Department of Justice Releases Reports Focused on Improving Safety and Wellness of Nation’s Law Enforcement Officers

Posted on April 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Department of Justice this week released two complementary reports that focus on the mental health and safety of the nation’s federal, state, local and tribal police officers.

Pierce ‘Road Rally’ to Bring the Most Advanced Fire Apparatus to Locations Nationwide

Posted on April 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pierce Manufacturing’s 2019 Road Rally will give members of the fire service a chance to experience the most innovative equipment in the fire industry and talk with experts about their community’s unique needs.

Cologne, MN, Fire Dept. Puts 3,000-gallon Tanker in Service

Posted on April 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Cologne, MN, Fire Department has placed in service a 3,000-gallon tanker built by Midwest Fire on a Kenworth T400 cab and chassis.

Axon Evidence Approved for Federal Agency Use

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Axon Evidence is one of only 15 Software as a Service (SaaS) cloud service providers with a FedRAMP JAB P-ATO. The authorization confirms that Axon Evidence has been reviewed and approved by the federal government and can be used by other federal agencies.

Viridian Introduces Weapon-Mounted Video System

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The FACT Duty WMC employs a 1080p full-HD digital camera with a microphone and 500 lumen tactical light. The weapon-mounted camera provides a clear view of critical use-of-force events from the end of the firearm, addressing limitations officers can face with body cameras.

Lawsuit: Faulty Safety Device Fatal for TX Firefighter

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A lawsuit filed by a San Antonio firefighter's family alleges that a personal safety alarm didn't sound as intended while battling a 2017 blaze, leading to the firefighter's death.

FL Firefighter Cancer Bill Gains More Momentum

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After emotional testimony Thursday, a Florida House committee unanimously advanced the proposed legislation that would give firefighters around the state cancer coverage.

Paris Honors Firefighters who Battled Notre Dame Blaze

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"You have saved part of what we are," Mayor Anne Hidalgo told the firefighters who gathered for a ceremony Thursday outside Paris' Hotel de Ville.

Mississippi Officer Shot, Suspect Killed in Standoff

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Deputy with the Jackson County (MI) Sheriff's Office was shot late Wednesday while responding to a domestic violence call.

Arbitrator: Minnesota Officer Should Be Reinstated

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Minnesota Public Radio, 51-year-old Officer Phillip Lombardi was fired after he got into a confrontation with a woman off duty. The woman had kicked his car, and Lombardi got into a verbal confrontation with her.

New York Officer Injured During Drug Arrest at Train Station

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the New Rochelle (NY) Police Department was injured during an arrest of a suspected drug dealer and his alleged customer on a train station platform.

NJ police team up with Basketball Cops Foundation to give kids much-needed basketball hoop

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By PoliceOne Staff

GARFIELD, NJ — Officers in a New Jersey city brought some joy to their community last Thursday through the game of basketball.

The department teamed up with viral police hooper and founder of the Basketball Cops Foundation, Officer Bobby White, to help out a group of kids who were playing basketball using a hoop that didn’t have a backboard.

Garfield Police Sgt. Jeff Stewart first noticed the issue and reached out to White on Instagram. Within minutes, White asked for an address to send a new Spalding regulation hoop set.

Officers from the police department set up the hoop and delivered the surprise to the kids. The kids and officers played a five on five pick up game with the new set.


Jury Finds Man Guilty of Killing Arizona Officer in 2010

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A jury in Arizona found 44-year-old Christopher Redondo guilty of first-degree murder of an officer with the Gilbert Police Department in 2010.

Pennsylvania Department Opens Investigation Into In-Custody OIS Incident

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the New Hope (PA) Police Department reportedly thought he was holding his TASER when he squeezed the trigger and struck a man with a bullet instead.

Off-Duty California Officer Drowns in Hawaii

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Rashad Riley passed away in a tragic drowning accident while on the island of Kauai.

