February 22, 2019

Indian Announced a Motorcycle Build-off Competition Between Texas Veterans and First Responders

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Non-profit organization pins Austin Vs. Dallas in competition to benefit veterans and first responders suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

NAEMSP president discusses impact of the ET3 model

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our co-hosts sit down with the NAEMSP president to discuss how the new reimbursement model will transform all aspects of the industry

NAEMSP president discusses impact of ET3 model

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our co-hosts sit down with the NAEMSP president to discuss how the new reimbursement model will transform all aspects of the industry

Michael Leo

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Michael Leo is a captain with the FDNY. While earning a bachelor’s degree in fire and emergency management at John Jay College, Leo studied the expanding role of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for use in emergency management. He has presented his...

LION Enters Exclusive Boot Partnership with Weinbrenner Shoe Company

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

DAYTON, OH – LION First Responder PPE, Inc., the largest family-owned manufacturer of first responder protective equipment (PPE) in the United States and Weinbrenner Shoe Company, manufacturer of Thorogood brand footwear have entered into a long-term...

LION Enters Exclusive Boot Partnership with Weinbrenner Shoe Company

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

DAYTON, OH – LION First Responder PPE, Inc., the largest family-owned manufacturer of first responder protective equipment (PPE) in the United States and Weinbrenner Shoe Company, manufacturer of Thorogood brand footwear have entered into a long-term...

MSA’s Globe Gear Giveaway Program 2019 Starts

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Thirteen departments will each receive four new sets of state-of-the-art gear.

Trijicon Introduces Fiber Sights

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Trijicon Inc. is introducing a new line of Trijicon Fiber Sights to its iron sight portfolio.

911 Industry Leader and Former NENA and FDNY Director Joins Hexagon

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Christopher Blake Carver, ENP, and former NENA Director of PSAP/911 Operations and FDNY Director of Fire Dispatch Operations, has joined its U.S. Public Safety team.

Watch GA Firefighters Rescue Hikers from Creek

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Walker County firefighters and other first responders used a cable system to save men who were stranded overnight trying to cross a creek's fast-moving waters.

Watch CT Crews Tackle House Blaze

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No one was hurt as firefighters from two departments battled the fire at a Manchester home Thursday afternoon.

Nearly 40 FL Firefighters Battle Three-Alarm Blaze

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Crews from nine departments battled the warehouse fire in Tamarac for more than two hours Wednesday night.

SC Fire Chief Worried about Department Closing

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dorchester County officials are considering abolishing the Ashley River Special Tax District, and that means the Ashley River Fire Department could shut down.

“Empire” Actor Jussie Smollett Charged with Felony for Filing False Police Report

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Following several weeks of investigation by Chicago police—and due diligence by the Cook County State’s Attorney office—"Empire" actor Jussie Smollett has been charged with a felony for filing a false police report claiming he was the victim of a hate-crime attack last month.

Video of Virginia Officer Playing “Dolls” with Girls Goes Viral

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Iesha Roper-Boswel posted video of the interaction between the kids and Officer C.B. Fleming on Facebook, and it quickly went viral with more than 45,000 views in the span of just a few days.

Arizona Deputy Writes Lullaby for ADHD Son—Releases Music to Public

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Maricopa County Sheriff's deputy has written a series of lullabies specifically to help children with ADHD fall asleep.

Texas Officer Goes to Trial for Fatal Shooting of Possibly Mentally Ill Man

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Mando Kenneth Gomez is facing one count of manslaughter in connection with the April 2015 shooting of Erik Emmanuel Salas Sanchez.

Arbitrator: Ohio Officer Fired Over Domestic Violence Charge Can Return to Work

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Patrol Officer Donald Ivory was fired in July 2018 after he was charged with assault, aggravated menacing, and domestic violence in an incident that allegedly occurred in April of that year.

Off-Duty Baltimore Officer Accidentally Shoots Herself in Leg

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty officer was taken to the hospital Wednesday morning after accidentally shooting herself in the leg.

Nashville Chief: “Our City Needs More Police Officers”

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The chief of the Nashville Metro Police Department took to Twitter late last week to plead for citizens to thank a police officer, appreciate the difficulty of their jobs, and understand that despite being fewer in numbers officers are being asked to do more and more every day.

Student Wanted to Shoot Ex-Girlfriend, Others at School—Nobody Hurt in Incident

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A student at a New Mexico high school said in a note that he wanted to shoot his ex-girlfriend and others at the Cleveland High School in Rio Rancho on Valentine's Day.

CO Department Unveils New Pumper Trucks

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The upgraded pieces of apparatus were specifically designed for the Colorado Springs Fire Department, and the cost of one of the vehicles was $500,000.

Apparatus Exposure Control: Going Beyond the Cab to Protect Firefighters

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Janet Wilmoth shares information from Robert Tutterow's FDSOA session “Apparatus Exposure Control: Beyond the Cab."

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Fire Launches Partnership with NVFC to Support Firefighters

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A donation of $75,000 will be made by Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Fire to the NVFC to help support volunteer firefighters. The company also launch a contest for 50 firefighters to win a trip to the Jack Daniel Distillery to attend a concert and tour.

Fallen NYPD Detective Posthumously Promoted at Funeral

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An emotional New York Police Department Commissioner James O’Neill remembered Detective Brian Simonsen as a man of courage and determination Wednesday at a funeral Mass for the decorated cop.

Chicago Police Superintendent Says Actor’s Attack Hoax Was ‘Shameful,’ ‘Publicity Stunt’

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Actor Jussie Smollett faked a threatening letter and then, a week later, staged a racist, anti-gay attack in downtown Chicago because he was “dissatisfied with his salary” on the “Empire” television show, Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said.

Feds: Coast Guard lieutenant compiled hit list of lawmakers

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A Coast Guard lieutenant who was arrested last week is a "domestic terrorist" who drafted an email discussing biological attacks and had what appeared to be a hit list that included prominent Democrats and media figures, prosecutors said in court papers

Christopher Paul Hasson is due to appear Thursday in federal court in Maryland after his arrest on gun and drug offenses, but prosecutors say those charges are the "proverbial tip of the iceberg."

"The defendant is a domestic terrorist, bent on committing acts dangerous to human life that are intended to affect governmental conduct," prosecutors wrote in court papers.

Hasson, who works at the Coast Guard's headquarters in Washington, has espoused extremist views for years, according to prosecutors. Court papers detail a June 2017 draft email in which Hasson wrote that he was "dreaming of a way to kill almost every last person on the earth," and pondering how he might be able to acquire anthrax and toxins to create botulism or a deadly influenza.

In the same email, Hasson described an "interesting idea" that included "biological attacks followed by attack on food supply" as well as a bombing and sniper attacks, according to court documents filed by prosecutors.

In September 2017, Hasson sent himself a draft letter that he had written to a neo-Nazi leader and "identified himself as a White Nationalist for over 30 years and advocated for 'focused violence' in order to establish a white homeland," prosecutors wrote.

Hasson routinely read portions of a manifesto written by Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik that prosecutors said instructs would-be assailants to collect firearms, food, disguises and survival tools, court papers said. Breivik, a right-wing extremist, is serving a 21-year sentence for killing 77 people in a 2011 bomb-and-shooting rampage.

Hasson also expressed admiration for Russia. "Looking to Russia with hopeful eyes or any land that despises the west's liberalism," he wrote in the draft email. Prosecutors say during the past two years he had regularly searched online for pro-Russian as well as neo-Nazi literature.

Prosecutors allege that Hasson visited thousands of websites that sold guns and researched military tactical manuals on improvised munitions.

Federal agents found 15 firearms — including several rifles — and over 1,000 rounds of ammunition inside Hasson's basement apartment in Silver Spring, Maryland. They also found a container with more than 30 bottles that were labeled as human growth hormone, court papers said.

Prosecutors wrote that Hasson "began the process of targeting specific victims," including several prominent Democrats in Congress and 2020 presidential candidates. In February 2018, he searched the internet for the "most liberal senators," as well as searching "do senators have ss (secret service) protection" and "are supreme court justices protected," according to the court filing.

Hasson's list of prominent Democrats included House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and presidential hopefuls Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker and Kamala Harris.

The list — created in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet — also included mentions of John Podesta, who was Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman, along with Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Maxine Waters, former Rep. Beto O'Rourke, MSNBC's Chris Hayes and Joe Scarborough and CNN's Chris Cuomo and Van Jones, according to the court filing.

Hasson appeared to be a chronic user of the opioid painkiller Tramadol and had purchased a flask filled with four ounces of "synthetic urine" online, prosecutors said. Authorities suspect Hasson had purchased fake urine to use in case he was randomly selected for a drug test.

The chief at the federal defender's office in Maryland — which is representing Hasson — declined comment on the allegations. The Coast Guard did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Hasson's arrest. No one answered the door Wednesday at the home address for Hasson listed in public records.

Hasson's arrest on Feb. 15 was first noted by Seamus Hughes, the deputy director of the Program on Extremism at George Washington University.


Wilson Electronics Offers Cell Phone Signal Booster For Responders

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It boosts 4G LTE and 3G signals for all cellular devices in the vehicle on all carriers simultaneously so users have the signal strength they need to communicate and stay connected with others on their team.

Mark Cholach

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mark Cholach currently serves as the assistant fire chief for the Henrietta, NY, Fire District. In addition to his career at Henrietta, Cholach serves as the deputy fire coordinator for Special Operations with the Monroe County Fire Bureau, ...

LAPD release bodycam footage of New Year’s Day fatal OIS

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles police released body camera footage of a New Year’s Day fatal officer-involved shooting that involved a knife-wielding man.

According to local news station ABC 7, officers were responding to reports of a woman screaming and the suspect getting into an altercation with a man who intervened.

Video shows the man opening the door to his apartment, dropping, then picking up a kitchen knife, and ignoring the officer’s commands.

The officers opened fire, killing the man.

The man was identified as 18-year-old Rony Parras, who had no history of mental health issues despite the erratic behavior he displayed that day.

The shooting is still under investigation.


GA Firefighter Charged in Silencer Theft from Fire Victim

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Coweta County firefighter Logan Thomas Bowden is accused of stealing a legal rifle silencer worth $1,600 from a person whose house had caught fire last month.

FDSOA Announces New Chairman and Board Members

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The new Fire Department Safety Officers Association officers were sworn in at the organization's meeting in Orlando, FL, on Jan. 23.

Chicago police: ‘Empire’ actor faked racist attack because he was ‘dissatisfied with his salary’

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Chicago Tribune Staff Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Actor Jussie Smollett faked a threatening letter and then, a week later, staged a racist, anti-gay attack in downtown Chicago because he was “dissatisfied with his salary” on the “Empire” television show, Chicago police superintendent Eddie Johnson said Thursday morning.

Smollett paid two brothers he knew $3,500 to fake the attack in the 300 block of East North Water Street around 2 a.m. Jan. 29, Johnson said. The superintendent called the scheme “shameful” and wondered how an African-American could set up a racist attack for a “publicity stunt.”

When investigators figured out the real motive behind the attack, “quite frankly, it pissed everybody off,” Johnson said. “Empire actor Jussie Smollett took advantage of the pain and anger of racism to promote his career.”

Looking out at a crowded room of reporters at police headquarters, Johnson said: “I just wish that the families of gun violence in this city got this much attention.”

Smollett surrendered to Chicago police earlier Thursday morning on a felony charge of disorderly conduct for allegedly making a false police report. Smollett, 36, turned himself in around 5 a.m. Thursday at the Central District police station at 1718 S. State St., flanked by four or five people, according to police spokesman Thomas Ahern, who was present during the surrender.

“He was very quiet and didn’t say anything,” Ahern said. “He went with detectives and they booked him.”

Area Central Cmdr. Edward Wodnicki, who led the investigation, said police and private surveillance cameras were critical to tracing the movements of the brothers and giving detectives a break in the case. He said the brothers’ use of a taxi and a ride-share service were tracked by detectives.

Wodnicki said about 100 subpoenas were issued. Social media and video was reviewed, and detectives learned the brothers had left for Nigeria after the reported attack and that they were coming back on Feb. 13. They were then arrested, but the probe began to “spin” in a new direction.

The two testified before a Cook County grand jury on Wednesday, hours before charges were announced against Smollett. “I’m told they did an excellent job,” he said.

Smollett was scheduled to appear for a bond hearing later in the day. If convicted, he faces up to three years in jail and could be ordered to pay for the cost of the investigation, which involved more than 20 detectives over three weeks.

Smollett, who is African-American and openly gay, has said he was walking from a Subway sandwich shop to his apartment in the 300 block of East North Water Street around 2 a.m. Jan. 29 when two men walked up, yelled racial and homophobic slurs, hit him and wrapped a noose around his neck. Smollett said they also yelled, “This is MAGA country,” referring to President Donald Trump’s campaign slogan.

Chicago police initially launched a hate crime investigation, but authorities had recently said they were looking into whether Smollett paid two brothers he knew to stage the attack. The brothers appeared before a grand jury hours before the charges were announced Wednesday evening, according to their attorney, Gloria Schmidt.

Schmidt declined to give much detail about the evidence presented to grand jurors. She did say the brothers got money from Smollett at some point, and said she believes the brothers have been in contact with the actor at least once since the attack was reported.

She urged Smollett to “unload” his conscience. “I think that Jussie’s conscience is probably not letting him sleep right now, so I think that he should unload that conscience and just come out and tell the American people what actually happened.”

Smollett’s attorneys released a statement saying “like any other citizen, Mr. Smollett enjoys the presumption of innocence, particularly when there has been an investigation like this one where information, both true and false, has been repeatedly leaked. Given these circumstances, we intend to conduct a thorough investigation and to mount an aggressive defense.”

Smollett is represented by local attorneys Todd Pugh and Victor Henderson as well as high-profile Los Angeles-based lawyer Mark Geragos, who has represented celebrities like pop star Michael Jackson, R&B singer Chris Brown and actress Winona Ryder.

Police say the case began to close in on Smollett last week when detectives took two brothers, 25 and 27, into custody after they were captured by surveillance cameras in the area around the time of the alleged attack. The brothers were taken into custody Feb. 13 at O’Hare International Airport after returning from Nigeria. Police also raided the men’s North Side town home.

Two days later, police called them “potential suspects” but then released them 12 hours later.

The shift in the investigation’s focus came amid often bitter public debate and stinging skepticism on social media — doubts that Smollett addressed in a national TV interview and in a strongly worded statement after the brothers were released.

As many as 20 detectives were assigned to the case in the weeks following Smollett’s report, and nearly every camera in the Streeterville neighborhood was checked for video that might have shown the attack. Some police sources privately expressed doubts after finding little, if any, corroborating evidence or video of a crime.

Police did release an image of two men seen in the area of Smollett’s building around the same time, but it was blurry and dark. Smollett said his music manager was on the phone with him at the time and would support his story, but the actor refused to turn over his full phone records, instead handing police redacted records.

There is also a federal investigation that is still pending.

A week before the alleged attack, Smollett told police he received a threatening letter at work. Witnesses told police a postal worker dropped off the letter at the Chicago studio where “Empire” is filmed. It was postmarked in southwest suburban Bedford Park on Jan. 18 and bore two American flag stamps. The letters “MAGA” were written in the upper-left corner of the envelope.

Federal authorities are looking into the origin of the letter. The status of their investigation was not known Wednesday.

———

©2019 Chicago Tribune


Cleveland, Firefighters to Battle in OH High Court

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Ohio Supreme Court will determine who will hear the case between the city and its firefighters union over when the work day begins.

What mobile computing tools do officers prefer? (infographic)

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Sponsored by Xplore, now part of Zebra Technologies

The use of technology and mobile tools for police work continues to increase, but what tools are officers using most in the field? Which devices and applications do they prefer? A December 2018 survey of active officers found that while most rely on laptops, many want the enhanced mobility of a tablet or smartphone.

Download the free infographic to learn:

What devices officers use most on the job, and what they like/dislike about them. What applications officers use most often on mobile computing devices. What functions are still completed on paper forms, desktop computers or vehicle-mounted computers.

Fill out the form below to download the graphic:


Van Dyke’s lawyers: No resentencing needed in fatal shooting

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

CHICAGO — Lawyers for the Chicago police officer convicted of murder for fatally shooting teenager Laquan McDonald say prosecutors have no right to challenge his nearly 7-year prison term.

Attorneys for Jason Van Dyke made the arguments in a filing Monday with the Illinois Supreme Court. They say the sentence is consistent with state law.

Illinois' attorney general and the case's special prosecutor have filed a petition to the high court, disputing the legal basis the judge used to sentence Van Dyke.

Van Dyke was convicted last year of second-degree murder and 16 aggravated battery counts. A judge sentenced him last month on just the second-degree murder conviction, ruling it was more serious.

Prosecutors want the 40-year-old sentenced on the aggravated battery counts, which could result in a longer prison term.


Parabon® NanoLabs to Exhibit at the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) 71st Annual Scientific Meeting

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Parabon representatives will be speaking and exhibiting during the AAFS 71st Annual Scientific Meeting, to be held Feb. 20 – 22, 2019 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Fla. school shooting suspect due back in court

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Florida school shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz is due back in court for a status hearing on his death penalty case.

The hearing is set Thursday afternoon in Broward County Circuit Court. A number of matters could come up ranging from the pace of defense interviews of witnesses to a potential setting of a tentative trial date.

The 20-year-old Cruz is accused of killing 17 people and wounding 17 others in last year's massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. He is also accused of assaulting a jail corrections officer.

Cruz's attorneys have said he will plead guilty in return for a life prison sentence. Prosecutors have insisted instead on seeking the death penalty.


Neighbors with Ladder Make NC Balcony Rescue

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Quick actions by neighbors were able to save three people in a burning apartment building in Morehead City on Wednesday.

Enhanced Technology and Design are Driving Adoption of Newest GLOCK Models by Law Enforcement

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

GLOCK, Inc. is proud to announce that its evolutionary changes in design are gaining interest and early adoption among law enforcement agencies throughout the United States.

Back and Better than Ever, The MEPRO RDS PRO V.2 from Meprolight®

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An upgraded version of the popular MEPRO RDS PRO, the new electro optical red dot V.2 sight features LED technology for low power consumption.

Squirt 43 Goes in Service in Plymouth Township, PA

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Plymouth Township, PA, Volunteer Fire Company has taken delivery of a 2018 Pierce Enforcer 55-foot Sky Boom.

Fla. department gets new therapy K-9

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Eryn Dion The News Herald, Panama City, Fla.

LYNN HAVEN, Fla. — The term "police dog" conjures a certain image - a stately German Shepherd or perhaps its darker cousin, the Malinois, or even a Bloodhound, known for sniffing out perps.

What it doesn't necessarily conjure is the ankle-high, tan possibly Chihuahua, Pug, Corgi, Pomeranian mix with a curlycue tail and a love of beef jerky serving as the Lynn Haven Police Department's first police dog.

"They brought him in and we were like, 'What the heck is that?'" joked LHPD Communications Manager Raymond Gates.

That would be Mugshot, or Mugsy as he's known around the travel trailer serving as LHPD dispatch since Hurricane Michael, so named because "he's just got that mug," remarked Gates, something about the combination of big brown eyes, lopsided ears and a slightly off-center nose that instantly puts people at ease. It's what makes him perfect for the role of therapy animal, because it's just about impossible to see him and not break out into a goofy grin.

"What we want to use him for is kind of like a therapy dog," Gates said. "In case there's situations with a child, maybe in a car accident and the child is upset, the parents are being checked out by EMTs. Mugshot can calm them down."

While interacting with police dogs is usually discouraged, as the dogs are working and it interferes with their work, Gates said that with Mugshot, it will actually be the opposite. They want people to come meet him, touch him and get to know him. The plan is to make him into a kind of mascot for the police department, bringing him to events around the county, like low-cost shot clinics and to the animal shelter. He made his debut on Friday during the city-wide cleanup event, and Gates said he passed with flying colors.

"His demeanor is perfect for it," Gates said. "He's very laid back."

Mugshot has been with the department for about a week, spending his days and the weekends in the dispatch trailer and going home at night with Gates. He was originally found by a resident wandering around an apartment complex damaged by Hurricane Michael, who took him to the Lynn Haven Animal Shelter when they couldn't find his owner. After being at the shelter a few weeks, the city's animal control officer brought him over to the city's Service Center, where "everybody just fell in love with him," Gates said. The city had been wanting to get an animal for the police department already, but wanted to start small. Mugshot fit the bill perfectly.

And yes, while his temporary badge says dispatch for now, Mugshot will be an official police department K-9, complete with an actual police badge.

"He will be the first K-9 unit for the community," Gates said.

Even though Mugshot's only been with the city a short time, Gates said he already sees a difference in how the public has been interacting with the police, bridging the gap and making people more comfortable. Gates said he's talked to quite a few residents who come by to see Mugshot, but then feel comfortable enough to bring up issues they're having at home or in their neighborhoods, or even feel comfortable enough to wander around the city's Service Center and get to know the other city departments. Gates said he's also taking the dog to the local schools so the students are familiar with him if something ever happens and Mugshot is sent out to assist.

Mugshot spends most of his time in the dispatch trailer behind Sharon Sheffield Park, but does take regular walks through the park to meet the public between 10 - 10:30 a.m. and 3 - 3:30 p.m.

MEET MUGSHOT A lot of people have been asking questions about Mugshot (aka Muggsy). Several Facebook messages,...

Posted by Lynn Haven Police Department on Friday, February 15, 2019

———

©2019 The News Herald (Panama City, Fla.)


Texas protesters accused of defacing memorials of fallen border agents

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Daniel Borunda El Paso Times, Texas

EL PASO, Texas — A weekend protest sparked the ire of U.S. Border Patrol supporters after accusations that a memorial to fallen agents was defaced at the National Border Patrol Museum in El Paso.

About two dozen protesters — some with bandannas covering their faces — held banners, sang and chanted in a take-over-style demonstration Saturday afternoon inside the museum on Trans Mountain Road.

The museum is not a part of the Border Patrol. The museum, which has free admission, is run on donations and by volunteers.

Stickers of photos of the Guatemalan girl Jakelin Caal Maquin and other immigrant children who died in U.S. custody were stuck on exhibits, including a memorial plaque with the photos of fallen agents.

"We feel this act was a disgrace, and the protest is misplaced against the men and women of the Border Patrol," said Carlos Favela, spokesman and executive vice president of the National Border Patrol Council Local 1929, the agents' union in El Paso.

Protesters crossed the line when they defaced exhibits and the memorial to fallen agents and should be prosecuted, Favela said.

Border Patrol concerns about overcrowding "got a deaf ear from Congress" until the children's deaths, Favela said. "All this is being blamed on the agents, who are dealing with this to the best of their ability," he said.

The demonstration by an activist group called "Tornillo: The Occupation" was part of a series of protests dubbed the "Weekend of Revolutionary Love."

The group's final scheduled demonstration took place Monday afternoon at San Jacinto Plaza in Downtown.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 21th 2019 PRESS RELEASE Media Contact: tornillotheoccupation@gmail.com Statement from Tornillo: the Occupation on the Action at the National Border Patrol Museum The action at the Border Patrol Museum was a collaboration between local El Paso residents and activists from around the country. Recognizing the interlocking nature of all our struggles, we staged an intervention to uplift and remember both the experiences of migrant families and the many lives that have been lost. Since its inception in 1924 the United States Border Patrol has expanded a colonial system that inflicts violence and death along its constructed border. We believe that the Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement should be held accountable for their human rights violations. We believe all migrants deserve to be treated with dignity and respect. We assert the only crisis on the border is the experiences of vulnerable migrant and undocumented populations bearing the weight of U.S. immigration and foreign policy and Indigenous peoples who have been terrorized and harassed by Customs and Border Patrol on Tribal lands. We stand behind all migrant indigenous families exercising their ancestral claim to migration across Turtle Island also known as the Americas. We took action because the museum and spaces like it exhibit a one-sided perspective of what is happening on the border. Nowhere in the museum would you find the problematic reality of the Border Patrol and its history of oppressive treatment towards indigenous peoples of this land, asylum seekers, and migrants. Our presence in the space was to center the voices that were missing from this memorial and the human rights violations inflicted upon them: Jakelin Caal Maquin, Felipe Gomez Alonzo, Claudia Patricia Gomez González, and the more than 100 others who have died as consequences of Border Patrol violence. They died in Border Patrol spaces, they deserve to be remembered in Border Patrol spaces. We are in a crisis of the consciousness of this country; a path towards reconciliation cannot begin unless institutions responsible for telling this country's story take that responsibility seriously and tell its whole truth. We must, as we have historically, fight for the sanctity of black and brown lives. It is irresponsible for any institution to claim to be apolitical while erasing the entire history of a people and using politically charged words, like "illegal alien" in their exhibits. We recognize that an injustice anywhere is an injustice everywhere—therefore, we will continue to resist state-sanctioned violence that places the lives and memories of law enforcement above those who have died as a result of systems of oppression, whether it be at the U.S. Borders, in Palestine, or in the streets of Ferguson, El Paso, Albuquerque/Tiwa Territory, or Tucson. No one is free until we all are free. For more information contact tornillotheoccupation@gmail.com BREAKING! Direct Action: Reclaiming the border patrol museum and exposing the true violence of borders and border patrol. MISSING HISTORY: The museum shows a small scoped perspective of what is happening on the border. No where in the museum would you ever find the fact that the Border Patrol has been a problematic entity in its treatment of the indigenous people of this land and asylum seekers. Our reclamation of the space was to highlight the voices that were missing from this memorial and the human rights violations inflicted upon them. They died in border patrol spaces, they deserve to be remembered in border patrol spaces. "Pedestrians were run over by agents. Car chases culminated in crashes. Some have drowned, others died after they were pepper-sprayed, stunned with tasers or beaten. But the majority of victims died from bullet wounds, including shots in the back. The bullets were fired not only by agents conducting border enforcement operations, but also those acting in a local law enforcement capacity and by agents off-duty, who’ve shot burglary suspects, intimate partners and friends. They are the largest federal law enforcement agency, with sweeping powers and a reach 100 miles into the interior of the US. But they have a worrying record — a Guardian investigation shows the federal government has paid out millions in compensation after a litany of deaths, abuses and negligence." -https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/may/02/fatal-encounters-97-deaths-point-to-pattern-of-border-agent-violence-across-america?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other -https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/01/border-patrol-violence-us-paid-60m-to-cover-claims-against-the-agency?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other "From 2005 to 2012, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents were arrested 2,170 times for misconduct, such as domestic violence and drunk driving, government inspectors found. CBP, which includes Border Patrol and customs agents, was also the target of 1,187 complaints of excessive force from 2007 to 2012. Since 2004, more than 200 agents have been arrested on corruption-related charges, including at least 13 under Trump. And a 2013 government-commissioned report found that Border Patrol agents regularly stepped in the paths of cars to justify firing at drivers, as well as shooting at rock-throwers, including teenagers on the Mexican side, with the intent to kill." -https://www.texasobserver.org/the-border-patrol-serial-killer-is-part-of-a-long-troubled-history/ "SINCE ITS FOUNDING in the early 20th century, the U.S. Border Patrol has operated with near-complete impunity, arguably serving as the most politicized and abusive branch of federal law enforcement — even more so than the FBI during J. Edgar Hoover’s directorship." -https://theintercept.com/2019/01/12/border-patrol-history/ #RevoLove #FreeThem #Libérenlos #hungerstrike #ELPASO9 #AbolishICE #waterislife #HumanitarianAidIsNeverACrime #liberty4patricia #niunamás #WeDoCare #amorYamistad #ReturnTheChildren #Liberty4Patricia @officialpatriciaOkoumou #pokoumou

Posted by Tornillo: The Occupation on Saturday, February 16, 2019

The group had protested the now-closed Tornillo child immigrant tent detention center and called for "disruptive nonviolent direct action" to highlight "an unjust immigration system."

At the museum, activists held banners stating "No estan olvidados" (You are not forgotten) and chanted “Say it loud, say it clear, Border Patrol kills” and "Up, up with liberation. Down, down with deportation."

The protest was filmed by activists in a video posted on the group's Facebook page.

“We are here at the Border Patrol Museum and what we did: We reclaimed their false narrative and put the truth," a woman said in the video. "Let them know that Border Patrol kills. There shouldn’t be a museum for genocide.”

The protest group stated that military police arrived, blocked the museum parking lot and checked protesters' identification before letting them go.

"Today, a group of protesters invaded the Border Patrol Museum and defaced all of our exhibits, including our sacred Memorial Room," David Ham, whom Channel 7-KVIA identified as the museum board president, posted Saturday on Facebook.

"Efforts to prosecute them will be pursued once damage is assessed," Ham posted. "This angers me greatly."

It was unclear which law enforcement agency would handle any vandalism investigation at the museum.

Yesterday, masked protestors “occupied & reclaimed” (whatever that means) the #BorderPatrol museum (non-profit entity run by volunteers) & defaced our fallen agent memorial (a very sacred monument). I’ll let you draw your own conclusions about the hypocrisy of their actions...? pic.twitter.com/VUmMmwAIqO

— Jason Owens, Chief Patrol Agent (@JOwensUSBP) February 17, 2019

The protest drew condemnation from Border Patrol supporters across the nation.

Houlton, Maine, Border Patrol Chief Jason Owens in a tweet said that protesters had "defaced our fallen agent memorial (a very sacred monument)."

The museum grounds are the site of an annual memorial service for fallen agents.

Protesters on social media countered that "there is nothing more sacred than lifting up the names of the children that were taken from us."

The museum began in 1985 in the basement of the Cortez Building in Downtown El Paso. The museum opened in 1994 at its current mountainside location in the Northeast.

Museum officials could not be reached for comment Monday, when the museum is closed.

———

©2019 the El Paso Times (El Paso, Texas)


Calif. sheriff releases graphic video of fatal OIS

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

NAPA, Calif. — A Northern California sheriff's department has released graphic video of a deputy fatally shooting an armed suspect.

Napa County Undersheriff Jon Crawford said Wednesday that the video was captured by the deputy's body-worn camera Sunday night and appears to show Javier Hernandez Morales shooting first with a stolen handgun.

It shows deputy Riley Jarecki approaching the driver's side of a car she deemed suspiciously parked and asking Morales to roll down the window. When he does, he appears to fire at least one shot at Jarecki and missing. Jarecki radios for help, retreats to the car's passenger side and returns fire, killing Morales.

Crawford said Morales had arrest warrant and a loaded .22-caliber rifle in the car. She was placed on paid leave.


Calif. sheriff releases video of fatal OIS

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

NAPA, Calif. — A Northern California sheriff's department has released graphic video of a deputy fatally shooting an armed suspect.

Napa County Undersheriff Jon Crawford said Wednesday that the video was captured by the deputy's body-worn camera Sunday night and appears to show Javier Hernandez Morales shooting first with a stolen handgun.

It shows deputy Riley Jarecki approaching the driver's side of a car she deemed suspiciously parked and asking Morales to roll down the window. When he does, he appears to fire at least one shot at Jarecki and missing. Jarecki radios for help, retreats to the car's passenger side and returns fire, killing Morales.

Crawford said Morales had arrest warrant and a loaded .22-caliber rifle in the car. She was placed on paid leave.


NJ police revive school bus driver with Narcan after crash

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. — Police in New Jersey's largest city used Narcan to revive a school bus driver after her bus, with a dozen children on board, hit a tree.

Newark Public Safety Director Anthony Ambrose says authorities used the opioid overdose antidote because it appeared 57-year-old Lisa Byrd was under the influence of a narcotic.

The special-needs students, who range in ages from 5 to 13, were not injured as the bus appeared to cross a street and bump into the tree during a snowstorm Wednesday.

Ambrose calls the situation "irresponsible and heinous."

Byrd is charged with child endangerment, driving while impaired and possession of drug paraphernalia. It could not be determined if she has retained a lawyer.


Funeral held for NYPD detective killed in blue-on-blue shooting

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

HAMPTON BAYS, N.Y. — A New York City police detective killed by friendly fire while responding to a chaotic robbery scene was hailed at his funeral on Wednesday as a consummate law enforcer with people skills befitting his lifelong nickname: "Smiles."

Brian Simonsen, whose posthumous promotion to detective first grade prompted a lengthy standing ovation in a crowded Long Island church, was shot in the chest on Feb. 12 outside of a cellphone store in Queens.

He and six other officers opened fire on a robbery suspect who police say was pointing what appeared to be a handgun. Simonsen's partner, Sgt. Matthew Gorman , was hit in the leg and arrived at the funeral in a wheelchair.

"The only two people responsible for Brian's death, the only two, are the career criminals" involved in the robbery, Police Commissioner James O'Neill said firmly, delivering a eulogy in a voice sometimes choked with emotion.

To the devastated men and women of the 102nd Precinct, where Simonsen worked, and to officers around the city, O'Neill said: "Thank you for your dedication."

"Always remember who you are, what you do and why you do it," he said. "Continue to be proud of that" while honoring Simonsen's legacy.

In his 19-year career, Simonsen made nearly 600 arrests, most of them for felonies. "He was exceedingly good at his job," said O'Neill, "making connections with the evidence" and also reconnecting crime victims "with the hope that was stolen from them."

On the night he was shot, Simonsen should have been off for a union meeting. But he opted to go to work so he could continue tracking a string of recent robberies.

"It was never just a job for him," said Mayor Bill de Blasio.

The mayor related a story about Simonsen soothing a crime victim who'd fought off an intruder. She cried on his shoulder so long that his shirt was soaked with her tears.

On Wednesday, the tears of many were evident at the Roman Catholic Church of St. Rosalie in Hampton Bays.

Simonsen and his wife, Leanne, a nurse, lived in Calverton, near the Long Island community where he grew up. Neighborhood kids knew him as "Uncle Brian."

"Smiles, he should have been the mayor. He was the glue. ... He just loved everyone," said Melissa Weir, who had known him since high school.

"There's a lot of people who are hurting," Weir said outside the church. "Last night, I screamed in my car."

"You don't want any of our police to end up that way. But why him? ... A good guy, such a larger-than-life personality," she said. "A stand-up guy."


All but One Firefighter Quits ME Department

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The resignations came at the first Select Board meeting since the release of a letter accusing Thorndike Fire Department's leadership put firefighters' lives at risk.

Authorities announce Houston officer case review, FBI probe

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

HOUSTON — Prosecutors will review more than 1,400 criminal cases that involved a Houston officer who the police chief has accused of lying in an affidavit justifying a drug raid on a home in which officers shot and killed two residents, authorities said Wednesday.

The FBI also announced that it is opening an investigation to determine whether any civil rights were violated as a result of the raid and shooting last month.

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said at a news conference that he welcomed the FBI investigation "in the spirit of transparency."

Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg said her office's review will look at cases spanning decades that involved Officer Gerald Goines, a 30-year department veteran. Twenty-seven of those cases are active.

"Although the criminal investigation of Officer Goines is ongoing, we have an immediate ethical obligation to notify defendants and their lawyers in Goines' other cases to give them an opportunity to independently review any potential defenses," Ogg said in a statement.

Goines was one of the four officers who were shot in a gunfight that killed 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle and 58-year-old Rhogena Nicholas, who both lived in the home where the raid occurred on Jan. 28. A fifth officer injured his knee during the shooting.

Police investigators now allege that Goines, who's been suspended, lied in the search warrant affidavit, saying a confidential informant had bought heroin at the home. But the informant told investigators no such drug buy ever took place.

Goines' attorney, Nicole DeBorde, said Wednesday that Ogg's review is necessary.

"It's exactly the right thing for her to do," DeBorde said. "We welcome that."

DeBorde has said Goines is innocent of any crime. She said partial information that has been released about Goines has painted a "very one-sided picture of (Goines') character."

The FBI's probe will look at the "totality of everything that went down" with the drug raid and shooting to determine if someone was deprived of their civil rights, said agency spokesman Connor Hagan.

Hagan declined to comment further on the case, citing the ongoing investigation.

Acevedo said the FBI's involvement doesn't mean the federal agency will be taking over his department's investigation into the drug raid and shooting and whether any state charges will be filed.

The police chief also asked residents to not let the actions of one officer represent the department.

"The majority of our men and women are honorable, dedicated professionals," Acevedo said.

No timeline was given for how long the various investigations will take.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner asked residents to be patient and allow for a "complete, thorough, honest and credible investigation."

DeBorde said a neutral review of the raid, and of Goines' police work, is necessary but that the effort has been undermined by Acevedo's public comments criticizing Goines.

Acevedo also announced that his department on Wednesday formally changed its policy to restrict the use of "no-knock warrants," which was the kind used in the deadly drug raid. Under such warrants, police can enter a home without giving any notification. Acevedo said he or someone he designates must now approve all such warrants.

The police chief also announced that body cameras will now be worn by SWAT team members and by officers who execute search warrants. Officers involved in the drug raid did not wear body cameras.


