Painter, both 26, remained in critical condition but were improving and surprising doctors with their recovery.

Devastated by the shooting, Santander’s and Almeida’s supervisors were even more saddened by the fact that it tore apart one of the tightest pairs in the northeast division.

“Those two were like this,” northeast patrol Sgt. Tim Lewis said, crossing his fingers.

Academy classmates usually go their own way after graduation, sorted into different patrol divisions and paired up with unfamiliar officers.

Not so with Almeida and Santander.

“You would be lucky, lucky if you can make it through a career with one good partner,” said Lewis, who’s been on the department longer than a decade. “The relationship that they had, you would be lucky.”

Santander was raised in Dallas. He made up his mind about becoming a cop after hearing a Dallas police officer talk about dangerous drugs at his elementary school.

He went on to attend Skyline High School and Texas A&M University-Commerce before returning to Dallas to join the Police Department. He wanted to become a community police officer for the area where he grew up, Arnold said.

Almeida was raised in El Paso. She played basketball in high school and was well liked by her teammates, her coach told the El Paso Times.

“She was always at practice and very dedicated,” Paul Baca told the Times. “No matter what, you can always count on Crystal.”

She’d apply that same dedication to law enforcement.

She worked at a Texas Department of Criminal Justice facility in Fort Stockton for two years before applying to the Dallas Police Department, where a few of her relatives were officers.

Santander and Almeida joined the department on the same day: Dec. 3, 2014.

Almeida was the quiet one in their academy class, but she wasn’t as shy when it came to training. She enjoyed using a Taser on a trainer wrapped in a red protective suit and practicing to use a baton, Arnold said.

Santander was patient, and his trainers said he always wore a grin. He even smiled during the dreaded academy tradition of getting sprayed in the face with Mace.

Three summers ago, the classmates-turned-brother-and-sister stood side by side as they recited the oath that would officially make them Dallas police officers.

They were eventually assigned to the northeast division, which tends to be one of the busiest patrol areas in the city, after a bid process that takes officers’ work preferences and the department’s needs into account.

“They were as humble as humble pie,” Lewis said.

He often teased Sgt. Shannon Smith, who supervised the pair, that he would someday poach Santander and Almeida to work for him because of how productive they were on the streets.

But they also took time to appreciate the people they worked with. They’d drive downtown to visit their dispatcher and bring her coffee.

Smith shared a moment with them the weekend before they were shot. Over the radio, he asked for someone to bring him a kit to test possible drugs.

“And who shows up?” the sergeant said. “Almeida and Santander.”

The two got to work as soon as they arrived. Santander walked over to the officer who was already there for a rundown of the call as Almeida walked over with the test kit.

“I’ve got some damn good officers,” he told them. “You guys are squared away.”

That was the last time he saw Santander.

Officers arrested Juarez after a five-hour manhunt that ended in a high-speed car chase through the city. He remains in the Dallas County Jail, facing multiple charges that include capital murder, with bail set at just over $4 million.

When Almeida regained consciousness after surgery last week, the first question she asked was about her partner: How was Rogelio doing?

They had to tell her he didn’t survive.

Smith said he got a chance on Thursday to sit by Almeida’s bedside and comfort her, but she ended up comforting him.

She waved as soon as her sergeant walked into her hospital room and told him, “I love you, Sarge” as he held her hand. The 47-year-old man burst into tears.

She pulled him in for a hug and told him she loved him repeatedly.

“I finally had to pull myself together and tell her, ‘Hey, I’m here for you!’” Smith said. “It made my day, my week, my year.”

©2018 The Dallas Morning News

Before shooting, Dallas officers shared ‘car full of laughs’ as partners, best friends

Posted on April 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Naheed Rajwani The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — Dallas police Officers Rogelio Santander and Crystal Almeida were just rookies, but even veteran cops were envious of their chemistry.

He was the one who cracked the jokes. She was the shy one.

The best friends were inseparable as they patrolled the streets of northeast Dallas in one squad car. Santander did most of the driving. Almeida took the lead on writing reports.

“It was a car full of laughs every day,” said Senior Cpl. John Arnold, their class adviser and fellow northeast patrol division officer.

The partnership ended Tuesday afternoon, when police say a suspected shoplifter with no history of violence shot them and a Home Depot loss-prevention officer as they tried to arrest him.

Santander, 27, died on Wednesday. Almeida and Scott Painter, both 26, remained in critical condition but were improving and surprising doctors with their recovery.

Devastated by the shooting, Santander’s and Almeida’s supervisors were even more saddened by the fact that it tore apart one of the tightest pairs in the northeast division.

“Those two were like this,” northeast patrol Sgt. Tim Lewis said, crossing his fingers.

Academy classmates usually go their own way after graduation, sorted into different patrol divisions and paired up with unfamiliar officers.

Not so with Almeida and Santander.

“You would be lucky, lucky if you can make it through a career with one good partner,” said Lewis, who’s been on the department longer than a decade. “The relationship that they had, you would be lucky.”

Santander was raised in Dallas. He made up his mind about becoming a cop after hearing a Dallas police officer talk about dangerous drugs at his elementary school.

He went on to attend Skyline High School and Texas A&M University-Commerce before returning to Dallas to join the Police Department. He wanted to become a community police officer for the area where he grew up, Arnold said.

Almeida was raised in El Paso. She played basketball in high school and was well liked by her teammates, her coach told the El Paso Times.

“She was always at practice and very dedicated,” Paul Baca told the Times. “No matter what, you can always count on Crystal.”

She’d apply that same dedication to law enforcement.

She worked at a Texas Department of Criminal Justice facility in Fort Stockton for two years before applying to the Dallas Police Department, where a few of her relatives were officers.

Santander and Almeida joined the department on the same day: Dec. 3, 2014.

Almeida was the quiet one in their academy class, but she wasn’t as shy when it came to training. She enjoyed using a Taser on a trainer wrapped in a red protective suit and practicing to use a baton, Arnold said.

Santander was patient, and his trainers said he always wore a grin. He even smiled during the dreaded academy tradition of getting sprayed in the face with Mace.

Three summers ago, the classmates-turned-brother-and-sister stood side by side as they recited the oath that would officially make them Dallas police officers.

They were eventually assigned to the northeast division, which tends to be one of the busiest patrol areas in the city, after a bid process that takes officers’ work preferences and the department’s needs into account.

“They were as humble as humble pie,” Lewis said.

He often teased Sgt. Shannon Smith, who supervised the pair, that he would someday poach Santander and Almeida to work for him because of how productive they were on the streets.

But they also took time to appreciate the people they worked with. They’d drive downtown to visit their dispatcher and bring her coffee.

Smith shared a moment with them the weekend before they were shot. Over the radio, he asked for someone to bring him a kit to test possible drugs.

“And who shows up?” the sergeant said. “Almeida and Santander.”

The two got to work as soon as they arrived. Santander walked over to the officer who was already there for a rundown of the call as Almeida walked over with the test kit.

“I’ve got some damn good officers,” he told them. “You guys are squared away.”

That was the last time he saw Santander.

Officers arrested Juarez after a five-hour manhunt that ended in a high-speed car chase through the city. He remains in the Dallas County Jail, facing multiple charges that include capital murder, with bail set at just over $4 million.

When Almeida regained consciousness after surgery last week, the first question she asked was about her partner: How was Rogelio doing?

They had to tell her he didn’t survive.

Smith said he got a chance on Thursday to sit by Almeida’s bedside and comfort her, but she ended up comforting him.

She waved as soon as her sergeant walked into her hospital room and told him, “I love you, Sarge” as he held her hand. The 47-year-old man burst into tears.

She pulled him in for a hug and told him she loved him repeatedly.

“I finally had to pull myself together and tell her, ‘Hey, I’m here for you!’” Smith said. “It made my day, my week, my year.”

©2018 The Dallas Morning News

Threats Lead Louisville Police to Send 2 Officers to Calls

Posted on April 27, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Louisville Police Chief Steve Conrad said police have received a number of threats on social media.

In response to those threats, the Louisville Metro Police chief is doubling up officers, WHAS 11 reports.

“As a result of that information, what we have done is implement a plan where two officers will respond to calls of service,” he said.

 

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Threats Lead Louisville Police to Send 2 Officers to Calls

Posted on April 27, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Louisville Police Chief Steve Conrad said police have received a number of threats on social media.

In response to those threats, the Louisville Metro Police chief is doubling up officers, WHAS 11 reports.

“As a result of that information, what we have done is implement a plan where two officers will respond to calls of service,” he said.

 

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Threats Lead Louisville Police to Send 2 Officers to Calls

Posted on April 27, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Louisville Police Chief Steve Conrad said police have received a number of threats on social media.

In response to those threats, the Louisville Metro Police chief is doubling up officers, WHAS 11 reports.

“As a result of that information, what we have done is implement a plan where two officers will respond to calls of service,” he said.

 

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Budget Talks Heat up for MD County Firefighters

Posted on April 26, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Frederick County firefighters and several council members say a $49.6 million budget proposal for fire protection services is not enough.

Two Dallas Police Officers Critically Wounded in Shooting

Posted on April 24, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Two Dallas police officers and a civilian were shot Tuesday afternoon near a Home Depot.

Two Dallas Police Officers Critically Wounded in Shooting

Posted on April 24, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Two Dallas police officers and a civilian were shot Tuesday afternoon near a Home Depot.

Report: Deputies took cover during Parkland massacre

Posted on April 24, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Nicholas Nehamas Miami Herald

MIAMI — Broward Sheriff’s Office deputies were taking cover behind cars and a tree as they responded to the worst school shooting in Florida history — and one of them thought he knew where the shooter was, according to an officer report released Tuesday by Coral Springs Police Department.

But the BSO deputies didn’t immediately attempt to track down shooter Nikolas Cruz or aid the wounded, according to the report by Coral Springs officer Bryan Wilkins, which recounts his actions at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14.

Wilkins wrote that he arrived at Stoneman Douglas within minutes of an active shooter alert. BSO was already there.