Philadelphia Officer Paints Portraits of Fallen Officers

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The most recent piece of art produced by Jonny Castro is of Deputy Justin DeRosier of the Cowlitz County (WA) Sheriff's Office, who was shot and killed after responding to investigate reports of a disabled motor home.

(Video) The Benefits (and Limitations) of Body Cameras

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

LAPD Captain Greg Meyer (ret.) discusses some of the benefits of body-worn cameras, such as proving an officer's innocence of wrongdoing when falsely accused by a citizen, as well as some limitations.

California Officer Runs Boston Marathon in Full Uniform to Honor Fallen Officers

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Detective Sean Dodge said he got the idea to run a marathon in full gear two years ago as a way to honor the memory of fallen officers.

New Hampshire Chief: Budget is ‘Treading Water’

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Andrew Lavoie is urging the Board of Aldermen to consider raising Mayor Jim Donchess' proposed budget for the Nashua Police Department, citing extensive overtime costs and other factors. The department is spending an average of $30,000 a week in overtime.

DOJ releases reports focusing on safety and wellness of U.S. law enforcement

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WASHINGTON — The Department of Justice released two complementary reports focusing on the mental health and safety of the nation’s federal, state, local and tribal police officers Wednesday.

The reports, Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress and Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies, focus on important steps to improving the delivery of and access to mental health and wellness services for the nation’s 800,000 law enforcement officers.

"Serving as a law enforcement officer requires courage, strength, and dedication," Attorney General William P. Barr said. "The demands of this work, day in and day out, can take a toll on the health and well-being of our officers, but the Department of Justice is committed to doing our part to help.”

Under the Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act, the COPS Office submitted reports to Congress that addressed recommendations on effectiveness of crisis lines for officers, efficacy of annual mental health checks, expansions of peer mentoring programs and ensuring privacy for those in need of these programs. “In this environment, where an inherently stressful job is made more so by a constant undercurrent of distrust and negative public opinion, the risks to officer wellness are exacerbated,” COPS Office Director Phil Keith said. “This report is an important measure and reflection in our ongoing commitment to protect those who protect us."

Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act: Report to Congress by Ed Praetorian on Scribd

Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Programs: Eleven Case Studies by Ed Praetorian on Scribd


SD Volunteer Firefighter Dies on Way to Wildfire

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Argyle volunteer firefighter Dwain Hudson suffered a medical emergency while he was en route to a fire Wednesday in Custer County.

Ohio police chief writes touching tribute to community following damaging tornado

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

SHELBY, Ohio — Following an EF-2 tornado that caused damage to the community, the city of Shelby’s police chief shared his appreciation in a touching tribute, local news station FOX 8 reports.

"We have been so blessed with food, drinks, snacks and an outpouring of support from this awesome community. So many businesses and individuals have chosen to feed first responders, our service crews, and even residents. We have had offers of shelter from individuals and groups; people compelled to act and compelled to be selfless," wrote Shelby Police Chief Lance Combs.

The chief said seeing utility workers from different communities working to restore power made him choke up. The workers accomplished more than a week’s of work in less than two days, according to Combs.

Find his full letter below:

I know I have missed a lot of thank you’s. We have been so blessed with food, drinks, snacks and an outpouring of...

Posted by Shelby Ohio Police Department on Monday, April 15, 2019


The Fexnix TK20R Flashlight

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Fenix TK20R flashlight packs quite a punch with its impressive 1000 lumen maximum output from the CREE XP-L HI V3 LED. The deep reflector gives an impressive beam throw of over 1,000 feet and the powerful strike bezel and strobe mode makes the...

The Fenix TK20R Flashlight

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Fenix TK20R flashlight packs quite a punch with its impressive 1000 lumen maximum output from the CREE XP-L HI V3 LED. The deep reflector gives an impressive beam throw of over 1,000 feet and the powerful strike bezel and strobe mode makes the...

Missouri Sheriff’s Deputy Shoots Suspect During Struggle

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy shot a suspected thief who lunged at the deputy after being confronted in an abandoned nursing home Wednesday morning south of Festus.