Houston FFs’ Salary Hike Less than Pay Parity Measure

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The proposed salary increase still doesn't create pay parity between city firefighters and police officers as outlined by a voter-approved charter amendment.

Eliminate EMS disconnects through patient, provider communication

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

8 ways to shape caregiver communications with patients and 4 key considerations for leading millennials

Fallen NYPD Detective Laid to Rest

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Thousands of police officers from near and far came to pay their respects to NYPD Detective Detective Brian Simonsen, a 19-year veteran who was killed by friendly fire while responding to an armed robbery in Queens last week.

5 things to know about the ET3 reimbursement model

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Find out the specifics of the Emergency Treat, Triage and Transport payment model, and how will it affect your EMS agency

5 things to know about the ET3 reimbursement model

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Find out the specifics of the Emergency Treat, Triage and Transport payment model, and how will it affect your EMS agency

5 things to know about the ET3 reimbursement model

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Find out the specifics of the Emergency Treat, Triage and Transport payment model, and how will it affect your EMS agency

Prison Training Program Aims to Help Women Enter Tech Jobs

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Research shows that women make up 25 percent of workers in computer occupations. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is bringing coding training to women in prison.

Woman Donates Time To Make Blankets for Police Dogs

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Some Denver police dogs will be extra cozy when they're not on the job.

Maryland State Police Trooper Struck While Assisting Driver

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Maryland State Police trooper was taken to the hospital Wednesday after he was struck while trying to assist a disabled vehicle on Interstate 695.

Florida Sheriff: Woman Who Charged Deputy Attempted Suicide by Cop

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Kim Nguyen Cholak’s wounds were not life threatening and she was taken to Memorial Regional Hospital for treatment, the Broward County Sheriff’s Office said.

Actor Charged With Lying About Attack in Chicago

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“Empire” actor Jussie Smollett has been charged with disorderly conduct after he allegedly filed a false police report about an attack he said occurred as he walked to his apartment building in the Streeterville neighborhood last month.

2 Dead, 6 Injured in Separate Crashes Fleeing Border Patrol Agents

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two men were killed and a woman was critically injured Tuesday evening when their vehicle crashed into a semi truck and careened down an embankment while fleeing from a Border Patrol agent in San Diego.

DNA, Old-Fashioned Police Work, Leads to Arrest in 1973 Cold Case Murder

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Linda Ann O’Keefe, an 11-year-old girl who was last seen walking home from summer school, last seen talking to a stranger in a blue or turquoise van, was found strangled in a ditch alongside a one-lane road on July 6, 1973.

Body Camera Shows Driver Fired at California Deputy First

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Napa County Sheriff’s Department on Wednesday released body-worn camera footage from a weekend police shooting that killed an armed motorist, and it appears to show that the motorist fired at the deputy first before she shot back and killed him.

Feds: U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Stockpiled Weapons, Planned Domestic Terror Attack

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant who described himself as a white nationalist allegedly stockpiled weapons, ammunition and a list of targets that included politicians and TV personalities.

EMS Today 2019 Quick Take: Medical ethics algorithms

Posted on February 21, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Learn how to train EMS providers in the four pillars of medical ethics, how to make difficult decisions in EMS and what ethics is not

Rapid Response: Life safety and fire escape education for new

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Here are actions for fire safety educators and their departments to reach new residents and share life safety messages

Rapid Response: Life safety and fire escape education for new immigrants

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Here are actions for fire safety educators and their departments to reach new residents and share life safety messages

Mont. firefighter who fought for workers comp law dies of cancer

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Great Falls City firefighter Jason Baker, an 18-year veteran of the fire industry, died of Stage 4 lung cancer

Fire pumper solutions for today’s firefighting challenges

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fire foam, advances in fire pump systems combat lightweight construction fire speed and contaminate hazards

Mich. family sues after 911 call about heart attack goes unanswered

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Stephen Greene’s family is suing after two dispatchers turned down the volume and missed 13 emergency calls made by rehabilitation staff members

Ark. firefighters honor late paramedic with scholarship

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Eli Staton Memorial Scholarship will cover the nearly $5,000 paramedic school tuition for one firefighter-EMT

Ark. firefighters honor late paramedic with scholarship

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Eli Staton Memorial Scholarship will cover the nearly $5,000 paramedic school tuition for one firefighter-EMT

Dear EMS provider, are you at risk of stroke?

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prehospital providers shouldn’t be cautionary tales of why knowing your stroke risk matters

Texas man shouts profanities after leading police on chase in stolen ambulance

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials said the man had been calm when transported to the hospital, but abruptly jumped back in the ambulance and drove away when they arrived

Man leads police on bizarre, profanity-laced chase in stolen ambulance

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials said the man had been calm when transported to the hospital, but abruptly jumped back in the ambulance and drove away when they arrived

LA officials OK $800K settlement in lawsuit over fire marshal’s dismissal

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Former Fire Marshal John Vidovich was transferred out of his job after he clashed with inspectors in his department and the fire union sought his removal

Audit: Fla. county 911 centers spending millions due to understaffing

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Broward County’s 911 centers are spending millions of dollars in overtime — with dispatchers forced to work the extra hours— to make up for continuing vacancies

Audit: Fla. county 911 centers spending millions due to understaffing

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Broward County’s 911 centers are spending millions of dollars in overtime — with dispatchers forced to work the extra hours— to make up for continuing vacancies

Bill that would allow responders to administer meds passes Minn. House committee

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Former Rep. Clark Johnson and Sen. Nick Frentz tried to pass a similar law in 2017 but ran into language issues with medical industry lobbyists

All but one member of embattled fire dept. quits amid safety concerns

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At the Thorndike Town Office, voices boomed and passions ran high, and in the end town officials and firefighters were unable to find a way forward together

All but one member of embattled fire dept. quits amid safety concerns

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At the Thorndike Town Office, voices boomed and passions ran high, and in the end town officials and firefighters were unable to find a way forward together

Limited supply: How drug shortages are impacting EMS

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rotating pharmaceutical stock, and exploring alternative pain management and expired drug options can mitigate EMS drug shortages

City Settles with Ex-LA Fire Marshal for $800K

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The former fire marshal accused Los Angeles Fire Chief Ralph Terrazas, Mayor Eric Garcetti and others of pushing him out of his job at the urging of the firefighters union.

City Settles with Ex-LA Fire Marshal for $800K

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The former fire marshal accused Los Angeles Fire Chief Ralph Terrazas, Mayor Eric Garcetti and others of pushing him out of his job at the urging of the firefighters union.

When New Orleans Mansion Caught Fire in 2007

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The blaze Wednesday wasn't the first time firefighters battled a multiple-alarm fire at the historic home on St. Charles Avenue.

TN Fire Chief Dies from Apparent Heart Attack at Fire

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fayette County Chief Jason Byrd suffered the medical emergency while at the scene of a large residential fire Monday night.

Audit: FL 9-1-1 Call Centers are Short-Staffed

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With an average of 30 open positions at Broward County's three call centers, staffers are assigned mandatory overtime shifts to handle the workload.

California Cracking Down on Back Market for Marijuana

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Last week, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced an expansion of efforts by the California National Guard to work with federal officials to target the black market, including illegal drug grows in Northern California operated by international drug cartels.

Dashboard Camera Video: Oklahoma Trooper Helps Rescue Three Children Trapped in Overturned Truck

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Recently released dashboard camera video shows Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Cody Enloe help rescue three small children from a truck overturned in water on Valentines Day.

NYPD commander’s ‘threat’ to shoot 50 Cent leads to investigation

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Thomas Tracy , Rocco Parascandola And John Annese New York Daily News

NEW YORK — A Brooklyn precinct commander’s statement that cops should shoot rapper 50 Cent on sight startled the officers in his command, leading one cop to write a text message about it that sent other officers buzzing.

“The inspector just said at roll call if u see Kurtis Jackson (aka 50 Cent) shoot on site … I’m like wtf,” the officer wrote on June 8, according to a copy of the text obtained by the Daily News. 50 Cent’s full name is Curtis Jackson.

The cop didn’t think anyone at the roll call recorded Deputy Inspector Emanuel Gonzalez’s now-infamous remarks, and added, “he said it as a joke.”

Nevertheless, word of the 72nd Precinct commanding officer’s alleged June 7 comment made its way to One Police Plaza, leading NYPD brass to open an internal investigation, police sources said.

The officer who sent the text declined comment Monday.

Since the Daily News first reported the investigation, the rapper and actor took to Twitter and Instagram blasting Gonzalez, calling him a “Gangsta with a badge.” He called out Mayor de Blasio in a Tweet, telling Hizzoner, “This piece a s—t Deputy Inspector Emanuel has to be dealt with. He is a embarrassment to Law Enforcement’s.”

The mayor had no comment, citing the Internal Affairs Bureau investigation of the alleged threat that dates to last June, when Gonzalez had an ongoing beef with the rapper, whose given name is Curtis Jackson.

Gonzalez allegedly made the threat when 50 Cent was expected to attend an NYPD sanctioned boxing match, or “smoker,” in the Bronx.

A month before the roll call, Gonzalez filed an aggravated harassment complaint, claiming 50 Cent threatened him on Instagram.

The rapper was commenting on a lawsuit accusing Gonzalez of shaking down the owner of the now-shuttered Sunset Park club Love and Lust, one of his favorite night spots, and wrote, “Get the strap,” a slang term for “get a gun.”

That lawsuit sparked a flurry of text messages from a detective’s union official, who said in May, “this is all bad for him (Gonzalez). They’ve been relentless with trying to close this place down and no one would be surprised because he’s completely obsessed with Puerto Rico.”

Gonzalez is being sued by the club’s owners for demanding 11 “free” round-trip tickets to Puerto Rico and a generator for a doctor after Hurricane Maria devastated the island. The precinct then slammed the club with violations, leading to its liquor license being pulled, the lawsuit alleges.

In the complaint he filed, Gonzalez said several of 50 Cent’s 18 million followers responded with their own threats against the precinct leader, including “F--k this commander” and “Blast this fool” — leaving him “in fear of his safety.”

The rapper ultimately took down the Instagram post. The department investigated Gonzalez’s complaint, but no charges were filed.

His duty status has not changed, pending the outcome of the IAB investigation.

Regardless, Gonzalez could soon find himself named in a lawsuit.

“I take this threat very seriously,” the rapper said on Twitter, “and I’m consulting with my legal counsel regarding my options moving forward.”

———

©2019 New York Daily News


E-ONE Announces a 5-Year Contract with Chicago Fire

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The contract will enable the city to replace dated fire apparatus and continue its best in class fire suppression and emergency demands for over 2.7 million citizens.

Accolade Thermal Binocular

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Designed for a variety of applications, the Accolade Thermal Binoculars offer a dual eyepiece configuration for comfort and reduced eye fatigue. Accolades offer a 384x288 (XQ models) or 640x480 (XP models) sensor with 50hz refresh rate and feature a...

Seven-Alarm Fire Destroys Historic New Orleans Mansion

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire officials called Wednesday’s damage “a catastrophic loss” as flames burned down the Victorian-style home that had been in the same family for more than 100 years.

Seven-Alarm Fire Destroys Historic New Orleans Mansion

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Fire officials called Wednesday’s damage “a catastrophic loss” as flames burned down the Victorian-style home that had been in the same family for more than 100 years.

How mobile evidence collection improves scene management

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dale Stockton
Author: Dale Stockton

The traditional in-car computer has served law enforcement well for the last three decades, but times are rapidly changing due to the capabilities of today’s smartphones and tablets. These powerful, yet fully portable, devices allow an officer to untether yet retain the connectivity and query capability that is so necessary for effective operations. And assignments such as bike and foot patrol, which previously lacked ready access to computing power, can now have the same level of tech capability that was once limited to officers in a car.

That real-time access to data, regardless of assignment or proximity to a vehicle, helps officers make better, more informed decisions. Progressive agencies are beginning to embrace the smartphone, recognizing both its usefulness and the potential to augment, even replace, the traditional car-mounted laptop.

Smartphone Utility

The sheer utility of a smartphone makes them invaluable to field personnel. Officers can conduct phone follow-ups with witnesses, check the availability of space at a homeless shelter or contact the parents of a detained juvenile. This saves time, increases effectiveness and eliminates the miscommunication that often takes place when relaying the information through a dispatch center.

Access to the internet allows officers to identify an unknown pill, check legal resources, or access on-demand language translation. These benefits are achieved simply by using the smartphone as a basic communication or query tool.

However, the same device can readily be used in more sophisticated ways that take advantage of other tech features, thereby opening the door to a wide array of capabilities.

Dedicated Police Applications for Field Operations

Officers perform a variety of tasks in the field, from conducting witness interviews to gathering evidence and completing reports on incidents ranging from vehicle crashes to homicide. When equipped with the right supporting application(s), smartphones can serve as the ultimate, multi-function device.

Photographing a damaged vehicle, taking video of a crime scene, recording witness interviews and dictating report narratives can all be accomplished with the smartphone. Having a single device that is capable of all these functions saves money and increases effectiveness because officers don’t have to carry multiple pieces of equipment or learn their individual operating nuances.

Here is a walkthrough of a typical police response to demonstrate the capabilities that are available today. An officer is dispatched to the scene of a home burglary. Upon arrival, the officer activates the reporting function of the smartphone and enters the case number assigned by dispatch. The officer obtains the victim’s identification and scans the barcode, instantly and accurately transferring the relevant information into the report form. As the victim walks the officer through the house, the officer can take a short video that effectively shows the overall scene. Where appropriate, individual evidentiary photos can be taken and accompanied by a short, dictated annotation. Items of physical evidence can be effectively logged and tracked thus assuring a documented chain of custody. An interview with a witness who saw a strange vehicle in the area can be audio recorded and the individual’s identification can be scanned in the same manner as was done with the victim.

These steps are all captured electronically and integrated into a single, comprehensive report, which is then uploaded to a secure, department-controlled, server that is either cloud-based or on-premise. This makes the report readily available for supervisory review and ensures timelier overall reporting.

In many cases, the report and supporting documentation can be submitted as the officer clears the scene. Data quality is improved because victim and witness information is captured by a scan rather than relying on handwritten notes. In cases where investigators need to immediately engage with follow-up, they can access all photos and even listen to the witness interviews while in the field. When integrated with a department’s record management system, the described reporting process eliminates the need for a separate data entry function.

The above scenario is a realistic depiction of what can be currently accomplished by an officer with a smartphone or tablet that is equipped with an application designed to support law enforcement operations.

Although an off-the-shelf smartphone can take pictures and record videos without special software, the integration of those items into a reporting system and proper chain-of-custody documentation for evidence require an application specifically designed to accomplish these tasks. Departments should vet potential vendors carefully and ensure that a product under consideration has a history of reliably meeting the needs of public safety.

Computer Aided Dispatch

Many suppliers of computer-aided-dispatch software are now offering or developing a mobile client that will provide even greater smartphone functionality, allowing them to serve as fully-enabled CAD devices. This means that officers can be assigned calls or initiate incidents even when they don’t have access to a vehicle computer. In addition, smartphones can provide real-time geolocation, improving officer safety and increasing command awareness of resources because the location is that of the individual officer and not their vehicle.

This is an evolving area and organizations should check with their current CAD vendor to determine product status and capabilities.

Conclusion

Forward-thinking police leaders across the country are taking a closer look at the way mobile technology can enhance officer effectiveness and improve officer safety. When you consider the overall utility of the smartphone and the added capabilities made possible by supporting applications, a compelling case can be made for ensuring every officer is a connected officer. This is a new paradigm for public safety, one that is only beginning to be fully realized.


How mobile evidence collection improves scene management

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dale Stockton
Author: Dale Stockton

The traditional in-car computer has served law enforcement well for the last three decades, but times are rapidly changing due to the capabilities of today’s smartphones and tablets. These powerful, yet fully portable, devices allow an officer to untether yet retain the connectivity and query capability that is so necessary for effective operations. And assignments such as bike and foot patrol, which previously lacked ready access to computing power, can now have the same level of tech capability that was once limited to officers in a car.

That real-time access to data, regardless of assignment or proximity to a vehicle, helps officers make better, more informed decisions. Progressive agencies are beginning to embrace the smartphone, recognizing both its usefulness and the potential to augment, even replace, the traditional car-mounted laptop.

Smartphone Utility

The sheer utility of a smartphone makes them invaluable to field personnel. Officers can conduct phone follow-ups with witnesses, check the availability of space at a homeless shelter or contact the parents of a detained juvenile. This saves time, increases effectiveness and eliminates the miscommunication that often takes place when relaying the information through a dispatch center.

Access to the internet allows officers to identify an unknown pill, check legal resources, or access on-demand language translation. These benefits are achieved simply by using the smartphone as a basic communication or query tool.

However, the same device can readily be used in more sophisticated ways that take advantage of other tech features, thereby opening the door to a wide array of capabilities.

Dedicated Police Applications for Field Operations

Officers perform a variety of tasks in the field, from conducting witness interviews to gathering evidence and completing reports on incidents ranging from vehicle crashes to homicide. When equipped with the right supporting application(s), smartphones can serve as the ultimate, multi-function device.

Photographing a damaged vehicle, taking video of a crime scene, recording witness interviews and dictating report narratives can all be accomplished with the smartphone. Having a single device that is capable of all these functions saves money and increases effectiveness because officers don’t have to carry multiple pieces of equipment or learn their individual operating nuances.

Here is a walkthrough of a typical police response to demonstrate the capabilities that are available today. An officer is dispatched to the scene of a home burglary. Upon arrival, the officer activates the reporting function of the smartphone and enters the case number assigned by dispatch. The officer obtains the victim’s identification and scans the barcode, instantly and accurately transferring the relevant information into the report form. As the victim walks the officer through the house, the officer can take a short video that effectively shows the overall scene. Where appropriate, individual evidentiary photos can be taken and accompanied by a short, dictated annotation. Items of physical evidence can be effectively logged and tracked thus assuring a documented chain of custody. An interview with a witness who saw a strange vehicle in the area can be audio recorded and the individual’s identification can be scanned in the same manner as was done with the victim.

These steps are all captured electronically and integrated into a single, comprehensive report, which is then uploaded to a secure, department-controlled, server that is either cloud-based or on-premise. This makes the report readily available for supervisory review and ensures timelier overall reporting.

In many cases, the report and supporting documentation can be submitted as the officer clears the scene. Data quality is improved because victim and witness information is captured by a scan rather than relying on handwritten notes. In cases where investigators need to immediately engage with follow-up, they can access all photos and even listen to the witness interviews while in the field. When integrated with a department’s record management system, the described reporting process eliminates the need for a separate data entry function.

The above scenario is a realistic depiction of what can be currently accomplished by an officer with a smartphone or tablet that is equipped with an application designed to support law enforcement operations.

Although an off-the-shelf smartphone can take pictures and record videos without special software, the integration of those items into a reporting system and proper chain-of-custody documentation for evidence require an application specifically designed to accomplish these tasks. Departments should vet potential vendors carefully and ensure that a product under consideration has a history of reliably meeting the needs of public safety.

Computer Aided Dispatch

Many suppliers of computer-aided-dispatch software are now offering or developing a mobile client that will provide even greater smartphone functionality, allowing them to serve as fully-enabled CAD devices. This means that officers can be assigned calls or initiate incidents even when they don’t have access to a vehicle computer. In addition, smartphones can provide real-time geolocation, improving officer safety and increasing command awareness of resources because the location is that of the individual officer and not their vehicle.

This is an evolving area and organizations should check with their current CAD vendor to determine product status and capabilities.

Conclusion

Forward-thinking police leaders across the country are taking a closer look at the way mobile technology can enhance officer effectiveness and improve officer safety. When you consider the overall utility of the smartphone and the added capabilities made possible by supporting applications, a compelling case can be made for ensuring every officer is a connected officer. This is a new paradigm for public safety, one that is only beginning to be fully realized.


Houston Police Chief: No More No-Knock Warrants

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Bowing to pressure from activists who were outraged over the death of two married suspects, Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo says his department will stop serving "no knock" search warrants.

Florida Patrol Officer Dies of Heart Attack in Training

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Florida Highway Patrol Training Academy posted on Facebook, "It is with great sadness that we inform you of the passing of Master Sergeant Daniel Hinton. Master Sergeant Hinton suffered cardiac arrest during a training exercise and was transported to Gulf Coast Hospital where he later passed away."

Video: Oklahoma Officers Rescue Children from Carjacked Vehicle

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In recently released video, officers with the Tulsa (OK) Police Department can be seen rescuing two children from a vehicle that had been carjacked.

Ohio Sheriff’s Sergeant Set on Fire Released from Hospital

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Sergeant with the Portage County Sheriff's Office who was set on fire late last week has been released from the hospital.

3 Teens Arrested for Attacking Off-Duty Florida Officer, 1 Still Sought

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Three teens of four that attacked an off-duty police officer jogging in a Sarasota, Florida park have been arrested—one remains at large.

Tennessee Department: Get Drunk on Our Tab to Help Out DUI Training

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Coopertown Police Department is seeking six volunteers to drink alcohol of their choosing in an effort to help the department with a day of DUI training.

Kentucky Departments Take ‘Polar Plunge’ for Special Olympics

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Earlier this month, three law enforcement agencies in Kentucky participated in an annual event—the Lexington Polar Plunge fundraiser—to support Special Olympics that put some officers in some very, very cold water.

Prosecutors Seek Death Penalty for Man Accused of Killing Arizona Officer

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prosecutors filed their intent to seek the death penalty in the case of a man accused of killing a Nogales (AZ) Police Department last April.

Nashville Metro Police Chief Sounds the Alarm Over Staffing Shortage

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nashville Metro Police Chief Steve Anderson released a statement urging public support for more manpower, acknowledging that it's a "tough time" for police and that "more is being asked of Nashville's police officers than ever before."

Supreme Court says constitutional ban on ‘excessive fines’ also applies to states

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

David G. Savage Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — In a unanimous ruling, the Supreme Court said Wednesday that the 8th Amendment’s ban on “excessive fines” applies to states and local agencies, not just the federal government.

The decision will limit the power of police and state law enforcement agents to seize cars, boats and other property.

The ruling is a victory for Tyson Timbs, an Indiana man whose $42,000 Land Rover was seized by police after he was convicted of two drug sales that amounted to about $300.

Indiana authorities and the state supreme court argued that the 8th Amendment’s ban on excessive fines did not apply to states because the Supreme Court had not explicitly ruled on that question.

Prior to the mid-20th century, most parts of the Bill of Rights were seen as limiting only the federal government. But in a series of rulings, the high court extended those rights to apply broadly to all parts of the government, including states and localities. None of those decisions dealt specifically with “excessive fines.”

In Timbs vs. Indiana, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the shield against “excessive fines” is a fundamental right and not limited in its scope.

“The protection against excessive fines guards against abuses of government’s punitive or criminal law-enforcement authority. This safeguard, we hold, is ‘fundamental to our scheme of ordered liberty,’ with ‘dee[p] root[s] in [our] history and tradition,’” she wrote.

The decision is not a final victory for Timbs. His case now goes back to Indiana, where he can argue that the seizure of his Land Rover was “grossly disproportionate” to his crime and is therefore unconstitutional.

His case highlighted what many see as abuse of the seizure power by local and state authorities. Under current laws, officers and agents may seize vehicles by asserting that they were used to carry out crimes.

Defense lawyers have argued such government forfeiture actions should be blocked if they are disproportionate to the alleged offense. In the case of Timbs, the high court noted that the maximum fine allowed for his conviction was $10,000.

———

©2019 the Los Angeles Times


Ariz. police release OIS video, 911 calls in terrorism case

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

MARICOPA COUNTY, Ariz. — Arizona police have released body camera footage of a Maricopa County sergeant shooting a man armed with a knife last month.

According to AZ Central, Sgt. Brandon Wells shot 18-year-old Ismail Hamed on Jan.7. Hamed was later charged with aggravated assault and terrorism.

In the moments leading up to the incident, Hamed called a 911 operator twice asking to speak with an officer and told operators he had a knife and some rocks.

"My name is Ismail Hamed," he said one of the 911 call recordings. "I live in Fountain Hills, and I'm owing my allegiance to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. I just want a cop to come real quick and I want to deal with them."

Wells’ body camera footage shows the officer approaching Hamed and telling him he wants to talk to him about political issues. Hamed can be seen throwing rocks at Wells and pulling out a knife.

Wells then points his gun at Hamed and tells him to back off, but Hamed walks towards Wells while telling him to shoot him.

The officer fires twice at Hamed, wounding him.

According to an indictment after the incident, Hamed “intentionally or knowingly did provide advice, assistance, direction or management'' to terrorist organizations. It isn’t clear how Hamed may be connected to any organizations or if he had plans to carry out a terrorist attack.

Hamed is currently in custody at the Maricopa County jail.


Puerto Rico officer fatally shot during undercover operation

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

SAN GERMAN, Puerto Rico — An officer was fatally shot while conducting an undercover operation on Friday.

According to Primera Hora, Agent Alfred Zanyet-Pérez, 52, was shot in the torso during a drive-by at the front of a local business.

Officials do not believe it was a targeted attack against the officer.

“What has been investigated so far has nothing to do with the investigation carried by the undercover agent,” Lieutenant Colonel Rafael Rosa told the new source.

Zanyet-Pérez was assigned to the Drugs and Narcotics Division of the Puerto Rico Police Department.

A bystander was also wounded in the shooting.

Suspects remain at large.


Fla. trooper dies after heart attack during training exercise

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

FORT MYERS, Fla. — A Florida Highway Patrol trooper died during a training exercise on Tuesday.

Master Sgt. Daniel Hinton, 56, suffered a heart attack during a training exercise, WINK News reports. He was rushed to a local hospital where he died.

Hinton served with Florida Highway Patrol for 32 years.

The entire @FLHSMV family mourns today for the loss of one of our own, FHP Master Sergeant Daniel Hinton. Master Sgt. Hinton was an extraordinary individual and a hero. We ask that you keep his wife and family in your prayers. #FHP #EOW pic.twitter.com/SKix1qYk84

— FLHSMV (@FLHSMV) February 19, 2019

Tribute to a fallen hero, FHP Master Sergeant Daniel Hinton...RIP Brother pic.twitter.com/IOAvoT56lX

— FHP SWFL (@FHPSWFL) February 19, 2019


Do You Have High Shelves or Shorter Personnel?

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Ladder Access System-Extend Down from Zico combines the popular, time-tested LAS design with a new, patented cable and pulley system capable of raising and lowering ladders an AMAZING 36 inches. Mounting to high side shelves leaves more space for...

Minneapolis Firefighters Escape Flashover

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Three firefighters were hurt as they climbed out windows to escape the flames that spread through the burning home Tuesday.

In Quarters: Harrisburg, NC, Fire Station #3

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Harrisburg Fire Station #3 also houses the Cabarrus County EMS Station No. 10, which both serve the rapidly growing suburb of Charlotte, NC.

In Quarters: Engine Co. 16, Washington DC

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2016, Washington D.C. embarked on a major renovation of Engine Company 16, including demolition of the interior spaces to support a new floor plan design and new building systems.

In Quarters: Spring, TX, Fire Station No. 8

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Located in a residential neighborhood, Klein VFD's Station No. 8 in Spring, TX, was designed to fully maximize county tax revenue and meet the community’s long-term needs.

In Quarters: Conroe, TX, Fire Station #7

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Conroe’s new 11,000-square-foot fire station is a beacon of safety for the community and a healthy facility for the firefighters who live and work within.

OH Department Adds New Engine Pumper to Fleet

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The $500,000 vehicle found its new home with the Ashtabula Fire Department, replacing a unit that had been in service since 2005.

N.J. officer leaves $100 tip, heartfelt note for pregnant waitress

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Victoria Priola Staten Island Advance, N.Y.

STATEN ISLAND, NY — Courtney English, 23, got an emotional surprise during her Friday afternoon shift as a waitress at the Lamp Post Diner in New Jersey, according to NJ.com.

A New Jersey police officer — who wishes to remain anonymous — interacted with English only to receive a menu, order a salad and pay for his meal. It wasn’t until he overheard her telling another customer of the upcoming birth of her first child, that he felt inspired to leave a $100 tip on a $8.75 check.

It wasn’t until the officer left the diner that English saw the tip amount and a note that read "Enjoy your first. You will never forget it.”

Moved to tears by the act of kindness, English sent a photo of the receipt to her father Brian Cadigan. He posted the photo on social media with the caption, “I don’t know you, Mr. Police Officer, but you made my little girl cry, and made her year.”

Since Friday, Cadigan’s post has gained social media traction with thousands of shares. Since the post went live, this silent hero was identified by the Lamp Post Diner manager as a “regular” who works with the Voorhees Township Police Department.

“It’s not the amount, it’s the humanity of it,” Cadigan said in an interview with NJ Advance Media. “He saw she was struggling and a young girl. She was working in a diner while pregnant, standing with that kind of weight on her, and it was his way of saying, ‘I understand your struggle’.”

You always hear about how Bad the Police are, How They treated you like dirt, how they are on a Power Trip, Yes I am...

Posted by Brian Cadigan on Saturday, February 16, 2019

———

©2019 Staten Island Advance, N.Y.


Police: Man arrested for biting off ear in fight attacks LEO while detained

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William Dean The Dominion Post, Morgantown, W.Va.

MORGANTOWN, W. Va. — A Westover man kneed a transportation officer in the groin after being arrested for biting part of a man’s ear off, police say.

William Kingsley Clark is charged with malicious wounding by the Morgantown Police Department and battery by the Monongalia County Sheriff’s Department.

MPD was called to a domestic violence incident on Listravia Avenue just after 5 p.m. on Monday, according to a press release. While on the way, officers were told Clark hit a woman in the face and was inside the kitchen, a criminal complaint stated.

Inside the kitchen, officers found Clark “highly intoxicated” with blood on his face, mouth and clothes and the victim, J.C., “bleeding profusely” with a large chunk of his ear missing.

People inside the house were yelling “he bit his ear off,” the press release said.

Clark was taken outside the house while EMS was called for the victim. Clark continued to fight and was “extremely belligerent” while being removed from the house, the release said.

J.C. told police he was trying to get Clark to leave when Clark bit his ear. The two went to the ground while Clark had J.C.’s ear in his mouth and J.C. used a frying pan to hit Clark in order to get him to stop biting, the criminal complaint said.

The investigation showed J.C. was at work and came home after being texted about a fight his daughter and Clark were having, the release said.

Both Clark and J.C. were taken to Ruby Memorial Hospital. Clark was charged with malicious wounding after being evaluated, the release said. The victim’s condition was not given.

While in custody at the sheriff’s department, Clark started smoking a cigarette he had hidden along with a lighter, a criminal complaint said.

A transportation officer noticed and entered Clark’s cell where Clark “delivered several knee strikes to the groin” to the transportation officer and punched him in the face before being restrained, the complaint said. Clark is charged with battery for that attack.

He was arraigned in Monongalia County Magistrate Court where bond was set at $10,000.

———

©2019 The Dominion Post (Morgantown, W.Va.)


3 Ways Speech Recognition Helps Overcome Manual Incident Reporting Challenges

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police technology can transmit information in an instant, yet the challenge of recording and retrieving data and the details of an incident within RMS/CAD systems remains. Here’s how speech recognition technology can help.

Hi-Viz Shield

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In-Vehicle Mounting Solutions from Gamber-Johnson

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Make the most of your mobile office with Gamber-Johnson’s rugged, reliable and responsive tablet and computer docking stations, console boxes and motion attachments for police and public safety vehicles. Orders of 25 or less ship in only 72 hours!

Firefighter Pending Paramedic and Firefighter/Paramedic

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Kansas City, KS, Fire Department is accepting applications for firefighter pending paramedic and a firefighter/paramedic.

VT Department Loans Apparatus to NH Firefighters

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Hartford Fire Department donated the vehicle after Charlestown's apparatus was damaged by debris from a crash between a train and a disabled truck.

Scottsdale, AZ, Airport Gets 4×4 Foam Truck

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Scottsdale, AZ, Fire Department has taken delivery of a foam ARFF unit, built by Pierced for use at the city's airport.

Critics: ME Department’s Leadership Puts Crews at Risk

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Thorndike Fire Department's unprofessional leadership is accused of endangering the lives of firefighters from other communities.

Cold Case Arrest Made In Murder of California Middle School Student

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An arrest was made in connection to a 1973 cold case involving the murder of an 11-year-old girl in Newport Beach

Courts Rules on NYPD Body Camera Footage

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A New York appeals courts rules that NYPD body camera video can be viewed by the public.

Deputies Rescue Puppies From ‘Horrible Conditions’ In Freezing Weather

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Deputies who went to the home to find a person with an active arrest warrant ended up rescuing eight puppies from what they called "horrible conditions."

3 Lifestyle Choices That Make All the Difference

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert Blaufarb shares the three lifestyle choices that have a significant impact on firefighter health.

Adopted Pup Become Florida Police Therapy Dog

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Lynn Haven Police Department's first therapy dog, Mugshot, has been with the department for about a week.

New Jersey Police Officer Leaves Pregnant Waitress $100 Tip

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A waitress at a southern New Jersey diner got a shock Friday when a co-worker called her over during the lunch rush to see a receipt from a police officer who had just left.

Wheelchair-Bound Man Aids Minnesota Police Officer in Struggle

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jacob Siem came across a Mankato police officer in a dangerous struggle with a suspect, grabbed and held the suspect until police back-up arrived.

New Jersey Deputy Mayor Charged With Assaulting Police Officer With Vehicle

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Haddonfield Deputy Mayor Jeff Kasko was arraigned Tuesday on assault charges for allegedly striking a police officer with his car while the officer was investigating a collision involving Kasko and a process server who tried to deliver divorce papers.

U.S. Border Patrol Memorial Vandalized During Protest

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A weekend protest sparked the ire of U.S. Border Patrol supporters after a memorial to fallen agents was defaced at the National Border Patrol Museum in El Paso.

Video: Nevada Trooper Injured After Drunk Driver Hits Cruiser

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Nevada Highway Patrol trooper was injured after he was hit by debris when a driver struck his cruiser as he stood outside of it Saturday morning.

5 fire engine pump operator mistakes

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Here's how to correct the most common pump operator mistakes and bonus tips from seasoned fire service veterans

Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Dies After Suffering Heart Attack During Training

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Florida Highway Patrol Sgt. Daniel Hinton went into cardiac arrest Tuesday during a training exercise and was transported to Gulf Goast Hospital where he was later pronounced dead.

7 children in Syrian refugee family killed in house fire

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police said the fire caused life-threatening injuries to the father of the children and less severe injuries to their mother

EMS Today 2019 Quick Take: Tech and the human touch to recruit and retain EMS providers

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Technology is advancing exponentially and those EMS agencies who cannot adapt their employee engagement will be left behind in hiring and retaining millennials and members of Gen-Z

Tackling the Pa. volunteer firefighter shortage

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A local Pennsylvania news site launched an in-depth look at the cause and the solutions to the the nationwide volunteer shortage

Hospital pays tribute to paramedic who saved 6 lives as an organ donor

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Vanderbilt Health staff members lined the hallways in a silent memorial to honor Kyle Fisher, who donated his heart, liver, kidneys, lungs and tissue after his death

Training Day: Equipment and environment make the difference in pediatrics training

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Turn real-life situations into realistic practice scenarios by placing pediatric manikins where you’re likely to encounter them, not just the classroom table

Inclusive emergency medicine conference launches in north Idaho

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The New Frontier Emergency Medicine event brings together physicians, nurses and EMS providers to learn the latest in emergency care

Inclusive emergency medicine conference launches in north Idaho

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The New Frontier Emergency Medicine event brings together physicians, nurses and EMS providers to learn the latest in emergency care

Study: Restricted fentanyl given to ‘alarming’ number of patients

Posted on February 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Researchers found that the FDA and opioid manufacturers failed to monitor the restricted use of a powerful type of fentanyl even after problems were discovered

Internal Study to Look at CT City’s Fire Apparatus Needs

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Norwich's city manager will work with the chiefs of the six fire departments to perform a needs analysis in order to determine which pieces of apparatus need replacing.

DC EMS crews to start denying hospital transports for some patients

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A new DC Fire and EMS policy allows EMS providers to refer some non-emergent patients to a clinic instead of taking them to a hospital

LODD: Tenn. fire chief dies after medical event at blaze

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fayette County Fire Chief Jason Byrd went into cardiac arrest while responding to a residential fire, according to officials

LODD: Tenn. fire chief dies after medical event at blaze

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fayette County Fire Chief Jason Byrd went into cardiac arrest while responding to a residential fire, according to officials

Veteran SC paramedic dies in off-duty domestic dispute

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rodney Gilmer, 50, was shot in the abdomen at his home and died of the injury less than an hour after being taken to the same hospital where he worked

Federal investigation into Mass. firefighter’s death begins

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health officials confirmed they have launched an investigation into the death of firefighter Christopher Roy

MA Firefighters Save Skier Who Fell Through Ice

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The cross-country skier stayed above water by clinging to bushes as he waited for Sudbury fireifghters to sled to his rescue.