“I saw approximately four Broward County Sheriff’s Office vehicles parked … with their personnel taking up exterior positions behind their vehicles,” Wilkins wrote in the report. “I drove up just west of the campus building 1200, exited my vehicle, grabbed my AR-15 rifle and donned on my tactical/medical gear. As I was advancing on foot through the chain-link fence, I was advised by an unknown BSO Deputy taking cover behind a tree, ‘he is on the third floor.’ “

Wilkins says he and Coral Springs Detective Gil Monzon then went into the freshman building where Cruz killed 17 people. Inside, they saw the dead and wounded. Cruz had already fled about five minutes before the officers went in.

Police around the county are trained to find and confront active shooters without delay.

The newly released report suggests the problems with BSO’s response to the Parkland shooting go beyond the school’s resource officer, Deputy Scot Peterson, who was at the school when the shooting began but never went into Building 12. At least three other BSO deputies arrived on campus in time to hear gunfire but said they couldn’t locate where the shooting was taking place.

Broward Sheriff Scott Israel held a news conference to announce Peterson’s resignation in February.

At the time, Israel said he was “sick to my stomach” that Peterson didn’t go into the building. Although he has resigned, Peterson remains the subject of a pending internal affairs investigation.

BSO didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

©2018 Miami Herald

Jury Acquits Border Agent in Killing of Mexican Teen

Posted on April 24, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Prosecutors will consider whether to retry Border Agent Lonnie Swartz on lesser charges after a jury acquitted him Monday of second-degree murder in the 2012 death of a Mexican teen.

Pair Face Arson Charges for Fire at Historic ME School

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The one-room Friends School House in Casco was built in 1849 and contained artifacts from the 1700s.

9 Dead, 16 Injured After Van Driver Hit Pedestrians in Canada

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Toronto police say nine people are dead and 16 are injured after a van apparently jumped onto a sidewalk from a busy intersection Monday and struck a crowd of pedestrians. The driver was later taken into custody, Canadian police said.

It was not immediately clear what caused the van to strike the pedestrians in the north-central part of the city. Police did not immediately identify the driver, reports the Associated Press.

CTV News reported that at least four of the hospitalized victims were in critical condition.

“At this point it’s too early to tell what if any motive there was,” Toronto police spokeswoman Meaghan Gray said.

The incident occurred as Cabinet ministers from the major industrial countries were gathered in Canada to discuss a range of international issues in the run-up to the G7 meeting near Quebec City in June.

 

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Police: 9 dead, 16 injured after van strikes crowd in Toronto

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Police said one person has been taken into custody

Nashville Waffle House Shooting Suspect in Custody After Manhunt

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Suspected Waffle House gunman Travis Reinking was arrested Monday afternoon.

LODD: Ga. firefighter-EMT dies after search and rescue drill

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Decatur County Fire and Rescue firefighter-EMT Adam Taylor, 30, went into cardiac arrest shortly after going home due to chest pains

Photo: Officer takes elderly man to hospital to visit sick wife

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. — A Pennsylvania officer is being praised for his kindness after helping an elderly man visit his sick wife at a hospital.

WNEP reports that Montoursville Deputy Chief Jason Bentley received a call Thursday about a man, 84-year-old Roger Baker, who needed a ride to the hospital. Baker’s wife of more than 60 years suffered a medical emergency, and Baker had no friends or family to take him to her.

Bentley drove the elderly man to the hospital and noticed Baker struggling to walk.

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We were sent a picture of Deputy Chief Bentley helping an elderly man into UPMC Susquehanna. The man's wife went to the…

Posted by Montoursville Police Department on Thursday, April 19, 2018

"When he got out of my patrol car at the hospital, he held onto the side of the car for about a minute. I didn't realize it was that bad, so I grabbed his hands and started to walk him in," Bentley said.

The Montoursville PD snapped a photo of the officer assisting Baker, which went viral. The department said they shared the photo to make their community feel comfortable calling for help no matter what the situation is.

"With this gentleman here, he mentioned on his way to the hospital that there have been a couple of times where his wife has fallen down and instead of calling 911, he went out to the road and flagged someone down and paid them $10 to help pick her up. I said, 'just call 911; it's what we do,’” Bentley said.

LODD: Ga. firefighter-EMT dies after search and rescue drill

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Decatur County Fire and Rescue firefighter-EMT Adam Taylor, 30, went into cardiac arrest shortly after going home due to chest pains

NJ officer crashes into parked car, dies

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

PATERSON, N.J. — A New Jersey police officer was killed after he crashed his patrol car into a parked vehicle Sunday.

Paterson Officer Tamby Yagan was on-duty when he crashed into a parked vehicle, NBC New York reported. Yagan was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Officials said it’s unclear whether the officer died as a result of the crash or if he suffered a medical emergency, according to NorthJersey.com. There was no indication that the officer was involved in a pursuit.

We have lost one of our own in the line of duty today.. #Paterson Officer Tamby Yagan was committed to protecting and serving. His tragic death leaves a loss for all of us. Keep Officer Yagan's family and friends as well as Paterson PD in your prayers- President Patrick Colligan pic.twitter.com/FoZsEoOkdp

— New Jersey State PBA (@NJSPBA) April 22, 2018

Councilman Luis Velez remembered Yagan, 41, as a “kind man” and said losing the officer is a “loss for the city.”

"In uniform he was the type of officer that would always orient people how to conduct themselves out there," Velez said. "Without uniform he was a kind man."

Police said no one else was injured in the crash. Yagan leaves behind a young son.

State police and prosecutors are investigating the crash.

LODD: Ga. firefighter dies after becoming ill at end of shift

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Fort Benning Fire Department firefighter Gregory Jackson was transported to the hospital after becoming ill, where he later died

Video: Off-Duty Detective Shot Outside His Chicago Home

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: Off-Duty Detective Shot Outside His Chicago Home

An off-duty Dolton, IL, police officer was wounded in a shooting outside his home on Chicago’s South Side early Monday morning, police said. Dolton is a southern suburb of Chicago.

The officer has been identified as 55-year-old Detective Darryl Hope, who has been on the Dolton force for about 17 years, ABC7 reports.

Police said Hope was coming home from work shortly after midnight, he was on his front porch when two armed men approached him. Shots were exchanged during the attempted robbery. Hope was shot three times but is reportedly in good condition.

“Our detective dropped his bag and sometime during the encounter, shots were exchanged and our detective was shot once in the arm, once in the abdomen and once in the leg. So at this point, he is in good spirits, but he is in a lot of pain. He is with his family,” said Dolton Police Chief Robert Collins Jr.

The suspects were still at large Monday morning. One may have been wounded in the gunfight.

 

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Understanding Body Armor

Posted on April 23, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Educate yourself before buying body armor.

Woman Now Faces First-Degree Murder in MO Officer’s Slaying

Posted on April 19, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Tammy Dee Widger’s charges in the fatal shooting of Clinton, MO, Officer Ryan Morton last month have been amended and now include first-degree murder, the Henry County Prosecutor’s Office said Wednesday.

<p>Clinton, MO, police officer Christopher Ryan Morton was shot and killed in the line of duty. (Photo: Clinton PD)</p>

Widger also now faces two counts of first-degree assault. She originally faced second-degree murder and drug charges, reports the Kansas City Star.

First-degree murder carries a maximum penalty of the death sentence or life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.

Officers responded to Widger’s home in Clinton by mistake in early March after a 911 call was made 20 miles away. James Waters fatally wounded Morton and injured two other officers in a shooting, police said.

“Although it is believed that James Waters actually shot the three police officers,” the Henry County Prosecutor’s Office said in a release, “Missouri law provides that if an accessory to a crime … aids another person in planning, committing or attempting to commit the offense, the accessory may be charged with the same offense.”

The release added that aiding can occur either before or during an offense.

 

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Woman now faces first-degree murder in slaying of Mo. officer

Posted on April 19, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Max Londberg And Ian Cummings The Kansas City Star

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Tammy Dee Widger's charges in the fatal shooting of Clinton Officer Ryan Morton last month have been amended and now include first-degree murder, the Henry County Prosecutor's Office said Wednesday.

Widger also now faces two counts of first-degree assault. She originally faced second-degree murder and drug charges.

First-degree murder carries a maximum penalty of the death sentence or life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.

Officers responded to Widger's home in Clinton by mistake in early March after a 911 call was made 20 miles away. James Waters fatally wounded Morton and injured two other officers in a shooting, police said.

"Although it is believed that James Waters actually shot the three police officers," the Henry County Prosecutor's Office said in a release, "Missouri law provides that if an accessory to a crime … aids another person in planning, committing or attempting to commit the offense, the accessory may be charged with the same offense."

The release added that aiding can occur either before or during an offense.

Widger had earlier told The Star that she never expected gunfire to break out and had no reason to believe officers were in danger that night.

She said she did not know Waters had a gun and thought he had left the house by a back door to avoid police.

She said she was in the house with officers when the shooting started.

Police reviewed surveillance footage from a camera installed at the residence. Waters is not seen leaving the residence leading up to the shooting, according to police.

"I didn't know what was going to happen," Widger said. "In the blink of an eye, my life changed. I didn't want this."

According to updated charging documents filed by investigators:

Investigators discovered a text message in which Waters asks Widger to "go home and load both of the 410's now." Police do not say when the text was sent.

Shotguns using the .410 caliber were found in the residence after the shooting.

A witness stated that Waters often carried a weapon and had told the witness that "he was going out with a bang. If anything ever happened to him, he was going to go out shooting." Such comments were common from Waters and made in the presence of Widger, the witness said.

Police also write that Widger had "adamantly" stated Waters had left the residence when he hadn't, and she "denied there were any weapons in the residence."

A pistol was found in Widger's purse, police state. Another witness told police of seeing "all kinds" of guns at the residence.

Waters had a large rifle magazine and said Widger had purchased it for him, according to a witness. Waters obtained a rifle without a magazine from two unknown people a few days before the shooting, the witness added.