Convicted Philadelphia Cop-Killer to Get New Hearing

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner said Wednesday that his office would drop its challenge of a judge’s ruling in convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal’s case, clearing the way for Abu-Jamal to again argue his appeal before the Pennsylvania Supre

Minneapolis to Ban ‘Warrior’ Training for Police

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Minneapolis police officers will no longer be permitted to participate in "warrior"-style training.

Metal Shark to Build Fire Boats for Miami-Dade Fire Rescue

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Shipbuilder Metal Shark has been selected to build the next generation of fire boats for the Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department.

Robot Helped Paris Crews Fighting Notre Dame Blaze

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Colossus, a remote-controlled firefighting robot, was used by the Paris Fire Brigade to help put out the fire at the 850-year-old cathedral while trying to keep firefighters safe.

Former Mich. trooper found guilty in ATV death

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

DETROIT — A former Michigan trooper has been found guilty of the death of a man who was riding an ATV.

According to local news station WXYZ, former Trooper Mark Bessner was on trial for the death of Damon Grimes, who was riding his ATV around his neighborhood in August 2017.

Bessner and his partner observed Grimes driving down the streets of Detroit and attempted to stop him for a traffic violation, but a pursuit ensued.

The trooper says Grimes reached for his waistband two times, leading him to believe that Grimes was reaching for a gun.

Bessner deployed his TASER, leading Grimes to crash into a parked pickup truck and die from blunt force trauma to the head.

During his testimony, Bessner said that Grimes slowed down while pursuing him on the ATV. He didn’t know if Grimes was “taunting” them or trying to lure them into a trap. He said he was shocked to learn that Grimes didn’t have a gun and was only 15 years old.

“The Michigan State Police appreciates the careful deliberation of the men and women of the jury and we are grateful to the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office for their dedication to justice,” the MSP said in a statement. “We send our sincere condolences to the family, friends and supporters of Damon Grimes.”

Bessner’s sentencing is scheduled for May 2.


NFFF Safety Campaign Stresses More Training

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New Jersey fire Capt. David Harris stresses the need for continued training in the NFFF's latest video in its 'Everyone Goes Home' safety campaign.

Suspect Allegedly Hits Pennsylvania Trooper, Flees Police in 100 mph Pursuit

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Fayette County man wanted on forgery charges is accused of hitting a Pennsylvania state trooper with his car early Tuesday, then leading police on a high-speed car chase that ended when he took off on foot into the woods, officials said.

Michigan Sheriff’s Deputy Seriously Wounded; Suspect Fatally Shot

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Jackson County Sheriff's deputy responded to reports of a domestic pursuit was shot multiple times and a suspect was fatally wounded Wednesday night.

Appeal focuses on Sandy Hook officials’ actions before shooting

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. — Sandy Hook Elementary School officials failed to follow mandated security protocol and order a lockdown that may have saved lives immediately after the gunman shot his way through the locked entrance, a lawyer for the parents of two children killed in the massacre told a Connecticut appeals court on Wednesday.

Attorney Devin Janosov tried to convince three judges on the state Appellate Court that they should overturn a lower court ruling that dismissed the parents' wrongful death lawsuit against the town of Newtown and its schools. It's not clear when the judges will issue their decision.

A lawyer for the town, Charles DeLuca, argued that ordering a lockdown was discretionary and there was confusion among officials about what the noises were when gunman Adam Lanza was shooting his way through the school's locked glass entrance in the chaotic first moments of the attack.

Principal Dawn Hochsprung and school psychologist Mary Sherlach rushed into a hallway to see what was happening and were killed. A third staff member was injured. Lanza went on to kill 20 first-graders and four other educators in two classrooms before fatally shooting himself on Dec. 14, 2012.

Janosov argued Hochsprung or other officials should have ordered a "code blue" lockdown over the intercom before going into the hallway, under school security protocol in place at the time. He said a lockdown would have alerted teachers to lock their classroom doors — possibly saving lives.