Emergency officials accuse Maine fire dept. of endangering firefighters

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials cited concerns with George Russell, Thorndike’s former fire chief who stepped down to assistant fire chief after stealing more than $5,000

SC county sued by family of woman killed in EMS vehicle crash

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The lawsuit alleges paramedic Danny Tinnel was negligent when the EMS vehicle he was driving while responding to a call crashed into the Dyer family’s truck

Baltimore City’s Aging Fleet, Stations Focus of Hearing

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lawmakers put the spotlight Tuesday on the fire department's outdated apparatuses and facilities after a recent series of high-profile equipment issues.

Mass. unions: Poor conditions plague fire stations throughout the state

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighter unions are sounding the alarm about station houses they say receive little attention, saying poor conditions raise safety fears and hurt morale

Minn. EMS director recalls becoming patient after suffering heart attack

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“I just didn’t think that would happen to me,” Don Hauge, a 38-year EMS veteran, said

Law firm Keavney & Streger launches transgender awareness program

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The online training is designed to educate EMS and healthcare providers on issues facing the transgender community and how to adequately care for individuals

NJ law firm launches EMS transgender awareness program

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The online training is designed to educate EMS and healthcare providers on issues facing the transgender community and how to adequately care for individuals

OpenHouse Products provides NOEMS with customized bike panniers

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Designed to fit over the back wheel of a bicycle, the bag is able to safely store medical equipment, including an oxygen cylinder

Watch CAL FIRE Crews Rescue Men from Submerged SUV

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five field workers tried crossing the San Joaquin River in Mendota when their SUV became stuck in the water.

Despite wheelchair, man steps up to aid assaulted cop

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Mark Fischenich The Free Press, Mankato, Minn.

MANKATO, Minn. — Jacob Siem's plan on Oct. 15 was to roll into the South Street Saloon, meet some friends and have some food and drink.

Instead, Siem came across a Mankato police officer in a dangerous struggle with a suspect, grabbed and held the suspect until police back-up arrived and ended up with one of the city's highest honors — the Award of Valor.

Officer Dan Grassman was on foot patrol in Mankato's downtown entertainment district when he saw a fight and identified Bryan Austin Meuangsaksith, 22, of Mankato man as the aggressor. In attempting to detain Meuangsaksith, Grassman lost his footing and the man landed on top of the officer.

"Grassmann then observed a male party wearing a dark-colored shirt push/tackle Meuangsaksith and knocked him to the ground off to Grassmann's right side," according to the criminal complaint. "... Grassmann further reports he observed the male ... was holding onto Meuangsaksith's head in a headlock hold. Grassmann was then able to radio Blue Earth County dispatch and advise other officers that he was actively fighting and also pulled both of Meuangsaksith's hands behind his back."

Siem doesn't have a wrestling background. Born with spina bifida, he uses a wheelchair. And he doesn't recall making an active choice to get between an apparently aggressive man and a cop who was in a vulnerable position.

"I don't remember deciding to get involved," the Eagle Lake man said.

With 15 years in a human services job, though, Siem said he has some experience with unstable people: "I call it 'Going into work mode.'"

So, he was just trying to create some space between the officer and the suspect when the situation escalated.

It ended with Meuangsaksith on the ground, Siem on top of him and the wheelchair on top of both of them. That was lucky, said Siem, who played wheelchair basketball in high school and he has substantial upper body strength.

"I was able to hold his arms behind his back and hold him until the officer could call for backup," he said.

Public Safety Director Todd Miller, in presenting the Award of Valor before a packed City Council chambers, said "the officer could have been seriously injured and/or the suspect could have escaped and continued to assault other innocent civilians. Jacob's quick actions undoubtedly prevented further injury while he risked exposing himself to danger."

After Meuangsaksith, who is facing a gross misdemeanor charge of fourth degree assault of peace officer, was taken away, Grassman and Siem chatted briefly.

"I made sure he was OK and he made sure I was OK," Siem said.

Four months later, he said he appreciated the city's honor: "Basically, I was touched. ... I made some jokes after (the incident) that I didn't even get my name in the paper."

Siem was honored as part of a ceremony recognizing heroic acts in 2018 by employees of the Department of Public Safety and average citizens alike.

Life Saving Awards went to three civilians and a firefighter who provided first aid to a motorcyclist following a crash on July 5th, and Life Saving Awards also went to three civilians, a firefighter and a police officer who performed CPR and saved the life of a heart attack victim at a local tire store.

Brian Bentdahl of Mankato, Katie Fitzgerald of Kasota and Lacie Hersom of Wells, along with firefighter Jay Kopischke, responded when the motorcyclist and a vehicle collided at the intersection of Riverfront Drive and Madison Avenue on July 5.

Miller said the man had a severe leg injury and was bleeding profusely. The three civilians witnessed the accident and immediately responded, devising a make-shift tourniquet to minimize the bleeding until firefighter Kopischke arrived.

"Without the quick thinking and willingness to render aid by these individuals, the victim could have entered shock, suffered massive blood loss and potential death," the citation stated.

Life Saving Awards also went to civilians Jessica Beyer of Mankato, Justin Willemsen of St. Peter and Ryan Jensen of Mankato; to firefighters Paul Wedel and Mark Bergman; and to police officer James Eggersdorfer for their response to a heart attack at Tire Associates on Sept. 29.

"Beyer found the employee behind a service counter," Miller said. "She yelled for help and began CPR."

With the man barely breathing, Beyer and Willemsen and Jensen, who are Tire Associates employees, performed CPR until police officer Eggersdorfer and firefighters Wedel and Bergman arrived. The first responders used a defibrillator and took over CPR, and assisted a Gold Cross ambulance crew until the man's pulse returned.

"With the fast action of the customer and employees to begin lifesaving measures, as well as continuing efforts by Mankato Public Safety, the patient's life was saved," the citation stated.

For the same incident, Distinguished Service Awards were presented to Tire Associates employee Zach Moehrke and police officer Katelyn Kaiser "for showing empathy, compassion and altruism to the civilians involved." That included caring for Beyer's pre-school daughter while Beyer assisted with CPR, moving her away from the traumatic scene to a quiet place with a television and snacks, Miller said.

On Monday night, the heart attack victim was standing in the back of the council chambers, not far from the motorcyclist.

"I'd like to thank everybody," he said.

Miller offered a similar sentiment.

"It takes an entire community to really make your community a safe and a healthy place," he said.

©2019 The Free Press (Mankato, Minn.)


NY court: Public allowed to see police body camera footage

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Michael R. Sisak, Associated Press

NEW YORK — Police body camera footage is subject to public disclosure under New York law, a state appeals court ruled Tuesday.

The Appellate Division panel rejected a police union's argument that body camera footage constitutes a personnel record and is therefore covered by a state law keeping police personnel records secret.

Body camera video "is more akin to arrest or stop reports, and not records primarily generated for disciplinary and promotional purposes," the court said. "To hold otherwise would defeat the purpose of the body-worn-camera program to promote increased transparency and public accountability."

The New York Police Department and police reform advocates welcomed the decision. The city's largest police union, which sued to block the disclosure of footage, said the court's decision was "wrong" and that it was considering an appeal.

"This ruling is an important step forward for transparency and affirms what the NYPD believes," Police Commissioner James O'Neill said in a statement. "Not only is the public entitled to this information, but this footage overwhelmingly shows just how brave, skilled and dedicated our cops are every single day in service of the people of New York City."

The Associated Press and other media outlets joined the fight to make police body camera footage public, arguing in court filings that the video is vital to police accountability.

The Legal Aid Society, a public defender group, said the ruling underscored the need for state lawmakers to repeal the law known as 50-A, which currently prevents the release of certain information about officers, such as discipline records.

The law "allows vague interpretation that is repeatedly exploited to serve certain agendas at the harm of our clients and other underserved New Yorkers," Legal Aid Society lawyer Tina Luongo said.

The officers' union, the Police Benevolent Association, had argued that making the videos public could lead to an invasion of privacy and threats to the safety of police officers. It also argued that the videos have a personnel function because superiors use them when evaluating officers for promotions.

"We believe that the court's decision is wrong, that it will have a negative impact on public safety and on the safety of our members. We are reviewing the decision and assessing our options for appeal," union president Patrick Lynch said in a statement.

The court said the union raised valid concerns about officer safety and privacy, but that a broader interpretation of the law would mean things like arrest reports, summonses, and accident reports would be blocked from public view.

The NYPD released its first body camera footage of a fatal shooting in September 2017. The appeals court halted the release of footage in July while it considered the matter.


Ky. officer shot in head and arm during robbery pursuit

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

HOPKINSVILLE, Ky. — A Kentucky officer was shot in the head and arm by a robbery suspect during a pursuit Monday.

According to local news station WBKO, police were pursuing two separate vehicles that had been involved in a robbery at a local Walmart. Hopkinsville Police Officer Jeremy Davidson attempted to stop one of the two vehicles when one of the suspects began shooting.

Hopkinsville Police Chief Clayton Sumner said Davidson is in good condition at a hospital in Nashville.

One of the suspects was later captured in Cunningham, Tennessee.

Early Monday morning the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office provided mutual aid assistance to the Hopkinsville Police...

Posted by Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, Tennessee on Monday, February 18, 2019


Md. judge overturns $38M verdict in standoff lawsuit

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Alison Knezevich The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE COUNTY, Md. — A Baltimore County judge has overturned the decision of a jury that awarded more than $38 million to the family of Korryn Gaines, the 23-year-old Randallstown woman who was shot and killed by county police in 2016.

Judge Mickey J. Norman dismissed the family’s claims against the county and the officer who fatally shot Gaines. The case drew attention from across the country, and the jury’s award was one of the largest ever against a Baltimore-area police force.

County officials declined to comment Friday. Norman’s decision came in response to post-trial motions filed by the county’s attorneys.

J. Wyndal Gordon, an attorney for Gaines’ family, said they plan to appeal.

“It’s devastating to a certain extent, but they’re a very faithful family,” he said. “It’s not over.”

Norman presided over the civil trial in Baltimore County Circuit Court last year. His new decision comes almost a year after jurors found that the first shot fired by Cpl. Royce Ruby at Gaines — killing her and injuring her then-5-year-old son, Kodi — was not reasonable and therefore violated their civil rights under state and federal statutes.

In a nearly 80-page ruling, dated Thursday and obtained late Friday by The Sun, Norman found that Ruby was entitled to qualified immunity, which shields law enforcement and government officials from civil liability when carrying out their duties.

Norman, who is a former state trooper, wrote that Ruby’s actions were “objectively reasonable” and did not violate Gaines’ Fourth Amendment right against unlawful seizure, as her family had claimed.

Ruby shot Gaines following an hours-long standoff at her apartment, also hitting Kodi in the face. The judge wrote in his opinion that Gaines, who was armed with a shotgun, “abruptly moved from a place plainly visible in the living room to partial concealment behind a kitchen wall.

“The physical evidence is that she began to raise the shotgun, Corporal Ruby believed she was about to fire the shotgun,” which could have injured members of his team stationed in the hallway, Norman wrote. “Corporal Ruby was not required to be absolutely sure of the nature and extent of the threat Gaines posed.”

Police initially went to Gaines’ home to serve warrants on her and her fiance. Gaines’ warrant was for an alleged failure to appear in court for charges stemming from a traffic stop.

The month after the shooting, State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger ruled that it was legally justified, declining to bring criminal charges against the officers involved. Gaines’ family brought a civil lawsuit against the county and police officers. At trial, Gordon said police knew that Gaines suffered from mental illness.

After the trial, county attorneys argued in court filings that jurors based their decision more on “guesswork, speculation and sympathy” than on the evidence.

Jurors awarded more than $32 million to Kodi in damages, and $4.5 million to his sister, Karsyn. Gaines’ parents and her estate also were awarded smaller damages.

Norman vacated the jury’s finding that Ruby committed battery against Kodi.

“A partial bullet fragment from Corporal Ruby’s first shot, struck, but did not penetrate Kodi’s cheek,” he wrote. “That injury was unintentional and was the unforeseen consequences (sic) of Corporal Ruby’s lawful act.”

Kenneth Ravenell, who represents Kodi, called the judge’s decision “factually wrong and legally flawed in many respects.”

“Justice was not done today,” he said in a statement to The Sun. “We will appeal on behalf of young Kodi Gaines. We will have more to say in the near future.”

T.J. Smith, a spokesman for County Executive Johnny Olszewski Jr., said he had no comment on the case at this time. Police department officials also declined to comment. Ruby remains employed by the agency.

Gordon, the Gaines family attorney, said that in the appeal, he hopes to revive legal issues the jury did not get to consider because Norman dismissed them before trial.

“Were not happy about it, but the bottom line is we get a chance to have a full hearing before an appellate court,” he said.

———

©2019 The Baltimore Sun


Seven Syrian Children Killed in Canadian Home Fire

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The children—the youngest was 3 months old and the oldest was 14 years old—had moved with their family from Syria to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 2017.

Christopher Sobieski

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Christopher Sobieski serves as a battalion chief with Cobb County, GA, Fire & Emergency Services. He is a 32-year veteran of the fire service, serving 29 years in Cobb County. His career started as a volunteer in the Northern Virginia/Washington, DC,...

‘No-Fly’ Ambulance List Saving CA County Millions

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fresno County started its list of ambulance abusers in 2011 as a way to stop residents who were merely tying up paramedics and dispatchers from handling real emergencies.

Spotlight: American Police Hall of Fame & Museum

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Sponsors

Company Name: The National Association of Chiefs of Police Headquarters: Titusville, FL Website: https://www.aphf.org/

1. What was the inspiration behind starting your organization? A desire to provide compassionate support, enhanced training, and better solutions for law enforcement nationwide.

2. What is your signature product and how does it work? NACOP focuses on educating LEOs about advancements in training and police work, providing funds for K9 units to smaller agencies across the country, providing support for officers disabled in the line of duty, and educating/inspiring the public about the essential role of LEOs nationwide through the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum in Titusville, Florida. We also publish Chief of Police magazine and are getting ready to offer college-credit continuing education to LEOs through a partnership with Eastern Florida State College.

3. Why do you believe your products are essential to your vertical (Police, Fire, EMS, Corrections, Government) community? We are one of piece of the puzzle that provides support, education and encouragement to our law enforcement professionals nationwide. While we have traditionally focused on our K9 program, the museum, honoring fallen officers and several other areas, we are redoubling our efforts to get the word out about our scholarships, gift program and other services available to the families of disabled officers and the officers themselves. Likewise, we hope to help address issues regarding the challenges faced by officers who are suddenly disabled and separated from their purpose and like-minded associates -- and we hope to create a resource database so that no disabled officer ever has to wonder where to find support, whether emotional, financial or professional. We have also expanded our educational efforts, offering state-of-the-art tactical training conducted by some of the nation's best-known trainers. Stay tuned for great announcements and activities geared toward making sure our LEOs are as prepared and well-trained as possible for every encounter!

4. What has been the biggest challenge your organization has faced? As a non-profit, the challenges are unique and involve balancing the cost of constant fundraising (something you have to do when you are administering programs at the national level) with the importance of providing enduring and essential program services. In our case, we are also maintaining a large facility and working to get the word out to civilians about personal safety and about the key role that law enforcement plays in any civil society. To that end, we must have compelling local/regional programs as well as a meaningful national message. We have a small staff (25 full and part-time people) who are LE family members or retired LE themselves, working hard to grow the organization and the services it provides. It is challenging but well worth the effort. When we receive thank-you cards and emails from the children and families of disabled officers, it truly inspires us to work even harder to build something of lasting value for our LEOs nationwide.

5. What makes your company unique? Our emphasis on disabled officers and our K9 program receive a lot of attention, as well as the high quality of our tactical training classes and the caliber of special trainers that we bring in (people like Dave "Boon" Benton - one of the Benghazi heroes, Ed Mireles - retired FBI agent involved in the 1986 Miami firefight, Shannon "the canon" Ritch- MMA fighter and trainer in hand-to-hand combat, Gary O'Neil - former special forces and author of “American Warrior,” and many others).

6. What do your customers like best about you and your products? Our LE families and disabled officers love the fact that we are with them for the long haul. When we learn of an officer disabled in the line of duty, we begin sending holiday and birthday gifts to their children. This continues from ages 0-18 -- and, at age 18, the children become eligible for college scholarships. So we have families with whom we have been connected for 20 or more years. Likewise, we offer summer camp scholarships for the children of disabled officers and medical reimbursement for certain health related expenses. The fact that we stay with the families and support them over the long haul seems very significant to officers who sometimes feel like they are forgotten once they are no longer active duty.

7. What is the most rewarding part of serving the first responder/local government community? Most of us who work for this organization have family members who are in law enforcement, so it is the satisfaction of serving those who serve us! It is a way to show our loved ones how much their service and sacrifice means and a way to show support for all those men and women who risk their lives each day to keep us safe.

8. Do you support any charitable organizations within public safety/community? Tell us more. Well, as a 501(c)(3) IRS-approved agency, we do support ourselves! But we also support larger "competitors" like COPS (Concerns of Police Survivors) because they do so much for the families of fallen officers; likewise, we work closely with the 9463 Foundation which also serves law enforcement families. We work with local law enforcement, like the Brevard County Sheriff's Office, Volusia County SO, local police departments and other police supporters to identify officers and families in need and to improve our programming.

9. Is there any fun fact or trivia that you’d like to share with our users about you or your company? Well, as the contact person, I can tell you that I cherish all things law enforcement. My husband retired as a deputy after 27 years of service, my late father-in-law rose to the rank of lieutenant with the sheriff's office and my son graduated with a degree in Criminal Justice (he is now an officer in the U.S. Army but will be serving in law enforcement eventually). And I am just ONE of the LE-related folks here, working to enhance and build the programs and efficiencies at the National Association of Chiefs of Police and the American Police Hall of Fame. In addition to my marketing and program support work, I also train civilians in firearm safety and proficiency on behalf of NACOP and am helping to build our LE training program. There is nowhere else I'd rather be or that would afford me the chance to do such meaningful work! And I know that my commitment is shared by everyone at our organization!

10. What’s next for your company? Any upcoming new projects or initiatives? We have several significant projects on the horizon including the pending ground-breaking for the U.S. Law Enforcement Eternal Flame, which will pay tribute to LE nationwide and will stand 100 feet tall with a 10 foot tall flame. We are just beginning to share this project with potential supporters, media, etc. This new phase of growth will include an expansion of the museum, a digital project called "Voices of the Flame" which will offer a unique digital tribute to individual law enforcement officers past, present and future, a "walk of heroes" with pavers honoring those who serve...and so much more! We are also working to expand our compassionate programs and help disabled officers and their families find the resources and get the assistance they need.


Executive Director of Fire Commission and Fire Rescue Training

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Kentucky Community and Technical College System is seeking an Executive Director of the Kentucky Fire Commission and Fire Rescue Training.

NY senator calls for $20M to aid police drug effort

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

StarGazette.com

ELMIRA, NY — U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer visited Elmira City Hall on Monday afternoon and called for more funding to equip police officers with screening devices to identify potentially dangerous street drugs.

The bill, dubbed the Providing Officers With Electronic Resources — or POWER Act — would create a $20 million grant program through the U.S. Department of Justice that would help state and local law enforcement organizations purchase the devices which would better determine the make-up of the drugs.

"The POWER Act pays for these portable devices to go to our police departments. With these devices, they can tell right away," Senator Schumer said. "The problem is these devices cost $80,000. I am here to tell our men and women from law enforcement that we are for you."

Full story: NY Sen. Schumer visits Elmira, calls for $20M to aid police drug effort


NY senator calls for $20M to aid police drug effort

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

StarGazette.com

ELMIRA, NY — U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer visited Elmira City Hall on Monday afternoon and called for more funding to equip police officers with screening devices to identify potentially dangerous street drugs.

The bill, dubbed the Providing Officers With Electronic Resources — or POWER Act — would create a $20 million grant program through the U.S. Department of Justice that would help state and local law enforcement organizations purchase the devices which would better determine the make-up of the drugs.

"The POWER Act pays for these portable devices to go to our police departments. With these devices, they can tell right away," Senator Schumer said. "The problem is these devices cost $80,000. I am here to tell our men and women from law enforcement that we are for you."

Full story: NY Sen. Schumer visits Elmira, calls for $20M to aid police drug effort


Protesters “Occupy” Border Patrol Museum, Deface Fallen Officer Memorial

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dozens of demonstrators stormed into the National Border Patrol Museum outside of El Paso, Texas, reportedly defacing the memorial in that facility dedicated to fallen Border Patrol Officers.

Fund Might Help Pay for Boston FFs’ Full-Body Scans

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Eligible, long-term firefighters might be receiving some financial assistance from the Boston Fire Department Relief Fund when it comes to certain scans and tests.

Maryland Boy Scout Renovates, Refurbishes Local Fallen Officer Memorial

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Boy Scout in Maryland saw that the fallen officer memorial at Thomas Pangborn Lodge 88 of the Fraternal Order of Police in Hagerstown could stand to have some work done to improve its appearance.

Kentucky Officer Shot, Suspect Arrested, After Vehicle Pursuit

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Hopkinsville (KY) Police Department was shot in a gunfight that erupted after stop sticks brought a vehicle pursuit to an end on Monday.

Brothers Tell Police that Jussie Smollett Paid them to Stage Attack

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two brothers—identified as Olabinjo and Abimbola Osundairo—told police in Chicago that "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett paid them to stage an attack orchestrated to look like a hate crime.

Ala. governor awards grant to police department for drug detection device

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

WVTM13.com

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has awarded a nearly $23,000 grant to the Moody Police Department to upgrade equipment and assist officers on the job.

A news release from the governor's office said the $22,955 grant will go toward the purchase of a hand-held analyzing device which can identify 450 illegal drugs, including heroin and methamphetamine. The device allows officers to obtain results more quickly.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grant from funds made available by the U.S. Justice Department. ADECA has awarded a number of similar grants to law enforcement agencies across Alabama to purchase necessary equipment.

Full story: Gov. Ivey awards grant to Moody Police Department for drug detection device


Ala. governor awards grant to police department for drug detection device

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

WVTM13.com

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has awarded a nearly $23,000 grant to the Moody Police Department to upgrade equipment and assist officers on the job.

A news release from the governor's office said the $22,955 grant will go toward the purchase of a hand-held analyzing device which can identify 450 illegal drugs, including heroin and methamphetamine. The device allows officers to obtain results more quickly.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grant from funds made available by the U.S. Justice Department. ADECA has awarded a number of similar grants to law enforcement agencies across Alabama to purchase necessary equipment.

Full story: Gov. Ivey awards grant to Moody Police Department for drug detection device


5 Bystanders Shot in New Orleans PD Gunfight with Armed Robbery Suspect

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When officers in New Orleans exchanged gunfire with an armed robbery suspect on Sunday night, at least five people waiting at a bus stop were caught in the crossfire.

Video: Cow Leads Nebraska Officers on Slow-Speed Pursuit

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A cow that escaped a Nebraska beef plant led police on a slow speed chase through the town of Grand Island.

PowerDMS’s Inaugural Entrust User Conference Recognizes Innovators of Cloud-Based Crucial Information Software in Business, Healthcare, and Public Safety

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

PowerDMS, a leader in cloud-based crucial information management technology, held its inaugural user conference, Entrust 2019, in Orlando last week.

VirTra Acquires Simulated Firearm Technology Patent Portfolio from Tiberius Technology

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

VirTra Inc. has acquired various intellectual property assets and proprietary designs related to simulated firearm technology from Tiberius Technology, LLC dba Innotech Dynamics (Innotech).

Florida Department Adopts Stray Dog, Makes him Official Therapy Dog

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Lynn Haven (FL) Police Department reportedly found a stray dog wandering the streets and took him to get cleaned up and examined. The department soon discovered that the animal would make a perfect pet for the department, and would also serve a vital role for the community.

NH grants used to improve school security

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

WMUR.com

LACONIA, N.H. — New Hampshire schools are using millions of dollars in grants from the state to improve security.

About 90 percent of all kindergarten through grade 12 public schools received some type of funding, including SAU 30 in Laconia.

"Laconia received approximately half a million dollars for improvements to all of the city schools," Police Chief Matt Canfield said.

Canfield said the money was used to target specific areas that might have been lacking in security.

Full Story: State grants used to improve school security


NH grants used to improve school security

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

WMUR.com

LACONIA, N.H. — New Hampshire schools are using millions of dollars in grants from the state to improve security.

About 90 percent of all kindergarten through grade 12 public schools received some type of funding, including SAU 30 in Laconia.

"Laconia received approximately half a million dollars for improvements to all of the city schools," Police Chief Matt Canfield said.

Canfield said the money was used to target specific areas that might have been lacking in security.

Full Story: State grants used to improve school security


Country Star Miranda Lambert Marries Police Officer from New York

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two-time Grammy Award winning Country Singer Miranda Lambert is no longer single, having announced on social media on Valentine's Day that she has tied the knot with a New York Police Officer.

PRO-VISION® Releases Enhanced Feature for Evidence Management Software

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New In-Field Tagging feature for SecuraMax™ evidence management software allows for instant timeline-based event tagging for videos from multiple devices.

California First Responders Conduct Annual Active Shooter Response Training

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Glenn County Sheriff's Office in California's Central Valley conducted its annual active shooter response training in an area high school over the weekend.

Suspected Drunk Driver Crashes into Texas Patrol Vehicle

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Irving (TX) Police Department was injured when a suspected drunk driver struck her patrol vehicle as she was attending to a hit-and-run collision in the very early hours on Sunday.

SIG SAUER P365 and MCX Rattler Honored with 2018 ON TARGET Magazine Editors’ Choice Awards

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NEWINGTON, N.H., (February 11, 2019) – SIG SAUER, Inc. is pleased to announce the SIG SAUER P365 pistol and the SIG MCX Rattler have each been recognized with a 2018 Editors’ Choice Award from ON TARGET magazine. ON TARGET Magazine’s 2018...

Understanding bias and power in community policing

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Shaun Ward, D. Mgt., PoliceOne Contributor

Effective law enforcement leaders constantly find themselves searching for opportunities to improve police-community relationships. Although leaders develop and implement strategies to achieve this goal, it is a difficult task.

The primary reason strategies fail to improve the police-community relationship is that law enforcement officers may be unaware of a fact the community constituency knows all too well: both leaders and their officers always bring their tacit bias and power to every call for service.

An officer is often the only person on-scene to carry multiple lethal weapons. An officer has a certain bias based on his or her previous experiences. An officer has the legal authority to vastly change the lives of all persons on a service call. Thus, the on-scene position of power is definitely one-sided, of which the public can be angrily aware. However, there are strategies officers can deploy to vastly improve this dynamic and subsequently improve community policing.

Strategy 1: Build an internal community

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) defines community policing by three components: relationships, organizational transformation and problem solving. Each component expresses the importance of building a community both internally and externally.

In order for community members to feel their police department cares about them and their communities, leaders should build and sustain an effective internal community first. This is accomplished through leaders involving their officers in every part of the decision-making process. Even though final decisions are made by the executives of an organization, involving officers enables them to feel connected to the overall mission of the organization and empowers them to be a stakeholder rather than an employee.

Police leader tip: When police officers accept leadership positions, their priority is their subordinates. If police officers are expected to serve their community, leaders should also serve their subordinates by embracing the practice of servant leadership.

Strategy 2: Understand how people connect

The concept of positionality, which is supported by the reticular activating system of the brain, attempts to explain how humans, consciously or unconsciously, connect with people with whom they share commonalities and interests. Our reticular activating system plays the role of gatekeeper of the information that travels into our conscious mind and how we perceive sensory information every day.

Although police officers, like all humans, have biases based on their background, experiences and what interests them, they must not apply those biases during their decision-making process.

Police leader tip: In order for decisions to be made without bias, leaders must constantly remind officers to focus on the facts and circumstances before them and make decisions as a result of that information.

Strategy 3: Recognize power dynamics

Sworn law enforcement officials have a certain degree of power and influence. It is essential for a sworn officer to understand a power dynamic always exists when he or she responds to a call for service. Knowing that, officers should not focus on exercising that authority as a tool, but rather use facts and circumstances to guide their use of power.

Police leader tip: Leaders may want to consider training strategies that encourage influence to be used proactively and not reactively. For example, letting a person know why they are stopped or why you are at their home encourages transparency. Although the officer has the authority to conduct the vehicle stop or be in someone’s home, being transparent invites cooperation and can show the officer is not abusing their power, thus potentially improving both officer and civilian safety.

Effective community engagement strategies for law enforcement leaders:

Why collaborative leadership improves decision-making How community-based enforcement will help close the trust gap 3 critical skills cops need for collaboration with community stakeholders Why we need to humanize law enforcement (and how to do it)

About the Author

Shaun Ward, D. Mgt., is a law enforcement professional with over 15 years of strategic and leadership experience who received his Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership degree. Dr. Ward has contributed extensively as a program manager of community policing initiatives and professional development. He is dedicated to researching occupational health and safety, relational process, and employee well-being to produce evidence-based best practices that are meaningful to scholars, practitioners and communities at large. Connect with him on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/shaunlward.


Judge bars immigration policing criteria for 2 grants

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — A federal judge on Friday permanently blocked the Trump administration from imposing conditions that police departments cooperate with immigration authorities to receive law enforcement grants.

The Department of Justice exceeded its authority and violated the constitution by requiring grant recipients to allow immigration authorities into jails and provide advance notice before releasing detainees suspected of being in the country illegally, Judge Manuel Real said.

Real said he agreed with a related ruling from the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago that said: "The attorney general in this case used the sword of federal funding to conscript state and local authorities to aid in federal civil immigration enforcement. But the power of the purse rests with Congress, which authorized the federal funds at issue and did not impose any immigration enforcement conditions on the receipt of such funds."

As a sanctuary city, Los Angeles does not provide the cooperation required by the grants.

City Attorney Mike Feuer sought the permanent injunction in a lawsuit after LA didn't receive Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants in 2017 for the first time in 20 years. The city had received more than $1 million each year from the grant that goes toward hiring, equipment, training and other needs.

"We've got to stand up for public safety in Los Angeles and against the Trump administration's efforts to arrogate to itself authority it does not have," Feuer said in a statement. "No matter who holds the presidency, the constitution is still the supreme law of land."

A Justice Department spokeswoman didn't immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

The ruling applies nationwide and includes another grant program aimed at fighting juvenile gang crime.

In a similar case, Real ruled in the city's favor in April over a grant program for hiring police officers.

The grant rules were imposed by former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who said cities endangered public safety if they didn't help enforce immigration laws.

Los Angeles is one of many U.S. cities that have implemented sanctuary laws aimed at focusing law enforcement officers on local crime rather than detaining people suspected of being in the country illegally.


How faux collaboration stymies community policing efforts

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.
Author: Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

Current leadership literature emphasizes the importance of teams and collaborative decision-making. In police work, however, collaboration is often interpreted as a lack of confidence or a way to take or shift blame depending on the outcome. In our world – where the time frame for decisions is measured in milliseconds and we have within our reach a belt-load of tools designed to bring a quick end to an adversary’s life, liberty, or pursuit of happiness – the idea that somebody else should get to vote on our course of action is contrary to our instincts.

Be an intentional listener

As a researcher on the subject of community policing, I discovered that while we train officers and leaders about community policing and community policing programs, we seldom teach skills associated with making collaborative decisions.

Shared exploration of police problems – beginning with the question of whether a problem in the community needs a police response as part of the resolution – requires the ability to shift from an autocratic, unilateral decision-making process to a process of intentional listening that disregards one’s own position of strength.

Invite diversity of thought

This is not only true of officers on the street, but for police leaders as well. In an attempt at the collaborative process many leaders fail at an essential component of collaboration that is the meat of a collaboration sandwich.

Think of the ideas for addressing an issue as two slices of bread. One slice is the leader’s ideas, the other slice is comprised of ideas of others who are invited to offer facts or an opinion about the ultimate outcome. The meat of the sandwich is the examination of the problem from various perspectives and the exploration of solutions offered.

To extend the sandwich metaphor, note that the two slices of bread on a sandwich are usually from the same loaf. In other words, when we invite people to join us in making our decisions, we are likely to ask those who will probably have the same world view and basis of opinion as ourselves, because we really aren’t looking for diversity of thought, but for others to agree that out decision was the right one to begin with.

This is not collaboration. It’s not even collaboration lite, it is faux collaboration. Faux collaboration is asking a lot of opinions to give the appearance of collaboration and then doing what you were going to do in the first place. We’ve all been in those meetings!

Move from coercion to collaboration

In policing – whether on the street, at a community meeting, the squad room, or conference room – there is always a tension between our coercive habits and our need to fully engage in collaborative decision-making. I developed the C-10 decision model to facilitate understanding that tension and discovering the optimal strategy for problem-solving.

After a problem has been identified accurately, C-10 begins with a continuum between the first two Cs, coercion (power) and collaboration (engaging in thoughtful discourse to discover solutions).

The Cs in the coercion column include control and compliance in order to achieve conformity. Under the collaboration column are creativity, cooperation and consensus.

The 10th C is completion, which is the end goal identified as the most desirable outcome.

The shared characteristic of each strategy is communication. In coercion, the object of communication is to ensure that the decision-maker’s power and demands are heard and obeyed. In collaboration, the object of communication is to ensure that every voice is heard and understood.

In faux collaboration, coercion is masked by asking for everyone’s input, but only those that align with the decision-maker’s predisposed outcome are heard. The Cs of creativity, cooperation and consensus are missing from the formula. Control, compliance and conformity rule the process while collaboration makes a brief appearance for display only.

There is nothing wrong with decisive, unilateral decisions when the circumstances require and time demands are pressing. In circumstances where others are going to be asked to be invested in a lasting outcome collaborative decisions are often the most sound.

Improving connections with your community:

6 ways beat officers can make a difference through community policing 4 ways officers can improve neighborhood relationships How to build bridges through community policing Why cops need to get out of their cars: Strategies for community engagement

Icarus Aerospace and Boeing create new UAV capabilities for public safety officials

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

By Juan Plaza Commercial UAV News

This year at the 2019 National Sheriffs’ Association Winter Technology Conference in Washington D.C., Icarus Aerospace drew an especially large crowd to their exhibit. While their program management solutions always attract attention at these types of events, it was the fact that the Boeing S-100 Camcopter® was being shown for the first time in a public setting that caught everyone’s attention.

The S-100 is no ordinary or off-the-shelf commercial device. It is truly a unique piece of aerospace technology, as it is uniquely equipped to locate missing persons in inclement weather, to enable resupply efforts during natural disasters & search and rescue operations, to provide long endurance overwatch during critical events, and to perform large area surveys in hard to reach locations. Being able to utilize the S-100 unmanned system when the weather poses a risk to manned aviation members will significantly reduce the danger to people, whether they’re in the air or on the ground.

Icarus Aerospace is a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) based in Pennsylvania. In the summer 0f 2018, the company became the first UAS Company in North America to pass the rigorous International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards & Training (IADLEST) National Certification Program™ standards. As a company led by those who not only wore the uniform as operators but served as Military & Public Safety instructors, Icarus Aerospace Inc. has been able to create an especially relevant UAS Public Safety-centric course focused on operator integration and knowledge. The company’s unique comprehension of public safety operational knowhow with aeronautical engineering understanding is what caught the attention of the Boeing executives who were looking for a partner in the public safety arena.

“The emergence of the S-100 with these capabilities in the Public Safety UAS sector is long overdue and shows a critical evolution many in the industry have been expecting,” President and CEO of Icarus Aerospace, Joshua Brown, told Commercial UAV News.

Brown and Icarus Aerospace are honored to help their brothers and sisters of the Public Safety community. They have made a name for themselves within the Public Safety industry by pushing the limits of unmanned technology and training methodology. Their focus on UAS development has set them apart from others in the industry and earned them the title of Subject Matter Experts by multiple Public Safety organizations around the globe.

As unmanned systems have entered the Public Safety realm, most of the focus to date has been around small, low-cost systems. Major disasters and emergencies in recent years have demonstrated the limitations of these devices, and have shown them to be inadequate. It seems the rise of the large unmanned aircraft systems has arrived.

Icarus Aerospace, one of the most well respected Public Safety UAS firms in North America, coupled with the very capable Boeing S-100 UAS, will undoubtedly open up new doors for the industry that will make our streets and skies safer.

This article was republished with permission from Commercial UAV News.


Kentucky Police Officer Wounded

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Hopkinsville Police Officer Jeremy Davidson was shot while attempting to stop a stolen vehicle early Monday morning.

Florida Police Officer Killed in Wrong-Way Crash on Alligator Alley

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Miccosukee Police Officer Steven Greco died in a head-on crash that happened early Saturday morning, just east of an Interstate 75 toll plaza.