John Picerno, a Kansas City-based defense attorney, said the distinction between first- and second-degree murder is that a perpetrator must display "cool reflection upon the matter, no matter how brief."

He called the first-degree murder charge in Widger's case "a stretch," adding that even if Widger provided bullets to Waters or loaded his weapon, she "has no idea what he's going to use that for."

"I don't see where there's any fact … that she coolly reflected upon the matter of taking a person's life," Picerno said.

Widger also faces felony drug charges.

©2018 The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Mo.)

Video Shows Texas Police Officer Nearly Caught in Explosion

Posted on April 19, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Hurst Police Officer Travis Hiser is shown being blown back, but he recovers and assists police Cpl. Ryan Tooker in getting a couple out of the home.

Photo of TX Firefighters Resting Goes Viral

Posted on April 18, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

A gripping photo of two Wheeler County volunteer firefighters resting as smoke and smog surround them is gaining interest on social media.

Special prosecutor appointed to defend Joe Arpaio case ruling

Posted on April 18, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Jacques Billeaud Associated Press PHOENIX — A special prosecutor will be appointed in an appeal over the pardon of former metro Phoenix Sheriff Joe Arpaio's conviction for disobeying a court order because President Donald Trump's Justice Department is now refusing to handle the case, an appeals court ruled Tuesday.

The U.S. 9th Circuit of ordered the appointment because the Justice Department lawyers who won the conviction have since declined to defend a court ruling that dismissed the case but did not erase Arpaio's criminal record after Trump issued the pardon.

Arpaio is a Trump ally, is running for a U.S. Senate seat and wants the court records related to his conviction expunged.

Legal advocacy groups that focus on free speech, democracy and civil rights had asked for the prosecutor and have mounted a challenge to Trump's pardon of the former six-term sheriff, a Republican who lost to a little-known Democratic challenger in 2016.

A federal judge last summer found Arpaio guilty of contempt of court for intentionally defying a 2011 court order that barred his traffic patrols targeting immigrants.

Arpaio, now running for the Senate seat by the outgoing Jeff Flake, was accused of prolonging the patrols for 17 months to boost his successful 2012 re-election campaign.

Jack Wilenchik, a lawyer representing Arpaio, accused the appeals court of appointing a special prosecutor because it did not like the outcome of the case.

"To be appointing a new lawyer is really the 9th Circuit taking a position on the case, which it shouldn't be doing," Wilenchik said.

Arpaio said the president made the right decision in issuing his pardon.

"I am not guilty," Arpaio said. "To this day, I will say that."

The retired sheriff is appealing the lower-court ruling that refused to expunge his criminal record.

The groups opposed to Arpaio's pardon are using the same appeals process to challenge clemency for him.

The pardon issued in late August spared the 85-year-old Arpaio a possible jail sentence.

Arpaio and his critics have complained that the case has been influenced by politics.

Arpaio maintains the criminal case was a political vendetta launched against him by the Obama administration over the sheriff's immigration crackdowns.

His critics have said the pardon was political repayment for Arpaio's endorsement of Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Ten days before Arpaio's 2016 primary election in his last race for sheriff of Maricopa County, a judge who was nominated to the bench by President George W. Bush had recommended the criminal charge as part of racial profiling lawsuit over the sheriff's immigration patrols.

Another federal judge who was nominated by President Bill Clinton then filed the criminal charge against Arpaio about three months before Obama left office.

Prosecutors from Trump's Justice Department brought the case to trial last summer and won the conviction.

Firefighter helps pull woman sucked out of plane back inside

Posted on April 18, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Andrew Needum and Tim McGinty pulled Jennifer Riordan to safety after she was sucked out of her window whenSouthwest Flight 1380 suffered an engine failure

TX Firefighter Rushed to Save Woman in Plane Blast

Posted on April 18, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

A Celina firefighter helped pull a fellow passenger back inside after she was sucked out of a plane following an engine explosion Tuesday.

Thousands Honor Slain Massachusetts Police Officer

Posted on April 18, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

There was a sea of blue in the streets of Yarmouth as police honored Officer Sean Gannon.

Thousands Honor Slain Massachusetts Police Officer

Posted on April 18, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

There was a sea of blue in the streets of Yarmouth as police honored Officer Sean Gannon.

Phoenix K-9 Killed Finding Suspect in Attic

Posted on April 17, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Phoenix PD K-9 Bane was killed attempting to apprehend a suspect hiding in an attic. (Photo: Phoenix PD)</p>

Phoenix Police K-9 Bane was killed after it was deployed to locate a suspect who had hidden in an attic after leading police on a pursuit and bailing from the vehicle a few hours earlier, said Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams.

The incident reportedly began with a vehicle theft and pursuit Tuesday afternoon and ended with one woman arrested and a man in the hospital after what police called an officer-involved shooting.

Williams did not immediately confirm the man was shot by an officer but said he was injured and taken to a hospital. She said, however, the incident was the 17th police shooting involving Phoenix officers. Police did not specify how the dog was killed, reports the Arizona Republic.

The suspect was found on top of Bane before he was transported to a local hospital for treatment of his injuries, Williams said.

K-9 Bane was a three-year-old Belgian Malinois who had served the Phoenix Police Department for a little over one year, according to Sgt. Jonathan Howard, Phoenix PD public information officer.

 

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Ore. police department gets speed enforcement grant

Posted on April 17, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Tyler Jones KEZI-TV

SUTHERLIN, Ore. — The Sutherlin Police Department recently received a speed enforcement grant from the Oregon Department of Transportation, allowing officers to work more overtime.

The grant from ODOT gives the police department 50 hours of overtime to work with.

Captain Kurt Sorenson with the Sutherlin Police Department said this means officers can come in any time they choose, before or after shifts or even on their days off, and only focus on speeding drivers.

Full Story: Sutherlin police receive speed enforcement grant

North Carolina Sheriff’s Deputy Faces Long Road to Recovery

Posted on April 16, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Harnett County Sheriff’s Deputy James Eric Cook, who was wearing a bulletproof vest, was hit in the chest and through the cheek.

Massachusetts Officer Shot in Head Serving Warrant Has Died

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A Yarmouth, MA, police officer was shot and killed Thursday while serving a warrant, reports NBC News 10.

He was initially seriously injured, but later died in the hospital.

<p>Officer Sean Gannon was shot and killed serving a warrant. (Photo: Yarmouth Police Dept./Facebook)</p>

“With deep sorrow and heavy hearts the Yarmouth Police Department reports the loss of Officer Sean Gannon,” the Yarmouth Police Department noted on Facebook Thursday night. “Officer Sean Gannon was killed in the line of duty today.”

Gannon, a K-9 handler, was shot on Blueberry Lane in the Marstons Mills village of Barnstable and was taken away in an ambulance, reported WBZ-TV. The suspect was reported to be in custody.

Related: Video: Massachusetts Officer Shot in Head Serving Search Warrant

 

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Breaking through cultural barriers: Serve with professionalism

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

America’s diverse population can make things complicated for the fire service, but addressing the issue prevents it from being a problem

Mass. officer fatally shot serving search warrant

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By PoliceOne Staff

BARNSTABLE – A Yarmouth K-9 officer was shot and killed while executing a multi-agency search warrant Thursday afternoon.

Multiple Massachusetts police departments expressed their condolences and extended their sympathies to the family of K-9 Officer Sean Gannon and the Yarmouth Police Department, which also changed it's Facebook profile photo.

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With deep sorrow and heavy hearts the Yarmouth Police Department reports the loss of Officer Sean Gannon. Officer Sean Gannon was killed in the line of duty today.

Posted by Yarmouth Police Dept. on Thursday, April 12, 2018 (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.12’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Procession held for officer shot, killed in Barnstable, Mass.

A procession is being held for a Yarmouth Police Dept. officer who was shot and killed while serving a warrant in Barnstable, Massachusetts. https://goo.gl/TzDvue

Posted by WMUR-TV on Thursday, April 12, 2018

Officer Gannon's K-9 partner was also shot during the incident and was taken to a veterinary hospital.

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The men and women of Plainville PD join our brothers and sisters from Yarmouth PD in mourning the loss of Yarmouth…

Posted by Plainville MA Police Department on Thursday, April 12, 2018

The suspect, who has a lengthy criminal record, was taken into custody following a long standoff with authorities.

The officer was taken to Cape Cod Hospital with life-threatening injuries, according to WCVB5.

Heartbroken to hear that Yarmouth Police Department Officer Sean Gannon has passed away after being shot this afternoon while serving a warrant. Our condolences go out to @yarmouthpolice and Officer Gannon’s friends and family – both blood and blue. pic.twitter.com/XHuE6VDwqu

— MIT Police (@MITPolice) April 13, 2018

@yarmouthpolice Officer Sean Gannon was killed and his K9 partner wounded serving a warrant on the Cape Thursday night. Our prayers for the family and for our brothers and sisters with the Yarmouth PD. pic.twitter.com/mbofu72VQ2

— Bristol Sheriff Dpt. (@BCSO1) April 13, 2018

3 officers charged in Laquan McDonald case to opt for bench trial

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

null

By Megan Crepeau Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Lawyers for three Chicago police officers charged with impeding an investigation into the fatal police shooting of teenager Laquan McDonald said Thursday they plan for a Cook County judge to decide the officers’ fate, not a jury.

Judge Domenica Stephenson set the trial tentatively for July 10.

The charges against former Detective David March, ex-Officer Joseph Walsh and Officer Thomas Gaffney allege that the three officers lied to exaggerate the threat posed by 17-year-old McDonald, who had PCP in his system and had damaged a police car while armed with a knife.

The video showed Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is white, shooting McDonald 16 times as the black teen walked away from police.

Van Dyke, who separately faces first-degree murder charges, and other officers had alleged that McDonald lunged at him with the knife.

The special prosecutors appointed to handle the case told Stephenson on Thursday that they anticipate the trial for all three will take less than a week. They face charges of obstruction of justice, official misconduct and conspiracy.

Judge Vincent Gaughan, who is presiding over Van Dyke’s case, said last month that he wants that trial to take place this summer, but no date has been publicly set.