DeLuca disagreed.

"We'll never know what Dawn Hochsprung thought it was," he said of the first gunshots. "You can't call a code blue unless you know there's a reason to do so."

Another lawyer for the parents, Donald Papcsy, said after the court hearing that the shooting sounds made by an AR-15-type rifle like the one Lanza used are unmistakable.

The parents of Jesse Lewis and Noah Pozner are hoping their lawsuit prompts school officials to follow security procedures during future emergencies. They also are seeking damages. Earlier in the case, they offered to settle the lawsuit for $11 million.

Neil Heslin, Jesse's father, attended the court arguments. He said after the hearing that while he blamed Lanza for the killings, the school system should be held accountable for lapses in security protocol.

"If a code blue was called ... it would have made it possible for all the teachers to realize to lock their doors," he said.

The arguments came on the same day that a Florida teenager who authorities say was obsessed with the Columbine school shooting and may have been planning an attack in Colorado was found dead in an apparent suicide after a nearly 24-hour search. That incident came just ahead of the 20th anniversary of the 1999 Columbine massacre.

Lanza, the Sandy Hook shooter, killed his mother at their Newtown home before going to the school, where he killed himself as police arrived. The motive remains unclear. Connecticut's child advocate said Lanza's severe and deteriorating mental health problems, his preoccupation with violence and access to his mother's legal weapons "proved a recipe for mass murder."

Last year, Connecticut Superior Court Judge Robin Wilson dismissed the lawsuit over the Sandy Hook security protocols, citing government immunity.

"Emergencies, by their very nature, are sudden and often rapidly evolving events, and a response can never be one hundred percent scripted and directed," Wilson wrote.

"To say that the faculty and staff of the school were to act in a prescribed manner in responding to an emergency situation would likewise be illogical and in direct contradiction to the very purpose of governmental immunity: allowing for the exercise of judgment without fear of second-guessing," she wrote.


Inheritance Will Pay for NH Department’s Breathing Gear

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Portsmouth Fire Department will dip into the inheritance it received from a late resident in order to buy two self-contained breathing apparatus retrofit kits.

Ex-Black Panther gets new hearing in 1981 LEO death

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — A former Black Panther and death row activist convicted of killing a Philadelphia police officer decades ago will get a new appeals hearing after the city prosecutor on Wednesday dropped his opposition to it.

Mumia Abu-Jamal, 64, is serving a life sentence after spending decades on death row in the 1981 slaying of Officer Daniel Faulkner, who had pulled his brother over in an overnight traffic stop.

Abu-Jamal, who was shot during the encounter, was largely tried in absentia at his 1982 capital murder trial, after being removed over his repeated objections and efforts to serve as his own lawyer.

A former radio journalist, Abu-Jamal's prison writings made him a popular cause among death penalty opponents worldwide - and a foe of police unions and the slain officer's widow. The attention to his case quieted after his death sentence was set aside over flawed jury instructions in 2011, and his appeals appeared exhausted.

However, in December, Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge Leon Tucker granted Abu-Jamal a new chance to argue his initial appeal after the U.S. Supreme Court said a former state justice had improperly heard an appeal in a murder case he had overseen as district attorney. The justice, Ronald Castille, had done the same in Abu-Jamal's case.

District Attorney Larry Krasner initially fought Tucker's order, fearing it could affect a large number of convictions. On Wednesday, he dropped his challenge, citing a revised ruling from Tucker that narrows the scope of his order.

Krasner agreed that Castille should not have worn "two hats" in the case, a fact made more egregious, he suggested, by the discovery of a 1990 note Castille sent Gov. Robert Casey about "police killers," urging him to issue death warrants to "send a clear and dramatic message to all police killers that the death penalty actually means something."

"Although the issue is technical," said Krasner, a longtime civil rights lawyer, "it is also an important cautionary tale on the systemic problems that flow from a judge's failing to recuse where there is an appearance of bias."