San Diego Crews Rescue 16 on SeaWorld Ride

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

San Diego firefighters lowered passengers who were trapped for several hours in suspended gondolas above the amusement park Monday.

Union Claims FL Firefighter Wrongly Denied Promotion

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Polk County captain was stopped from becoming battalion chief because of his age, union activity and roles in two incidents, according to a complaint against the county.

OH Firefighter Burned Falling Through Floor

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two Warren firefighters were hurt in the house fire, which was so intense that the heat from it damaged a neighboring garage.

Ill. state trooper helps driver with blown tire

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Kaitlin Cordes Effingham Daily News, Ill.

EFFINGHAM, Ill. — The last thing Steve Hibbard expected on his Dec. 30 trip to Indianapolis was a flat tire. What could have been a disastrous situation was avoided with the help of an Illinois State Police District 12 trooper.

Hibbard, who was traveling to Indiana with his father from their Arkansas home, was driving on Interstate 70 when his front passenger side tire blew around 4 a.m. The two were on their way to see Hibbard’s grandmother who was being treated at an Indianapolis hospital.

They decided to pull over on exit ramp 160 after searching on the internet for the nearest Walmart as Hibbard said he did not have a jack or other tools to change the tire. The Effingham store was approximately a mile from Hibbard’s disabled vehicle, so Hibbard said he and his father decided to walk there.

The Hibbards began walking back to the truck after purchasing a jack and four-way tire iron and tried to hitch a ride for the last mile of their trek.

“On our way to Walmart, there was a gas station, and we tried to get a ride since we still had a mile back to our truck after the first trip to Walmart. We asked two different people that turned us down,” Hibbard said.

When the two returned, they realized they didn’t have the right tool to release the spare tire from its cables. Hibbard said he decided to make the second trip alone because his father has heart problems.

That’s when Hibbard said he spotted Illinois State Police District 12 Trooper Andy Rath. In a December Facebook post, Hibbard described his initial encounter with Rath.

“As I got to Walmart, I saw (Illinois) State Trooper Andy Rath sitting in his patrol car. I asked if he wouldn’t mind giving me a ride back to the truck, saving me from a mile of cardio. He agrees without hesitation,” Hibbard wrote in the post. “We get back to the truck, and the blade breaks, so he gives me another ride to Walmart. He stays the whole time and makes sure we got back on the road.”

Rath said he did not think twice about giving Hibbard a ride and monitoring traffic while he and his father changed the tire. Rath said he assisted the Hibbards partly because he hoped someone would do the same for him or his family.

“I try to put myself in the position where if that’s my family stranded on the road or a friend that’s stranded, I’d want the trooper or the officer to treat them with respect and the way I’d want to be treated,” Rath said. “That’s the good part about the job. You don’t realize how much of an impact that you have on people.”

Hibbard snagged a photo with Rath before departing for Indiana, which he included in his “thank you” Facebook post to Rath.

Proud he's one of ours! Thanks for sharing this Steve. While Andy Rath is an exemplary Trooper, many more serve their...

Posted by Illinois State Police District 12 Effingham on Wednesday, February 13, 2019

The 11-year ISP veteran said the kind deed was nothing out of the ordinary for a state trooper.

“This is just what we do. I’ll tell you what though. I will never forget them,” Rath said of Hibbard and his father. “That’s what we’re here for. We want to be there to help people.”

Rath said Hibbard did not call 911 because he didn’t think a blown tire was an emergency. However, Rath said if a driver needs that type of assistance, he or she should call for help.

ISP District 12 Safety Education Officer and Media Liaison Trooper Tammy Welborn said Rath’s act of kindness is just one of many examples of ways troopers assist the public beyond enforcing the law.

“On any given day, our troopers can be found assisting drivers who are having a rough day with a broken-down vehicle. Even on a mild day, you can see a sense of relief come to their face when they see a trooper walk up to the window to provide assistance,” Welborn said. “Whatever the trouble — flat tire, out of fuel, dementia, mechanical issues, medical issues or a crash — troopers are there to help them figure out the next step.”

Rath agreed, saying assisting motorists with something as small as a flat tire is something any one of his co-workers would do. He said it’s just a part of the job.

Hibbard said he will forever be grateful for the assistance Rath provided him and his father in their time of need.

“I’d just like to thank him again because I know that being an officer is mainly a thankless job. There are so many good deeds and actions out there every day that go unnoticed,” Hibbard said.

———

©2019 the Effingham Daily News (Effingham, Ill.)


Gone but Not Forgotten: A Look Back at Now-Defunct Apparatus Makers

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

As the number of apparatus manufacturers continues to contract, almost annually, Firehouse offers a photographic remembrance of long gone fire truck builders.

Ohio deputy who was set on fire out of the hospital

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Eileen McClory Record-Courier, Kent, Ohio

PORTAGE, Ohio — The Portage County sheriff's deputy who was set on fire Thursday while arresting a fugitive is out of the hospital after suffering burns on about 20 percent of his body.

Portage County Sheriff David Doak said Monday evening that Sgt. Jim Acklin was released from Akron Children's Hospital burn unit on Monday afternoon.

When he visited Acklin in the hospital on Sunday, Doak said the deputy was "in good spirits and making some progress."

"I was over yesterday afternoon and he was in real good spirits," Doak said Monday morning. The sheriff posted on his office's Facebook page Sunday, after he visited Acklin in the hospital.

Acklin was able to walk around a little on Sunday and was trying to wean himself off of painkillers he was given. Acklin was hospitalized with burns on about 20 percent of his body, mostly on his hands and arms, Doak said last week.

The sheriff posted on his Facebook page that Acklin "is a very humble guy and doesn't care for the 'limelight'... he expressed to me he and his family want to THANK everyone for the texts, phone calls, social media posts, and especially your prayers and well wishes."

Acklin has served a long and distinguished career with the sheriff's office and was just 70 days from retirement when he was attacked, Doak said.

Doak said a GoFundMe page has been set up through the Big Creek Search Dog Team, a Painesville-based group Acklin participates in. The group uses trained dogs to perform specialized operations throughout the region. The sheriff's office is also accepting donations of gas cards, grocery cards and restaurant gift cards for Acklin's family, as long as they are addressed to Sgt. Jim Acklin, Doak said. The sheriff's office cannot accept cash.

A GoFundMe page has been set up for the deputy. As of Monday morning the fund had surpassed its goal of $5,000.

Acklin was among three deputies and two officers from the Northeast Ohio Medical University police force who were serving felony warrants on a fugitive, Jay E. Brannon, 45, at 6:43 p.m. Thursday after receiving confidential information that he was at a home in the 3900 block on Route 44 in Rootstown.

The officers detained two people outside a garage at the home before entering the garage to confront Brannon. Doak said Brannon ignited a can of flammable liquid and proceeded to make threats that he was going to "kill the cops," in addition to saying he wanted officers to kill him, according to reports.

Brannon threw the ignited can of flammable liquid at the officers, striking Acklin, who fled outside with his clothing on fire.

Brannon has been charged with five counts of attempted murder, each a first-degree felony, and five counts of arson, each a first-degree felony. He has not yet been indicted for the incident and the charges are pending in Ravenna Municipal Court. If he is indicted, the case will proceed in Portage County Common Pleas Court.

He is being held in the Portage County jail on a $1 million bond.

In online court records, charges linked to Brannon vary, but include burglary, domestic violence, drunk driving, possession of drugs and various others that go back decades.

Brannon has also been charged in two separate cases from January, both of which are currently pending.

On Jan. 27, he allegedly offered a man money to make a false report to law enforcement and was charged with two counts of complicity, one a third-degree felony and the other a fifth-degree felony.

He was also indicted for tampering with evidence, a third-degree felony, and forgery, a fifth-degree felony, after allegedly forging documents for a motor vehicle on Jan. 4. The next court date on that charge is Feb. 22 in Judge Becky Doherty's court.

———

©2019 Record-Courier, Kent, Ohio


Twin Tanker-Pumpers Delivered to Truckee Meadows FPD, Reno, NV

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District in Reno, NV has taken delivery of two Midwest Fire side control tanker-pumpers

Chief: Houston PD to end use of no-knock warrants

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

St. John Barned-Smith and Keri Blakinger Houston Chronicle

HOUSTON — The Houston Police Department will end its use of controversial no-knock warrants in most situations, Chief Art Acevedo said during a contentious town hall meeting three weeks after a deadly Pecan Park drug raid that left two people dead and five officers injured.

"The no-knock warrants are going to go away like leaded gasoline in this city," Acevedo told the crowd of activists, reformers and concerned community members gathered at Talento Bilingüe de Houston.

After the event - organized by the Greater Houston Coalition for Justice - Acevedo said any situation where a no-knock raid would be required would have to receive a special exemption from his office.

"I'm 99.9 percent sure we won't be using them," he said. "If for some reason there would be a specific case, that would come from my office."

Given the wounded officers and the two slain civilians, the chief said he didn't "see the value" in the controversial raids.

"So that's probably going to go by the wayside," he said.

The news came during the meeting late Monday after more than an hour of questions from a furious crowd that repeatedly pressed Acevedo on the conduct of his undercover officers, the use of no-knocks and inflammatory comments from Houston police union President Joe Gamaldi who recently seemed to suggest the department was surveilling law enforcement critics.

And, despite pushback earlier in the day from a defense lawyer representing the case agent at the center of the botched bust, Acevedo doubled down on his previous statements about the likelihood of charges against the police involved.

"I'm very confident we're going to have criminal charges on one or more of the officers," he said.

The crowd greeted his declaration with a chorus of angry voices demanding: "All of them."

Still, Acevedo said he wouldn't agree to let the Texas Ranger or the FBI take over the investigation.

"I feel very strongly that a police department that is not capable of investigating itself and finding malfeasance and criminal misconduct," he said, "we should just shut down -- and that's just not the case here."

Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg also tried to assure the crowd that her office would investigate and that bad actors would not be allowed off the hook, but pushed back against "mob justice."

"There is a process - it is the justice system," she said. "What you've seen is more accountability - grand juries are returning more true-bills, and we're prosecuting them."

When asked whether he would fire Gamaldi or others allegedly surveilling or harassing activists, Acevedo said he wouldn't deal with speculation. In response, activist Shere Dore fired back with an allegation that earlier in the day police came out and took pictures of protesters gathered outside Houston police headquarters to demand murder charges against the case agent behind the raid.

Acevedo asked for video to look into the claim.

He went on to say that he would roll out a new policy in the coming weeks to make sure that undercovers wear body cameras; the fact that they didn't in the Harding Street raid was a point of contention afterward, given the lack of evidence to counter the initial narrative.

But Acevedo's sweeping announcements weren't enough to placate some of the town hall attendees.

One member of the audience, Tomaro Bell, expressed indignation over police use of no-knock warrants.

"I do believe this officer is going to be charged with murder," she said, of Goines. "But the systemic problems that exist in the undercover narcotics division will not be resolved with this officer charged with murder."

Relatives of several people killed in no-knock raids said they believe more investigation was needed before using the raid.

Aurora Charles said her brother, 55-year-old Ponciano Montemayor Jr., was killed during a no-knock raid in September 2013.

"I just want to see change, that's it," she said. "They've got to do their homework before they go in with these warrants."

For some in the crowd, the killing of the Tuttles brough back memories of the killing of Joe Campos Torres in 1977.

"We've been down this road before," said Johnny Mata, a longtime civil rights activist. Still, he tried to assure them.

"To those who feel down and depressed, that nothing has changed, ill tell you it has," he said.

But at the same time, he called on Gamaldi to reach out to activists.

"An apology is still needed," he said, suggesting the union could recall his election. "We don't need any demagoguery."

———

©2019 the Houston Chronicle


MA Stations in Poor Condition, Firefighters Union Says

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firehouses across Massachusetts face safety and health concerns, the state's firefighters union says. Now, a new law requires municipalities to address those issues.

IN Firefighters Sue Town in Overtime Dispute

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chesterton firefighters have gone without overtime for nearly 10 years, according to a federal lawsuit filed against the town by the union.

NC Fire Departments Still Struggling to Recruit

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A recent federally funded PSA was designed to help recruit and retain volunteers as North Carolina fire departments struggle to maintain their numbers.

Colorado State Patrol Concerned About Flurry of Traffic Incidents Involving Troopers

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Being a Colorado state trooper is a dangerous job and that has been evidenced this month by four incidents in a four day period in which a trooper or his vehicle have been struck.

Wake Continues for Fallen NYPD Detective

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Hundreds paid their respects at a church in Hampton Bays, Long Island, for NYPD Detective Brian Simonsen, the NYPD officer killed by friendly fire last week.

VirTra Acquires Simulated Firearm Technology Patent Portfolio from Tiberius Technology

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

VirTra says it intends to use these newly acquired patents to enhance its current product lineup of recoil kits as well as create new, state-of-the-art, training equipment for both military and law enforcement simulation training. Additionally, Innotech will provide ongoing consulting support to VirTra as the company integrates the technology into its existing product portfolio.

VirTra Acquires Simulated Firearm Technology Patent Portfolio from Tiberius Technology

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

VirTra says it intends to use these newly acquired patents to enhance its current product lineup of recoil kits as well as create new, state-of-the-art, training equipment for both military and law enforcement simulation training. Additionally, Innotech will provide ongoing consulting support to VirTra as the company integrates the technology into its existing product portfolio.

Florida Inmates Break Into Car to Save Baby Locked Inside

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prison inmates were caught on camera trying to break into a car to save a 1-year-old child who was locked inside.

Dirty Napkins Lead to Arrest in 1993 Cold Case Murder

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Minnesota man was charged with second-degree murder in the 1993 stabbing of a 35-year-old woman, all thanks to his dirty napkins.

Photo: Illinois State Trooper Helps Driver With Blown Tire

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

ISP District 12 Safety Education Officer and Media Liaison Trooper Tammy Welborn said Trooper Andy Rath's act of kindness is just one of many examples of ways troopers assist the public beyond enforcing the law.

Illinois State Police Wrongly Issued Gun License to Mass Shooter

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Illinois State Police acknowledged Monday that the agency wrongly issued a gun license to the shooter in the Aurora warehouse murders.

Houston Police to End Use of No-Knock Warrants

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Houston Police Department will end its use of controversial no-knock warrants in most situations.

Spotlight: Active 911 is changing the way emergency personnel communicate

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Using modern computing technology to make the alerting and response active instead of passive

Manhunt Continues for Suspect in Shooting of Virginia Police Officer

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Tips and leads were being followed up and new photographs were released Monday in the search for a suspect in the Saturday shooting of a Bluefield police officer.

Compensation Fund for 9/11 Victims to Slash Payouts

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 9/11 fund is running out of money, and will slash payments by at least half for growing numbers of people getting sick or dying from the toxins unleashed in the terror attacks of 2001.

Ohio Sheriff’s Deputy Who Was Set On Fire Is ‘In Good Spirits’

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sgt. Jim Acklin, who was set on fire last Thursday while attempting to arrest a fugitive, is "in good spirits and making some progress," according to Portage County Sheriff David Doak.

Ohio Deputy Set On Fire Released From Hospital

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Portage County Sheriff's Sgt. James Acklin was released from Akron Children’s Hospital Burn Center Monday afternoon.

Spotlight: PGI is outfitting the world for safety

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

For over seventy years, PGI has been creating industry-leading flame resistant fabrics and protective gear

Webinar: How to provide EMS care for traumatic brain injuries like a pro

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Learn how prehospital providers can play a key role in determining the outcome of TBI patients

Spotlight: eSchedule gives you the tools to organize your agency

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Powerful shift schedule and timekeeping software

Product of the Day: Breathing Air Systems — Mobile Air Trailer

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Breathing Air Systems Mobile Air Trailer, ''Responder 13D'', is built in a 7x16x7 highway-rated, tandem-axle, heavy-duty trailer with a 6,000 PSI 13 CFM diesel-drive compressor and a four-bottle DOT 6,000 PSI cascade storage system. It also has a...

2 Dallas paramedics hurt in ambulance crash

Posted on February 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An ambulance transporting a patient was involved in a crash with a truck, requiring all individuals to be transported to the hospital for evaluation

What you need to know about the FY 2018 SAFER Grant program

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 2018 Safer Grant application period is open; understand the objectives, guidelines and your eligibility

N.J. EMS organizations outraged over advisory board changes

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Some fire and emergency services associations believe the changes to the first responders' advisory board could politicize the group

N.J. EMS organizations outraged over advisory board changes

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Some fire and emergency services associations believe the changes to the first responders' advisory board could politicize the group

Mass. commission rules firefighter must be reinstated after nearly 10 years

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Gerald Alston sued the the town in 2015 after a Brookline Fire Department lieutenant used a slur in a voicemail left on his phone

Mass. commission: Firefighter to be reinstated after nearly 10 years

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Gerald Alston sued the the town in 2015 after a Brookline Fire Department lieutenant used a slur in a voicemail left on his phone

N.H. first responders to make house calls for drug treatment

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NH Project FIRST enlists “quick response teams” to return after an overdose call and offer to connect individuals with services at their local treatment hub

N.H. first responders to make house calls for drug treatment

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NH Project FIRST enlists “quick response teams” to return after an overdose call and offer to connect individuals with services at their local treatment hub

N.H. first responders to make house calls for drug treatment

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

NH Project FIRST enlists “quick response teams” to return after an overdose call and offer to connect individuals with services at their local treatment hub

9/11 Victim Compensation Fund in danger of running out of money

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With just $2.375 billion left to spend on 20,000 pending cases, compensation packages will have to be cut in half on all claims

9/11 Victim Compensation Fund in danger of running out of money

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With just $2.375 billion left to spend on 20,000 pending cases, compensation packages will have to be cut in half on all claims

Firefighters union files grievance against Florida county for discrimination

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The union claims a captain was denied a promotion because of discrimination by administrators

Firefighters union files grievance against Fla. county for discrimination

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The union claims a captain was denied a promotion because of discrimination by administrators

Indiana firefighters sue city for denial of overtime pay

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters claim in a federal lawsuit they have been denied overtime pay for nearly a decade

Ind. firefighters sue city for denial of OT pay

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters claim in a federal lawsuit they have been denied overtime pay for nearly a decade

Firefighter blames blames failed drug test on coca tea

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Florida firefighter claims coca tea leaves he brought back after hiking Machu Picchu in Peru caused him to fail a drug test

Firefighter blames failed drug test on coca tea

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Florida firefighter claims coca tea leaves he brought back after hiking Machu Picchu in Peru caused him to fail a drug test

FHWorld19: Camp Fire: The Fire That Changed California

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In his Firehouse World 2019 session, CAL FIRE Deputy Director Mike Mohler will detail the timeline of this paradigm-shifting wildfire.

FHWorld19 Keynote — California’s Wildfire Reality: It’s Deadly, It’s Destructive and It’s HERE

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

CAL FIRE Director Chief Thom Porter will deliver the Firehouse World 2019 keynote, titled "California’s Wildfire Reality: It’s Deadly, It’s Destructive and It’s HERE."

Intelligent, Rapid Suspect Identification for Law Enforcement

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Leverage booking databases and digital evidence to quickly link known offenders to criminal activity with the Veritone IDentifyTM solution

STREAMLIGHT® LAUNCHES PROTAC® RAIL MOUNT HL-X LASER

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Multi-Fuel Light Features Double Switch Functionality, Adjustable Red Aiming Laser

Veritone IDentify

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Harness the power of your booking database to identify suspect leads faster with AI.

SIG SAUER Introduces 120gr Supersonic 300BLK SBR Elite Copper Duty Ammunition for Short Barrel Rifles

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

SIG SAUER, Inc. is pleased to introduce its newest 300BLK ammunition – the 120gr supersonic 300BLK SBR Elite Copper Duty load, specifically designed for short barrel rifles.

OfficerStore.com Acquires Interstate Arms

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Witmer Public Safety Group, Inc. is excited to announce their recent acquisition of Interstate Arms, the nation’s oldest wholesaler of firearms, weapon accessories and ammunition, headquartered in Billerica, MA.

Veritone IDentify Application

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Video technology is a vital resource for law enforcement to collect crime evidence and pinpoint suspects for investigation.

Mec-Gar® USA Announces New Sig Sauer 226 X5 9mm Magazines

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mec-Gar® USA is proud to announce the addition of an upgraded 9mm 19 round Sig Sauer P226 X5 magazine to their product line.

Two Pierce Enforcer Pumpers Purchased by the Milwaukee Fire Department

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Milwaukee Fire Department placed the order in partnership with exclusive Pierce dealer for Southern Wisconsin and Iowa, Reliant Fire Apparatus.

Puerto Rico Undercover Agent Shot, Killed in Drive-by

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Agent Alfred Zanyet-Pérez was shot and killed Friday while conducting an undercover operation for the Drugs and Narcotics Division of the Puerto Rico Police Department.

Puerto Rico Undercover Agent Shot, Killed in Drive-by

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Agent Alfred Zanyet-Pérez was shot and killed Friday while conducting an undercover operation for the Drugs and Narcotics Division of the Puerto Rico Police Department.

MA Crews Battle Condo Fire During Snowstorm

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Easton firefighters worked through snowfall to battle a fire that broke out at a condominium complex in the early morning hours Monday.

One Dead in Rash of Overnight Baltimore Fires

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

One man is dead and two people were seriously injured after three fires broke out within blocks of each other in Southwest Baltimore early Monday.

Off-Duty California Sheriff’s Deputy Killed in Traffic Collision

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty deputy with the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department was killed in a traffic collision in the early morning hours on Sunday.

Off-Duty California Sheriff’s Deputy Killed in Traffic Collision

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty deputy with the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department was killed in a traffic collision in the early morning hours on Sunday.

Alabama Officer Wounded in Shooting Recovering from Injuries

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Auburn (AL) Police Department identified the officer—wounded in a gunfight that left two suspects dead on Friday—as 30-year-old Justin Sanders.

Alabama Officer Wounded in Shooting Recovering from Injuries

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Auburn (AL) Police Department identified the officer—wounded in a gunfight that left two suspects dead on Friday—as 30-year-old Justin Sanders.

NYPD Wants Authority to Disable Drones Deemed a Threat

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2018, Congress passed a law allowing federal law enforcement agencies to disable a drone—including shooting it down—but it would take additional federal legislation to give local law-enforcement agencies like the NYPD the same right.

NYPD Wants Authority to Disable Drones Deemed a Threat

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2018, Congress passed a law allowing federal law enforcement agencies to disable a drone—including shooting it down—but it would take additional federal legislation to give local law-enforcement agencies like the NYPD the same right.

New Jersey Officer Leaves $100 Tip for Pregnant Restaurant Server

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer who stopped for lunch at the Lamp Post Diner in Gloucester Township on Friday left behind more than a lasting impression on the food server who tended to his table. He left the woman—seven months pregnant but still working to save money for her new arrival—a $100 gratuity and the gift of a touching note for her.

New Jersey Officer Leaves $100 Tip for Pregnant Restaurant Server

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer who stopped for lunch at the Lamp Post Diner in Gloucester Township on Friday left the pregnant server who tended to his table a $100 gratuity and the gift of a touching note.

Nebraska Lawmaker Proposes Law to Ban School Resource Officers

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nebraska State Senator Ernie Chambers—the longest-serving state senator in the history of the Cornhusker State—has introduced legislation that would ban law enforcement officers from patrolling school halls.

Nebraska Lawmaker Proposes Law to Ban School Resource Officers

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nebraska State Senator Ernie Chambers—the longest-serving state senator in the history of the Cornhusker State—has introduced legislation that would ban law enforcement officers from patrolling school halls.

Stabbed CHP Officer Treated for Serious but Non-Life-Threatening Injuries

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to the Sacramento Bee, the officer was transported to a hospital nearly 45 miles from where the attack took place. There, he was treated for serious but non-life-threatening injuries.

Stabbed CHP Officer Treated for Serious but Non-Life-Threatening Injuries

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The officer was transported to a hospital nearly 45 miles from where the attack took place. There, he was treated for serious but non-life-threatening injuries.

Retired NBA Star Shaquille O’Neal to Help Honor Fallen Georgia Officer

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When officers from throughout the southeast gather in March for a memorial ride to honor Officer Michael Smith of the Henry County Police Department—who was killed in the line of duty in December 2018—they will be joined by one of the biggest names in sports.

Retired NBA Star Shaquille O’Neal to Help Honor Fallen Georgia Officer

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When officers from throughout the southeast gather in March for a memorial ride to honor Officer Michael Smith of the Henry County (GA) Police Department—who was killed in the line of duty in December 2018—they will be joined by one of the biggest names in sports.

NYPD K-9 Honored Before Being Euthanized Due to Deadly Cancer

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The first NYPD K-9 to have previously served in military combat overseas has succumbed to a fight with cancer after a solemn ceremony in which the animal and his NYPD handler walked through a gauntlet of other K-9 units.

NYPD K-9 Honored Before Being Euthanized Due to Deadly Cancer

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The first NYPD K-9 to have previously served in military combat overseas has succumbed to a fight with cancer after a solemn ceremony in which the animal and his NYPD handler walked through a gauntlet of other K-9 units.

3 Dead, Minnesota Deputy Wounded in Multi-Scene Shooting Incident

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The injured deputy was transported to a nearby hospital and then another medical facility in Fargo, North Dakota, where he was treated for a non-life threatening shooting injury and released.

3 Dead, Minnesota Deputy Wounded in Multi-Scene Shooting Incident

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The injured deputy was transported to a nearby hospital and then another medical facility in Fargo, North Dakota, where he was treated for a non-life threatening shooting injury and released.

FL County Facing Major Firefighter Shortage

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Polk County Fire Rescue is facing a major shortage of firefighters with 80 to 100 positions currently vacant while overtime piles up to compensate.

NJ Fire Chief Booked for DWI in Apparatus

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ramapo police arrested Montvale Fire Chief Charles Lydon on Saturday night for allegedly driving drunk in a department vehicle and hitting a tree.

Elistair Tethered Drones Deployed at Super Bowl in Atlanta

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NFL security officials expressed their interest in using this solution as often as possible.

Teen Injured When MO Apparatus Overturns

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A teenage passenger in the fire vehicle was injured when it slid off the roadway, overturned and struck a tree early Sunday near Columbia.

Firehouse Station Design 2019: Your Old Fire Station – Renovate or Knock it Down?

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert Mitchell of Mitchell Associates Architects describes the steps to take when determining if your existing building and site can be modified to meet your needs and whether it is better to renovate it, knock it down and rebuild, or move to a new site.

Monitor Township, MI, FD Gets Custom Rescue Pumper

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Monitor Township, MI, Fire Department recent took delivery of a rescue pumper built by HME Ahrens-Fox. It is built on an HME Ahren-Fox 1871 Spectr MFDxl-12 mid-roof, large windshield cab and chassis. It is powered by a Cummins ISL-9 engine and an...

HI Firefighter Touts AED after Airport Save

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighter Salesi Maumau was instrumental, along with an AED, in saving a man's life when he had a heart attack at the Honolulu airport last month.

Watch CT Firefighters Battle Industrial Blaze

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Raw video shows the mutual aid response to a second-alarm industrial fire in West Haven on Sunday.

Pa. school threat system fields thousands of tips in first month

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A threat reporting system now required for all Pennsylvania schools fielded more than 4,900 tips in its first month, about a third of them considered serious enough to pass along to local police and school officials.

The goal of the Safe 2 Say Something program, which funnels tips to an around-the-clock call center at the attorney general's headquarters in Harrisburg, is to respond to troubling behavior, unsafe school situations and anything else tipsters deems appropriate to report.

The program passed the Legislature with near unanimity last year, mandating it encompass all K-12 students in Pennsylvania, including charter, private and vocational-technical schools.

Sen. Scott Martin, a prime backer of the new law, has been encouraged by the volume of tips so far.

"I think, in itself, that justifies why we need to do this and why it's important," said Martin, R-Lancaster.

The reports come in through phone calls, by email and via an app. Callers are assured of anonymity.

In the first month, nearly 1,400 contacts were deemed "life safety" tips, considered important enough to notify schools and the local 911 center.

Attorney General Josh Shapiro told lawmakers at a hearing last week those tips have included suicide threats and situations where students may have hurt others without intervention. Other common subjects of calls include harassment, bullying and mental health issues, Shapiro's office said.

There have been more than 415 incidents of gunfire on U.S. school grounds since 2013, according to Every Town for Gun Safety, a nonprofit aimed at reducing domestic gun violence. Last year's carnage at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 dead surpassed the 1999 Columbine High School massacre as the deadliest high school shooting in U.S. history.

The program, which is in part a response to the frequency of mass shootings in America, is mandated in four other states and about a dozen others are at least considering starting their own version, according to Tim Makris, managing director of Sandy Hook Promise. The nonprofit has provided technical help, support for training and equipment to help get Pennsylvania's program up and running.

Pennsylvania is the first state to do a comprehensive launch of the program, training schools, students, 911 operators and the team that fields calls at the attorney general's office, Makris said.

The attorney general's office says 3,800 schools are already involved. About 85 percent of all K-12 schools are currently participating, including nearly all of the state's 500 public school districts.

Each district is supposed to set up a group of three to five people who can respond to the tips, the majority coming in through the app and online, Makris said.

The goal is "to teach kids and the adults around them how to identify and intervene around individuals who may be at risk of hurting themselves or others through words, through actions, through weapons," Makris said.

In Philadelphia, the state's largest public school district, the roll-out is just getting underway and training is expected to be complete by mid-March, spokeswoman Megan Lello said.

Lawmakers appropriated about $600,000 to operate the program through June, when the fiscal year ends, and Shapiro wants to double that figure for the full 2019-20 budget year. So far, the call center has hired eight analysts and two supervisors.

The program is exempt from the state's open records laws and guarantees confidentiality. But prosecutors and criminal defendants can request records of tips — with the tipster's name redacted — leaving the decision about providing those records to a judge who first must review the record in private.

Making a false report under the Safe 2 Say Something program is a misdemeanor criminal offense. The false report rate is currently less than 1 percent, roughly the same frequency as the national average for such school threat reporting systems, the attorney general's office said.

Shapiro's office must produce a report every year, by Aug. 1, that includes the total calls for the year and for the lifetime of the program, how the calls were received, calls broken down by school entity and the cost. The attorney general's office also must disclose the number of false reports.


Hunt under way for suspect in shooting of Va. officer

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

BLUEFIELD, Va. — Authorities say a Virginia police officer has been shot and seriously wounded after making a traffic stop.

State police say a Bluefield officer was shot after stopping a 2008 Toyota Yaris for an equipment violation on Route 460 shortly before midnight Saturday.

Authorities say a passenger in the vehicle began shooting at the officer.

The officer and another Bluefield officer, who had responded to assist with the traffic stop, returned fire. The Toyota's driver surrendered but the passenger got into the driver's seat and drove off.

The Toyota was found abandoned a few hours later in Bluefield, West Virginia. The search for the passenger continued Sunday.

The wounded officer was being treated for serious injuries that were not considered life threatening at Roanoke Memorial Hospital.


CO Fire Museum Makes Endangered Places List

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The nearly 125-year-old building that houses Pueblo's fire museum has been named an endangered place, making it eligible for federal restoration grants.

More than 1,500 people attend vigil for Ill. shooting victims

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — More than 1,500 people braved snow and freezing drizzle to attend a prayer vigil for five slain co-workers Sunday, two days after they were fatally shot at a suburban Chicago manufacturing plant by a longtime employee who was fired moments earlier.

The Rev. Dan Haas told those who gathered near five white crosses erected for the shooting victims outside Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora that Friday's "senseless killings" left their families brokenhearted in the city about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago.

"All of these were relatively young people — many of them were very young people. We will never know their gifts and talents. Their lives were snuffed out way too short," he said of the victims, who included a 21-year-old university student on his first day as an intern.

Haas called on God to bring comfort to the families and Aurora. He then read the names and ages of the five shooting victims, prompting waves of sobs and cries from relatives attending the vigil.

The city of Aurora tweeted that about 1,700 people attended the vigil in a snowy lot outside the industrial valve manufacturer where several ministers and a rabbi called for healing.

Authorities said Gary Martin pulled out a gun and began shooting right after hearing that he was being fired from his job of 15 years at the plant for various workplace violations. Martin, 45, was killed in a shootout with officers, ending his deadly rampage. Five police officers and a sixth plant worker were injured in the shooting and are expected to survive.

Aurora Mayor Richard C. Irvin told the vigil crowd that the city's residents feel for the victims' families "with all our hearts."

"When I thought about the words that I might share with our community and the families of the victims today, I thought to myself that just to simply offer condolences is not enough," he said. "It doesn't measure the amount of pain that we feel, for the loss that we've experienced in this community."


MD Man Dies in Flaming Porta John Mystery

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man died after being engulfed in flames and running from a portable toilet that was also on fire in a stadium parking lot in Baltimore on Sunday.

LA Firefighter Honored for 45 Years of Service

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

During his 45 years as a volunteer firefighter, Jim Montez has served as fire chief in Cut Off and as a battalion chief for Lafourche Fire District 3.

Watch NJ Firefighters Respond to Van Fire

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Raw footage shows firefighters responding to a van that caught fire on Broad Street in Newark on Saturday night.

NIST Launched Nationwide Survey on Public Safety Communication Technology

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

National Institute of Standards and Technology is requesting responders to take a 15-minute survey about the communication technology first responders currently use, need, and want in the future.

Colorado Trooper Nearly Killed During Pursuit Riding Bike to Honor Fallen Officers

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Colorado State Patrol Trooper Bellamann Hee, who was struck by a fleeing vehicle during a pursuit in 2014, will ride from Newark, New Jersey to Washington DC to the Fallen Officers memorial in May.

NYPD K-9 Sniffs Out Illegal Guns

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An NYPD K-9 named Timmy helped find three illegal guns in Brooklyn.

11-Year-Old Becomes Sacramento Police Officer for a Day

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A dream come true for an 11-year-old boy in Sacramento who became a police officer for the day. Family and friends were clapped for Miller Greenfield as he tried on his new uniform.

Chicago Police Investigating Whether Actor Paid Brothers to Stage Attack

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chicago police are investigating whether “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett paid two brothers to stage an attack on the actor in the Streeterville neighborhood late last month, according to a law enforcement source.

Wife of Jason Van Dyke Speaks After Husband Beaten in Prison

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The wife of former Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke told reporters how her husband was beaten in his prison cell shortly after being transferred from Illinois custody to a federal prison in Connecticut.

Judge Overturns $38M Verdict in Maryland Police Shooting

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Baltimore County judge has overturned the decision of a jury that awarded more than $38 million to the family of Korryn Gaines, a woman who was shot and killed by Baltimore County police officers in 2016.

Second Suspect Charged in ‘Friendly Fire’ Death of NYPD Detective

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A second suspect in the alleged robbery attempt that left NYPD Detective Brian Simonsen dead and another officer injured was charged with felony murder and a dozen other charges Sunday in Queens Criminal Court.

Survey: Most Baltimore Police Officers ‘Afraid’ to Initiate Arrests

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Most Baltimore Police officers who participated in a recent informal survey feel restricted by the department’s federal consent decree, inadequately trained and unsupported by city leadership.

4 of 5 Illinois Police Officers Wounded in Mass Shooting Released From Hospital

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

All but one of the five Aurora police officers who were injured by gunfire in Friday’s mass shooting at a warehouse have been released from area hospitals.

Law Enforcement Agencies Making Changes to Lure New Recruits

Posted on February 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The loss of tens of thousands of officers over the past decade has compromised effectiveness and imposed greater demands on those still on the job, according to law enforcement officials.

Baltimore firefighter arrested for allegedly stealing from fire stations

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police said Douglas Cloman II, who was on medical leave, let himself into two fire stations with keys and stole from the station and from other firefighters

Baltimore firefighter arrested for allegedly stealing from fire stations

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police said Douglas Cloman II, who was on medical leave, let himself into two fire stations with keys and stole from the station and from other firefighters

Cleveland firefighters give chief vote of no confidence

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters listed a dozen issues that they said prove Chief Angelo Calvillo is jeopardizing public safety, including failing to test or replace equipment

Cleveland firefighters give chief vote of no confidence

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters listed a dozen issues that they said prove Chief Angelo Calvillo is jeopardizing public safety, including failing to test or replace equipment

Iowa fire dept. seeks taxpayer support to keep station open year-round

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Waterloo Fire Rescue is seeking additional taxpayer support to keep its frequently “browned out” Station No. 6 open full time

Iowa fire dept. seeks taxpayer support to keep station open year-round

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Waterloo Fire Rescue is seeking additional taxpayer support to keep its frequently “browned out” Station No. 6 open full time

Nurse, former paramedic seeks to change assault laws

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pam Lewis wants to protect all healthcare workers from attacks by adding wording to current legislation to make such assaults a Class C Felony

Woman recalls saving husband’s life after allergic reaction

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lori Gentry performed CPR on her husband James after he collapsed from a reaction to his new medication

Texas county begins using 911 tech to communicate with responders faster

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Grayson County began using Active 911, a program which simultaneously sends call information to all emergency department communication devices

Iowa fire dept. seeks taxpayer support to keep station open year-round

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Waterloo Fire Rescue is seeking additional taxpayer support to keep its frequently “browned out” Station No. 6 open full time

FL Firefighter Gets Job Back after Cocaine Firing

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An Orlando firefighter has been given his job back after he argued the cocaine in his system was a result of drinking a tea made with coca leaves.