By contrast, even though the charges date to November 2015, Van Dyke’s lawyers have yet to disclose whether the suspended officer will let the judge or a jury decide his fate.

The court-ordered release of the shooting video sparked widespread protests, the firing of Chicago’s police superintendent and a damning report of police practices by the U.S. Department of Justice.

A special prosecution team led by former Judge Patricia Brown Holmes was appointed in 2016 to investigate the conduct of other officers at the shooting scene, including whether department higher-ups assisted in an alleged cover-up.

The grand jury convened to investigate those allegations, however, disbanded in November without charging any department supervisors, to the disappointment of local activists.

March was the lead detective in the shooting’s probe; Walsh was Van Dyke’s partner on the night of the shooting; and Gaffney was among the first officers on the scene. All were charged in June and have pleaded not guilty.

March and Walsh left the department after city Inspector General Joseph Ferguson recommended their firing following his investigation of the shooting. Gaffney, still with the department when the indictment came down, was suspended without pay.

©2018 Chicago Tribune

New York Police Officer Killed in Crash

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Whitestown Police Officer Kevin Crossley was killed in a car crash Wednesday night.

New York Police Officer Killed in Crash

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Whitestown Police Officer Kevin Crossley was killed in a car crash Wednesday night.

New York Police Officer Killed in Crash

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Whitestown Police Officer Kevin Crossley was killed in a car crash Wednesday night.

Veteran dispatcher meets baby she helped deliver over phone

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Dispatcher Stacie Rosedale met Kaylessie St. Martin, whose parents were instructed by Rosedale over the phone on how to deliver her on a bathroom floor

Firefighters’ widows file lawsuit after fatal wall collapse

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Casey Flanscha and Allison Hoffman initiated legal action against C.S. Davidson Inc., the company that the city of York contracts for engineering jobs

Firefighters’ widows file lawsuit after fatal wall collapse

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Casey Flanscha and Allison Hoffman initiated legal action against C.S. Davidson Inc., the company that the city of York contracts for engineering jobs

PA Firefighter Widows Prep for Possible Lawsuit

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The widows of two York City firefighters killed on March 22 have filed paperwork which could lead to a lawsuit against a city contractor.

Denver Police Officers Awarded for Selfless Acts While On Duty

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Ten Denver police officers were honored with the Citizens Appreciation Police Award.

Auditor Finds Unclaimed $80K for PA Firefighters

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

An auditor recovered $80,814 for the Coal Township Volunteer Firemen’s Relief Association that sat unclaimed in the state treasury.

Georgia Deputy Accused of Having Sex While on Duty Fired

Posted on April 12, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A Gwinnett County sheriff’s deputy was fired after officials alleged he had sexual intercourse with women while on duty.

Thomson Reuters Recognizes Springfield Police Department with Everyday Heroes Award

Posted on April 11, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Thomson Reuters has honored the Springfield (Mass.) Police Department with its 2018 Everyday Heroes award.

The Springfield PD was recognized for its use of Thomson Reuters CLEAR to locate and arrest a sexual predator. Armed only with the perpetrator’s first name and potential street location, investigators were able to find the suspect and uncover his significant criminal history. Soon after, the victim was able to positively identify the suspect via a photograph.

“Crimes of this sort are difficult to investigate and unfortunately many cases never close,” said Steve Rubley, managing director of Thomson Reuters Government business. “It is a testament to the tenacity and skill of the investigators, along with the courage of the victim in this case, that the suspect of this violent crime was located and captured. It is an honor to recognize the dedication of the Springfield Police Department with this year’s Everyday Heroes Award.”

As the recipient of the award, the Springfield PD received a $10,000 charitable donation made by Thomson Reuters on its behalf to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC). The award and check presentation to department and NCMEC, respectively, occurred at a ceremony in Springfield last week.

The annual Everyday Heroes award is given to Thomson Reuters customers who use CLEAR, PeopleMap on Westlaw and other Thomson Reuters public records solutions. Customers are encouraged to share their stories on hero.thomsonreuters.com, and a panel of Thomson Reuters employee judges from the Government, Corporate and Law Firm business segments evaluate customer submissions and select the recipients.

For the complete stories of this and prior Everyday Heroes award winners, visit hero.thomsonreuters.com.

 

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Video: Police Impersonator Handcuffs Real Officer in DC Store

Posted on April 11, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: Police Impersonator Handcuffs Real Officer in DC Store

A man impersonating a police officer handcuffed a real officer at a Whole Foods store in Washington, D.C., charging documents say.

Officers responded to the store’s Foggy Bottom location Monday after reports that someone was disturbing customers in the self-checkout lane by waving a pair of handcuffs and threatening to cuff people.

The man became combative when real officers tried to subdue him, charging documents say.

The suspect clamped a cuff tightly onto one officer’s right wrist, NBC Washington reports.

The officers were able to arrest 47-year-old Evan Jerrold Graham, from Maryland, and found a second set of handcuffs and a single hollow-point bullet in his pants, police said.

 

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Paramedic spends birthday saving life for the second time

Posted on April 11, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Brewster Ambulance paramedic Erika Apicella said her “greatest birthday present” was being able to spend her last two birthdays saving patients’ lives

Phoenix Police Officer Saves Dog From Canal

Posted on April 11, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A Phoenix police officer was able to rescue a dog from a canal near 35th Street and Roosevelt. Officer Mike Mannino said that if the dog goes up for adoption, he’d love to take him home.

NY bill would allow volunteer firefighters to recover ambulance costs

Posted on April 10, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The bill would give volunteer fire departments the ability to make up the extensive costs of ambulance services by billing insurance companies

NY bill would allow volunteer firefighters to recover ambulance costs

Posted on April 10, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

The bill would give volunteer fire departments the ability to make up the extensive costs of ambulance services by billing insurance companies

FDNY paramedic arrested for allegedly molesting patient in ambulance

Posted on April 10, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Police said Karel Delgado exposed himself and fondled the woman after asking if he could examine her

TX Firefighters Test New Active Shooter Protocols

Posted on April 10, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Red Oak and Glenn Heights firefighters are training to enter active shooter scenes in body armor under police escort to render medical aid.

LAPD Officer Wounded, Suspect Dead in Shooting

Posted on April 10, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A suspect was killed and a Los Angeles police officer was wounded in a shooting Monday morning in Reseda.

Alabama Officer Dies After Car Wreck

Posted on April 9, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

<p>Officer Keith Earle died after sustaining injuries in a car wreck on duty Mar. 26. (Photo: Huntsville PD)</p>

A Huntsville (AL) Police Department officer who was involved in a wreck late last month has died.

A spokesperson with the Huntsville Police Department confirms 46-year-old Keith Earle died at the hospital on Monday, reports WAAY.

Earle was involved in a head-on collision March 26 at Pulaski Pike and Grizzard Road while on duty. As of April 4, he was still in Huntsville Hospital and police said at the time he was in stable condition.

It was unclear whether Earle died from injuries sustained in the wreck or some other medical reason.

Earle was a 25-year veteran of the Huntsville Police Department.

 

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PROPPER RevTac

Posted on April 9, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The RevTac Collection of shirts and pants is a modern, updated take on the classic tactical look and function.

5 essentials for your range bag

Posted on April 9, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: Sean Curtis

In the profession of law enforcement you will encounter police officers who love their guns (Tackleberrys) and those who border on hoplophobic, while recognizing the critical necessity of their firearms.

Because it is our least often used, but most important weapon, cops need to engage in regular firearms practice, which means training at the shooting range.

Some officers can’t wait to clear leather and create some tight groups on their paper foes, while others experience stress and test anxiety when they need to qualify.

Wherever you fall on this scale, here is some awesome gear to make your trip to the shooting range a little better.

Tactical Rx

When Bret Hunter got done with being a combat engineer he went to school to be become an optician. He then solved one of the greatest puzzles in the world of eyewear – how to make a curved prescription lens.

Too much magnification in a curved lens creates a fishbowl effect that causes people to become dizzy and nauseous. While people in his industry said it was impossible, Hunter pulled it off by inventing his own proprietary formula.

He didn’t stop there. He went on to produce his own line of eyewear, including prescription safety glasses.

So if you’re a shooter with less than 20-20 vision, his company, called Tactical Rx, can take care of you.

Many high-end tactical teams use Hunter’s eyewear. The FBI gave him feedback that they loved Hunter’s prescription safety glasses because they were equipped with transitioning lenses that darkened in the sun and lightened at night.

I’ve used a couple of pairs of Tactical Rx and the products are outstanding. Basic safety glasses are available in prescription and non-prescription with the latter starting around $89.

FoamAction Sports

Innovations often improve various aspects of our lives and this certainly holds true for the shooting range. After years of using heavy shooting bags, I found the FoamRest from FoamAction Sports.

These X-shaped foam shooting rests are lightweight and durable, and don’t take up a huge amount of room. During several recent trips to the range I used traditional filled shooting bags. They usually start out at the right elevation, but then settle with recoil, causing them to need to be adjusted. FoamRest doesn’t settle. Plus, they give you myriad options when it comes to elevation.

While a pair is great for long guns, you can also use a single one for a pistol during sighting or accuracy testing. At $14.99 for a single or $24.99 for a pair, they won’t break the bank or weigh you down when you haul them out to the range.

Tuff Writer Pen

Many gun ranges determine what you need to bring. For those of us who shoot at unimproved ranges, we need to bring more gear. It may seem like an afterthought, but a pen in the range bag is pretty important when shooting, especially if you’re not in uniform when doing so.

Most qualification courses I’ve attended required a sign-in sheet where you indicate shooter, course, maybe your firearm, plus whether you passed or failed. These forms have to be filled out and pens never seem to be handy. Keeping one in the range bag is a good remedy. Pens are also great for marking and scoring targets.