Maureen Faulkner said Krasner broke a promise made this week to inform her of the decision before announcing it. She had been out walking her dogs for a few hours Wednesday morning, out of cellphone range, when she learned the news.

"I was just crying my eyes out, once again," said Faulkner, 62, who was removed from a court hearing last year after her emotions overwhelmed her. "What about the survivors? What about victims in Philadelphia, and how they're notified?"

Krasner's office says he spoke with Maureen Faulkner on Tuesday before making a final decision to drop his challenge to the new appeal.

Castille told The Associated Press last year that Abu-Jamal's lawyers never asked him to step down from the appeal. He served as district attorney after Abu-Jamal's murder trial. He said his colleagues on the Supreme Court "knew I'd signed off on the appeal (filings), but I had nothing to do with the trial."

Tucker, in his opinion, said "the slightest appearance of bias or lack of impartiality undermines the entire judiciary."

Judith Ritter, a lead lawyer for Abu-Jamal, praised Krasner's decision.

"We look forward to having our claims of an unfair trial heard by a fair tribunal," said Ritter, a professor at Widener University's Delaware Law School.


Bail Lowered for Ex-FF Accused in PA Relief Fund Theft

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The former Lehigh Township volunteer firefighter and Allentown police officer allegedly stole more than $315,000 from a firefighter support group.

Ohio trooper rescues teen sex trafficking victim

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dayton Daily News, Ohio

TOLEDO, Ohio — A trooper rescued a sex trafficking victim during a routine traffic stop near Toledo.

Trooper Mitch Ross from the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Swanton Post stopped a 2013 Nissan Sentra for a failure to move over violation on the Ohio Turnpike.

During the stop, the trooper noticed a teenage girl riding with a man. Neither had identification or spoke English, and a translator was called to assist. It was determined the girl was 15 and the man was 35, CBS affiliate WTOL-TV in Toledo reported.

Troopers also confirmed that the man had forced the girl to perform sex acts on him and that she was being taken to Chicago from New Jersey. The girl had been entered into police databases as a missing juvenile from New Jersey, WTOL reported.

The girl was taken to a hospital for medical care and the man was arrested. He was charged with abduction and is being held in the Lucas County Jail.

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©2019 the Dayton Daily News (Dayton, Ohio)


The Importance of Continued Firearms Education

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Who is the firearms expert in your department? If you’re on a big agency, then there are likely many of them regularly working at your firearms range. If your agency is small, it might just be the person who has been hunting long enough or enjoys...

Post Office Could be Named after Fallen WI Firefighter

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Federal legislation has been introduced to honor Sun Prairie Capt. Cory Barr, who was killed in a natural gas explosion last year, by naming the city's post office after him.

Colo. schools reopen as FBI continues to investigate woman’s threats

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colo. — The death of a Florida teenager who authorities say was obsessed with the Columbine school shooting and may have planned to carry out her own attack in Colorado did not end an investigation into the 18-year-old, authorities said as they examine whether the young woman acted alone and Denver-area schools prepared to reopen their doors.

The body of Sol Pais was discovered in the mountains outside Denver with what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound on Wednesday after investigators got a tip from the driver who took her there, the FBI said.

Dozens of schools that closed as a precaution during the daylong manhunt planned to reopen Thursday with heightened security measures. Events planned to mark the anniversary of the 1999 Columbine attack will go on as scheduled throughout the week, including a ceremony near the school on Saturday.

Two teenagers attacked Columbine on April 20, 1999, killing 12 classmates and a teacher before taking their own lives. They have inspired cult-like admirers, some of whom committed other mass shootings over the decades. A growing "no notoriety" movement has urged news organizations to avoid naming the perpetrators of mass shootings to deprive them of the notoriety they seek.

The details of Pais' travel from Florida to Colorado began to trickle out Wednesday along with some classmates' confusion at her involvement. The student at Miami Beach High School dressed in black and kept mostly to herself, said Adam Charni, a senior at the school.

Charni said he was "baffled" to learn she was the person authorities in Colorado were searching for. Another classmate, 17-year-old Drew Burnstine, described Pais as quiet and smart.