NY Firefighter Sues Arsonists Over Injuries

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Watertown fire captain seriously injured while fighting a Newell Street arson fire last year has filed suit against the two men who started the blaze.

MN Chief Hopeful on Restructuring Leadership

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Duluth City Council narrowly shot down adding a third deputy chief of training to the fire department, but Chief Dennis Edwards hasn't given up hope.

WA County FFs Reeling from Recent Deaths

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After experiencing only 12 fire-related deaths in an 11-year span, Whatcom County firefighters have now had three deaths in less than a week.

CA City to Replace Iconic Fire Station

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Oceanside's iconic Fire Station No. 1, which opened in 1929 and originally housed the police and fire headquarters, will be replaced by a new facility.

CA Crews Help Rescue Trapped Mountain Lion

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In a twist on that old cliche of a cat getting stuck in a tree, San Bernardino County firefighters helped rescue a trapped mountain lion Saturday in Hesperia.

Houston woman finds tiger in house, tells dispatch: ‘I’m not lying’

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

HOUSTON — A woman who called Houston's non-emergency dispatch line after discovering a tiger inside a cage at an abandoned home told the shocked dispatcher: "I'm not lying."

The Houston Chronicle obtained a recording of the call after animal rescue workers found the well-fed animal resting on a bed of hay Monday inside a cage they said could be easily opened.

Police say a group of people looking for a place to smoke marijuana happened across the tiger on Monday. The woman told the dispatcher: "It's pretty big." Authorities say the animal weighed 350 pounds (159 kilograms).

Investigators have leads into who owned the tiger but say it may not be the person who owns the property.

The tiger has been moved to an animal sanctuary in Texas. The tiger was nicknamed "Tyson" after the movie "The Hangover."


Houston woman finds tiger in house, tells dispatch: ‘I’m not lying’

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

HOUSTON — A woman who called Houston's non-emergency dispatch line after discovering a tiger inside a cage at an abandoned home told the shocked dispatcher: "I'm not lying."

The Houston Chronicle obtained a recording of the call after animal rescue workers found the well-fed animal resting on a bed of hay Monday inside a cage they said could be easily opened.

Police say a group of people looking for a place to smoke marijuana happened across the tiger on Monday. The woman told the dispatcher: "It's pretty big." Authorities say the animal weighed 350 pounds (159 kilograms).

Investigators have leads into who owned the tiger but say it may not be the person who owns the property.

The tiger has been moved to an animal sanctuary in Texas. The tiger was nicknamed "Tyson" after the movie "The Hangover."


Police: Pot smokers find caged tiger in abandoned house

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

HOUSTON — A woman who called Houston's non-emergency dispatch line after discovering a tiger inside a cage at an abandoned home told the shocked dispatcher: "I'm not lying."

The Houston Chronicle obtained a recording of the call after animal rescue workers found the well-fed animal resting on a bed of hay Monday inside a cage they said could be easily opened.

Police say a group of people looking for a place to smoke marijuana happened across the tiger on Monday. The woman told the dispatcher: "It's pretty big." Authorities say the animal weighed 350 pounds (159 kilograms).

Investigators have leads into who owned the tiger but say it may not be the person who owns the property.

The tiger has been moved to an animal sanctuary in Texas. The tiger was nicknamed "Tyson" after the movie "The Hangover."


Ill. shooting raises questions over gun permit checks

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — An initial background check five years ago failed to flag an out-of-state felony conviction that would have prevented a man from buying the gun he used to kill five co-workers and wound six other people, including five responding police officers, at a suburban Chicago manufacturing plant, authorities say.

Gary Martin, who was killed in a shootout with officers Friday, ending his deadly rampage at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, was issued a firearm owner's identification card in January 2014 after a background check failed to show a 1995 aggravated assault conviction in Mississippi, Aurora police Chief Kristen Ziman said Saturday.

He bought the Smith and Wesson handgun he used in Friday's attack two months later, on March 11, 2014, she said. Five days after that, he applied for a concealed carry permit, which included a more rigorous background check that used digital fingerprinting and that did flag his Mississippi felony conviction, which led the Illinois State Police to revoke his permit.

"Absolutely, he was not supposed to be in possession of a firearm," Ziman said.

Martin was able to keep his gun despite losing his permit, raising questions about what, if anything, the state did to get him to relinquish it.

Authorities said Saturday that Martin pulled out the gun and began shooting right after hearing he was being fired from his job of 15 years at the industrial valve manufacturer.

Martin killed the other three people in the room with him and two others just outside, Ziman said. Among those killed was a college student starting a human resources internship at the plant that day. Martin also wounded a sixth worker — who is expected to survive — before police began arriving, drawing his attention toward them.

After wounding five officers and with law enforcement from throughout the region pouring in to help, Martin ran off and hid in the back of the building, where officers found him about an hour later and killed him during an exchange of gunfire, police said. All of the wounded officers are expected to live.

"He was probably waiting for us to get to him there," police Lt. Rick Robertson said. "It was just a very short gunfight and it was over, so he was basically in the back waiting for us and fired upon us and our officers fired."

Martin, 45, was no stranger to police in Aurora, where he had been arrested six timesover the years for what Ziman described as "traffic and domestic battery-related issues" and for violating an order of protection.

Scott Hall, president and CEO of Mueller Water Products Inc., which owns Henry Pratt, said at a news conference Saturday that Martin was being fired "for a culmination of various workplace rules violations," though he didn't elaborate.

He said a company background check of Martin when he joined Henry Pratt 15 years ago did not turn up the 1995 felony conviction in Mississippi.

A vigil was planned for Sunday in Aurora, which is about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago and is Illinois' second-largest city, with about 200,000 people.

Police identified the slain workers as human resources manager Clayton Parks of Elgin; plant manager Josh Pinkard of Oswego; mold operator Russell Beyer of Yorkville; stock room attendant and fork lift operator Vicente Juarez of Oswego; and Trevor Wehner, the new intern and a Northern Illinois University student who lived in DeKalb and grew up in Sheridan.

It was Wehner's first day on the job, his uncle Jay Wehner told The Associated Press. Trevor Wehner, 21, was on the dean's list at NIU's business college and was on track to graduate in May with a degree in human resource management.

"He always, always was happy. I have no bad words for him. He was a wonderful person. You can't say anything but nice things about him," Jay Wehner said of his nephew.


Ill. shooting raises questions over gun permit checks

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — An initial background check five years ago failed to flag an out-of-state felony conviction that would have prevented a man from buying the gun he used to kill five co-workers and wound six other people, including five responding police officers, at a suburban Chicago manufacturing plant, authorities say.

Gary Martin, who was killed in a shootout with officers Friday, ending his deadly rampage at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, was issued a firearm owner's identification card in January 2014 after a background check failed to show a 1995 aggravated assault conviction in Mississippi, Aurora police Chief Kristen Ziman said Saturday.

He bought the Smith and Wesson handgun he used in Friday's attack two months later, on March 11, 2014, she said. Five days after that, he applied for a concealed carry permit, which included a more rigorous background check that used digital fingerprinting and that did flag his Mississippi felony conviction, which led the Illinois State Police to revoke his permit.

"Absolutely, he was not supposed to be in possession of a firearm," Ziman said.

Martin was able to keep his gun despite losing his permit, raising questions about what, if anything, the state did to get him to relinquish it.

Authorities said Saturday that Martin pulled out the gun and began shooting right after hearing he was being fired from his job of 15 years at the industrial valve manufacturer.

Martin killed the other three people in the room with him and two others just outside, Ziman said. Among those killed was a college student starting a human resources internship at the plant that day. Martin also wounded a sixth worker — who is expected to survive — before police began arriving, drawing his attention toward them.

After wounding five officers and with law enforcement from throughout the region pouring in to help, Martin ran off and hid in the back of the building, where officers found him about an hour later and killed him during an exchange of gunfire, police said. All of the wounded officers are expected to live.

"He was probably waiting for us to get to him there," police Lt. Rick Robertson said. "It was just a very short gunfight and it was over, so he was basically in the back waiting for us and fired upon us and our officers fired."

Martin, 45, was no stranger to police in Aurora, where he had been arrested six timesover the years for what Ziman described as "traffic and domestic battery-related issues" and for violating an order of protection.

Scott Hall, president and CEO of Mueller Water Products Inc., which owns Henry Pratt, said at a news conference Saturday that Martin was being fired "for a culmination of various workplace rules violations," though he didn't elaborate.

He said a company background check of Martin when he joined Henry Pratt 15 years ago did not turn up the 1995 felony conviction in Mississippi.

A vigil was planned for Sunday in Aurora, which is about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago and is Illinois' second-largest city, with about 200,000 people.

Police identified the slain workers as human resources manager Clayton Parks of Elgin; plant manager Josh Pinkard of Oswego; mold operator Russell Beyer of Yorkville; stock room attendant and fork lift operator Vicente Juarez of Oswego; and Trevor Wehner, the new intern and a Northern Illinois University student who lived in DeKalb and grew up in Sheridan.

It was Wehner's first day on the job, his uncle Jay Wehner told The Associated Press. Trevor Wehner, 21, was on the dean's list at NIU's business college and was on track to graduate in May with a degree in human resource management.

"He always, always was happy. I have no bad words for him. He was a wonderful person. You can't say anything but nice things about him," Jay Wehner said of his nephew.


LA sheriff: Fewer crimes spur transfer to immigration agents

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The new leader of the nation's largest sheriff's department on Friday further limited when inmates in Los Angeles County jails can be transferred to U.S. authorities for deportation.

The department has reduced the number of misdemeanor charges that can trigger an inmate's transfer to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for deportation from 151 to 101, spokeswoman Nicole Nishida said.

One example of a charge removed from the list is vandalism with prior convictions, she said.

Under its so-called sanctuary law, California already limits which crimes can trigger the transfer of someone held in a county jail to federal deportation agents. The Los Angeles County sheriff's department further reduced the list of misdemeanors that qualify.

The department also limited the timeframe for these convictions to three years from five, she said.

Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva, who won an upset election victory last year, previously said he would bar ICE agents from entering department facilities to conduct civil immigration matters.

That directive took effect this month, Nishida said. Previously, federal immigration agents would interview inmates suspected of being in the country illegally while they were still in jail.

Thomas P. Giles, acting field office director for ICE's enforcement and removal operations in Los Angeles, said in a statement that the changes would encourage criminal activity by immigrants without legal status. He said agents would keep making arrests elsewhere in the community of those suspected of being in the country illegally.

Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, said she welcomed a reduction in the number of misdemeanor charges that can lead to deportation.

She said immigrants convicted of crimes already serve their sentences and the question is whether deportation is an appropriate enhancement for the offenses committed.


Ala. officer shot multiple times, suspects die in subsequent fire

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. — An Alabama police officer who was shot multiple times after responding to reports of an armed robbery was recovering Saturday, while two suspects are believed to have died in a fire following a shootout.

The incident began about 5:30 p.m. Friday, the Opelika-Auburn News reported.

Auburn Officer Justin Sanders stopped a vehicle that fit the description of one driven by the suspects. As Sanders approached, police said the man opened fire, striking the 30-year-old officer at least four times. Sanders, five-year veteran of the department, was hospitalized in stable condition, Police Capt. Lorenza Dorsey said.

The suspects fled and an ensuing manhunt tracked them to a nearby apartment complex.

Dorsey said heavily armed officers in tactical gear surrounded the building. Gunfire then erupted, filling the air with noise and smoke. Residents from several blocks away heard the commotion, while nearby Auburn University issued warnings and a lockdown for the veterinary school.

Residents fled the scene as the gunfire continued. "Get back! Bullets are flying everywhere!" one officer warned bystanders.

"It sounded like fireworks going off," one man told the Opelika-Auburn News.

A woman told the newspaper when she heard the gunfire she took cover in her bathtub.

Officers tossed canisters of tear gas into the apartment, which caught fire, Dorsey said. The two suspects refused to exit. Authorities said their bodies were later found in the rubble.

Lee County Coroner Bill Harris identified one of the suspects as Christopher James Wallace, 38. The identity of the other person, a woman, has not been released.

Two people believed to be relatives of Wallace exited the apartment and were taken into custody as officers were trying to get the suspects from the apartment. After the fire was extinguished, authorities found the suspects' bodies in a back room of the apartment.

Harris said the bodies will be taken to the medical examiner's office at the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences in Montgomery for an autopsy to determine the cause of death and positive identification.


Mass. opioid OD deaths drop for second straight year

Posted on February 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Opioid deaths decreased 4 percent, from 2,056 in 2017 to 1,974 deaths last year, according to the latest quarterly report

FL Fire Captain May Have Shot Second Video

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Polk County firefighter who shot a Snapchat video of a fatal fire scene last year is under suspicion of shooting a second video at a separate fire.

NH Safe Stations recognized at first responders breakfast

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Natacha Davis stood before 300 first responders and told them how the caring she found at a fire station helped her to finally overcome her addiction

$30,000 donation helps Calif. firefighters heal after wildfire

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Paradise firefighters accepted a $30,000 check from the American Punjabi Chamber of Commerce, which will go to outfitting a gym with fitness equipment

Ohio fire dept. to use $216K FEMA grant for fire equipment

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Huber Heights Fire Department will purchase 33 new self-contained breathing apparatus with a grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency

Remains of helicopter pilot who died in Ohio chopper crash return home

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The remains of helicopter pilot Jennifer Topper were returned to Santa Rosa, delivered safely by her mother under ceremonial escort

NH Safe Stations recognized at first responders breakfast

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Natacha Davis stood before 300 first responders and told them how the caring she found at a fire station helped her to finally overcome her addiction

Watch NJ Crews Battle Intense Co-Op Blaze

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Raw video shows firefighters battling an intense fire that tore through an apartment building in Fort Lee on Thursday.

MN Crews Douse Blaze after Vehicle Wreck

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At least one person was hospitalized early Saturday morning after a vehicle crashed into a building and caught on fire in Rochester.

MN Crews Douse Blaze after Vehicle Wreck

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At least one person was hospitalized early Saturday morning after a vehicle crashed into a building and caught on fire in Rochester.

CO Firefighters Mark 15 Years Since Special Delivery

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Colorado Springs firefighters at Station 15 have celebrated a special birthday for 15 years since they helped deliver Chloe Huddle on Feb. 15, 2004.

Wife of imprisoned Chicago officer fears he’s in danger

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

CHICAGO — The wife of a Chicago police officer who was convicted of fatally shooting teenager Laquan McDonald demanded on Thursday to know why her husband was transferred from an Illinois state prison where he was kept from harm to a federal prison in Connecticut where he was assaulted and where she fears he is still in danger.

"I don't need people to go into his cell and attack him," said an emotional Tiffany Van Dyke at a news conference. "The next time this could happen, they could kill him. I cannot bury my husband."

The Illinois Department of Corrections confirmed Thursday that Jason Van Dyke was moved to federal custody but would not say why. Asked about the attack on Van Dyke, the federal Bureau of Prisons said in an email that it could confirm "an assault resulting in minor injuries" occurred on Feb. 7. The bureau declined to provide additional information, citing privacy concerns.

Van Dyke, who is white, was convicted in October of second-degree murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery for shooting McDonald 16 times in 2014. He was sentenced last month to six years and nine months in prison.

Van Dyke was attacked by another inmate after his transfer to the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Connecticut, appellate attorney Jennifer Blagg said in an interview Thursday. Blagg said Van Dyke was not severely injured and has since been placed in a segregated unit away from most inmates as a precaution.

Blagg said she learned of the attack when she and another attorney were on the phone with Van Dyke talking a request the state's attorney general filed asking the Illinois Supreme Court to review Van Dyke's sentence.

"We were explaining to him what it meant ... when he said another inmate had jumped him and landed a few punches," Blagg said.

Blagg didn't appear at a news conference Thursday with Tiffany Van Dyke and trial attorneys Dan Herbert and Tammy Wendt, who expressed concern that Jason Van Dyke had been placed in the prison's general population with other inmates. They said former police officers would be particularly vulnerable to attack from other inmates — something Tiffany Van Dyke and others told a judge about during her husband's sentencing hearing. While imprisoned in Illinois, Van Dyke had been kept in a segregated unit.

"It was as if he was led like a lamb to slaughter," said Wendt of the attack that she said occurred within four hours of Van Dyke's arrival to the general population unit.

Van Dyke is the first Chicago police officer in a half-century convicted of murder in an on-duty shooting. He was sentenced in January to six years and nine months in prison — a sentence that angered activists. This week, the state's attorney general and the special prosecutor who handled the case and asked the judge to impose a sentence of 18 to 20 years asked the Illinois Supreme Court to review the sentence.

Absent a new sentence, Van Dyke will likely serve only about three years, with credit for good behavior.

Tiffany Van Dyke said the assault was a realization of her worst fears and noted the widespread media attention his case has received in explaining why her husband might still be in danger even though he's imprisoned several states away.

"My husband's life, my family's life is national news," she said. "At the basic minimum, they were supposed to keep him safe."


GA Landfill Fire Still Smoldering after 5 Months

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Emergency funds have been approved to extinguish a landfill fire that has poured smoke into a South Fulton neighborhood for five months.

Accountant Stole $2M from New Orleans Firefighters

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Baton Rouge accountant stole roughly $2 million given to him for life insurance policies by the New Orleans Firefighters Pension and Relief Fund.

Court Asked to Nix Houston Firefighter Pay Parity

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lawyers for Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner filed a motion Friday seeking to declare a voter-approved firefighter pay parity measure invalid.

2nd arrest in robbery that led to NYPD blue-on-blue death

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Police arrested a man Friday suspected of being the lookout during a robbery that led to the blue-on-blue death of a New York City police detective, an official briefed on the investigation told The Associated Press.

The man was taken into custody in Queens hours after NYPD Commissioner James O'Neill revealed on a radio show that police were looking for a second suspect in Tuesday night's stick-up, the official said.

The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the matter and spoke on condition of anonymity. The suspect's name wasn't immediately available Friday night.

Detective Brian Simonsen was hit once in the chest by crossfire as he and six other officers fired 42 shots at robbery suspect Christopher Ransom, who police say charged at them from inside a T-Mobile store pointing a fake handgun.

Simonsen, 42, will be laid to rest next week.

Ransom, who was wounded eight times, was arraigned Friday by video from his hospital bed on murder, manslaughter and other charges.

A judge ordered him held without bail. His next court date is scheduled for Tuesday. Ransom faces up to 25 years to life in prison if convicted.

The Legal Aid Society, which represents Ransom, cautioned people not to "demonize" him.

"The loss of life and the serious injuries suffered by all are tragic," the an indigent defense organization said in a statement. "But we ask the public to respect Mr. Ransom's right to due process and a presumption of innocence."

Ransom, 27, has a long rap sheet and a habit of bizarre stunts, styling himself on social media as a comedian and prankster in the vein of Sasha Baron Cohen of "Borat" fame.

Ransom has been arrested at least 11 times since 2012, records show, and he was wanted by police in connection with a Jan. 19 robbery at another cellphone store. After one arrest, court papers show, Ransom was taken to a psychiatric ward.

Ransom pleaded guilty to criminal trespass and was sentenced to 20 days in jail in 2016 after allegedly climbing over a gate and walking up to a desk at a Brooklyn police station while wearing a fake SWAT vest and police badge. Police records listed his alias as "Detective."

Four years earlier, he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to jail time for pretending to be an intern to gain access to a judge's chambers.

A funeral for Simonsen, a 19-year veteran of the NYPD, is scheduled for Wednesday in Hampton Bays on Long Island, with viewings on Monday and Tuesday.

Simonsen's supervisor and partner, Sgt. Matthew Gorman, was wounded in the leg . He was discharged from the hospital on Thursday.

Simonsen, Gorman and six uniformed officers swarmed to the T-Mobile store at around 6:10 p.m. Tuesday after a 911 caller standing outside reported seeing a man take two employees to a back room at gunpoint, police said.

According to a criminal complaint, Ransom ordered the employees to remove iPhones and money from the cash registers and back room safes.

Simonsen and Gorman, who were both in plainclothes and not wearing bulletproof vests, were working on another case nearby when the call came and arrived around the same time as patrol officers, police said.

Gorman and two of the uniformed officers went into the store, but retreated when Ransom emerged from a back room and came at them, police said. The gunshots blew out the store's doors, showering the sidewalk with glass.

Simonsen stayed outside as Gorman and the uniformed officers went in, police said. Simonsen fired two shots. Gorman fired 11 times. It's not clear who fired the shots that struck them, police said.


Ill. man being fired from job fatally shoots 5 workers

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — The frantic calls started pouring in at 1:24 p.m. A gunman was shooting people inside a sprawling manufacturing warehouse in Aurora, Illinois.

Within four minutes, the first police officers rushed to the 29,000-square-foot building in the suburban Chicago city and were fired on immediately; one was struck outside and four others shot inside.

By the time the chaos ended Friday afternoon, five male employees of Henry Pratt Co. were found dead and the gunman was killed in a shootout with police after a 90-minute search of the sprawling warehouse. Five male police officers were hospitalized with injuries that were not life-threatening.

"For so many years, we have seen similar situations throughout our nation and the horrible feeling that we get when we see it on the news. To experience it first-hand, is even more painful," said Aurora Mayor Richard C. Irvin.

Aurora Police Chief Kristen Ziman said the gunman, 45-year-old Gary Martin, was being fired from his job Friday after 15 years with the company. It was not immediately known why Martin was being fired.

"We don't know whether he had the gun on him at the time or if he went to retrieve it," Ziman said.

She also said that authorities don't yet know if the employees firing him were among the victims. The names of those killed were not immediately released.

In addition to the five employees killed, a sixth worker was taken to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening. A sixth police officer suffered a knee injury while officers were searching the building.

The shooting shocked the city of 200,000 that is about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago.

Christy Fonseca often worries about some of the gang-related crimes and shootings around her mother's Aurora neighborhood. But she never expected the type of phone call she got from her mom on Friday, warning her to be careful with an active shooter loose in the town.

Police cars with screaming sirens revved past her as she drove to her mother's house, where the Henry Pratt building is visible from the porch stoop. It was only when they flipped on the television news that they realized Martin had killed people just a few hundred feet away.

"In Aurora, period, we'd never thought anything like this would happen," Fonseca, a lifelong resident, said as she looked out at the warehouse where Henry Pratt makes valves for industrial purposes.

At Acorn Woods Condominiums where Martin lived, a mix of brick apartments and condos nestled on a quiet street just a mile and a half from the shooting, neighbors gathered on sidewalks near Martin's unit talking and wondering among themselves if they knew or had come in contact with him.

Mary McKnight stepped out of her car with a cherry cheesecake purchased for her son's birthday, to find a flurry of police cars, officers and media trucks.

"This is a strange thing to come home to, right," she said. She had just learned that the shooter lived close by and his unit in the complex had been taped off by police.

Asked if Martin's rampage had been a "classic" workplace shooting, police chief Ziman said:

"I don't know. We can only surmise with a gentleman that's being terminated that this was something he intended to do."


Suspect in Ill. mass shooting was being fired from job

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — The frantic calls started pouring in at 1:24 p.m. A gunman was shooting people inside a sprawling manufacturing warehouse in Aurora, Illinois.

Within four minutes, the first police officers rushed to the 29,000-square-foot building in the suburban Chicago city and were fired on immediately; one was struck outside and four others shot inside.

By the time the chaos ended Friday afternoon, five male employees of Henry Pratt Co. were found dead and the gunman was killed in a shootout with police after a 90-minute search of the sprawling warehouse. Five male police officers were hospitalized with injuries that were not life-threatening.

"For so many years, we have seen similar situations throughout our nation and the horrible feeling that we get when we see it on the news. To experience it first-hand, is even more painful," said Aurora Mayor Richard C. Irvin.

Aurora Police Chief Kristen Ziman said the gunman, 45-year-old Gary Martin, was being fired from his job Friday after 15 years with the company. It was not immediately known why Martin was being fired.

"We don't know whether he had the gun on him at the time or if he went to retrieve it," Ziman said.

She also said that authorities don't yet know if the employees firing him were among the victims. The names of those killed were not immediately released.

In addition to the five employees killed, a sixth worker was taken to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening. A sixth police officer suffered a knee injury while officers were searching the building.

The shooting shocked the city of 200,000 that is about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago.

Christy Fonseca often worries about some of the gang-related crimes and shootings around her mother's Aurora neighborhood. But she never expected the type of phone call she got from her mom on Friday, warning her to be careful with an active shooter loose in the town.

Police cars with screaming sirens revved past her as she drove to her mother's house, where the Henry Pratt building is visible from the porch stoop. It was only when they flipped on the television news that they realized Martin had killed people just a few hundred feet away.

"In Aurora, period, we'd never thought anything like this would happen," Fonseca, a lifelong resident, said as she looked out at the warehouse where Henry Pratt makes valves for industrial purposes.

At Acorn Woods Condominiums where Martin lived, a mix of brick apartments and condos nestled on a quiet street just a mile and a half from the shooting, neighbors gathered on sidewalks near Martin's unit talking and wondering among themselves if they knew or had come in contact with him.

Mary McKnight stepped out of her car with a cherry cheesecake purchased for her son's birthday, to find a flurry of police cars, officers and media trucks.

"This is a strange thing to come home to, right," she said. She had just learned that the shooter lived close by and his unit in the complex had been taped off by police.

Asked if Martin's rampage had been a "classic" workplace shooting, police chief Ziman said:

"I don't know. We can only surmise with a gentleman that's being terminated that this was something he intended to do."


Tributes, activism, safety drills mark 1 year since Parkland

Posted on February 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Some students around the country marked the anniversary of the school massacre in Parkland, Florida, with moments of silence Thursday or somber vigils while others sought to find threads of positivity in the fabric of tragedy.

Boardman High School in northeast Ohio had a "legacy lockdown" including an active-shooter drill, a chime ringing once for each of the 17 victims from Parkland's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and an opportunity to applaud local emergency responders.

It repeated an event they did weeks after the Florida shooting: Students practiced hiding during the drill, then lined the hallways to clap and cheer as dozens of police and other responders walked through the school.

Seventeen-year-old senior Jack Pendleton, who helped plan that as a non-political response to what happened, said it's a way to help students feel safer and responders feel more appreciated.

"We turn away from the dread and have to look more toward who's helping us," he said.

Near Washington, a group of students advocating for stricter gun control displayed 671 white T-shirts outside Bethesda Chevy Chase High School as a "Memorial to Our Lives," with each bearing the name and age of a teenage victim of gun violence from 2018. That, too, expands on a display they initiated last year after the Parkland shooting.

Emily Schrader, an 18-year-old senior, said the display conveys outrage and loss, but the students who hung up the shirts Thursday morning also felt hopeful about demonstrating solidarity with victims of gun violence.

"Bringing it back to our school may be a way to allude to the student activism for the past year but also to keep the focus of the day on the victims and make sure that the stories and lives of the victims are being told," Schrader said.

Students in suburban Kansas City sent kids in Parkland thousands of notes of encouragement written on labels affixed to chocolate candy bars, which were delivered to the high school earlier this week, The Kansas City Star reported .

Educators were remembering, too. In New York, the Buffalo Teachers Federation encouraged people to wear orange — as hunters do for gun safety — and join with others nationwide dedicating a moment of silence to mark the shooting.

Leaders of the nation's largest teachers' unions, the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association, issued statements remembering the Parkland victims, honoring survivors and urging legislation to reduce gun violence and improve school safety.

In Parkland, the 14 students and three staff members who died were being honored quietly through an interfaith service and service projects by students.

A Facebook page set up for mobilizing Stoneman Douglas alumni urged people to participate in an online vigil by posting pictures of lit candles with the hashtag #17Eagles. Chicago Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo was among the alumni tweeting in remembrance of the victims.

How to sensitively commemorate school tragedies is part of broader guidance the National Association of Secondary School Principals is working to put together this year to help principals in the aftermath of such situations, NASSP spokesman Bob Farrace said. It will be based on conversations with school leaders who have dealt with shootings over the past two decades, he said.


Pa. fire chief resigns after less than a month amid allegations

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Several people alleged former Wyoming Hose Co. No. 1 Chief Thomas Skilonger made inappropriate comments on fire call scenes and online

Wash. voters approve $113M levy for fire dept.

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The levy funds 54 percent of the fire department’s annual operating budget, which includes firefighter salaries and day-to-day expenses

Fla. county officials demand answers in fatal fire

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

County commissioners said they want answers to how a 76-year-old woman died in a house fire as firefighters battled the blaze just outside

Ark. doctor’s license suspended for overprescribing opioids

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dr. Donald Hinderliter allegedly prescribed 832,994 pills to 462 patients over two years, averaging 1,803 pills per patient

Police: Man strikes ambulance after overdosing

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Terry Ramsay allegedly suffered a heroin overdose and struck a New Hanover Regional Medical Center ambulance transporting a patient

Documents: Mo. cop charged with killing colleague says he was in love with her

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

ST. LOUIS — Documents state the St. Louis officer who allegedly shot and killed a fellow officer while playing Russian Roulette was in love with her and was planning to move in with her.

According to court documents newly obtained by KMOV 4, Officer Nathaniel Hendren stated to his supervisor that “he did not try and kill [Officer Katlyn Alix] because he was in love with her and they were in an intimate relationship and were planning on moving into his apartment.”

According to the local news station, the exact relationship between Hendren and Alix was unknown previously, but the two sometimes patrolled around south St. Louis as partners and were said to be friends.

Hendren was charged with involuntary manslaughter for the shooting last month.

Documents also stated that the other officer who was there during the time of the shooting said Hendren and Alix were “consuming alcoholic beverages and playing with their off-duty weapons.” The Circuit Attorney stated previously that there was probable cause that drugs and/or alcohol may have been involved in the incident.

The officer also said that Hendren and Alix started playing Russian Roulette with a revolver, and at a point the officer became uncomfortable with the drinking and gunplay. He left the living room and as he did, he heard a single gunshot, according to the documents.

Three cell phones were found at the scene and police are attempting to determine who they belong to. According to the officer, Alix had sent several text messages to both officers that night asking for their whereabouts and had phone conversations with them leading up to the incident.

Hendren has been released on bond and his next court date is set for March 4.


Gunman kills 5 people, wounds 5 LEOs at Ill. business

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Carrie Antlfinger and Amanda Seitz Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — An employee of a manufacturing company opened fire at its suburban Chicago plant Friday, killing five people and wounding five police officers before he was fatally shot, police said.

Aurora, Illinois, Police Chief Kristen Ziman told a news conference that the gunman was 45-year-old Gary Martin and said he was believed to be an employee at the Henry Pratt Co. — which makes valves for industrial purposes — in the city about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago. She told reporters that officers arrived within four minutes of receiving reports of the shooting and were fired upon as soon as they entered the 29,000-square-foot manufacturing warehouse.

Police said they did not know the gunman's motive.

"May God bless the brave law enforcement officers who continue to run toward danger," Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said at the news conference.

Hospitals reported treating at least seven patients from the shooting, though their conditions weren't released. Two of the officers were airlifted to trauma centers in Chicago, Ziman said. She said a sixth officer suffered a knee injury. Officials did not say the total number of people injured other than the police officers.

Dozens of first responder vehicles converged on the building housing the company in Aurora after police received multiple calls about an active shooter at 1:24 p.m. CST.

Several ATF teams also responded to the shooting and were at the scene, according to the agency's Chicago spokeswoman, and the FBI said it also responded.

John Probst, an employee at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, told ABC7 that he ran out of the back door as the shooting unfolded Friday afternoon. Probst says he recognized the gunman and that he works for the company.

"What I saw was the guy running down the aisle with a pistol with a laser on it," Probst said.

Probst said he wasn't hurt but that another colleague was "bleeding pretty bad."

"It's a shame that mass shootings such as this have become commonplace in our country. It's a shame that a cold and heartless offender would be so selfish as to think he has the right to take an innocent life," Aurora Mayor Richard C. Irvin said.

The White House said President Donald Trump was briefed on the shooting and monitoring the situation as he prepared to depart for a weekend trip to his home in Palm Beach, Florida. Trump tweeted his thanks to law enforcement officers in Aurora and offered his condolences to the victims and their families. "America is with you," he said.

Presence Mercy Medical Center was treating two patients and a third had been transferred by helicopter to another hospital, spokesman Matt Wakely said. Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital and Advocate Lutheran General Hospital each had one patient from the shooting, spokeswoman Kate Eller said. Rush Copley Medical Center received three patients from the shooting and all are being treated for non-life threatening injuries, spokeswoman Courtney Satlak said.


Gunman kills 5 people, wounds 5 LEOs at Ill. business

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers were fired upon Friday afternoon as soon as they entered the building

Gunman kills 5 people, wounds 5 LEOs at Ill. business

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers were fired upon Friday afternoon as soon as they entered the building

Improving trust, efficiency top agenda for police leaders at Entrust conference

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By P1 News Staff

ORLANDO – Law enforcement, public safety and healthcare leaders attended the inaugural Entrust 2019 conference in Orlando. More than 300 attendees, users of the PowerDMS platform, came together to explore best practices such as engaging a millennial workforce, training tactics to increase employee safety, and maintaining a culture of compliance.

Retired Navy SEAL Rich Diviney delivered the keynote address " Start with Why." Diviney, drawing on more than 20 years of experience as a Navy SEAL officer, gave participants the foundational understanding and tools to unlock their greatest potential. Diviney has worked with motivational speaker Simon Sinek to help leaders and organizations create environments where people feel valued and free to explore their potential. Diviney spoke about the qualities of high-performing teams and how to build them, as well as the important relationship between trust and performance.

Other sessions covered a wide-range of experts and topics. Paul Tennies, Northville Township Police Department, spoke on engaging the millennial workforce. He shared how the police department has used technology, specifically the PowerDMS mobile app, to increase buy-in, trust, and transparency with their growing millennial workforce.

Richard Beary, University of Central Florida chief emeritus and past-president of the International Chiefs of Police, shared the use of technology-based policies for modern policy practice and procedure training. His talk, "Everyday is a Training Day," stressed the importance of daily training to avoid serious line of duty injury and to decrease liability as police interact with suspects.

Bob Bradley, senior vice president of the PoliceOne Academy, described how to use activity-based tracking to close the loop on traditional training methods, driving greater consistency and transparency within your department.

The conference concluded with the first-ever Entrust Awards, which celebrated three police departments for modernizing subpoena management, finding high-risk children with autism faster and saving their departments money.


Four Illinois Officers Injured, Suspected Gunman Dead at Manufacturing Firm

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Aurora city spokesman said that four police officers were injured while responding to the active shooter situation at the Henry Pratt Company and that their conditions had stabilized.

Workplace Shooting Outside Chicago, 4 Officers Injured

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Multiple law enforcement agencies—local and federal—reportedly responded to the incident, and local news radio station WBBM is reporting that four officers were "injured" or possibly wounded in the incident. The injured officers are reportedly stable.

Workplace Shooting Outside Chicago, 5 Officers Wounded, 5 Civilians Dead

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Multiple law enforcement agencies—local and federal—reportedly responded to the incident, and Aurora Police now say five officers were shot and wounded in the incident that left five workers at the business and the gunman dead. The injured officers are reportedly stable.

Workplace Shooting Outside Chicago, 5 Officers Wounded, 5 Civilians Dead

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Multiple law enforcement agencies—local and federal—reportedly responded to the incident, and Aurora Police now say five officers were shot and wounded in the incident that left five workers at the business and the gunman dead. The injured officers are reportedly stable.

The AS-1 Arbitrator In-Vehicle Video Camera

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Tthe AS-1 Camera, small enough to fit behind a vehicle’s rearview mirror and including features that provide remarkably high-performance video evidence capture.Key features of the Panasonic AS-1 camera include:Compact (4.5” W x 1.77”H x 1.45” D)...

Four Police Officers, Others Hurt in IL Shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At least four police officers and several others were wounded in a shooting at a manufacturing business Friday in Aurora before the suspected shooter was apprehended.

One Dead, Four Police Hurt in IL Shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

One person was killed and at least four police officers were among the wounded from a shooting at a manufacturing plant Friday in Aurora before the shooter was "neutralized."