Tuff Writer’s Operator Series comes in at an MSRP of $89.95. This is a perfect example of a quality item you will only need to buy once. I have had cheap pens freeze in my range bag and I’ve had them break when I’ve dropped guns, staplers or ammo on them. Tuff Writer has a YouTube video where the pen wrecks a high-end blender… the sparks alone are worth the watch. This pen will hold up to anything it might experience in your range bag and it serves as a backup weapon because it won’t deform with forces under 750 PSI. Buy a pen you can pass on to your children.

Hygenall LeadOff

We are learning more about the dangers of lead exposure during shooting. Although this article refers to indoor ranges and breathing in lead dust, I recently learned about another method of entry. One of the head firearms instructors from a major sheriff’s department told me several of their instructors had developed various cancers in the intestinal tract, starting at the mouth and moving south from there. Eventually it was attributed to the officers shooting and then eating handheld foods at lunch.

While proper handwashing is critical, what if you shoot at an unimproved range that doesn’t have the best decon options? Hygenall makes a product called LeadOff designed to remove lead. It comes in several forms to suit your needs. The soap is great for ranges with bathrooms, but if you’re truly roughing it, nothing is better than the wipes. Hygenall makes enormous, refillable buckets with 500 wipes in them that can be parked at a range or mounted on a wall. This job is tough enough without increasing your cancer risk, so tell your range master to buy LeadOff by Hygenall. Prices vary according to products; check out the Hygenall website.

Everyone faces different challenges at their range. In the comments section below, sound off on what you face, and what gear you bring to deal with it.

MagPump 9mm

Last but not least is the new MagPump. A previous version of this thumb-saving device has been around for about a year now – AR-15 shooters marveled at the ease with which they could load their magazines. Now, MagPump has done it again with a time-saving loader for the popular 9mm.

This unit is hopper-fed like its predecessor, but it has evolved to being non-directional. That’s right, dump up to 50 rounds of ammo in the bin, place your magazine in the base, and start pumping. The unit loads magazines faster than I can manually, and it breaks down into two pieces to better fit in a range bag.

MagPump has created sleeves that enable the loader to be used with Ruger, Glock, Smith & Wesson, CZ and Sig Sauer double-stack magazines. The company also makes a billet aluminum version for heavy use. This loader is perfect for any range day, but it could be a great time saver for heavy training days. The standard version of the MagPump 9mm is $149.99. MagPump has a no-questions-asked, transferable, lifetime warranty.

LODD: NC fire chief dies after car overturns, catches fire

Posted on April 9, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Reynolds Volunteer Fire Department Chief Richard Sales was on his way to accept an award for the department when the incident occurred

Super Bowl a Tech Boon for Minneapolis Police

Posted on April 9, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The new technology includes 17 cameras installed downtown by Verizon at no cost to the city — which join the 300 police cameras already recording throughout Minneapolis.

Emergency services resource allocation

Posted on April 6, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Public safety leaders must understand the standards and hazards in their area to properly allocate fire stations, personnel and equipment

South Carolina Sheriff’s Deputy Killed in Crash

Posted on April 6, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Saluda County Sheriff’s Corp. Dale Hallman was involved in a single-vehicle collision when he was responding to an incident as a member of the Bloodhound Tracking Team Thursday night.

Video: Florida Deputies Rescue Woman, Kids During Domestic Shooting

Posted on April 6, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: Florida Deputies Rescue Woman, Kids During Domestic Shooting

Recently released video from a 2016 arrest shows deputies in Volusia County, Florida, rescuing three children and their mother from their father during a domestic dispute involving a firearm.

The video recorded from a body camera was released Thursday in light of the conviction of the gunman in the case, 27-year-old Emmanuel Rosado, NBC Miami reports.

The footage begins with a Volusia County Sheriff’s deputy approaching the home while Rosado, his then-wife and their three children were still inside.

The deputy positions himself near the front of the home then takes cover behind a tree as gunshots ring out.

Rosado’s wife then crawls out a window, bleeding from a gunshot wound to her leg.

Additional deputies arrived and rescued the children. They then took the gunman into custody.

 

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Final Salute for Fallen Connecticut State Trooper

Posted on April 6, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Friends and family are set to gather in East Hartford on Friday to lay Connecticut State Trooper First Class Kevin Miller to rest.

Adorable K-9 Puppies Train In Australia

Posted on April 6, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Soon the puppies will work for Australia’s federal police force.

Video shows NC police shoot armed man who held pregnant woman hostage

Posted on April 5, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By Jane Wester The Charlotte Observer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Body camera videos released Wednesday show Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officers shooting an armed man while his pregnant hostage crawls to safety.

Johnathan Autry, 28, survived the Sept. 25, 2017 shooting, and he is still in Mecklenburg County Jail. He's been charged with kidnapping and robbery with a dangerous weapon, among other offenses.

The three officers who shot Autry were all placed on paid administrative leave after the shooting, but the Mecklenburg County District Attorney's Office found they acted lawfully, CMPD said.

Police said Autry broke into the pregnant woman's home on Holly Street, off Beatties Ford Road in north Charlotte, and asked for money.

When officers arrived at the house, they found him holding her at gunpoint. On video, the officers repeatedly told Autry to drop the gun before shooting him.

"I'm pregnant!" the woman said in the officers' body camera video, just before Autry was shot.

In September, CMPD said the woman managed to separate her body from Autry's before the officers fired their guns. The videos showed her drop her body to the ground and crawl to safety while officers shot Autry.

"I'm dying!" Autry said in the videos.

"Listen, we're not going to let you die," one officer said. "But you've got to work with us."

Officers demanded to see his hands and asked where the gun was, according to the videos. A minute after shots were fired, one officer announced he'd found the gun by his foot.

Just over 90 seconds after Autry was shot, the officers lifted him into a clearing to provide medical help.

Autry was in critical but stable condition in the hospital the day after the shooting, police said at the time.

Police said the break-in was not random, because Autry mentioned the pregnant woman's husband by name. The husband wasn't home at the time. The woman was taken to the hospital as a precaution, but she wasn't hurt.

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CMPD FOOTAGE RELEASED: We're getting a closer look at what happened last September when three Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department officers shot at a man who was holding a pregnant woman hostage. WARNING: You will hear gunshots.

Posted by Reporter Kirstin Garriss on Thursday, April 5, 2018

©2018 The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, N.C.)

Baltimore Leaders Working to Keep Homicide Rates Down

Posted on April 5, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The murder rate is down in Baltimore. It’s the lowest it’s been in years at this of the year time of the year, according to crime data from the city.

RI union criticizes vote to remove memorial outside police station

Posted on April 4, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

MIDDLETOWN, R.I. — A Rhode Island police union is criticizing the removal of a memorial commemorating fallen officers.

The Middletown Town Council initially planned to repair the memorial but voted on Monday to remove it instead of spending $41,000 to repair it, WJAR reports. Detective Michael Kravchuk, president of the Middletown Police Officers Union, said it’s “disheartening” the council voted to remove the memorial.

"Given the current climate regarding attacks on police officers in our nation, it's saddening they would choose to remove a memorial dedicated to the service and sacrifice of law enforcement officers, including the ultimate sacrifice made by two Middletown residents,” Kravchuk said.

The union also said a council member referred to the memorial as a “doormat,” which the union said is "distasteful and completely disrespectful."

Middletown council votes to remove walkway officers memorial outside police station rather than pay $41k to repair it. Union is upset. @ 6 pic.twitter.com/EsqYL0ls1y

— Brian Crandall (@nbc10_brian) April 3, 2018

The memorial statue has been cordoned off for some time. The town has also been sued after someone slipped on it several years ago.

Councilwoman M. Theresa Santos the removal of the statue has nothing to do with the council’s support for the town’s police and its officers, according to the Newport Daily News.

Councilwoman Barbara VonVillas, the lone council member who voted against the memorial’s removal, questioned her colleagues’ motives and support for police.

“In my opinion, this council sends mixed messages,” VonVillas said.

Amid opioid crisis, cities face gabapentin, too

Posted on April 4, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Doctors are prescribing gabapentin more often because of its non-addictive properties, but officials are finding signs of abuse that exacerbate opioid abuse

Calif. woman leads police on 40-mile chase in stolen ambulance

Posted on April 4, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Police said paramedics were transferring a patient into the California Hospital Medical Center when the woman jumped into the ambulance and drove off

Close Call for Chicago FF When Wall Collapses

Posted on April 3, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

A Chicago firefighter suffered only minor injuries when a wall collapsed and rained bricks down on him at a fire Tuesday in Englewood.

National Dogfighting Awareness Day is April 8

Posted on April 3, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

Embed from Getty Images

Sunday April 8 is National Dogfighting Awareness Day. To help law enforcement tasked with investigating dogfighting crimes, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) has partnered with the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).

National Dogfighting Awareness Day, which takes place annually on April 8, was established by the ASPCA to raise awareness about the prevalence of dogfighting in the U.S., reveal little-known truths about the blood sport, and encourage animal lovers nationwide to take action against this brutal form of animal cruelty.

The COPS Office and the ASPCA have partnered to develop The Dogfighting Toolkit for Law Enforcement, an invaluable resource aimed at assisting law enforcement agencies in addressing dogfighting.

Despite being a felony in all 50 states, the ASPCA estimates that there are tens of thousands of dogfighters in the United States forcing hundreds of thousands of dogs to brutally train, fight, and suffer as part of a so-called “blood sport.” 

Dogfighting is often associated with other forms of criminal activity including illegal gambling and possession of drugs and firearms.

Last year alone, the ASPCA rescued more than 300 dogs from 13 dogfighting operations across 11 states.

 

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Georgia Officer Killed in Apparent Murder-Suicide

Posted on April 2, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The Statesboro (GA) Police Department has announced the sudden off-duty death of Advanced Patrol Officer Ian Huggins, in what appears to be a murder-suicide.

On Sunday at approximately 2:36 AM, officers of the Statesboro Police Department responded to Copper Beech Townhomes in reference to reports of possible shots fired. Upon arrival, officers encountered APO Huggins with multiple gunshot wounds. Moments after officers entered the home, Rebecca Boyett Huggins, his wife, took her own life with one gunshot to the head. The two were married February 14, 2018.