How police agencies can share criminal intelligence data

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dale Stockton
Author: Dale Stockton

Criminals seldom limit their activity to a specific jurisdiction so it is important that crime analysis efforts look well beyond the siloed information produced by a single organization. Increasingly, agencies are utilizing shared databases that allow analysts to consider incidents that are taking place in adjoining cities, information that might prove crucial to resolving a crime series but that would go unnoticed if the data were not readily available. Improvements in analysis software and increased computing power, combined with the recognition that a more inclusive use of data can yield better results, are motivating many law enforcement leaders to invest in tools that are effective force multipliers when it comes to patrol and investigative operations.

Today’s crime analysts have an array of tools available that aid in the early determination of emerging crime patterns and in the identification of a single individual as a likely suspect. The potential effectiveness of these tools is largely dependent on the depth and breadth of the data sources available for analysis. A 2017 DOJ-commissioned report, A Blueprint for Interagency and Cross-Jurisdictional Data Sharing (available in full below), offers practical lessons for launching data sharing, integration and analysis efforts that can better inform crime prevention and reduction strategies. The report, published by the nonprofit Urban Institute, addresses the major challenges that are likely to be encountered and offers strategies to overcome those challenges. The blueprint also serves as a guide to facilitating cross-sector analysis and identifies trends in technology and practice relevant to data sharing. Following is a summary of the key findings and recommendations outlined in the 85-page report.

Challenges of data sharing in law enforcement

Resources are often a primary concern and will determine the scope and sustainability of data-sharing efforts. It takes staff time to generate and review data, as well as significant technical capability in terms of data infrastructure. Organizations may face substantial challenges regarding the use of their data systems for analytic purposes, particularly during the initial implementation period. Ensuring compatibility of datasets is a key concern, as is data security.

Organizational culture may be such that there is actual opposition to the concept of sharing data. Data-sharing agreements will have little chance of success if staffing and management within an agency do not support data sharing or if staff turnover weakens the communication between partners. Lack of shared goals or recognized mutual benefits can result in friction and weaken data integration efforts. Staff members tasked with execution and implementation of this type of effort need the technical expertise to manage project demands. Effective lines of communication must be in place to introduce new leadership and management to data-sharing protocols.

A stable and centralized leadership is key to promoting system utility, but it may be difficult to identify long-term leadership that can be accepted by all project partners. There must be coordination among partners to maintain the momentum as efforts progress and evolve. Some data-sharing participants may fear public scrutiny or have concerns that release of information might have negative economic impact, resulting in varying levels of support for greater transparency.

In addressing the above challenges, each potential data-sharing partner must weigh the costs and utility of integrating their data, noting that the degree of effort may range from one-time participation to establishment of an ongoing system. Agencies should try to implement structures that adequately support ongoing data sharing so that they can monitor trends and respond to challenges as they arise.

Key steps to achieving data sharing in law enforcement

Develop a framework for data integration. Start with the determination of the types of questions that need to be answered, allowing for consideration of the benefits that can result from examining the relationship between crime and other variables.

Organize the research team to ensure that projects have a clear, yet flexible, leadership that ensures progress while allowing for engagement of new opportunities as they emerge. A good approach is to utilize a central project manager who oversees the work of several subject matter experts, thus balancing competing priorities.

Identify data sources while giving due consideration to data availability and quality, willingness to share data, the utility of data content and the effort needed for analysis based on formatting or organization. There should be regular engagement among data-sharing partners. Participants should be careful to avoid redundant requests and remain conscious of the frequency of new data requests. A mutually-agreed-upon timeline for collaboration and accountability will help ensure that data-sharing efforts move forward.

Build and manage relationships. The solicitation of data-sharing partners can be challenging, especially when there are public relations or operational risks for an agency. To address these concerns, participants must be able to demonstrate the value of integrated data sharing to other partners and ensure that operational and technical frameworks are in place to maintain data security.

Data management structures must be created that facilitate the efficient analysis of data. It is important that data from contributing partners be cleaned, coded and reconciled. The reconciliation of data should be prioritized, and a common framework established to deal with situations where jurisdictions use different terminology to describe a similar occurrence or observation. A data dictionary can be invaluable in this process.

To ensure effective analysis, integration of data should include structuring that facilitates efficient management. Although data can be integrated at the level of either an individual or a place, integration at a place level is often easier. Data integration will be most sustainable and useful if it is built into the daily functions of the agencies collecting the data.

The increased use of GPS-enabled devices could benefit data collection efforts, providing an opportunity to analyze granular, real-time data. Consideration should be given to how such geographic information can factor into the analysis of crime patterns.

Conclusion

There is great potential for data integration having a positive impact on public safety given the ongoing development of technological tools and the increasing willingness to embed data more thoroughly in the daily work of public agencies. However, concerns over privacy and the protection of civil rights will be a significant issue and there are justified concerns about data security. Agencies entering into data-sharing partnerships must establish sufficient safeguards and protocols to protect against data breaches.

The future of integrated data will involve partnerships between practitioners, academics and researches wherein each stakeholder communicates needs and developments with stakeholders from other fields. The result of this type of strategic partnership approach will enable jurisdictions to effectively examine the relationships of neighborhood dynamics and crime, allowing police to respond more holistically to incidents by drawing on information beyond traditional criminal justice sources.

Blueprint for Interagency C... by on Scribd


Ill. police respond to active shooter at manufacturing plant

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By News Staff

AURORA, Ill. — Illinois police responded to an active shooter incident at a manufacturing plant Friday afternoon.

The suspect was apprehended by Aurora police and is in custody.

An employee at the company where the shooting was reported that the gunman is a co-worker and had "a pistol with a laser."

Aurora is 40 miles west of Chicago.

Live TV reports show dozens of first responder vehicles outside the building.

DEVELOPING: Police responding to "reported active shooter situation" at a manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois, ATF says.

DEVELOPING: Police responding to "reported active shooter situation" at a manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois, ATF says. https://nbcnews.to/2GrxlS5

Posted by MSNBC on Friday, February 15, 2019

Citing Aurora Ward 4 Alderman Bill Donnell, CNN is reporting that four law enforcement officers and multiple civilians were injured. Donnel said the information was provided to him by the deputy mayor.

This is a breaking story. More information will be updated when available.


Officials: 1 person dead, 4 police officers wounded in Ill. shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — At least one person was killed and four police officers wounded when a shooter opened fire at an industrial park in Aurora, Illinois, officials said Friday.

Kane County Coroner Chris Nelson confirmed one person was killed. City spokesman Clayton Muhammad said four officers were wounded and in stable condition, but did not say if they were shot.

Details of the person killed were not released.

The gunman was apprehended, officials said, and the Kane County coroner was at the scene.

Live TV reports showed dozens of first responder vehicles outside a building housing the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, a city of about 200,000 people about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago.

Several ATF teams responded to the shooting and were at the scene, according to the agency's Chicago spokeswoman, and the FBI said it also was responding.

John Probst, an employee at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, told ABC7 that he ran out of the back door as the shooting unfolded Friday afternoon. Probst says he recognized the gunman and that he works for the company.

He said the gunman had "a pistol with a laser." Probst said he wasn't hurt but that another colleague was "bleeding pretty bad."

The company makes valves for industrial purposes.

Police said the situation had been contained and that there was "no ongoing threat to the public," according to a statement issued by the Kane County Sheriff's Department on behalf of the Aurora Police Department.

The statement said the Aurora Police Department was expected to hold a news conference at 5 p.m. CST.

The White House said President Donald Trump was briefed on a shooting in Illinois and monitoring the situation as he prepared to depart for a weekend trip to his home in Palm Beach, Florida.

West Aurora School District 129 said on its website that it was keeping all students in their classrooms as police investigate, but that "teaching will continue with reduced movement."

Spokespeople for Mercy Medical Center and Rush Copley Medical Center in Aurora did not immediately return messages about whether either hospital was treating victims from the shooting. No victims had been sent to Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital in nearby Downers as of Friday evening, spokeswoman Kate Eller told The Associated Press.

ALERT: There is an active shooter near Highland and Archer. Aurora Police are on the scene. More information will be available soon.

— City of Aurora, IL (@CityofAuroraIL) February 15, 2019

DEVELOPING: Police responding to "reported active shooter situation" at a manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois, ATF says.

DEVELOPING: Police responding to "reported active shooter situation" at a manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois, ATF says. https://nbcnews.to/2GrxlS5

Posted by MSNBC on Friday, February 15, 2019

This is a breaking story. More information will be updated when available.


5 people killed, 5 LEOs wounded in Ill. shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

AURORA, Ill. — The chief of police says five people were killed and five officers were wounded in a shooting at a business in suburban Chicago

Aurora Police Chief Kristen Ziman told reporters that the officers were fired upon Friday afternoon as soon as they entered the Henry Pratt Co. building in Aurora.

Ziman says the gunman was also killed.

Live TV reports showed dozens of first responder vehicles outside a building housing the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, a city of about 200,000 people about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Chicago.

Several ATF teams responded to the shooting and were at the scene, according to the agency's Chicago spokeswoman, and the FBI said it also was responding.

John Probst, an employee at the Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora, told ABC7 that he ran out of the back door as the shooting unfolded Friday afternoon. Probst says he recognized the gunman and that he works for the company.

He said the gunman had "a pistol with a laser." Probst said he wasn't hurt but that another colleague was "bleeding pretty bad."

The company makes valves for industrial purposes.

Police said the situation had been contained and that there was "no ongoing threat to the public," according to a statement issued by the Kane County Sheriff's Department on behalf of the Aurora Police Department.

The White House said President Donald Trump was briefed on a shooting in Illinois and monitoring the situation as he prepared to depart for a weekend trip to his home in Palm Beach, Florida.

West Aurora School District 129 said on its website that it was keeping all students in their classrooms as police investigate, but that "teaching will continue with reduced movement."

Spokespeople for Mercy Medical Center and Rush Copley Medical Center in Aurora did not immediately return messages about whether either hospital was treating victims from the shooting. No victims had been sent to Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital in nearby Downers as of Friday evening, spokeswoman Kate Eller told The Associated Press.

ALERT: There is an active shooter near Highland and Archer. Aurora Police are on the scene. More information will be available soon.

— City of Aurora, IL (@CityofAuroraIL) February 15, 2019

DEVELOPING: Police responding to "reported active shooter situation" at a manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois, ATF says.

DEVELOPING: Police responding to "reported active shooter situation" at a manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois, ATF says. https://nbcnews.to/2GrxlS5

Posted by MSNBC on Friday, February 15, 2019

This is a breaking story. More information will be updated when available.


Photo of the Week: California dreaming

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This week's photo comes from Thomas Schubin of the Law Enforcement Division of the Sacramento County Regional Parks in California. Pictured is a park patrol cruiser at a nice, California sunset. Thank you for your service!

Calling all police photographers! PoliceOne needs pictures of you in action or training. Submit a photo — it could be selected as our Photo of the Week! Be sure to include your name, department information and address (including city, state and ZIP code) where we can reach you — Photo of the Week winners have a chance to win a PoliceOne.com T-shirt!


United States Army Selects Med-Eng to provide its 2nd Generation Advanced Bomb Suit to Protect Explosive Ordnance Disposal Teams

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Major contract award demonstrates continued confidence in Med-Eng to successfully deliver Army programs. Supports highly-skilled manufacturing jobs in northern New York for up to four years

Police leaders recognized for innovative use of cloud-based crucial information software

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By P1 Staff ORLANDO – Several law enforcement leaders from around the country were recognized for their innovative use of a cloud-based records management system to solve pressing community problems at the inaugural Entrust conference.

In addition to honoring award winners, conference attendees – users of the PowerDMS information management technology platform –participated in educational sessions on topics such as engaging a millennial workforce, using tactics to increase employee safety, and maintaining a department culture of compliance.

The six award winners were: • Community Hero Award: Paul Tennies, Northville Township (Ill.) Police Department • Innovation Award: Alicia Schotter, Winder (Ga.) Police Department • ROI Award: Gabrielle Fiore, Orlando (Fla.) Police Department • Environmental Protector: Jennifer Cruz, Community Care Plan • Power User: Beth Elliott-Thul and Lisa Montpetit, Boynton Health Service • Champion of the Year: Megan Styron, Greenville (N.C.) Police Department

"With Entrust, we set out to bring together our exceptional customers from across the country to collaborate, share and learn best practices from each other, from industry leaders, and from PowerDMS experts," said David DiGiacomo, CEO of PowerDMS. "We are proud of the award winners who demonstrate the transformative work our customers are doing to benefit their organizations and the communities."

Public safety Entrust Award winners

Among the six winners, three recipients were recognized for their innovative use of PowerDMS in law enforcement.

Digitizing subpoenas for improved access

Winder Police Department, represented by Alicia Schotter, was recognized with the Entrust Innovation Award for moving the department's handwritten, paper log subpoena process to PowerDMS.

Once a subpoena is scanned into PowerDMS the document can be emailed to officers and tracked for the presence of an officer signature. If an officer misses her court date she can look at the documentation to see when she signed for it. Officers also receive an alert the day after the subpoena is entered in PowerDMS and have access to that subpoena up to one day after the court appearance date.

Helping officers find high-risk children with autism

The Entrust Community Hero Award was presented to the Northville Township Police Department, represented by Paul Tennies, for the department’s resourceful use of the PowerDMS mobile app to record and track all high-risk children with autism in the community.

The project was initiated by Sgt. David Roberts who has a child with autism, who is non-verbal. Roberts has experienced the panic of his son running away from home. Thankfully, first responders searched the area and eventually found the boy by a body of water.

As a result of his personal experience, Roberts initiated a public education program to obtain profiles of children with autism in their community. These profiles were physical paper files which remained in the police department and weren't accessible to the units responding to a missing child incident.

Roberts realized time is critical in these incidents and suggested loading the profiles into PowerDMS to make them accessible to all officers with the PowerDMS mobile app. Now, all responding officers have a photo of the child and the demographic information they would typically request when they arrive on scene. The child's information led to creation of an enhanced profile which includes a search grid map of the child's residence, including identifying nearby bodies of water for officers to check first.

Further, this initiative was tied to Autism awareness month in the state of Michigan. The department has had success in using the profiles and in 2019 is expanding the concept to include vulnerable adult profiles. There are seven assisted living facilities in the community and most specialize in dementia care. This program provides support to individuals in those communities who may also wander.

Redesigning department's Transfer History Records

Orlando Police Department received the ROI Impact Entrust award. Gabrielle Fiore accepted the award after spearheading a redesign of the agency's process for Transfer History Records and how those records are managed, revised and accessed by employees.

Managing Transfer History Records with PowerDMS has saved the department multiple hours and dollars every week. Personnel no longer must make multiple requests to access and print employee transfer records. Rather, employees can access this information from any device, at any time.

Policy delivery, tracking and training

PowerDMS, used by agencies across the U.S., is web-based software that electronically delivers and tracks the policies police officers need to do their jobs.

"As a longtime user and champion of PowerDMS, I was blown away by the creative ways agencies and organizations are leveraging PowerDMS to improve how they do their important work," said Eric Daigle, principal, Daigle Law Group and legal advisor to law enforcement agencies throughout the country. "The critical information shared during Entrust will undoubtedly maximize the impact of PowerDMS, allowing its customers to continue to strive for and achieve operational excellence within their organizations."

With PowerDMS supervisors can make sure officers receive and understand critical content, can hold officers accountable for their performance in the field and quickly prove officer's compliance in the wake of an incident.


Hanwha To Showcase Latest Cameras and New version of WAVE VMS at ISC West 2019

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Focus on modular, easy to install, high-resolution cameras plus advanced analytic support in V4 of Wisenet WAVE VMS

Million Dollar Bond for Man who Set Ohio Sheriff’s Sergeant on Fire

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An Ohio man who is accused of setting a Portage County Sheriff's sergeant on fire Thursday night is being held on $1 million bond.

Million Dollar Bond for Man who Set Ohio Sheriff’s Sergeant on Fire

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An Ohio man who is accused of setting a Portage County Sheriff's sergeant on fire Thursday night is being held on $1 million bond.

President Trump Declares Border Emergency

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

President Donald Trump capped months of speculation and two years of failed negotiations over fortifying the southern border by declaring an emergency on Friday.

FL Chiefs’ Group to Investigate Fatal Fire Response

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A probe by the Florida Fire Chiefs' Association will try to shed light on a Polk County fire captain's handling of a blaze last year in which a 76-year-old woman died.

President Trump Declares National Emergency to Fund Border Wall

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The president on Friday took executive action—declaring a national emergency—to spend $8 billion for the border wall he has promised since his campaign.

President Trump Declares National Emergency to Fund Border Wall

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The president on Friday took executive action—declaring a national emergency—to spend $8 billion for the border wall he has promised since his campaign.

Minnesota Department Disbanding Mounted and Motor Units

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Spokesperson Steve Linders said that there are multiple reasons went into the department's decision, including the fact that the department has seen an increase in injuries to members of both units.

St. Paul Police Disbanding Mounted and Motor Units

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Spokesperson Steve Linders said multiple reasons went into the department's decision, including the fact that the department has seen an increase in injuries to members of both units.

St. Paul Police Disbanding Mounted and Motor Units

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Spokesperson Steve Linders said multiple reasons went into the department's decision, including the fact that the department has seen an increase in injuries to members of both units.

Texas Police Called to Rescue Caged Tiger in Abandoned Building

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Houston Police Department responded to a 311 caller stating that they had discovered a tiger in a cage in an abandoned building.

Texas Police Called to Rescue Caged Tiger in Abandoned Building

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Houston Police Department responded to a 311 caller stating that they had discovered a tiger in a cage in an abandoned building.

Aiming to Reduce Struck-By Incidents, Michigan Move-Over Law Takes Effect

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to reports, at least a dozen Michigan State Police vehicles have been struck so far this year.

Aiming to Reduce Struck-By Incidents, Michigan Move-Over Law Takes Effect

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to reports, at least a dozen Michigan State Police vehicles have been struck so far this year.

Milwaukee baseball team honors fallen officer at training facility

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

MILWAUKEE — A Milwaukee officer is being honored by the city’s baseball team through a jersey now hanging at the teams’ training facility, the Journal Sentinel reports.

Fallen Officer Matthew Rittner, 35, was fatally shot on Feb. 6 while serving a search warrant. His funeral was held on Wednesday.

Dan Larrea, the Milwaukee Brewers’ director of travel, had the idea to make a jersey for Rittner, who loved the team and the sport.

Rittner and his wife, Caroline, were married at Miller Park in 2017. The team assigned him No. 10 to indicate he’s their “10th man” on the field.

We’re sending all our love and prayers to the family and friends of Matthew Rittner, a Milwaukee police officer recently killed while serving his beloved community. God bless you all pic.twitter.com/pV09wuVAgh

— Brent Suter (@bruter24) February 13, 2019


FBI, LAPD Arrest Dozens of Suspected Gang Members in Raids

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Los Angeles Police Department were joined by FBI agents in raids on Wednesday that resulted in the arrest of 38 people.

FBI, LAPD Arrest Dozens of Suspected Gang Members in Raids

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Los Angeles Police Department were joined by FBI agents in raids on Wednesday that resulted in the arrest of 38 people.

Florida School Hires Combat Veterans to Protect Against Active Shooters

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Principal Bill Jones said he wants to make sure if an armed intruder were to enter the campus of Manatee School for the Arts, which has a student population of about 2,100 middle and high school students.

Florida School Hires Combat Veterans to Protect Against Active Shooters

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Principal Bill Jones said he wants to make sure if an armed intruder were to enter the campus of Manatee School for the Arts, which has a student population of about 2,100 middle and high school students, they would be met with swift, overwhelming and deadly force.

Tenn. police to remove SROs from troubled schools

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Two troubled schools in a Tennessee school district will be without SROs starting March 1.

According to News Channel 5, the decision to pull three Metro Nashville Police officers was in the works for a month. SROs have reported “toxic” school environments where they’ve been verbally harassed on a daily basis.

“The officers don’t need to be subjected to that kind of abuse, they don’t need to be subjected to an environment where the students aren’t welcoming,” Metro Police spokesperson Don Aaron told News Channel 5.

Metro Nashville Public Schools has approximately 70 SROs across their district. Every high school has at least one officer along with most middle schools. SROs at Bass W. A. Alternative School and Johnson Alternative Learning Center have had to focus their time on security issues rather than building relationships with students, according to the report.

“Frankly in the alternative schools the mission has not been mentoring students but rather de facto security guards and that’s not the intended purpose of these SROs,” Aaron said.

The district now has the option to station security guards at the schools if they choose, but it’s unclear if they would be armed.

The population of both schools is made up of students with lengthy criminal records and most have been removed from conventional high schools because of behavioral problems.

Aaron said the police are not abandoning the school entirely.

“The Police Department will periodically be a presence at each school throughout the remainder of the year,” he said.


Massachusetts Officer Talks Suicidal Man to Safety from 70-Foot Building

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to the Sun Chronicle, Sergeant Jeffrey Peavey—a 32-year-veteran of the force—established a dialogue with the 21-year-old man, speaking with the distraught subject for 45 minutes before convincing the man to retreat from the precipice into safety.

Massachusetts Officer Talks Suicidal Man to Safety from 70-Foot Building

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to the Sun Chronicle, Sergeant Jeffrey Peavey—a 32-year-veteran of the force—established a dialogue with the 21-year-old man, speaking with the distraught subject for 45 minutes before convincing the man to retreat from the precipice into safety.

Florida Sheriff’s Office Valentine’s Day Facebook Post: “Don’t Play Hard to Get”

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Martin County (FL) Sheriff's Office posted an image on Facebook of five deputies collectively holding a bouquet of flowers, a heart-shaped balloon, and five boxes of Valentines chocolates, saying, "Our Warrants team is waiting for you with open cuffs. Don’t play hard to get, because they’re in it for the long haul and are truly committed to capturing your heart!"

Florida Sheriff’s Office Valentine’s Day Facebook Post: “Don’t Play Hard to Get”

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Martin County (FL) Sheriff's Office posted an image on Facebook of five deputies collectively holding a bouquet of flowers, a heart-shaped balloon, and five boxes of Valentines chocolates, saying, "Our Warrants team is waiting for you with open cuffs. Don’t play hard to get, because they’re in it for the long haul and are truly committed to capturing your heart!"

Parkland school shooting: What leadership failures mean for LE nationwide

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis suspended Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel—who served as the 16th sheriff of that county—on January 11, 2019. Many would argue that his firing was long overdue. His agency was derided for failing to take control over a shooting at the Fort Lauderdale airport in 2017. Then, in 2018, deputies with the agency failed miserably in their response to the mass murder taking place at the Stoneman Douglas High School. In April 2018, the Broward Sheriff's Office Deputies Association opened a no-confidence vote—it tallied 534–94 against Israel. In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss Israel's dismissal, and what it means for law enforcement leaders nationwide.

LEARN MORE

Trickle-down leadership: When officers become the boss

Parkland shooting report: Failures in communication and coordination

Our first line of defense: Training and recruiting school resource officers

School shooting response: 5 action items for every police leader


Former Chicago Officer Convicted of Murder of Teen Attacked in Prison

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A former police officer with the Chicago Police Department—who was convicted in October of second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Laquan McDonald in 2014—was reportedly beaten by inmates in a Connecticut prison.

Former Chicago Officer Convicted of Murder of Teen Attacked in Prison

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A former police officer with the Chicago Police Department—who was convicted in October of second-degree murder for killing 17-year-old Laquan McDonald in 2014—was reportedly beaten by inmates in a Connecticut prison.

Trickle-down leadership: When officers become the boss

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Richard Fairburn
Author: Richard Fairburn

February 14, 2018, is another of those days that will live in infamy. A year ago, 17 were killed and 17 were wounded at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and the Broward County Sheriff’s Office did nothing to stop it, either before the event or during the shooting.

Before the event, numerous people reported the shooter as a potential threat to the school, but both the school district and the Sheriff’s Office apparently did the least they could to make the complaints go away (as did the FBI). During the event, the response of the Incident Commander, SRO and responding officers make me want to use the word cowardice…there, I said it.

Several Broward officers have been forced out or remain on investigative suspension for NOT entering the building or engaging the shooter, despite many of them reporting on the radio they heard shots fired. When I was in Florida a week ago a local news station said one officer, who was only a block away when the call went out, turned and drove AWAY from the school – according to his cell phone track.

Who is to blame for such behavior by experienced police officers? Certainly, these officers should be disciplined harshly for their failure to respond properly, but I think the ultimate blame – the underlying cause – lies elsewhere.

An agency’s culture comes from its CEO

After more than 40 years of studying police leadership and developing leadership training programs during my tenure at the Illinois State Police Academy, I have come to believe the “culture” of an agency comes almost totally from its CEO, be they a chief, sheriff, director, superintendent or commissioner.

When a department gets a new chief, most of the officers will quickly “become the boss.” Many years ago in my home agency, a chief brought in from a larger neighboring department was very professorial. He wore expensive suits and smoked a pipe all day. Before long the detectives all dressed much better and one of the senior commanders started smoking a pipe. They became the boss.

So how did a 2,800-officer-strong sheriff’s department become the nation’s worst example of how to handle an active shooter at a high school? The simple answer is that the officers became the boss. That boss was Sheriff Scott Israel, who was recently suspended by the Governor of Florida for the incompetent performance of his agency at the Parkland massacre. In his January 11, 2019, order suspending Sheriff Israel, Governor DeSantis stated that Israel “egregiously failed in his duties” by not properly training deputies and not maintaining “a culture of vigilance and thoroughness,” according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

To back up my argument, I submit the Fort Lauderdale airport active shooter event the previous year, where five were killed, six were wounded and 36 more were injured during the ensuing panic. And panic it was! The analysis of that airport shooting reveals several hours of almost total chaos.

You would think the Broward County Sheriff’s Office would have implemented some lessons learned from the airport shooting to improve their response to any subsequent critical incidents. Did they seek out any Incident Command training to better prepare commanders for a large-scale response? Did they institute refresher training on rapid deployment tactics for patrol deputies? But why would they when Sheriff Israel bragged to the media about their excellent handling of the airport shooting? After their even worse performance at the high school in Parkland, Sheriff Israel stated on CNN, “I have given amazing leadership to this agency.”

Scott Israel had more than 20 years of law enforcement experience, through the rank of police chief prior to being elected sheriff in 2012. He may have been a fine officer, even a good chief in those years. But the self-serving political creature we saw on TV demonstrated exactly the attitude I expected to see based on the horrible performance of his deputies. Leadership trickles down to the lowest levels of an agency and it can happen in a very short time.

We have all known someone like Scott Israel in our careers. There will always be self-serving cops who manage to float to the top, sometimes for all the wrong reasons. I believe we can improve ourselves by changing the way we train our leaders.

We need a military approach to leadership

When the U.S. military trains new NCOs and Commissioned Officers, it prepares a young leader to take their team into combat and, hopefully, to bring them back home.

The hands-on training teaches leaders to make difficult decisions under extreme stress. It drives home the need to get your team the best possible training and helps leaders learn they need to prepare their people for worst-case scenarios.

At the Illinois State Police (ISP) Academy, I was tasked with developing a military-style leadership course for new street-level supervisors, sort of a "boot camp" for sergeants. We standardized a four-day curriculum that placed all the students into teams of six. All the training evolutions were done in these teams, which had each student rotating through the team leader role.

Each team handled a role-playing incident on the BowMac Model City Simulator. The critical incidents they faced were a barricaded gunman incident with officers pinned down, a hazmat tanker vs. school bus crash, a domestic gone bad with an officer taken hostage inside a home at gunpoint, and an active gunman firing from the third floor of a hotel into a heavily populated urban area. One day of the training was a field training exercise (FTX) in which the teams had to use red guns to handle four more scenarios – an indoor active shooter, a suicide-by-cop standoff with an armed individual, an outdoor active shooter and an officer-down rescue from an ambush situation.

In all the exercises, the scenarios were short but very intense. Each evolution was debriefed from the leader's point of view asking, “What would you do differently next time?” Like in the real world, communication failures are often the most common problem. We ran each scenario 3-4 times so the last leader in each scenario could get as close to perfection as possible. The program was based on a training concept called "coaching forward" where we only presented positive coaching.

If you don’t have a military background, study the subject and train yourself. Prepare your people and yourself for the worst day you can imagine. NEVER fail to back your officers when they do their best. Understand that perfection is never possible when officers must make snap decisions based on imperfect information. Make sure they understand what you expect of them, and most will exceed your expectations.

Hope in the next generation

When a police agency fails to protect its community, the failure can almost always be traced to the head of that agency. But there is hope. After several decades of seeing fewer and fewer police recruits hire on with military experience, the numbers are reversing. More and more cops are climbing their way through the police ranks with military leadership experience in their resume. We face a violent future in this country. The population is severely divided and the potential for some degree of civil war is not out of the question. We will need these excellent young leaders to prepare their officers for the worst-case scenarios and protect their communities like sheepdogs.

Leadership – both good and bad – trickles down to the lowest levels of an agency and it can happen in a very short time.


North Carolina Jail Deaths Hit Record Level in 2018

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More inmates died in North Carolina’s jails in 2018 than any other year since the state began tracking deaths in 1997.

11 Tips for Responding to Domestic Violence Calls

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Here are some tips on staying safe on these types of calls for service, and ensuring the welfare of the individuals who have been victimized.

11 Tips for Responding to Domestic Violence Calls

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Here are some tips on staying safe on these types of calls for service, and ensuring the welfare of the individuals who have been victimized.

Officer Shot in Dallas Ambush Sues Facebook, Twitter and Google

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

DART Officer Jesus Retana, who was wounded in the July 7, 2016, police ambush in downtown Dallas, has sued Facebook, Twitter and Google, saying their platforms knowingly support terrorist groups.

Ohio Sheriff Deputy Set On Fire While Serving Warrant

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A deputy serving felony warrants was seriously injured Thursday night when the suspect threw a flammable liquid on the officer and then set him on fire.

Cleveland Fire Chief Receives No-Confidence Vote

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighters union passed a resolution asking the city to investigate claims that Chief Angelo Calvillo is mismanaging the department and jeopardizing public safety.

Minnesota Sheriff’s Deputy Wounded, 3 Others Dead in Shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A deputy with the Hubbard County Sheriff’s Office is in the hospital Friday morning after being shot during a pursuit in which he exchanged gunfire with a suspect.

NYPD Officer Wounded in ‘Friendly Fire’ Shooting That Killed Detective Released From Hospital

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NYPD Sgt. Matthew Gorman, who survived a friendly fire shooting in Queens that killed Detective Brian Simonsen, was released from the hospital Thursday.

A Factory Tour: Behind the Scenes at HME Ahrens-Fox

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firehouse recently visited HME Ahrens-Fox in Wyoming, MI, and viewed how world-class apparatus is built in its high-tech facility.

Fake Fla. LEOs arrested after pulling over commissioner

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By PoliceOne Staff

MIAMI — Two men impersonating officers were arrested after pulling over a South Florida commissioner and former officer.

Miami-Dade Commissioner Joe Martinez became suspicious when he was pulled over by a sports utility vehicle with flashing lights on Wednesday, NBC News reports.

Martinez says the vehicle was too spiffy to be a police car. It also had temporary tags.

The commissioner refused to pull over and was able to flag down an officer in a squad car on the side of the road who radioed for help.

The men were taken into custody.

FL Crew Save Two Trapped in Car-Semi Crash

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Marion County Fire Rescue firefighters rescued a man and woman from their car after a tractor-trailer flipped on top of it Thursday night.

TX Chief Retires after 25 Years with Department

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Next month, Westlake Chief Mike Elliot will hand over the reins of the department he has run since 2012 to current Assistant Chief David Wilson.

George Clay Fire Department, West Conshohocken, PA, Gets Rescue Pumper

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

George Clay Fire Department, West Conshohocken, PA, has taken delivery of a 2018 KME rescue pumper.

George Clay Fire Co., West Conshohocken, PA, Gets Rescue Pumper

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

George Clay Fire Co., West Conshohocken, PA, has taken delivery of a 2018 KME rescue pumper.

Locating the Deadman Room—A High-Priority Area for Search Teams

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Charles Lind Jr. shares tips for locating the "deadman room," an isolated room on the second or third floor in a single or row dwelling where fire victims are often discovered during search.

Federal Adds 40 S&W, 45 Auto Premium Hydra-Shok Deep Loads 

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2018, Federal reinvented the Hydra-Shok bullet design with Hydra-Shok Deep in 9mm Luger. Now, it has expanded the line with new loads in 40 S&W and 45 Auto. The bullets feature a more robust center post and a core design that penetrates to critical depths through common self-defense barriers, without over-penetrating.

Federal Adds 40 S&W, 45 Auto Premium Hydra-Shok Deep Loads 

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2018, Federal reinvented the Hydra-Shok bullet design with Hydra-Shok Deep in 9mm Luger. Now, it has expanded the line with new loads in 40 S&W and 45 Auto. The bullets feature a more robust center post and a core design that penetrates to critical depths through common self-defense barriers, without over-penetrating.

Joe Ficarelli

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Joe Ficarelli is an 11-year veteran of the FDNY.

Jonathan Brumley

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jonathan Brumley is a firefighter with the Houston, TX, Fire Department.

TX Woman Can’t Recall Getting Stuck in Air Vent

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Houston firefighters pulled the woman from a vent in a vacant home early Friday, but she wasn't able to tell her rescuers how she became trapped.

Dallas officer shot in 2016 ambush sues Facebook, Twitter, Google

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Dana Branham The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — A Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) officer who was wounded in the July 7, 2016, police ambush in downtown Dallas has sued Facebook, Twitter and Google, saying their platforms knowingly support terrorist groups.

Officer Jesus Retana, 34, and his husband, Andrew Moss, filed the lawsuit in federal court Wednesday. Retana, who began working for Dallas Area Rapid Transit police in 2006, was shot in the arm during the ambush.

The lawsuit says Micah Johnson, the gunman who killed five police officers in the attack, was radicalized in part by the terrorist group Hamas’ use of Facebook, Twitter and Google.

The companies knowingly provided Hamas “with accounts to use its social networks as a tool for spreading extremist propaganda, raising funds, and attracting new recruits,” Retana and Moss say.

A spokesman for Twitter declined to comment on the lawsuit. Representatives for Facebook and Google did not respond to requests for comment.

Keith Altman, an attorney representing Retana and Moss, said the lawsuit is one of several he has filed against the tech giants in an attempt to hold them responsible for terrorists using their platforms. Altman has also sued on behalf of victims of the San Bernardino killings, the Pulse nightclub shooting and a 2015 Islamic State attack in Paris, among others. The cases have so far been unsuccessful, he said.

In January 2017, Dallas police Sgt. Demetrick Pennie — also represented by Altman — sued the three tech companies in a case that was later dismissed. A federal judge ruled that the plaintiffs did not "plausibly allege a connection between Hamas and the Dallas shooting."

Altman said the companies can’t claim they don’t know terrorists are using their websites to spread propaganda and attract recruits.

“They absolutely know that the terrorists are using their sites,” he said. “This is not the dark web.”

The lawsuit says Retana and Moss' claims don’t have to do with the social-media content posted by Hamas, but rather the “infrastructure” of support the websites provide to Hamas.

The lawsuit also accuses Facebook and Twitter of profiting from displaying ads alongside Hamas’ posts.

While Altman acknowledged that Johnson was not radicalized directly by Hamas, the lawsuit draws parallels between the terrorist group and black radical groups.

It notes that Johnson “liked” the Facebook pages of the New Black Panther Party, the Nation of Islam and the Black Riders Liberation Army, which are designated as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Altman said the lawsuit's intent is not to target black radical groups. It's focused on asking Facebook, Twitter and Google to "act reasonably" and holding them accountable for terrorist content on their platforms, he said.

"I don't care what group you are," he said. "It is not cool to call for the killing of police officers."

Altman said Retana and Moss are still hurting in the aftermath of the 2016 ambush and "will never be the same."

All they want to get out of the lawsuit, which seeks unspecified damages, is “no more funerals,” he said.

“Nobody should lose a loved one, a friend, a family member because of a terrorist attack,” Altman said.

———

©2019 The Dallas Morning News


Body Camera Video Released in Arizona Terrorism Case

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office is set to release body camera video and 911 calls on Thursday afternoon in the case of a terrorism suspect shot by officials in Fountain Hills.

Search For Missing Illinois Girls’ Killer Continues

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Detectives say they've received more than 38,000 tips regarding the 2017 murders of 13-year-old Abigail Williams and 14-year-old Liberty German.

IA State Senator, FF Resigns over Cross-Training Policy

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jeff Danielson stepped down as a Cedar Falls firefighter and a state senator because of his objections to a city policy cross-training police to perform firefighting duties.

Off-Duty LAPD Detective, Suspect Critically Wounded In Skid Row Shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty Los Angeles police detective and a suspect are both in critical condition after exchanging gunfire early Thursday morning in Skid Row.

Bogus Cops Try to Pull Over Former Florida Police Officer

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two men suspected of impersonating police officers tried to pull over a South Florida county commissioner who is a former officer were taken into custody Wednesday.

Man charged in killing of Ala. officer

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Authorities took a man straight from a rehabilitation center into custody Thursday as they arrested him in the shooting death of a Birmingham police officer last month.

Jeremy Elwin Owens, 31, rode in a wheelchair as he left the treatment center to face charges in the killing of Birmingham police Sgt. Wytasha Carter.

Speaking at a news conference, Police Chief Patrick Smith said Owens was arrested using Carter's handcuffs.

"The whole purpose is delivering justice for the Carter family and also Sgt. Carter," Smith said.

Carter and another officer, Lucas Allums, were shot while investigating a series of late-night car break-ins on Jan. 13. Owens was being charged with capital murder, attempted murder and receiving stolen property, plus gun and drug offenses, authorities said.

Injured in the confrontation with police, Owens was first treated at a hospital and then the rehabilitation center following the shooting. He didn't respond to questions seeking comment, and court records don't show whether he has a defense attorney.

Smith said authorities had built a "very strong case" against Owens but would not discuss details.

Records show Owens pleaded guilty to robbery in 2012 and was sentenced to serve three years in prison. He was released on Jan. 1, 2015.


NYPD officer wounded in blue-on-blue shooting returns home

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

NEW YORK — The police officer who was wounded in a shooting that led to the blue-on-blue death of a New York Police Department detective has returned to his Long Island home.

Sgt. Matthew Gorman emerged from a black van outside his home in Seaford Thursday afternoon. He used crutches and was accompanied by several unidentified people.

Gorman was struck in the leg as he and six other officers fired 42 shots at a robbery suspect brandishing a fake handgun at a cellphone store in Queens Tuesday night.

His partner, Det. Brian Simonsen, was shot in the chest and died.

The suspect, who was also wounded, has been charged with murder.


North Carolina Trooper’s Accused Killer Charged in Second Murder

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An 18-year-old man accused of killing state Highway Patrol Trooper Kevin Conner last year has been indicted in the shooting death of another man more than two years ago.

Stolen Gun, Pickup Truck Lead to Arrests in 2013 Oklahoma Cold Case

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The recovery of a stolen gun and a stolen pickup were central to cracking a nearly six-year-old murder in far northwest Oklahoma.

Fallen NYPD Detective’s Organs Will Go to Transplant Patients

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Even in death, NYPD Detective Brian Simonsen will touch people’s lives for the better — as an organ donor.

Plan Alters Cleveland Police Recruiting Practices

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The monitor overseeing reforms within the Cleveland police department recommended that a federal judge approve key plans that address how officers are used and how the city will recruit a more diverse police force.

Military Comrade of Fallen Milwaukee Police Officer: ‘I Really Do Owe My Life to Him’

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

As fallen Milwaukee Police Officer Matthew Rittner's squad commander in Iraq with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Marines, Aurora Police Officer Josh Horton saw multiple examples of his bravery and selflessness.

President Trump Addresses L.E. Leaders

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

President Donald Trump on Wednesday spoke to law enforcement officials at the Major County Sheriffs and Major Cities Chiefs Association Joint Conference in Washington, D.C.

Firefighting in an Age of Terrorism: Fire Service Response—Part 2

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dennis Merrigan and Duane Hagelgans examine how to plan for and respond to terrorist attacks and the importance of unified command.

Breaking down public safety silos, geographic barriers

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Seamlessly share data between public safety agencies and mutual aid partners with enterprise information management

Ill. police respond to active shooter at manufacturing plant

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials say a total of four LEOs and multiple civilians were injured in the shooting

Ill. police respond to active shooter at manufacturing plant

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials say a total of four LEOs and multiple civilians were injured in the shooting

Officials: 1 person dead, 4 police officers wounded in Ill. shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

City spokesman Clayton Muhammad said four officers were wounded and in stable condition, but did not say if they were shot

Officials: 1 person dead, 4 police officers wounded in Ill. shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

City spokesman Clayton Muhammad said four officers were wounded and in stable condition, but did not say if they were shot

5 people killed, 5 LEOs wounded in Ill. shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers were fired upon Friday afternoon as soon as they entered the building

5 people killed, 5 LEOs wounded in Ill. shooting

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers were fired upon Friday afternoon as soon as they entered the building

Accommodating Mass Timber Buildings—the Right Way to Change the Building Code

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In this op-ed, Rob Neale explains why people should not let emotions drive decisions when it comes to updating building code.

Accommodating Mass Timber Buildings—the Right Way to Change the Building Code

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In this op-ed, Rob Neale explains why people should not let emotions drive decisions when it comes to updating building code.

Baltimore City FF Accused of Stealing from Fire Stations

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A firefighter on medical leave faces burglary charges after he allegedly broke into several Baltimore firehouses and stole items belonging to the department and other firefighters.

AMR: ET3 payment model is a ‘great step forward’

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

AMR released a response to the ET3 announcement and said the model aligns with the company’s “key initiative” to provide a “better model for care delivery”

AMR: ET3 payment model is a ‘great step forward’

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

AMR released a response to the ET3 announcement and said the model aligns with the company’s “key initiative” to provide a “better model for care delivery”

Hundreds Pay Their Respects to Late CA Fire Chief

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 1,000 mourners turned out for a memorial service for Garden Grove Fire Chief Tom Schultz, who died weeks after he was diagnosed with pancreatic and liver cancer.

Hundreds Pay Their Respects to Late CA Fire Chief

Posted on February 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 1,000 mourners turned out for a memorial service for Garden Grove Fire Chief Tom Schultz, who died weeks after he was diagnosed with pancreatic and liver cancer.

Calif. county’s ambulance ‘no-fly’ list helps save millions of dollars

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fresno County is saving millions of dollars by not transporting people who have been identified as 911 “frequent fliers” who abuse the system

Researchers develop system to improve firefighting robots

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The new automatic T-valve system designed by Purdue University researchers can remove water from the fire hose when the robot moves to another location

28 Ga. middle school students hospitalized after eating Valentine’s Day candy

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Sandtown Middle School students were taken to the hospital after feeling “nauseated and disoriented,” officials said

Photo: EMS providers pick up fallen American flag in snowstorm

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mobile Life Support Services Paramedic and U.S. Army Sergeant Dan Rivera and EMT Larry Lawless picked up the flag and brought it to the police department

FDNY EMT’s quick thinking saves man’s severed arm

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Francis Jost, who was covering a shift for his colleague, was able to pack the arm in ice because he knew of a nearby bar where he could get supplies

FDNY EMT’s quick thinking saves man’s severed arm

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Francis Jost, who was covering a shift for his colleague, was able to pack the arm in ice because he knew of a nearby bar where he could get supplies

Conn. fire dept. expands eligibility, offers scholarship for recruits

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Bridgeport Fire Department is hoping to attract a diverse crew to become the newest of the city’s bravest

More than 1K pay tribute to Calif. fire chief who died of cancer

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Garden Grove Fire Chief Tom Schultz died just two weeks after being diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic and liver cancer

Pa. firefighter arrested for making false 911 calls

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Isaiah Smith is facing charges after police said he made six false 911 calls over a period of more than a month

Pa. firefighter arrested for making false 911 calls

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Isaiah Smith is facing charges after police said he made six false 911 calls over a period of more than a month

NH Safe Stations recognized at first responders breakfast

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Natacha Davis stood before 300 first responders and told them how the caring she found at a fire station helped her to finally overcome her addiction

First Responder Networks

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In an emergency when the cellular systems are overwhelmed, public safety priority networks can provide you with voice communications and high-speed data transfer.

First Responder Networks

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In an emergency when the cellular systems are overwhelmed, public safety priority networks can provide you with voice communications and high-speed data transfer.

2 Ways to Stop Mass Attacks

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Allowing law enforcement officers to carry in public places off duty and adjusting shifts at major events could prevent or quickly end many mass shootings.

2 Ways to Stop Mass Attacks

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Allowing law enforcement officers to carry in public places off duty and adjusting shifts at major events could prevent or quickly end many mass shootings.

CAL Fire Firefighters Hurt in Rollover Crash

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The three firefighters were taken to the hospital Thursday after their fire apparatus left the road and landed in an embankment in Bonsall.

Tax Help Needed to Keep IA Fire Station Open Full Time

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Waterloo Fire Rescue is asking for another $83,000 in overtime in next fiscal year’s budget in order to keep one of its firehouses open year-round.

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Nightstick Launches TCM-Series Compact Handgun Weapon Lights at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

TCM-550XL and TCM-550XLS combine intuitive switches and small footprint for winning combination

Questions Mount over FL Captain’s Fatal Fire Response

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Public criticism continues to swell over a Polk County Fire Rescue captain's handling of a fire last year involving a 76-year-old woman who died waiting to be rescued.

President Trump to Chiefs, Sheriffs at National Conference: “The Wall is Coming”

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

President Donald Trump delivered remarks to the Major County Sheriffs and Major Cities Chiefs Association Joint Conference in Washington on Wednesday, saying during his speech that "the wall is coming."

6 body armor trends on display at SHOT Show 2019

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ron LaPedis
Author: Ron LaPedis

Each year, body armor vendors kick things up a notch. PoliceOne visited Angel Armor and Armor Express at SHOT Show and, as you can see by the following six trends, armor manufacturers are doing everything they can to help police departments make the right choice when purchasing ballistic protection for officers.

1. Low visibility external carriers for everyday use

It's no secret that many departments are moving away from duty belts and to load-bearing vests. As this article points out, officers who carry most of their equipment – which often weighs close to 30 pounds – on vests rather than duty belts experience significantly less hip and lower-back pain.

As long as the officer is wearing an external vest, why not put their ballistic panels into it and call it a day? Angel Armor and Armor Express were showing off their latest external carriers. The carriers are available in standard uniform colors (black, navy and tan) and others by special request. Even though the latest low-visibility carriers look like they button in front, they are secured from the side like traditional armor carriers.

2. New shaping using clothing industry expertise and customer feedback

Both manufacturers I talked to said they had been working with fashion designers and apparel manufacturers who know exactly what the human body looks like and how to shape clothing to it for comfort.

In the past, ballistic panels and carriers were scaled by math. A smaller panel had the exact same shape as a bigger panel. But apparel manufacturers have known forever that male and female, and smaller and larger bodies, all have different proportions. This means that manufacturers need to tailor each size of panel and carrier to the average proportions for that size.

Angel Armor worked with a research team at Colorado State University in Fort Collins to conduct 3D body scans of officers to help re-design its RISE 2.0 carrier for improved comfort and coverage.

The completely new Bravo design from Armor Express gives the wearer more clearance under their neck and arms. Mike Criswell, senior designer, started the Bravo ballistic panel project and Monica Russ, product development manager followed, designing new carriers around them. Both have extensive backgrounds in the apparel/shirt industry and Monica attended fashion school before starting her career. Mike really understands fit, and he applies his knowledge when designing tactical gear.

3. Stretch when you sit down

Your armor should not feel like the Batsuit when you wear it. It needs to move with you, especially when you sit down. Older carriers have large slabs of hook and loop fabric on the side, which have no give in them.

Whether internal or external, the latest carriers are “stretchy” so that they move with you. Angel Armor has always used overlapping front and rear carriers attached with elastic-loaded rubber straps on each side. Armor Express has gone a different route, with a stretchy cummerbund that is attached to and stretches from the back. These new designs mean cops do not have to worry about their vest shifting or riding up into their neck and throat when sitting down.

4. External plate pouches

In the old days (meaning last year), I had to dissemble my armor to get to the rifle plate carrier, which was a hook and loop (Velcro) sealed pouch hidden inside the carrier. If I wanted to add or remove my plate, I had to unseal the main body of the carrier, blindly feel for the plate pouch, and then slide my plate(s) into it.

Because of the move to external carriers for everyday use, why not put the plate pouches on the outside where they are easier to get to? In fact, why not put them on the front and the back?

Both manufacturers offer external front and rear top-loading combo plate pockets to accommodate a variety of rifle plate sizes and thicknesses, maximizing the coverage area. The Armor Express Traverse dress carrier maintains the low-visibility look by hiding the front plate carrier under a zipper opening disguised as a button front.

Angel Armor managed to combine last year’s two-plate Truth Snap 308S system into one plate called the 308C, which is almost 30 percent thinner and lighter. The new Truth 855 ceramic strike plate ups the ante to protect the wearer from M855 “green tip” ammo when worn with the 308C on top of their Level IIIa armor.

Unlike other ballistic materials, ceramic is subject to chipping and can shatter if it is dropped. Because it is much less expensive to replace just the strike face rather than an entire rifle-rated plate, Angel Armor went with an easy-to-replace separate plate.

5. Specific designs for fire and EMS

Since fire and EMS personnel are being brought into warm or hot zones in an active shooter event, they need some armor love too. But it gets a bit pricey when an agency needs to equip all of its firefighters and paramedics with armor. Armor Express thinks it has the answer with its Hardcore FE product. It comes with or without MOLLE panels and has what the company calls a “dynamic armored cummerbund.” In a nutshell, there are multiple side panels that can fold or unfold giving the vest a 10-inch variation, allowing you to share vests among staff.

Along with the Hardcore FE, Armor Express partnered with Buffalo Armory to offer the Triton, an affordable Multi-Hit NIJ .06 certified level III steel plate with Polyurea coating that also will stand up to M855 green tip. Measuring only .21” thick with a weight of 6.3lbs in a 10×12 “shooters cut” configuration, it is substantially thinner and less expensive than laminate/ceramic rifle armor, allowing agencies to put one or two into every one of those shared fire and EMS vests.

6. Wire routing tabs and pockets

Another trend is wire-routing tabs and pockets – lots of pockets. While tactical pants have plenty of pockets, sometimes they are hard to get to, especially when sitting or kneeling, or you just need to carry more stuff than will fit in them.

Angel Armor’s RISE 2.0 has two hidden front body-facing utility pockets made of durable high performance stretch material ideal for your radio, cellphone, extra magazine and/or a backup firearm or folding knife. It also has a front-zippered admin pocket with low-profile, laser-cut, MOLLE/PALS-compatible Velcro laminate material with microphone loops.

Armor Express has various pocket layouts depending on the model. These include a rear hidden lumbar map pocket, zipper cover with camera mount, wire routing ports, ambidextrous utility pockets, and a Napoleon chest pocket with zippers or hook and loop closures. The company’s low visibility vests also offer concealed ID tag and badge tab attachment points.

Considerations prior to purchasing body armor

Like buying a car, there are dozens of decisions to be made before cutting that purchase order. With the new NIJ Standard 0101.07 about to be released this year, the wrong purchase could be deadly for cops in the field.

How do you distribute your funds over the carrier, armor panels and rifle plates? One size does not fit all, and each person’s armor needs to be tailored to their mission.

Carriers with fewer features might be great for some, while the latest style with tons of features might be better for others. As discussed above, shared carriers could be an option. Maybe heavier and less-expensive panels for some, lighter but pricier panels for others. Does a first responder need a lighter but more expensive plate, a heavier but cheaper plate, or no plate at all?

And while not a trend, your buyers should ask for a copy of the NIJ letter that proves the armor complies with the NIJ standards and hasn’t just been “tested to NIJ standards.” For bonus points, buyers also can ask if the manufacturer has attained certification to BA 9000, the NIJ body armor quality management standard. This lets buyers know that the armor they are buying is as good as the armor that was submitted for compliance. For more information on BA 9000, email bactp@justnet.org.

For more SHOT Show coverage, visit https://www.policeone.com/shot-show/.


President Trump to Chiefs, Sheriffs at National Conference: “The Wall is Coming”

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

President Donald Trump delivered remarks to the Major County Sheriffs and Major Cities Chiefs Association Joint Conference in Washington on Wednesday, saying during his speech that "the wall is coming."

Kansas Officer Found Dead in Patrol Vehicle

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation is investigating the death of a law enforcement officer the Sac and Fox Police Department deceased in his patrol vehicle near the Kansas-Nebraska border.

Kansas Officer Found Dead in Patrol Vehicle

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation is investigating the death of a law enforcement officer with the Sac and Fox Police Department found deceased in his patrol vehicle near the Kansas-Nebraska border.

Indiana Police Chief Killed in Single Vehicle Crash

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief David Hewitt was transported by helicopter to a nearby hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

Indiana Police Chief Killed in Single-Vehicle Crash

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief David Hewitt was transported by helicopter to a nearby hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

Indiana Police Chief Killed in Single-Vehicle Crash

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief David Hewitt was transported by helicopter to a nearby hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

First Responders, Service Members, Hollywood Stars Thank Gary Sinise in Touching Video

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On Tuesday, dozens of individuals from the military, police, and fire services were joined by their families and dozens of Hollywood legends in the creation of a video tribute and thanks for his tireless work with the Gary Sinise Foundation.

Video: First Responders, Service Members, Hollywood Stars Thank Gary Sinise

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On Tuesday, dozens of individuals from the military, police, and fire services were joined by their families and dozens of Hollywood legends in the creation of a video tribute and thanks for his tireless work with the Gary Sinise Foundation.

Video: First Responders, Service Members, Hollywood Stars Thank Gary Sinise

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On Tuesday, dozens of individuals from the military, police, and fire services were joined by their families and dozens of Hollywood legends in the creation of a video tribute and thanks for his tireless work with the Gary Sinise Foundation.

Birthday Boy Asks for Donations to Police Department’s K-9 Program

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An eight-year-old Pennsylvania boy asked for a special gift for his birthday. The twist was that he wanted nothing for himself—he wanted to donate money to the local police department's K-9 Unit.

Birthday Boy Asks for Donations to Police Department’s K-9 Program

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An 8-year-old Pennsylvania boy asked for a special gift for his birthday. The twist was that he wanted nothing for himself—he wanted to donate money to the local police department's K-9 Unit.

Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Team Honors Fallen Officer with Jersey and Locker

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Milwaukee Brewers have set up a locker in their Spring Training clubhouse dedicated to Officer Matthew Rittner, who was killed in the line of duty as he executed a narcotics and firearms related search warrant.

Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Team Honors Fallen Officer

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Milwaukee Brewers have set up a locker in their Spring Training clubhouse dedicated to Officer Matthew Rittner, who was killed in the line of duty as he executed a narcotics and firearms related search warrant.

Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Team Honors Fallen Officer

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Milwaukee Brewers have set up a locker in their Spring Training clubhouse dedicated to Officer Matthew Rittner, who was killed in the line of duty as he executed a narcotics and firearms related search warrant.

Oklahoma Department Posts Adorable Picture of New K-9 Pup to Social Media

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Kellyville Police Department—located in Creek County, Oklahoma—posted a picture of its newest "hire" on Facebook that quickly went viral.

Oklahoma Department Posts Adorable Picture of New K-9 Pup

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Kellyville Police Department—located in Creek County, Oklahoma—posted a picture of its newest "hire" on Facebook, and it quickly went viral.

Oklahoma Department Posts Adorable Picture of New K-9 Pup

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Kellyville Police Department—located in Creek County, Oklahoma—posted a picture of its newest "hire" on Facebook, and it quickly went viral.

Nashville Police Pulling SROs from Schools after Being Harassed

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two of the most troubled schools in Nashville, Tennessee will soon be without school resource officers after those SROs reported being verbally harassed on a daily basis.

Nashville Police Pulling Harassed SROs from Schools

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two of the most troubled schools in Nashville, Tennessee will soon be without school resource officers after those SROs reported being verbally harassed on a daily basis.

Nashville Police Pulling Harassed SROs from Schools

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two of the most troubled schools in Nashville, Tennessee will soon be without school resource officers after those SROs reported being verbally harassed on a daily basis.

Canadian Government to Study Post-Traumatic Stress Among First Responders

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Canadian government will reportedly invest millions of dollars in an effort to better identify, treat, and prevent post-traumatic stress among public safety workers.

Canadian Government to Study Post-Traumatic Stress Among First Responders

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Canadian government will reportedly invest millions of dollars in an effort to better identify, treat, and prevent post-traumatic stress among public safety workers.

Canadian Government to Study Post-Traumatic Stress Among First Responders

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Canadian government will reportedly invest millions of dollars in an effort to better identify, treat, and prevent post-traumatic stress among public safety workers.

Portland City Council Votes to Leave the Joint Terrorism Task Force

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In a 3-2 vote, elected officials in Portland, Oregon voted to withdraw the Portland Police Bureau from the national Joint Terrorism Task Force.

Portland City Council Votes to Leave Joint Terrorism Task Force

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In a 3-2 vote, elected officials in Portland, OR voted to withdraw the Portland Police Bureau from the national Joint Terrorism Task Force.

Portland City Council Votes to Leave Joint Terrorism Task Force

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In a 3-2 vote, elected officials in Portland, OR voted to withdraw the Portland Police Bureau from the national Joint Terrorism Task Force.

Suspect Accused of Dragging Texas Trooper Arrested After Manhunt

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man accused of dragging a Texas state trooper with his vehicle during a traffic stop Wednesday night has been taken into custody.

Parkland Shooting Anniversary: ‘A Day for Peace’

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

PARKLAND, Florida – Juliette Rodriguez, like the rest of her Marjory Stoneman Douglas High classmates, was not required to be at school today.But as difficult as it was to be there, she was not going to stay home."It's kind of hard to just walk back...

Suspect Charged in ‘Friendly Fire’ Shooting Death of NYPD Detective

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Christopher Ransom, who was shot by police multiple times, has been charged with murder, robbery, assault, aggravated manslaughter and menacing.

More Than 80 Gang Members and Associates Indicted in Joint LAPD-FBI Takedown

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dozens of suspected gang members and associates were charged with federal racketeering, gun and drug violations Wednesday, marking the end of long-running investigations targeting street gangs in South L.A. and the San Fernando Valley.

Public speaking: 3 things I learned from TEDx

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

By Ben Thompson, P1 Contributor

In October 2017, I walked out into an unusually warm winter morning. My hands were shaky and I could feel my heart beat pounding up into my throat.

This was the moment I learned I had been selected to speak at TEDx Birmingham 2018. I stared up to the blue sky with a big smile and imagined myself standing on the bright red dot in the middle of a dark stage.

Suddenly a chill shot through my body. I thought, “my God, what have I done?”

Public speaking is terrifying. Whether at your own TEDx event, reporting to local officials or speaking at a community meeting, the good news is that even if you feel like you are horrible at public speaking, there are some things you can do to make you look like a pro.

Trust the process

When I was selected to speak at TEDx Birmingham, I had to informally agree to follow the organizers’ “process.” This applied to everyone who speaks at the event, even those who do it professionally.

This is what sets a TEDx event apart from so many other conferences. There is a strong focus not just on the content, but on the delivery.

So what is the process?

The first step was to read the book TED Talks; The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking by Chris Anderson. This book gives a brief history of everything TED. But, more important, it also goes in depth about what can make or break a successful presentation. For anyone looking to bring that TED style into a presentation, this is a must read.

When I reflect on my experience of the process, I am reminded of these three takeaways on how to be a better public speaker:

Identify what it is you want the audience to remember; Watch yourself on video; Seek out honesty. 1. Identify what you want the audience to remember

At TEDx, I was one of about 15 other speakers split into three sessions. I was going to be lucky if they remembered my name, much less what I said that day. One of my first assignments was to type up what I wanted to the audience to remember in less than 140 characters; basically the length of a first generation tweet.

It seemed like a simple task, but for me, it proved to be one of the most difficult. It took me over three weeks and 47 different attempts before I finally narrowed it down to this:

The key to serving people lies in our willingness to step outside the boundaries of our job titles.

It seems like a lot of work for a line that was not uttered once during my talk. But during my preparations, this line acted as my guide, leading me toward the message to get through to the audience.

With each presentation I give now, I start by asking myself this simple question: “What do I want the audience to remember?”

By focusing on the answer, I am able to keep my presentations lean and to the point. In the world of public speaking, brevity is your best friend. It leaves the audience wanting to hear more, rather than sending them running for coffee.

2. Watch yourself on video

I have a confession to make. Since my TEDx video has posted to YouTube, I have not watched it a single time. Just the sound of my own voice is enough to make me cringe. But during the months leading up to the event, I practiced in front of the camera on my laptop many times.

And I watched all of them. It was excruciating.

Why does the side of my head look so weird? Do I always sound like that?

And it never got any easier. But each time I watched, I couldn’t deny that I was getting better. There were so many little things that I did at first that I didn’t even know I was doing. One example, I used the word “so” like many people use the word “uh.”

I was unconsciously using it as a placeholder while I gathered my thoughts between lines. Over the course of a 12-minute talk, I probably said the word “so” 30 times. Had I carried the habit on stage, the audience would have walked out wondering about my strange love affair with the word “so.”

So…before your big day, lock yourself in a room; record yourself, watch and repeat. Just be sure to destroy the evidence when you’re done.

3. Seek out honesty

It must be said again. Brevity is your best friend. Do not take 45 minutes to say what you could have said in five, although being brief while still being effective is not easy, especially when you are passionate about the subject.

It helps if you have someone who is not afraid to be brutally honest with you. During TEDx, I had a speaking coach as well as the organizers reviewing each draft of my talk. With each draft, I was forced to either cut out or defend whole sections that I had worked so hard to create.

The good news for those of us in public safety is that we do not have to look far for honesty. Every day we go to work, we are surrounded by people who love the chance to be brutally honest; sometimes, whether we ask for it or not.

If you can give your presentation to a station full of the world’s harshest critics and survive, doing the same for a room full of strangers will be a piece of cake.


About the author Ben Thompson is a lieutenant with the Birmingham (Ala.) Fire and Rescue Service. Since 2016, Lieutenant Thompson has served as the coordinator of the department’s mobile integrated health program, Birmingham Fire and Rescue C.A.R.E.S. He shared his experiences from building the program at TEDxBirmingham.

Roundtable: How to land a job in academia

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

There are many job options available for police officers after retirement. Planning a successful transition from working in law enforcement to another profession should begin early in every officer’s career.

In this roundtable, we asked PoliceOne columnists and subject matter experts what advice they would give a police officer looking to land a position teaching in a college.

If you have successfully transitioned into a teaching position, please share your story in the comments below or email editor@policeone.com.

Build your resume during your police career

I am a full-time college instructor and a part-time writer. I teach criminal justice at a couple of different institutions. When I retired from my career as a police officer, I really did not know what I was going to do. I didn't plan to be an educator, but I knew I enjoyed teaching. However, I have always practiced the same thing since I first was sworn in: resume building.

Everything you do in law enforcement is about building your resume. I didn't know where I would apply this practice, but I knew it would benefit me somewhere. Here are three steps I would recommend:

1. Prepare yourself to be valuable to your students

The first time I ever had to attend a preliminary hearing, I became fascinated with the court process. I didn't sit around saying, “I hate being in court.” I decided that my time waiting for my case to go could be put to good use.

One of the first drug cases I had required using a professional expert to interpret the drugs I had seized. We used an agent from the consolidated task force to testify about my case. As the agent ran his curriculum vitae in testimony, I held on to every word. Once my arrestee was held to answer, I asked this agent in the hallway how he got where he was. He told me, “Resume building.” He explained that he kept a ledger of every single class he ever took, every time he talked to other officers about drug cases, every arrest he made, every time he testified and what he learned from each case. He told me he worked hard to establish an expertise, and then maintained a way to prove that he had the requisite experience.

I got myself a PDA (personal data assistant) and recorded every moment of my training and experience in drug cases. After conferencing with the Deputy District Attorney who did intake for drug cases, he agreed to voir dire me on a possession case. After a couple of years, I was able to give expert testimony in a number of different aspects of drug cases, for a number of different types of drugs.

At one point in my career, I was averaging one felony and one misdemeanor drug case per day, which was punctuated by labs, mobile labs and other cases attached to them.

I had several amazing advantages. Most coworkers thought that some of the jobs I took over the course of my career were tedious. For example, I worked inside the county jail as a medical officer, which meant I had to escort medical personnel and inmates to appointments and maintain safety and security flaw these appointments took place. One of my responsibilities was to assist the doctors and nurses in checking inmates with medical conditions, including being under the influence of drugs.

Consider this: it was our policy to check a person under the influence of heroin every 15 minutes. At one time, I was the only person in the county who has seen every phase of heroin withdrawal every 15 minutes with dozens of patients. I am an expert in viewing track marks and describing the extent of the user’s habit. Who else could describe this in their resume? Guess who now teaches a class in recognizing drug use?

Everything you do in your career could have training value. The question is, will you have 10 years of experience, or one year of experience repeated 10 times?

2. Prepare yourself academically

It is important to have the correct degree for a particular job. Most educational organizations require degrees that are relevant to the subject for which you will eventually teach. Degree requirements are part of a list of minimum standards.

I recommend that a young officer who wishes to eventually teach to ask the dean or department chair of the local college what sort of degree is required for teaching. The minimum standards list is usually available to the public.

For criminal justice instructors, you will generally require some time working in the field. Just for clarification, many, if not most, universities don’t require any experience in order to teach some aspect of police sciences. If you are the type of person who doesn’t see this as a problem, you are part of the problem.

A note to dinosaurs: There is no excuse for technological incompetence. Know and understand how college classes are taught in different modalities. Most colleges expect that instructors will have some sort of technological competency in 2018.

3. Establish and maintain relationships

Everyone in LE must have personal policies in their practice to keep current on case law, policing trends and the needs of law enforcement agencies. Once an educator is out of the policing business, this could be a challenge. It is critical that they maintain relationships with officers in the field. There are plenty of ways to do this, but I have found the best way is to always mentor someone.

If you are thinking of teaching for a particular college, establish a relationship with a college now. Most colleges will have an advisory committee, or some sort of committee that gives input to the curriculum of the program, either through public forum or designated committees. For example, our college’s program has an advisory committee whose activities directly influence what is taught in the classroom.

In our advisory committee there was a shared concern among local agencies that officers were lacking in report-writing skills. We modified the degree so every student who completes the degree has completed a specified report-writing class that meets a specific standard (Lindsey’s note: A quick glance at the Course Catalog will show that my name is literally on the program. As long as my name is on it, this standard will prevail).

If you are thinking about teaching for that college, or a similar college in the region, get active on the advisory committee.

I teach several classes in which I invite guest instructors or mentors on a regular basis. These are online classes, so our guests really get an opportunity to converse with students. In one class, students are given investigations problems and encouraged to ask questions of their mentors. For me, it is a great opportunity to see how future instructors will interact with students. Talk to the local criminal justice instructors to see if they do anything similar.

Lindsey Bertomen teaches criminal justice at Hartnell College in Salinas, California.

Be passionate about teaching

The key to teaching in academia either while working in the field, shortly after retirement, or switching careers all together, is passion. Any officer looking to teach the future leaders of law enforcement must be passionate about teaching, not just fieldwork. It is not enough to walk into a classroom and share war stories (although the students certainly do love that). It is about putting theory into practice and teaching them that integrity and professionalism begin in the classroom. The earlier the students understand the complexities of being a professional, whether in uniform or off the clock, the better chance they have at being an authentic law enforcement officer.

Academia is not for everyone and I suggest becoming a trainer within your department before making the leap to teach college students. Guest speaking for college classes is also a great way to see if your passion lies within educating. Without passion, you are no more than a robot, standing in a room, barking empty words at students. In order for students to learn, they must feel your passion around the subject. If you are excited, they too, will be excited. Passion has a domino effect on other.

Jenna Curren, MS, is an assistant professor of criminal justice

Continue your education before becoming an educator

You will be able to teach with a bachelor’s degree at most colleges combined with the fact that as a veteran of several years in policing you will qualify as a subject matter expert (SME).

That said I would encourage you to continue with, at a minimum, your master’s degree to remain a level above your students. An EDd, PhD, JD or other doctorate is necessary to attain a tenure track position with better pay and promotions or advancement opportunities.

Prepare for the shock that unless you go to teach at Unicorn University where law enforcement is seen as a noble profession, you will otherwise be greeted by the anti-law enforcement attitude. There is a wave afoot to decriminalize crime and treat offenders as victims.

Tomorrow’s criminal justice students need to hear the other side of the issues. Academic freedom calls for balanced lecturing and students looking to get into the profession appreciate the perspective that police are a vital part of society.

James Dudley is a member of the criminal justice faculty at San Francisco State University.

Take every opportunity to deliver training

For law enforcement officers interested in teaching in an academic program, I would first recommend taking every opportunity to gain experience as an instructor. For example, officers could offer to conduct internal agency training programs, volunteer to educate the public, or find similar teaching opportunities.

Since officers consistently use communication skills in the performance of their jobs, most, at least in my experience, feel surprisingly at ease once they step foot in a classroom setting. However, it’s important to make sure officers truly love being an instructor and feel confident it’s a good fit for their personality and career goals. Gaining experience as an instructor will also help boost an officer’s resume and demonstrate their ambition and eagerness for teaching.

As soon as an officer determines they truly like teaching, I suggest pursuing a graduate degree since most colleges and universities require candidates to possess a minimum of a master’s degree. Earning a graduate degree, coupled with field experience, will improve the officer’s marketability during the job search. It’s important to remember that earning a degree can take time, especially when officers are also working full-time. I recommend officers start their degree as soon as possible and stay realistic when it comes to how many courses they can take at one time while also being a working professional.

I also suggest officers start networking, and LinkedIn would be my recommendation of where to start. Officers should search for adjunct position openings at a local colleges or universities and start networking with faculty and administrators there. While LinkedIn is a great place to start the search, officers should also strive to meet administrators and other faculty members face to face. Sometimes administrators need short-term instructors for courses and if they know you’re interested, available, and local that may be your foot in the door for future available positions. Teaching even a semester or two at a local university can help officers build their teaching resume and gain needed experience.

Dr. Michael Pittaro is an associate professor at the School of Security and Global Studies at American Military University.

A master’s degree plus specialty knowledge can open doors

I am often contacted by active law enforcement and corrections officers interested in employment and/or careers in academics. Having navigated this transition myself and helped many officers do the same, I can hopefully provide a bit of guidance to make this a successful process. Be aware, however, that my recommendations today may have a shelf life. For example, while experience and a graduate or master’s degree was all that was needed years ago to make the transition into academics, times and conditions have changed.

Today, to get hired by many academic institutions, officers need a terminal degree such as a PhD or Doctor of Criminal Justice (DCJ) to get through the initial screening conducted by human resources (HR). Presently, I run one of the largest criminal justice departments in higher education as the program director of criminal justice at American Military University. For every job opening I post, I receive about 200 or so applications. HR does its initial screening and forwards me the “top 10” or “top 20” candidates. All applicants have both years of experience in law enforcement or corrections as well as a PhD or DCJ. Those applicants with “just a master’s” would never make it to my desk. That master’s degree no longer opens the doors it did just 10 or 15 years ago.

That being said, it is not impossible to get hired with “just a master’s” degree. Candidates with certain specialties can and do find employment in academia without a terminal degree. Actually, my last hire had multiple master’s degrees and no terminal degree. I was able to hire that individual due to experience in a specialty area I was seeking, in this case, public safety use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). Specialties such as UAS, digital forensics and cybercrime may be some of these specialty areas. Unfortunately, for many officers, specialties like SWAT, hostage negotiations, investigations, training and chief/sheriff positions (just to name a few) are often not specialized enough to get around the need for the terminal degree.

Dr. Chuck Russo is program director of criminal justice at American Military University.


How to get the most out of your LE career: Self-assessment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Jerrod Hardy
Author: Jerrod Hardy

As I prepare to step away from my career as a law enforcement officer after 21 years, I felt an overwhelming need to share my experience with as many others as possible.

For me, there have been four steps I have taken during my police career that has allowed me to leave physically and mentally fit so that I can enjoy the next phase of my life.

In my previous articles, I wrote about remembering your purpose and stress management. This month I address the third step: self-assessment.

Step Three: Self-Assessment

Being honest with yourself is essential not only in law enforcement, but in life in general. It is critical to constantly take an inventory of your skills and remain humble enough to address deficiencies. Every police officer should ask themselves:

Am I shooting enough? Are my defensive tactics skills current? Is my fitness level where it needs to be? Am I still growing as a person and professional? What is my attitude toward the job? Am I counting down the days to step out the door instead of staying sharp to quickly recognize danger?

Over my career I made a conscious effort to frequently self-assess and make changes where needed to ensure I could walk away from law enforcement happy, healthy and prepared for the rest of my life. Here are three areas of self-assessment officers can focus on:

1. Take pride in your physical skills and preparation.

As someone who spent most of the last half of my career training officers and new recruits, it pained me greatly to see veteran officers approach training with dread and disgust. It was disappointing to see them arrive to class with little intention of improving their skills, focusing only on getting through the training with as little effort as possible.

Officers would ask why they should worry about being taken to the ground and defending their firearm against an assaultive subject when it had never happened to them. Similar questions were posed to me many times throughout training sessions.