EMS and officers on scene made efforts to revive both APO Huggins and Rebecca Huggins. Both were transported to East Georgia Regional Medical Center. Life-saving efforts were not successful.

 

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Improving response to emergencies involving autistic children

Posted on April 2, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Educating firefighters about autism awareness can help them identify behaviors and special needs in victims that may require modifications in their response

Improving response to emergencies involving autistic children

Posted on April 2, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Educating EMS providers about autism symptoms can help them identify behaviors and special needs, and modify their response

Amputee paramedic becomes bobsledding champion

Posted on April 2, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Barry Schroeder, who lost his leg after a motorcycle crash, will get a chance to qualify for the 2022 Paralympics

Conn. trooper killed in crash remembered as good LEO, father

Posted on April 1, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

null

By Christine Dempsey The Hartford Courant

HARTFORD, Conn. — Kevin Miller, the state trooper who died in a crash on I-84 Thursday, was remembered Friday as a good officer and a good father.

“He was a good trooper. I think he was a better man,” Enfield Police Chief Alaric Fox said. Fox is a former state police colonel who used to command the Troop C barracks in Tolland, where Miller was assigned. Fox also trained Miller at the police academy.

Fox said Miller didn’t seem to experience the job fatigue that people sometimes feel after years on the job, no matter what profession.

“He always had a kind word, always respectful toward me,” Fox said. “He was not a kick-the-trash-can kind of guy. He went out there every day and did his job. He was one of the good guys.”

Miller was five months away from his 20th anniversary with the state police, which would have made him eligible for retirement, Fox said.

He died when his police car crashed into the back of a tractor trailer between exits 68 and 69 in Tolland early Thursday afternoon. Police are still investigating the crash, but said in a preliminary report that both vehicles were heading east in the highway’s right lane at the time of the collision. The truck was traveling “at a slower speed than the flow of traffic,” the report said.

The autopsy showed that Miller died of blunt trauma, and that his death was an accident, a medical examiner’s spokeswoman said.

The stretch of highway was closed for more than eight hours while investigators gathered evidence and took measurements. A procession of state troopers went to the scene of the crash to retrieve Miller’s body and bring him back to Troop C for a memorial service. The procession then headed west on I-84 to the medical examiner’s office in Farmington.

Police officers and firefighters from towns and cities along the route lined up on the side of the highway and on overpasses and saluted as the procession passed. Some towns unfurled large U.S. flags to honor the trooper.

The 49-year-old leaves behind a son and a daughter — children he was known to talk about at work.

A man who lives in Miller’s Coventry neighborhood said Miller was a good neighbor and a good father. Children from the neighborhood played ball together, often in the Millers’ yard, said the man, who didn’t want to be named.

“From the summer sounds in that yard, they all enjoyed life,” he said.

©2018 The Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.)

Video: San Francisco Police Release Footage of Deadly Barber Shop Shooting

Posted on March 30, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: San Francisco Police Release Footage of Deadly Barber Shop Shooting

San Francisco police have released body camera footage of a shootout that killed a suspect and injured five other people, including an officer, inside of a barber shop, CBS San Francisco reports. The video was shown during a tense town hall meeting where there was conflict even between members of the family of the 21-year-old man killed.

Police did not disclose who shot the four other people who were injured. It remains unclear from the chaotic and graphic body camera video. One of the victims suffered life-threatening injuries, however, police say all of victims have been released from the hospital.

According to Capt. Valerie Matthews, the shooting happened on March 21. Family members had reported that Jehad Eid was threatening them, flashed a gun and was trying to break into their garage. When police arrived, the family said he had gone to the barber shop. 

Eid stood up and shot at the officers upon their arrival. Two officers returned fire, shooting 26 bullets at Eid, who then shot nine rounds from a .40-caliber handgun. He was struck 18 times.

 

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Oakland Fire Marshal abruptly resigns amidst slew of problems

Posted on March 30, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Oakland Fire Chief Darin White announced that he is searching for a new leader to the Fire Prevention Bureau after Miguel Trujillo resigned

Pa. paramedics return to work after fatal ambulance crash

Posted on March 30, 2018 by in EMS, Uncategorized

Mike Ankenbrand and Emmett Thomas are back on the job after being injured in an ambulance crash that killed the patient they were transporting

Report: Proper Resources Not Dispatched to Destructive CA Wildfire

Posted on March 30, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

The report shows that the Orange County Fire Authority delayed a full response to the Canyon 2 Fire last October.

Why meditation should be part of every cop’s mental fitness plan

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

American Military University
Author: American Military University

By Matthew Loux, Faculty Member, Criminal Justice at American Military University

Being a law enforcement officer is stressful. Officers respond to volatile and often dangerous situations on a regular basis. Throughout my 20-year career in law enforcement, I’ve managed stress by incorporating exercise and eating right into my daily regimen. While working out and good nutrition have been extremely beneficial, I found myself looking for additional ways to reduce my stress levels.

After doing some research, I decided to try meditation as a way to improve my mental fitness. If you are like me, meditation is something you’ve heard about, but never really tried. Since I started meditating a few months ago, I have experienced an increase in my mental focus. I also have less stress and an overall sense of well-being.

Meditation involves mentally concentrating on an object or a time in your life that brings you peace in order to achieve a state of calmness. The main goal of meditation is to help the mind slow down and let go of distractions.

Meditation Techniques

Various techniques increase one’s ability to perfect meditation and the calming effects it brings. There are six meditation techniques that can be performed by law enforcement officers:

Spiritual reflection; Mindfulness; Movement; Focus; Visualization; Chanting.

The simplest form of meditation involves sitting in a comfortable chair or lying on a bed or couch. Some people choose to close their eyes.

Breathe normally and naturally. If you try to control your breathing, then you are focusing more on the breathing and not on clearing your mind. Feel your body moving with each inhalation and exhalation. While doing this type of breathing, some people repeat a chant or a mantra either out loud or silently in their mind. Others place a candle in front of them and focus on the flame.

The key to meditation is not paying attention to noise or other distractions and simply letting your mind go while you breathe in and out. When thoughts come into your head, as they surely will, allow them to come in and gently leave your mind.

Do not allow yourself to focus on them, but don’t work too hard to block your thoughts either. Always return to your breathing.

Meditation Has Multiple Benefits

There are several major benefits of meditation that can substantially improve the life of law enforcement officers including:

Stress reduction: The first and most well-known benefit of meditation is reduced stress. Using meditation techniques, such as focusing on one object or image, helps officers relax their mind, which helps stress fade away. Increased happiness and elevated mood: When feelings of anxiety are relieved through meditation, individuals feel happier. They are less likely to become angry and short-tempered whether they are on or off the job. Improved brain power and improved concentration: Meditation helps the mind let go of distractions and provides enhanced focus. This helps officers feel mentally prepared to take on the tasks ahead. Physical health improvements: Meditation can increase cardiovascular performance, boost immunity, slowdown the aging process, and lead to an overall healthier lifestyle. This can be one of the greatest benefits for officers since they have physically demanding jobs. Self-awareness and self-acceptance: Mediation focuses on the practice of self-awareness and an increased feeling of self-acceptance. Self-awareness is the conscious knowledge of one's own character, feelings, motives and desires.

When someone is self-aware, he or she is better able to cope with a stressful job and knows when to take a step back if they are feeling overwhelmed. Individuals who practice meditation are also more accepting of themselves. They understand their strengths and weaknesses, and they do not cause themselves additional stress by striving for unrealistic goals.

Meditation Apps for Mobile Devices

Some people find it difficult to start practicing meditation on their own. I used two different apps to help guide me in the process:

1. Stop, Breathe & Think

This app has been downloaded over two million times and is very highly rated. It takes only a few weeks to create your personal place of calmness through the app.

2. Headspace

It walks users through various levels to enhance the meditation process. The first level introduces basic meditation in easy 10-minute sessions.

Finding Time to Meditate

You might say you don’t have time for meditation, but shouldn’t your health be a priority? I use the Headspace app for my meditation and it easily fits into my busy schedule.

I find the best time to meditate is before breakfast so I can start my day with a feeling of peace and a sound mind. Even just five minutes in the morning is beneficial.

The time needed to meditate and clear the mind of stress depends on the individual. For most beginners, it is recommended that you set aside five to 15 minutes in the morning or whenever you have time.

Whether you are in law enforcement, the fire service, the military or another stressful profession, take a little time for yourself every day to meditate. The mental and physical rewards are well worth the time you spend on meditation.


About the Author: Matthew Loux has been in law enforcement for more than 20 years and has a background in fraud and criminal investigation, as well as hospital, school and network security. Matt has researched and studied law enforcement and security best practices for the past 10 years. To contact him, email IPSauthor@apus.edu. For more articles featuring insight from industry experts, subscribe to In Public Safety’s bi-monthly newsletter.

Off-Duty Kentucky Officer Shot, Killed by Man Posing as Cop

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A suspect is at large after an officer with the Hopkinsville (KY) Police Department was shot and killed Thursday evening

According to the Hopkinsville Police Department, at 5:10 p.m., the off-duty officer was driving in his personal vehicle when a man “pretending to be a police officer” pulled over the real officer’s car.

Police haven’t specified what transpired, other than “shortly after that,” the off-duty officer was fatally shot, the department said in a news release Thursday night.

Authorities are searching for the suspect, 35-year-old James Kennith Decoursey, who remains at large, the Leaf-Chronicle reports.

 

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Video: Virginia Officer Rescues Family, Dog from House Fire

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

VIDEO: Virginia Officer Rescues Family, Dog from House Fire

Early Sunday morning, Officer Jacob Moore of the Buena Vista (VA) Police Department ran into the burning home of Thomas and Lovie Atkinson to save them and their dog from the flames.

He was able to get them out before anyone was hurt. Police Lt. Randy Chittum also arrived to assist in blocking off the area, reports WSLS.

The two said it’s their job to go above and beyond to save anyone in harm’s way.

No one was injured in the fire.

 

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Friends, Family Pay Tribute to Fallen FDNY Fire Marshal

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Friends and family on Thursday honored FDNY Fire Marshal Chris Zanetis, who was killed March 15 in a helicopter crash in Iraq.

Friends, Family Pay Tribute to Fallen FDNY Fire Marshal

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Friends and family on Thursday honored FDNY Fire Marshal Chris Zanetis, who was killed March 15 in a helicopter crash in Iraq.

Friends, Family Pay Tribute to Fallen FDNY Fire Marshal

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Friends and family on Thursday honored FDNY Fire Marshal Chris Zanetis, who was killed March 15 in a helicopter crash in Iraq.

Connecticut State Trooper Dies in Crash With Tractor Trailer

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

A Conneticut State trooper was killed in a crash with a tractor trailer Thursday afternoon.

Conn. trooper killed in crash

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff TOLLAND, Conn. — A Connecticut trooper was killed after a collision with a tractor-trailer.

NBC Connecticut reports that the unidentified trooper’s cruiser collided with a trailer Thursday afternoon. State police said the portion of the highway where the accident occurred will remain closed for an extended period of time.

Details about the crash and what caused it were not immediately available.

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates.

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Here's the latest on the crash on I-84 east in #Tolland where a CT state trooper has died… Stay with Channel 3 on air, on the app –>> https://goo.gl/KdsdfY

Posted by WFSB – Channel 3 Eyewitness News on Thursday, March 29, 2018

MVA ALERT: #TollandFire is on scene of a very serious MVA on #I84 between X68 & X69. Eastbound is closed between X68 & #69 for extended period of time. Tractor trailers & trucks to use RT195 south to RT32 north & passenger vehicles are to use RT195 north to RT74 east.

— Tolland Alert (@TollandAlert) March 29, 2018

Texas PD hires first deaf female officer

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

DALHART, Texas — A Texas police department has made history with a new addition to the force.

KVII reports that newly-hired Dalhart PD Officer Erica Trevino became the first female deaf commissioned officer in the department’s history and is believed to be the first in Texas. Trevino said becoming a police officer is a passion for her.

“It’s not something I just want, it’s something God has called me to do. That’s what I believe. This truly is a career and I can’t tell you how much I look up to the people and I respect how much work the officers put into becoming a police officer,” Trevino said.

The newly-hired officer said she is fluent in four sign languages and can communicate with people in ways some officers can’t.

“With officer Trevino being here that’s going to be tremendous asset for those who are hard of hearing or deaf,” said David Conner, Dalhart Police Chief. “She will be able to communicate and assist us in that realm as well.”

Both Conner and Trevino acknowledge that day-to-day communication will present some challenges in the future. Trevino said she’s prepared to go to work and “be the best officer I can be.”

“Is it going to be a challenge for her and us? Yes, there’s no doubt,” Conner said. “Through all the obstacles she’s had to face in life and all the times she’s been told now she can’t do something she has succeeded. Who am I to say she can’t do this? There’s no doubt she can do it and she is qualified."

Trevino reports to work on April 14 and will work the night shift. She said her goal is to climb up the ranks in the department and eventually work in the Criminal Investigations Division.

Accused Cop-Killer Claimed He Was ‘Just Trying to Scare’ Trooper

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

New York State Police Trooper Chris Wyant testified Wednesday that Justin D. Walters told him he “was just trying to scare him” when he allegedly shot and killed Trooper Joel Davis last July.

Mark43 Announces $38M in Series C Funding Led by General Catalyst and Jim Breyer of Breyer Capital

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in Uncategorized

Mark43, a leading cloud-based public safety software platform, today announced $38M in Series C funding led by General Catalyst and Jim Breyer of Breyer Capital. The round will bring Mark43’s total funding to $77.8 million, with returning investments from Spark Capital, Ashton Kutcher’s Sound Ventures, Bezos Expeditions, Goldman Sachs, General David Petraeus, Sheel Tyle’s Amplo, Innovation Endeavors, Govtech Fund, SV Angel, and others.

The round of funding follows a stellar 2017 for Mark43, with 550% client growth, new executive hires from Google, and the opening of new offices in Los Angeles and Charlotte. Mark43 plans to use the funding to accelerate software development, sales, and deployments, and further its mission of empowering public safety with a unified platform to share and analyze critical data in the cloud.

Founded in 2012, Mark43 has already deployed its core software applications, Mark43 Records Management System and Mark43 Computer Aided Dispatch, to thirteen public safety agencies across the U.S., with over 30 more expected to launch this year. Mark43’s technology is used by departments of all sizes—from the Richmond (CA) Police Department to the Seattle Police Department—for reducing report writing times and allowing officers to spend significantly more time on the street. As public safety agencies also look to improve criminal justice information sharing across jurisdictions, Mark43’s cloud-based platform provides secure, reliable, and cost-effective hosting for multi-agency environments.

“After years on the ground with officers, reimagining and perfecting the fundamentals of public safety software, it’s really gratifying to have the kind of year we had in 2017,” said Scott Crouch, CEO and co-founder of Mark43. “This latest round of funding, coupled with new growth hires, perfectly positions Mark43 to capitalize on the momentum we were able to generate following our Series B and bring new products like digital evidence management to market.”

“From the beginning, Mark43 has been laser-focused on reinventing a market plagued by legacy software and solving the most pressing issues that our public safety agencies face,” said Larry Bohn, repeat investor at General Catalyst. “Since then, we’ve seen Mark43 execute on that vision with incredible precision. They are developing solutions that have the potential to improve department technology operations nationwide. We’re honored to continue what has already been an extremely rewarding partnership.”

“We’re honored to support the Mark43 entrepreneurs and team, and very excited to invest,” said Jim Breyer, Founder and CEO of Breyer Capital based in Menlo Park, California. “Mark43 is tackling a significant market opportunity, and as importantly, their products can make the world safer.”

 

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RevTac Collection

Posted on March 29, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The new Propper RevTac Pant is a modernized update to the company’s flagship tactical pant. Look more professional without sacrificing function.

 

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Finding the facts in 30 frames per second

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Kevin Davis

This article is reprinted with permission from the journal of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA).

So your agency plunked down some serious tax-payer funds for body-worn cameras. It may have seemed like a great deal on the front end, with free cloud storage for a couple of years, and maybe even free cameras, but a large agency also has to consider the back-end issues:

How will a BWC program change the processes of your agency? What are the many impacts of the video captured? Who is trained to analyze and evaluate use of force incidents and specifically officer-involved shootings? What don’t you know about video? Video uploading

Uploading video for a mid- to large-size agency usually requires increasing a city’s bandwidth. At my agency, we were told that without increases, one shift docking their BWCs would take up the entire city’s internet access. BWC technology requires more than just attaching a USB cable to an existing department PC and hitting upload.

“Tagging” of videos can be aided by smart phone programs, but proper tagging by officers and oversight of such is mandatory. Report number, location address of the incident and records retention categories must be tagged.

Video retention

As for retention of videos, depending on your state, these are considered public records and are subject to the same legal requirements as written or computer-generated reports. So…misdemeanors are kept for how long after the case is adjudicated? The retention period begins when the case is adjudicated, not when you upload the video. For felonies and violent felonies, there are different retention periods in most states. Is non-evidentiary 90 days in your state? You better know this prior to getting those cool cameras the salesperson sold your chief on.

Video redaction

How about redaction? Are you going to give the entire video on every public records request? What if it contains victim or witness info like SSNs or dates of birth? How are you going to handle those redactions? There is a great software product called Fast Redaction that is a web-based program that can redact faces and easily redact audio (I am not a paid spokesperson by the way). Each license is around $1,500.00. Have you budgeted for that? Don’t think you’ll need it? Wait until those insurance companies find out you video accidents. Wait until the media puts in a request for videos from a shooting.

By the way, how many officers will be assigned to handle the public records requests? Did you know that a large busy agency can produce over 25 terabytes of video in less than six months? Are you contemplating hiring an outside service to handle public record requests for your agency? Is your agency prepared to pay those costs?

Hey, sarge, get ready to add 25% manpower to each complaint or use of force investigation (and 25% is a low estimate). After all, you have to watch the videos of each officer involved to properly evaluate and assess (as an example, a recent OIS produced 43 videos from involved and responding officers). Do you think that a web-based video player will allow you to see all that you need to see?

I’ve worked on multiple officer-involved shootings and use of force analysis; most online players do not have the capability to advance frame by frame or zoom in on the action. Is that something you’ve even contemplated? Do you have the ability to edit videos down to the pertinent sub clip and crop to the important actions of the suspect or officer? Have your supervisors been properly trained in video investigations? Do they know the difference between I, P and B frames and how video is compressed? Do you know the frame rate of the closed circuit cameras in the booking areas of the county jail? How about from a surveillance camera at a business that captured an officer-involved shooting?

Are you aware of how state-of-the-art video analysis is used both for and against police officers? Do you realize that the top video experts are producing PDF reports for court that take the video and break it down into frame by frame reports? At roughly 30 frames per second, that means a five-second video produces 150 jpegs of pictures and action by the suspect or officer that can be broken down by the millisecond. This capability can be used against you, in criminal cases or civil. Is your agency prepared?

Let’s talk about the worst case scenario of an officer-involved shooting or serious use of force incident. Video can help investigators and prosecutors, but running it real time on an online player will seldom give you enough information. Forensic programs like iNPUT-ACE (no affiliation with this company either) with proper training can really elevate your video evidence. With a modicum of knowledge, you can produce sub clips, zoom in on action, incorporate other DVR video from businesses and produce PDF reports. With this software, you can give investigators and prosecutors so much more to work with on the case. By the way, is someone in your agency trained and court certified to testify on use of force video evidence? You’re producing the video evidence, but without the proper expertise, you can miss much of what the digital evidence holds based on a lack of training and software. Cost of one license for iNPUT-ACE? Close to $4,000.00.

Wrap Up

Think those videos capture the facts? All they do is record what the camera lens captured. A BWC video is not the entire incident! Videos are a mere part and certainly aid a force investigator if they are properly trained!