My response was always the same: I would ask them what their family thought they were doing that day. I liked to let that question sit for a few seconds before giving them my answer: “They think you are training to get better at your profession today, to return home safely to them after every shift. So that’s why you’re going to work hard, sweat and get uncomfortable so that we can live up to their idea of what’s happening here today!”

Every day you put the badge on, you owe it to your family, co-workers and community to maintain the highest level of skills because you will never get a second chance to have properly trained and prepared when faced with an assaultive subject.

And if you are fortunate to have the privilege of leading training, you cannot accept complacency and allow your critical skills training to become a “going through the motions” event.

2. Be aware of the attitude you bring to work every day.

It’s incredibly easy to become cynical of just about everything in this career field. One day you may come to work and find everyone drives you crazy. You start to think that citizens, city council members, department heads, mid-level supervisors, immediate supervisors and maybe even your shift mates are all idiots, and no one has any idea how to do anything, except you! You have all the answers and all the great ideas. You are the only one who knows how to handle a particular call or create a new program, except you will not step forward with ideas because you don’t want any more work to do. Does that sound familiar? Maybe it sounds like some of your co-workers or people you associate with, or it could be the person looking back at you in the mirror.

The truth of the law enforcement profession is that it is exactly as it is advertised – there are many ways to be right, it will always be changing, it will always be a challenge, it will require you to deal with people and it will force you to grow. Yet for many officers, the very things they were seeking when embarking in policing are now the things they are most frustrated with. The hard truth here is that it is our personal attitude that has changed, not the job.

3. Ensure you continue to grow professionally and personally.

In 2003 I stumbled across a group of guys training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. I had no idea what they were doing or how to do it, but I knew I needed more training for ground encounters.

At my first class I was manhandled by men and women much smaller and far more skilled than me. I knew I had a lot to learn and continued my training by going once or twice a week while my family was younger. Over the last 16 years, it’s developed into much more.

By continuing to learn, being humble enough to admit I did not know everything and putting myself into situations where I was the student, I was able to obtain critical skills that enhanced my agency’s training program. I was able to share this knowledge with fellow officers and provide more peace of mind to them and their families.

While Brazilian Jiu Jitsu may not be your cup of tea, find something you are passionate about and immerse yourself in it. Make sure it is something outside of police work like coaching youth sports, joining a group focused on your favorite activity, or participating in anything that gets you into a different circle of people who will help you rebalance your attitude, grow and have some fun!

In my final article I will discuss step four: Life after the badge.

FBI: Most Wanted list suspect is believed killed by officers

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Jerrod Hardy

Associted Press

APEX, N.C. — The FBI tracked a man they think was one of the country's Ten Most Wanted Fugitives to a North Carolina motel, where agents shot and killed him on Wednesday.

The armed suspect shot to death at a motel in the Raleigh suburb of Apex will be identified by state medical examiners but was believed to be 47-year-old Greg Alyn Carlson, the FBI's North Carolina office said in a news release. Authorities said he was wanted in connection with multiple armed sexual assaults including a burglary and sexual assault in Los Angeles last fall.

An FBI spokeswoman did not respond to messages asking whether the man exchanged gunfire with agents. Apex Police Capt. Mitch McKinney said his officers were contacted after the FBI raid to secure the scene. He said he had no information about the shooting.

"Agents approached the room and tried to take Carlson into custody. Following an altercation over a gun, Carlson was shot to death by FBI agents," Paul Delacourt, assistant director of the FBI's Los Angeles office, said in a press conference.

Carlson, who the agency said had been linked by DNA to sexual assaults dating back to 2003, had previously been tracked to South Carolina, Alabama and Florida, the FBI said.

Authorities say Carlson committed a burglary on July 13, 2017, during which he attempted to sexually assault a woman while using a weapon.

In September, he was charged with assault with intent to commit rape, assault with a deadly weapon and burglary, and he was arrested by Los Angeles police.

Carlson posted bond and was released, then fled to Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. The FBI said investigators believe he then left the state in a car with a stolen gun and a significant amount of cash.

He was spotted in Hoover, Alabama, on Nov. 22 and led police on a high-speed chase, but officers called off the pursuit because of danger to the public.

Carlson was then spotted in Florida, first in Jacksonville on Nov. 28 and in Daytona Beach two days after that.


Fear and mistrust: Parkland attack disrupts school life

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Jerrod Hardy

Associated Press

OKEECHOBEE, Fla. — Some students have difficulty trusting classmates outside their circle. Parents say interactions with school staff are more impersonal. Teachers worry that added security detracts from learning.

The Parkland massacre a year ago upended school life across Florida. In the year since a gunman fatally shot 14 students and three staffers, school districts have reshaped the K-12 experience, adopting new rules for entering campus, hiring more police and holding frequent safety drills. Some districts trained teams of armed employees to confront attackers.

"You can't really trust other students. They all have different mindsets," said Allen White, a senior at the lone high school in the central Florida farming town of Okeechobee.

Reflecting at a skate park near campus, White and four friends said their school's atmosphere changed after Feb. 14, 2018. Only last month, suspicious social media posts put Okeechobee High on alert, prompting many students, including White, to stay home.

"I don't really feel safe. It has become a real-life epidemic," he said. He attributed school violence primarily to bullying and mental health and said schools need to better address those issues.

Okeechobee is one of at least 24 Florida districts that have started training and arming non-instructional personnel.

On a recent afternoon, four school staffers met secretly at a grassy basin dug into the fertile land that borders Lake Okeechobee. They grabbed ammunition from a military-style container and loaded a handgun while standing by a picnic table. For hours, they practiced shooting at silhouette targets with sheriff deputies.

Authorities keep the identities of these "guardians" secret, citing security reasons. One of the women practicing said the 140 hours of required training adds to a busy schedule, but she feels compelled to do it just in case.

"Protecting the children's safety is first," she said. "They won't know that I am one of their guardians. But I will be prepared."

In Miami, parents say some schools — even preschools— have lost a sense of community since Parkland. Once-mundane morning drop-offs, for instance, have turned into a regimented affair.

Some schools previously allowed parents to drop off students directly with their teachers. Now children as young as 4 or 5 must be dropped off outside and walked inside by staff, cutting off opportunities for informal interactions.

"We are treated like we are criminals," said Karilyn Bacallao, a former teacher who now has two elementary school children. "The last time I heard the news, it has never been the parent who comes to shoot."

Bacallao says she worries about how the new measures are affecting her 7-year-old daughter, who came home from class in tears one day in December.

"She starts telling me, 'There was blood in the bathroom, our teacher wasn't there, and there was a bad guy with a gun,'" she said.

Bacallao learned later that the school was on lockdown because of a nearby robbery. The kids were gathered in the cafeteria with a school counselor who turned the lights off and told them to draw in the dark. She said children heard sirens outside. Nobody explained the blood in the bathroom. Her daughter later found out it was nothing more than a nose bleed.

Teenagers are increasingly getting used to hearing about guns on campus.

Terezie Roberts is a member of Moms Demand Action, a nonprofit that fights to reform gun laws. She has two children in high school who now talk more about threats, but it is often unclear whether they are rumors or real.

"My son told me that he and his friends always talk and say that they could be the next" target. "It almost feels like a game to them," Roberts said.

Ivy Schamis, who was teaching Holocaust studies at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School when her classroom came under attack, says more students now ask to visit the school's wellness center. The teacher whose classroom was across the hall from hers on the day of the shooting did not return to school this year, she said.

Schamis said it was "preposterous" that students have to come to school "thinking what may happen as opposed to what they are learning."

"It's absolutely disrupting education," she said.

A 2016 study published in the Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis journal analyzed the effects of 36 high school shootings on math and English tests in 12 states over three years. It found that in these schools, enrollment declined among 9th grade students, and test results dropped significantly compared to other schools in their districts.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and GOP state lawmakers want to expand the existing guardian program so more teachers can have guns. Senate Republicans filed the proposal last week.

Before the shooting, Schamis said, she would have "felt that only military and law enforcement should really carry guns." But now "I keep going over it in my head."

She shared the story of the school's athletic director, Chris Hixon, a Navy veteran who was shot in the legs as he ran toward suspect Nikolas Cruz.

"Had he had a gun, he might have been able to take the shooter down before any more damage was done. So now, I am not sure."


Layoffs for Four OH Firefighters Delayed

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The layoffs of the four Barberton firefighters/paramedics were moved to March 1, marking the first time firefighters will be let go in the department's 117-year history.

Suspect arrested after ramming Calif. patrol car, crashing into garage

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert Salonga and Joseph Geha The Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — A man was arrested Wednesday afternoon after he allegedly tried to flee a police stop by ramming a police car and speeding off, but ended up crashing into the garage of an Alum Rock home, authorities said.

Around 1:45 p.m., a patrol officer was trying to conduct a traffic stop on a blue Chevrolet pickup truck for an unspecified vehicle code violation near Dale Drive and Alum Rock Avenue, Officer Gina Tepoorten said. She added that the truck matched a description from a January hit-and-run crash in the area where the driver was suspected of ramming another vehicle.

But Wednesday’s driver — whose identity was not immediately released — instead backed into the officer’s patrol car, sped away, and traveled about a half-mile east to East Hills Drive when he crashed and wedged the truck into the residential garage. Police would later learn that the suspect hit two other vehicles in his escape path, Tepoorten said.

It was unclear whether the officer whose car was hit was able to engage in a pursuit. But after the crash, a large contingent of police officers, joined by police dogs, surrounded the home with guns drawn as they searched for the driver.

Around 3 p.m., police officers entered the garage and took the man into custody. He was taken a local hospital, and upon release was expected to be booked into the Santa Clara County jail on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon, hit and run, and evading a police officer.

The officer involved in the initial traffic stop attempt was also taken to a hospital with what police described as non-life threatening injuries. The occupants in the other two vehicles the suspect allegedly hit were not injured, police said.

According to police, the pickup truck matched a description from a January hit-and-run collision in the area. But it was not immediately clear whether that was spurred the initial traffic stop.

———

©2019 the San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.)


Ex-Dallas FF Allegedly Hid Camera in Station Bathroom

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The former Dallas Fire-Rescue firefighter was arrested after he was accused of hiding a small camera in a firehouse's downstairs bathroom.

US Digital Designs Launches OmniAlert Strobe Speaker for Fire Stations

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The novel new fire station alerting strobe speaker answers the challenges posed by open areas with high ambient noise levels.

Man convicted in 2010 killing of Ariz. Border Patrol agent

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Jerrod Hardy

Shaq Davis The Arizona Daily Star, Tucson

TUSCAN, Ariz. — One of the men linked to the fatal shooting of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in 2010 was convicted of murder Tuesday afternoon, officials said.

Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes was a part of an armed five-person crew in search of drug smugglers to rob from Mexico into the United States before the fatal shooting, a U.S. Department of Justice news release said.

He was convicted of: first-degree murder, second-degree murder, conspiracy to effect interstate commerce by robbery, attempted robbery, assault on four agents and carrying a firearm during a violent crime, the release said.

Terry, 40, was part of the elite Border Patrol unit attempting to arrest the group north of Nogales, Arizona when shots rang out Dec. 14, 2010.

A bullet from an AK-47 assault weapon struck Terry's spine severing his spinal cord and aorta. Agents were not able to save him.

Investigators collected four loaded AK-47 assault weapons, an AR-15 semi-automatic assault weapon, 180 rounds of ammunition and food to last for days from the scene, the news release said.

When Osorio-Arellanes fled the scene, he left behind his wounded brother, Manuel Osorio-Arellanes. Manuel was ultimately sentenced to 30 years in prison, but not before identifying the crew members for authorities.

In 2017, Heraclio was arrested by Mexican authorities in Chihuahua, Mexico and extradited to the U.S. last August.

He is the sixth of seven men convicted in the case so far.

Ivan Soto-Barraza and Jesus Lionel Sanchez-Mesa were sentenced to life in prison in their first-degree murder convictions in 2015, the release said.

Rosario Rafael Burboa-Alvarez pled guilty to first-degree murder and received 27 years in prison.

Rito Osorio-Arellanes was given an eight-year sentence after a guilty plea of conspiracy to interfere with commerce by robbery. He was not at the shooting scene.

Jesus Favela-Astorga is the last person said to be involved in the incident. He will be extradited to the U.S and tried in Tucson.

Sentencing for Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes is set for April 29.

“Brian Terry’s family will never have its hero back, but his loved ones now have justice,” said Robert Brewer, U.S. Attorney of the Southern District of California. “The jury’s verdict is the right outcome not only for the family, but for the men and women of the U.S. Border Patrol who daily put their lives at risk to protect this country.

———

©2019 The Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, Ariz.)


Coxreels Introduces the New Brawny Option for the 100 Series Reels

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Coxreels is proud to announce the new Brawny option available for most 100 Series hose reels. The 100 Series reel can be mounted to a floor, wall, ceiling, bench, or truck and is made of steel for strength and durability with a U-shaped frame for 2-point...

Two Seattle Firefighters Hurt on Overdose Call

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighters were taken to the hospital following the early Thursday incident and are in stable condition.

2 dead after kidnapping, police pursuit in Mo., Ill.

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A man accused of kidnapping his girlfriend and their 10-year-old daughter then killing a man during an attempted carjacking was shot to death following a police pursuit through Missouri and Illinois, authorities said Wednesday.

The pursuit began Tuesday evening in Jefferson City, Missouri, and ended about three hours later in Greenville, Illinois, after sheriff's deputies used stop sticks to deflate the tires on Leslie Austin's SUV, allowing the girlfriend and child to escape. Authorities said Austin, 39, fired multiple shots during and after the pursuit, but do not yet know if he shot himself or was shot and killed by law enforcement.

Austin's 33-year-old girlfriend, Danielle Smith, was shot and wounded several times, and has been hospitalized in critical condition, Illinois State Police said in a news release. The daughter wasn't hurt.

Jefferson City police Lt. David Williams said the girlfriend had a restraining order against Austin.

Little information has been released about the circumstances of the abduction. Officers responding to reports of gunfire in a Jefferson City parking lot around 7:40 p.m. found spent shell casings and broken glass, Williams said. Witnesses who called 911 said they saw the SUV speeding away after the shots were fired.

Not knowing of the abduction, a Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper in Union, about 75 miles (120 kilometers) away, attempted to stop Austin for a registration violation around 9 p.m., Patrol Cpl. Justin Wheatley said. Austin took off and blew through several stop lights. The patrol called off the pursuit, Wheatley said.

A Franklin County sheriff's deputy reinitiated the pursuit after learning the vehicle was wanted, Wheatley said.

Patrol troopers caught up with Austin again about 25 miles (40 kilometers) away on Interstate 44 in the western St. Louis suburb of Eureka. They pursued him until he drove across a bridge into Illinois, where Illinois State Police Troopers took up the pursuit, Wheatley said.

At around 10:30 p.m., Bond County sheriff's deputies deployed the stop sticks on Illinois 140 near Greenville, and the girlfriend and child were able to escape the slowing SUV, Illinois State Police said in a news release.

Austin then tried to carjack a vehicle from Gregory Price, shooting and killing the 67-year-old man from Florissant, Missouri. Austin apparently decided against taking Price's car and failed in an attempt to carjack a second vehicle, choosing instead to continue on in his damaged SUV, state police said.

He eventually stopped the vehicle and was shot and killed in a shootout, although police said it was unclear if he was shot by an officer or the gunshot was self-inflicted.

Austin had convictions in Missouri for misdemeanor theft, domestic assault, tampering with a motor vehicle and resisting arrest.


Engine 255 Delivered to Gilbert, AZ, Fire & Rescue

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Gilbert, AZ, Fire & Rescue has taken delivery of Engine 255, a Pierce Quantum pumper. It is powered by a Detroit Diesel engine and an Allison transmission. It is equipped with a 500-gallon water tank with a 30-gallon foam cell, a hydraulic ladder rack,...

Suspect charged with murder in NYPD blue-on-blue death

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

NEW YORK — A robbery suspect with a long rap sheet and a habit of bizarre stunts was charged Wednesday with murder in the death of a New York City police detective struck by friendly fire while responding to a stick-up Tuesday night.

Detective Brian Simonsen died after being hit once in the chest by crossfire as he and six other officers fired 42 shots at suspect Christopher Ransom, who charged toward the entrance of a Queens store and mimicked pulling the trigger of a fake handgun, police said.

"You have to understand, this happens in seconds," Chief of Department Terence Monahan said. "It goes from 0 to 60. You're investigating a possible crime and all of a sudden someone is charging at you, pointing what you believe to be a firearm, simulating firing at you. It raises everything very quickly."

Simonsen's supervisor, Sgt. Matthew Gorman, and Ransom were also wounded. Gorman was hit in the leg. The extent of Ransom's injuries is unclear. Both are listed in stable condition.

Ransom, 27, is also charged with robbery, assault, aggravated manslaughter and menacing. It wasn't clear if he had a lawyer who could comment on his behalf. A telephone number listed for Ransom in Brooklyn had a busy signal Wednesday night.

Ransom has been arrested at least 11 times since 2012, records show, and he was wanted by police in connection with a Jan. 19 robbery at another cellphone store. After one arrest, court papers show, Ransom was taken to a psychiatric ward.

On social media, Ransom has styled himself as a comedian and prankster in the vein of Sasha Baron Cohen of "Borat" fame, filling Facebook and YouTube pages with videos of himself masquerading as a Speedo-wearing superhero.

At times, the two personas have blurred.

Ransom pleaded guilty to criminal trespass and was sentenced to 20 days in jail in 2016 after allegedly climbing over a gate and walking up to a desk at a Brooklyn police station while wearing a fake SWAT vest and police badge. Police records listed his alias as "Detective."

Four years earlier, he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to jail time for pretending to be an intern to gain access to a judge's chambers.

Meanwhile, on social media, he's posted videos of himself in his superhero garb stopping a subway train by jumping on the tracks and putting his hand up. In another, titled "Vigilante offers services to the NYPD," he shows up to a police precinct in the outfit.

Ransom sued the city over a 2015 arrest, alleging officers approached him on a street corner for no reason, cornered him in a store with guns drawn and took him to a psychiatric ward against his will. His charges were later dismissed, and he dropped the lawsuit in 2016.

Simonsen, 42, grew up in eastern Long Island, and he and his wife continued to live close by — more than an hour's drive from the 102nd precinct where he worked his whole 19-year NYPD career.

Simonsen should have been off Tuesday for a union meeting, but he opted to work so he could continue tracking a string of recent robberies.

Since childhood he's been known as "Smiles" for his bright, welcoming personality. At Riverhead High School, he played football and baseball and was friends with everyone he met, childhood friend Melissa Weir said.

"Everyone is in complete shock. Everyone is feeling this," Weir said. "When you have somebody like Brian, it's really hitting everybody. There are people all over the place hurting."

Simonsen, Gorman and six uniformed officers swarmed to the T-Mobile store at around 6:10 p.m. Tuesday after a 911 caller standing outside reported seeing a man take two employees to a back room at gunpoint, Monahan said.

Simonsen and Gorman, who were both in plainclothes, were working on another case nearby when the call came and arrived around the same time as patrol officers, Monahan said.

The shooting started as Gorman and two of the uniformed officers retreated from the store when Ransom emerged from a back room and came at them, Monahan said. The gunshots blew out the store's doors, showering the sidewalk with glass.

Simonsen stayed outside as Gorman and the uniformed officers went in, Monahan said. Simonsen fired two shots. Gorman fired 11 times. It's not clear who fired the shots that struck them, Monahan said.


Watch TN House Explode While Crews Fight Fire

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Memphis firefighters were trying to put out a blaze at a Nutbush area home Wednesday when it exploded.

Sources: Jason Van Dyke assaulted in Conn. prison

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

CHICAGO — A Chicago police officer who fatally shot teenager Laquan McDonald was assaulted by inmates in his cell at a Connecticut prison, the officer's wife said Wednesday.

Jason Van Dyke was transferred earlier this month to a federal prison in Danbury, Connecticut. He told his lawyers he was placed in the prison's general population hours after his arrival and was assaulted there, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

"We are all petrified and in fear for Jason's life," his wife, Tiffany Van Dyke, told the newspaper. "Jason just wants to serve his sentence. He does not want any trouble. I hope prison officials will take steps to rectify this right away. He never should have been in the general population."

Details of the incident weren't immediately clear. A spokesperson for the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury wasn't available for comment when The Associated Press called on Wednesday night.

A Cook County, Illinois, jury in October found Jason Van Dyke guilty of second-degree murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery with a firearm for the 2014 killing of McDonald, who was shot 16 times. In January, Van Dyke was sentenced to six years and nine months in prison.

Prosecutors on Monday asked the Illinois Supreme Court to review the sentence. They said they believe Judge Vincent Gaughan improperly applied the law when sentencing Van Dyke.

Absent a new sentence, Van Dyke will likely serve only about three years, with credit for good behavior.

Van Dyke was being held at the Rock Island County Jail in Rock Island, Illinois, about 150 miles (240 kilometers) west of Chicago, before the move to the low-security Connecticut prison. County authorities said he was kept out of the Illinois jail's general population.


CT Department Expands Firefighter Eligibilty

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials are hoping to a diverse crop of potential firefighters to the Bridgeport Fire Department.

Memorial Grows For NYPD Detective Killed by Friendly Fire

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

New Yorkers are remembering NYPD Detective Detective Brian Simonsen as a “cop’s cop” who served the city for nearly 19 years until he was shot and killed by friendly fire while responding to a robbery in Queens.

FBI 10 Most Wanted Fugitive Shot Dead In North Carolina

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Greg Alyn Carlson was shot to death in a hotel n the Raleigh-Durham area by the FBI.

MT Chief Wins National Wildfire Mitigation Award

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Wolf Creek/Craig Fire Chief Rocky Infanger, who began his firefighting career in 1985, received one of the highest honors in the field of wildfire mitigation Wednesday.

MT Chief Wins National Wildfire Mitigation Award

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Wolf Creek/Craig Fire Chief Rocky Infanger, who began his firefighting career in 1985, received one of the highest honors in the field of wildfire mitigation Wednesday.

Cops Catch Loose Chicken With Oatmeal Creme Pie

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Did the chicken cross the road? This one sure did, blocking traffic in Nashville and prompting authorities to be called in.

Inmate Claims Georgia Deputy Shoved Him Into Elevator Wall

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Clayton County inmate is suing the sheriff’s office over an incident caught on video where he appeared to be shoved into an elevator by a deputy.

Suspect Arrested After Ramming Patrol Car, Crashing Into Garage

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man was arrested Wednesday afternoon after he allegedly tried to flee a police stop by ramming a police car and speeding off, but ended up crashing into the garage of an Alum Rock home, authorities said.

Eighth Massachusetts Trooper to Plead Guilty in Overtime Scandal

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Another suspended state trooper is expected to plead guilty in the ongoing investigation of overtime abuse at the Massachusetts State Police, the U.S. attorney’s office said.

The Challenge for Police in Dealing With an Unconscious Person With a Gun

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Use-of-force experts say that the sight of a gun poses a potential threat to police even if it's on an unconscious person, and as the person awakes, officers have to make split-second decisions.

Police: Suspect in Ohio Student’s Abduction Fatally Shot Her in Kentucky

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The man suspected of abducting an Ohio State University student from the Mansfield campus fatally shot her before a Kentucky police officer shot and killed him, authorities confirmed Wednesday.

Braun debuts latest trends, technology in ambulance design

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

From custom colors to anti-theft systems and additional patient transport options, EMS Today attendees will find four Braun ambulance demos to explore

Florida Deputies Shoot at Armed Man Who Was Live-Streaming on Instagram

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 23-year-old man armed with a gun and live-streaming on Instagram was shot at by three Orange County deputies on Wednesday night, said Sheriff John Mina.

Aladtec launches Extra Hours function for cloud-based scheduling software

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The new function will allow employees to record unplanned shifts, holdovers, shift variances, shift adjustments and unscheduled overtime

Sixth Suspect Convicted in Fatal Shooting of Border Patrol Agent

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Heraclio Osorio Arellanes faces life in prison after a federal jury in Tucson convicted him of first- and second-degree murder, among other charges related to a shootout that left Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry dead in 2010.

Apparatus Graphics and Colors Only Limited by Imagination

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Stunning graphics with deep, mirror-like finishes on apparatus make for show-stopping parade pieces that are the envy of neighbors.

NAEMSP commends new ‘Emergency Triage, Treat and Transport’ model

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The model policy will reimburse EMS agencies for the cost of providing Medicare beneficiaries with treatment-without-transportation and transporting patients to alternative destinations

IAFC applauds Emergency Triage, Treatment and Transport reimbursement model

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The model policy will reimburse fire departments for the cost of providing Medicare beneficiaries with treatment-without-transportation and transporting patients to alternative destinations

Emergency Triage, Treatment and Transport reimbursement model is a watershed moment in modern EMS

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

EMS leaders react to ET3, HHS reimbursement model that recognizes the value of community paramedicine and emphasizes quality and outcomes

CMS announces Medicare reimbursement for certain non-transport treatment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Emergency Triage, Treat and Transport Model makes Medicare reimbursement available for treatment without transport

CMS announces Medicare reimbursement for certain non-transport treatment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Emergency Triage, Treat and Transport Model makes Medicare reimbursement available for treatment without transport

CMS announces Medicare reimbursement for certain non-transport treatment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Emergency Triage, Treat and Transport Model makes Medicare reimbursement available for treatment without transport

CMS announces Medicare reimbursement for certain non-transport treatment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Emergency Triage, Treat and Transport Model makes Medicare reimbursement available for treatment without transport

CMS announces Medicare reimbursement for certain non-transport treatment

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Emergency Triage, Treat and Transport Model makes Medicare reimbursement available for treatment without transport

4 effective strategies to cope with drug shortages in EMS

Posted on February 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pharmaceutical shortages are an ongoing challenge for EMS providers, but agencies can take proactive steps to address the issue

Firefighter who was bullied for having down syndrome rejoins department

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jason Eagan and his family met with several members of the department, apologies were made, and his job was offered back

Firefighter who was allegedly bullied for having down syndrome rejoins department

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jason Eagan and his family met with several members of the department, apologies were made, and his job was offered back

4 challenges to fighting fire in the snow

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Snow can hinder the size-up, hiding dangers and firefighter tools, and requires more effort to effect a fire attack, making rehab a must

Idaho first responder, veteran hopes clinical trial will help him speak again

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William Paine contracted throat cancer after on-the-job asbestos exposure and has communicated through a prosthesis for over 15 years

Idaho first responder, veteran hopes clinical trial will help him speak again

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William Paine contracted throat cancer after on-the-job asbestos exposure and has communicated through a prosthesis for over 15 years

Video: UPS truck blocks FDNY ambulance with sirens blaring

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A UPS truck was parked in the street and blocking traffic, and an ambulance was forced to wait until the driver pulled ahead

Search team picks up underwater signal from crashed air ambulance

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The team heard a strong “ping” from a beacon attached to the Beechcraft King Air 200 turboprop’s cockpit voice recorder, according to officials

Texas paramedic accused of sexually harassing 2 teens during transports

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Aaron English was accused of groping a teenage patient in 2017, but he wasn't charged until another teen came forward with allegations of inappropriate behavior

Fla. county honors fallen firefighters by renaming road

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Todd Aldridge and Mark Benge, who died 30 years ago, are the only firefighters in Orange County fire Rescue’s history to have died in the line of duty

Mont. fire chief wins national fire mitigation award

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Wolf Creek/Craig Fire Chief Rocky Infanger was honored for bringing a passion and purpose to mitigation work as well as a concern for the well-being of others

Fla. ambulance struck by concrete truck while en route to call

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police said an Okaloosa County EMS ambulance was responding to a call when a concrete truck pulled out in front of the ambulance

Battalion chief rescues man twice from burning car

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prince George's County Fire-EMS Department Battalion Chief Donald Fletcher was on his way home from work when he saw a “ball of fire”

5 ways to bring a culture of celebration to your EMS agency

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Regardless of size or service model, here are a few ways your department can honor its employees throughout the year

PA Volunteer FFs Might See Tax Credits by 2020

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Taylor Borough Council could roll back the first eligibility period for tax credits for volunteer firefighters.

FL County Renames Road for Fallen Firefighters

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Orange County Fire Rescue firefighters Todd Aldridge and Mark Benge are being posthumously honored with a stretch of road named after them.

Driver Accused of Killing Colorado Trooper Faces Second Trial

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Opening arguments are scheduled to begin in Douglas County District Court Wednesday against a truck driver who allegedly struck and killed Colorado State Patrol Trooper Cody Donahue.

Officers Cleared of Wrongdoing in Response to Pulse Nightclub Massacre

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fourteen law enforcement officers fired shots during the mass shooting at Pulse nightclub, but none struck anyone other than the gunman, the Orange-Osceola State Attorney’s Office said Wednesday.

Florida School Arming Combat Veterans to Stop Attacks

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Manatee School for the Arts is hiring only military veterans with combat experience and arming them with Glock handguns and Kel-Tec RDB 17-inch semi-automatic long-guns.

CA Fire Recruit Gets $275K Discrimination Settlement

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighter recruit said she was wrongfully terminated in 2016 after speaking up about lewd comments and drawings in the San Deigo Fire Academy locker room.

Why I believe in simulation training: One officer’s story

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Sponsored by Laser Shot

By Rachel Zoch for PoliceOne BrandFocus

Capt. Michael Curry discovered simulation training almost by accident. As a training officer with a suburban department in the Houston area, he found that the agency had purchased the Laser Shot training platform but wasn’t making full use of it.

Curry started exploring what Laser Shot had to offer, first by using the platform to boost marksmanship. He worked with the department’s firearms instructors to create a laser-based course to help officers struggling with their shooting qualification by providing training in a dry-fire environment at the station.

This effort yielded positive results right away, from greater control and customization of the training program to cost savings from reduced range fees and officer overtime.

“No. 1, the cost-benefit analysis for using laser-based training versus live was the biggest issue,” said Curry. “I could get more bang for my buck using the laser-based program.”

Improving training without increasing costs

Because the department didn’t need to worry about scheduling, overtime, travel to the range or ammunition expenses, officers were able to get as much training as they needed to boost their skills.

“We had very good success with this technique because it allowed us to get numerous numbers of rips and rounds down range in a very short period, without having to do all the scheduling,” he added. “We were able to actually train officers on shift so they didn't need to be paid overtime.”

In addition to improving officer performance and reducing expenses, using in-house simulation training also enabled the department to keep officers at the station so they could respond quickly when needed.

“We were able to actually practice in the building,” Curry said, “so if something did happen, we would just put the toys down, pick up our real guns and then respond accordingly.”

The small footprint and mobility of the Laser Shot system provided a great deal of flexibility for the department.

“It allows you to create a training environment just about anywhere,” Curry said. “You can pick it up, put it in a case with all of the tools, take it anywhere and set it up.”

Creating custom scenarios to train for local issues

Once he saw the positive impacts of simulation training, Curry began to expand the program, including working with Laser Shot to develop custom scenarios to train for specific local issues.

“We used every bit of the training apparatus. We used the judgmental scenarios. We used the games and the core skills drills to work on handling and marksmanship,” he said. “Just about everything they had to offer, I found a way to use it.”

Laser Shot collaborated with Curry and his team to create custom local scenarios, based on the agency’s specific needs and goals, with the department’s officers acting as role players. Being able to customize the scenarios is a key benefit, Curry says, and he appreciates that the company was willing to work with him to develop the custom scenarios when he didn’t see what he wanted in their existing catalog.

“We had a good working relationship, and they were able to make those scenarios come to life for us,” Curry said. “They were always open to suggestions and feedback.”

Bringing simulation training to a new agency

Based on those experiences, Curry says it only made sense to bring Laser Shot’s training technology to his current agency, which serves a rural college campus about 45 miles north of Houston. He joined in the agency in late 2017 and hopes to have the system in place by June 2019.

To get ready for the simulator’s rollout, Curry is developing a three-stage process for all the department’s officers that includes moving drills and advanced weapon handling drills in both the dry-fire laser environment and live-fire drills.

“The goal is to use the Laser Shot training to get all our officers to an 80 or 90 percent threshold for marksmanship qualification and to maintain that into perpetuity,” he said. “It’s to get everybody comfortable doing what they need to do so that they are as accurate as they possibly can be when handling their firearms.”

He also envisions using the judgmental branching video scenarios for decision-making training and evaluation.

“I’ve put a sergeant into the environment, had them respond to whatever shows up on the screen in front of them, and then begin to walk through the incident command portion of the event,” said Curry. “So after all of the shooting is done – if shooting was even necessary – now let’s begin to discuss and evaluate the thought process on what needs to happen next.”

A key benefit of the judgmental branching scenarios, he says, is the opportunity to understand what the officer is thinking about and help him or her navigate possible responses. The instructor is then able to evaluate the trainee’s thought process as well as his or her performance in the exercise.

Curry also appreciates the realism provided by the Laser Shot simulator because he says it helps officers experience life-or-death situations in a controlled training environment.

“As a police trainer, I should be able to recreate the adrenaline, the feeling, the rush, the fear, in a scenario-based environment that causes you to think so you have the tools to operate in the real-world environment,” he said. “I call it putting these tools into the mental Rolodex of the officer. You should have made whatever mistakes you're going to make in training and talk them through so you have the tools in your mental Rolodex to respond appropriately.”


Trail LRF Thermal Riflescope

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Trail LRF units deliver vivid thermal imaging by taking the same thermal technology found in Pulsar Trail thermal riflescopes and adds a useful integrated laser rangefinder. Pulsar Trail LRFs feature a detection range between 875 and 2000 yards and...

Man Convicted of First-Degree Murder for Border Agent’s Slaying

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to officials, Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes and four other members of a crew that planned on robbing marijuana smugglers encountered Terry and other agents who were on a stakeout in the southern Arizona desert. The 30-year-old Border Patrol agent was fatally shot in the encounter.

Man Convicted of First-Degree Murder for Border Agent’s Slaying

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to officials, Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes and four other members of a crew that planned on robbing marijuana smugglers encountered Terry and other agents who were on a stakeout in the southern Arizona desert. The 30-year-old Border Patrol agent was fatally shot in the encounter.

How to fund FirstNet implementation in your agency

Posted on February 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Therese Matthews
Author: Therese Matthews

With all 50 states and U.S. territories opting-in to FirstNet access, first responders are looking at ways they can utilize this mission-critical communication network within their agencies. Police, fire, EMS, hospitals and other public safety agencies are beginning to see the benefits of this communication resource during large crowd gatherings, natural disasters or other major events in their communities.

Finding funding to cover network access and acquire smart phones, SIM cards, tablets, software applications or other equipment may require a mix of your department’s own funding, as well as grants and loans. Numerous federal, state and private grants may be able to support all or part of your FirstNet implementation project. Here are some to consider.

FEMA grants

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) funding may be the largest source of federal grants available to cover FirstNet implementation costs. FEMA offers several grant programs that can support state, local, tribal and territorial emergency communication projects. These include:

1. Emergency Management Performance Grants (EMPG)

The EMPG assists state, local, tribal and territories in preparing for all hazards. State Administering Agencies (SAAs) or State Emergency Management Agencies apply directly to FEMA but must sub-award a portion of the funding to other state and local agencies.

2. Homeland Security Grants (HSGP)

The HSGP consists of three grant programs:

State Homeland Security Program (SHSP): Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI); Operation Stonegarden (OPSG).

Each state and territory receives an allocation of SHSP funds. However, UASI funds are restricted to 32 eligible urban areas based on risk. OPSG funds are awarded to state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies located along our nation’s borders.

Note that any communications projects must align with the Statewide Communication Interoperability Plan (SCIP) and involve coordination and consultation with the Statewide Interoperability Governing Body (SIGB) or Statewide Interoperability Executive Committee (SIEC). Reach out to your SAA to discuss your project.

3. Port Security Grant Program (PSGP)

The PSGP provides grants to port authorities, facility operators, and State and local agencies required to provide security services to implement Area Maritime Transportation Security Plans and facility security plans. If your first responder agency falls within this mission, these funds could support some of your FirstNet resource needs.

4. Transit Security Grant Program (TSGP)

These funds support transportation infrastructure security. Those eligible include publicly owned operators of public transportation. Agencies such as transit police, or first responders who work with these transit agencies may benefit from using a portion of these dollars to fund the communication equipment and software required for FirstNet access.

5. Tribal Homeland Security Grant Program (THSGP)

Grants through the THSGP support numerous activities enabling tribes to strengthen their capacity to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to and recover from potential terrorist attacks and other hazards.

6. Assistance to Firefighters (AFG)

These federal grant dollars meet the firefighting and emergency response needs of fire departments and non-affiliated emergency medical service organizations. Communication equipment among first responders to foster interoperability during a disaster, fire and related hazards could be an eligible expense under this program.

Department of Justice grants

The U.S. Department of Justice offers millions of dollars each year in grant funding to support law enforcement, emergency first responders and their community partners. Many of these grants could support the equipment, software and pe