And that’s where we’ll end it, like any piece of new equipment, there are pros and cons, but training and education of officers, supervisors, force investigators and agency heads is vital!

Anyone can get a GoPro digital camera and produce some video of their calls for service, but how to interpret, evaluate and analyze the video is something entirely different and that requires specialized training.


About the Author Kevin Davis is a full-time officer assigned to the training bureau where he specializes in use of force, firearms and tactical training. With over 23 years in law enforcement, his previous experience includes patrol, corrections, narcotics and he is a former team leader and lead instructor for his agency's SWAT team with over 500 call-outs in tactical operations.

NYPD to Make Information on Police Misconduct Investigations Public

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The NYPD said Tuesday that it will post summaries of police misconduct investigations on its website — without naming the officers involved.

NYPD to Make Information on Police Misconduct Investigations Public

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The NYPD said Tuesday that it will post summaries of police misconduct investigations on its website — without naming the officers involved.

NYPD to Make Information on Police Misconduct Investigations Public

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

The NYPD said Tuesday that it will post summaries of police misconduct investigations on its website — without naming the officers involved.

AT&T announces nationwide launch of FirstNet

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

DALLAS — AT&T announced the official, nationwide launch of FirstNet.

According to a press release, the FirstNet evolved packet core is now live, which means first responders nationwide will now have access to their own broadband network that is currently being certified by the First Responder Network Authority.

“This is what public safety has spent years advocating for,” Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communication System Executive Director Scott Edson said. “We knew giving first responders a network that they could truly call their own was possible from our work on LA-RICS – 1 of 5 FirstNet early builder projects. But to see public safety’s network core roar to life nationwide, well, there are no words for how meaningful that is. We at LA-RICS look forward to connecting our sites to the FirstNet network core.”

The evolved packet core:

Controls the FirstNet experience. Processes vital public safety information. Unlocks critical capabilities such as First Priority to help agencies respond to incidents. Forms the basis for a unified, nationwide public safety communication system. The evolved packet core was created based on objectives derived from years of consultation with the First Responder Network Authority.

“Outdated communications capabilities are a threat to public safety,” former Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said. “We’ve seen it repeatedly when disasters strike – from September 11, the Boston Marathon and Parkland. “Those on the front lines can now evolve the way we communicate, using mission-critical text and data on top of voice to ensure we are connected to as much information as possible to achieve our missions. Because the more connected we can be, the more protected we can be.”

AT&T announces nationwide launch of FirstNet

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

“The launch of the network core comes a year into the FirstNet public-private partnership” FirstNet Senior Vice President Chris Sambar said

AT&T announces nationwide launch of FirstNet

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

“The launch of the network core comes a year into the FirstNet public-private partnership” FirstNet Senior Vice President Chris Sambar said

AT&T announces nationwide launch of FirstNet

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

“The launch of the network core comes a year into the FirstNet public-private partnership” FirstNet Senior Vice President Chris Sambar said

Calif. county votes to join fight against state’s sanctuary law

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

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By Roxana Kopetman The Orange County Register

SANTA ANA, Calif. — The Orange County Board of Supervisors voted on Tuesday, March 27 to join a Trump administration lawsuit against California’s controversial sanctuary law.

The board’s vote may mark the biggest maneuver yet in a nascent local movement against California’s law to protect people residing illegally in the country. The board announced its unanimous decision after discussing the matter during a closed session Tuesday.

Orange County, they said, plans to join a lawsuit filed earlier this month by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions that alleges three of California’s laws are unconstitutional.

The supervisors’ vote follows a move by the Los Alamitos City Council last week to adopt an ordinance that would exempt the small northern Orange County city from SB-54, a California law that limits cooperation between local and state agencies.

Yorba Linda’s council, meanwhile, agreed last week to file an amicus brief to the federal lawsuit, and several other cities are considering taking some kind of action to voice opposition to California measures that protect residents living in the country illegally.

Supervisor Shawn Nelson, who proposed joining the federal lawsuit, on Tuesday told a contentious crowd that cheered and booed throughout the hearing that the goal is “not to go rogue” but to offer perspective on how state laws are affecting citizens of Orange County.

“Our duty always has to be first and foremost to the citizens,” Nelson said.

Nelson proposed the action after Supervisor Michelle Steel introduced a resolution to condemn SB-54, dubbed the California Values Act, which took effect in January.

“We cannot let the state begin cherry-picking which federal laws it decides to follow. As supervisors of this county, we all took oaths to uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States and bear true faith and allegiance to it against all enemies,” Steel said in a statement after the vote.

Supervisors initially voted 3-0 during closed session on Nelson’s request but Supervisor Todd Spitzer later added his support to make it 4-0. Supervisor Andrew Do was absent. The board then voted unanimously on the resolution.

More than 60 speakers spoke for and against the anti-sanctuary move, an issue that was dwarfed Tuesday by the county’s proposed handling of the homeless. As many as 2,000 residents, most from Irvine, Laguna Niguel and Huntington Beach, protested a plan to move to their cities homeless people who previously lived in a tent city by the Santa Ana River. Others arrived to argue compassion and demand a permanent solution. The board voted to rescind their homeless plan.

The immigration showdown attracted a much smaller number, but still, tempers sometimes flared and passions were high.

“We condemn this hateful and violent action against all our immigrant communities. These actions seek to create fear and anxiety and only serve one purpose, to fulfill your political agenda and ambitions,” said Carlos Perea, a spokesman for Resilience OC, which advocates for immigrant rights.

“You are scapegoating our communities and this is shameful,” Perea told the board members.

Many of those gathered for the board meeting praised the elected leaders and urged them to proceed against California’s laws.

Those laws include SB-54, which limits cooperation between local law enforcement and federal immigration authorities. The California Legislature passed that law in reaction to the Trump administration’s stance on immigration. The other laws in question are: the Workplace Raid law, or AB-450, which forbids employers from cooperating with federal immigration officials and can fine them if they fail to comply; and the Detention Review law, or AB-103, which allows state officials to inspect federal facilities in California that house people on immigration detentions.

Betty Robinson, a Tustin resident and long-time opponent of illegal immigration, thanked the board and recalled the death of Kate Steinle in San Francisco. The 32-year-old woman died when an accidental shot ricocheted off concrete while she was walking in the Embarcadero district. The case often has been cited because the man responsible for her death had been deported five times and had seven felony convictions.

Comparing the incident to an oft-used refrain by immigrant rights advocates who complain that deportations separate immigrant families, Robinson told the board: “Kate’s family is forever separated from her.”

Sen. Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, chastised Orange County leaders in a statement Tuesday: “This kind of obsessive immigrant bashing is embarrassing to the county and its residents, and seems designed to court the approval of a racist President and his cronies.”

De León recalled that Orange County was at the forefront of a move more than two decades ago to restrict benefits to those living here illegally through a state ballot measure, Prop. 187. California voters passed Prop. 187 but it ultimately did not survive court challenges.

“The county that gave us Prop 187 more than two decades ago is at it again with another unconstitutional attack on our immigrant communities. I am confident the courts will reject this challenge to SB-54, just as they roundly rejected Prop 187,” De León said.

©2018 The Orange County Register (Santa Ana, Calif.)

TX Fire Union Absent as City Makes Contract Offer

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

San Antonio officials on Tuesday offered raises and a health care package to firefighters, but union officials did not attend the session.

TX Fire Union Absent as City Makes Contract Offer

Posted on March 28, 2018 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

San Antonio officials on Tuesday offered raises and a health care package to firefighters, but union officials did not attend the session.

FFs Vote for Probe into LA Chief Whose Wife Was Murdered

Posted on November 2, 2017 by in FIRE, Uncategorized

Firefighters have voted to launch a probe into the conduct of a St. Tammany Parish district fire chief.

Video shows shootout between Ohio police, suspect

Posted on June 8, 2017 by in POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

CINCINNATI — The Green Township police released body camera and dash cam footage Wednesday of a May 28 shootout between officers and an armed suspect.

A neighbor called 911 after Brendan MacDonald, 51, spoke about “killing demons” and fired a shot into his neighbor’s yard, Fox 19 reported.

When the Green Township Police Department and Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office responded, MacDonald opened fire on officers from his porch. Officers returned fire as MacDonald fled into the house.

Video shows officers taking cover as they return fire and negotiating with MacDonald.

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On May 29th Green Township Police Officers and Hamilton County Sheriff Deputies were dispatched to Jessup Road for a report of a subject firing a gun into a neighbor’s yard. When responding units arrived on scene, they were met by an armed defendant who pointed a gun at them. The defendant fired several rounds at the responding units who returned fire. After an exchange of gun fire, the defendant went back into his house and units were able to contain the scene and call in the Hamilton County Special Response Team. After an approximately 5 hour stand off the Hamilton County SRT was able to take the suspect into custody without injuries. This was a very dangerous call for the responding officers. The Green Township Officers and Hamilton County Sheriff Deputies that responded to this call should be commended for the courage and professionalism. They relied on their training and kept their composure in an extremely stressful situation. I would also like to thank the members of the Hamilton County Special Response Team for their role in seeing this incident to its successful conclusion. This was a great example of two departments working together in a cooperative manner to achieve a desired result. That result in this case was taking the individual into custody without any loss of life or bodily injury. As a result of this incident, Brendan MacDonald was indicted yesterday by a Hamilton County Grand Jury for multiple counts of Attempted Murder and Felonious Assault. Chief Jim Vetter ***Additional videos from the incident are posted on our page***

Posted by Green Township Police Department on Wednesday, June 7, 2017

After a five-hour standoff, police took MacDonald into custody without injury, Police Chief Jim Vetter wrote on Facebook.

Vetter praised both departments, saying they should be “commended for courage and professionalism.”

MacDonald was charged with two counts of attempted murder and five counts of felonious assault. According to WLWT, he pleaded not guilty.

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Additional body camera video from the incident on 5/28/17 on Jessup Rd.

Posted by Green Township Police Department on Wednesday, June 7, 2017