But the Miami Beach high school student made troubling remarks to others about her "infatuation" with the 1999 assault at Columbine High and this weekend's anniversary, said Dean Phillips, FBI agent in charge in Denver. He did not elaborate on what she said.

Investigators will seek to learn more from Pais' social media and her other online presence, largely to ensure that she had no "accessories" or "accomplices," Phillips said. He confirmed that the material being scrutinized includes a blog containing hand-written journal entries that occasionally feature sketches of guns or people holding large firearms.

In Pais' hometown, Surfside Police Chief Julio Yero asked that the family be given "privacy and a little time to grieve." Pais' parents had reported her missing on Monday night, police said.

"This family contributed greatly to this investigation from the very onset. They provided valuable information that led us to Colorado and a lot of things that assisted in preventing maybe more loss of life," Yero said.

Pais purchased three one-way tickets to Denver on three consecutive days, then flew in on Monday night and went directly to a gun store, where she bought a shotgun, authorities said. Authorities said she did not threaten a specific school. But Columbine and more than 20 other schools outside Denver reacted by locking their doors for nearly three hours Tuesday afternoon, and some canceled evening activities or moved them inside.

"We're used to threats, frankly, at Columbine," John McDonald, security chief for Jefferson County school system, said when the manhunt was over. "This one felt different. It was different. It certainly had our attention."

McDonald described her trip as a "pilgrimage" to Columbine, though Pais is not believed to have been on the campus.

The threats and response added an emotional burden for many with ties to the Columbine community ahead of this weekend's anniversary.

Frank DeAngelis, Columbine's principal at the time of the shooting, said he was on campus Tuesday when the threat prompted officials to lock the high school's doors. He immediately went to check on several staff members who continue working there 20 years after the attack.

"The support was so great," he said. "Everybody came together."

Denver-area parents faced the difficult job of explaining to their children why they had the day off school without scaring them.

"This is definitely a challenge in their generation, and watching my kids learn how to navigate this is really hard. It is really heartbreaking," said Suzanne Kerns of suburban Arvada, whose children are 8 and 15.

Kerns said she was angry about how easy it was for someone reported missing to come from out of state and buy a gun.

Jefferson County Sheriff Jeff Shrader said the sale of the shotgun apparently followed the state's legal process. Out-of-state residents who are at least 18 can buy shotguns in Colorado. Customers must provide fingerprints and pass a criminal background check.

Pais' body was found off a trail not far from the base of Mount Evans, a recreation area about 60 miles (97 kilometers) southwest of Denver, authorities said. She used the weapon she bought, Phillips said.


Avalon, NJ, Vol. Fire Dept. Puts Engine 1132 in Service

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Avalon, NJ, Volunteer Fire Department, in Cape May County has taken delivery of a 2019 Pierce Enforcer PUC pumper. It is built on a four-door six-occupant cab and chassis, powered by a Cummins L9 450-hp engine and an Allison 3000EVS transmission. To...

NC Chief Explains Report Lag of Early Call in Fatal Blast

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Durham's fire chief said he only just learned of a 9-1-1 call reporting a gas odor about an hour before the explosion that killed a man and injured 25, including nine firefighters.

Son of Firefighter Killed on 9/11 to Begin FDNY Career

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Probationary FDNY firefighter Aric Tegtmeier, whose dad, Paul, was a member of Ladder Company 46 in the Bronx, calls graduating from the fire academy "a dream come true."

Your weakest link: 6 ways to strengthen the chain

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Weak links negatively impact our ability to properly serve our community as “superior servants”

Kalamazoo Police Officers Cleared in Plasma Center Fatal Shooting

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On April 16, Kalamazoo County Prosecutor Jeff Getting cleared both officers for firing their weapons during the incident.

Colorado Police Release Surveillance Video of Henry Pratt Shooting Scene

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Surveillance video released by the Aurora Police Department Wednesday afternoon shows shooter Gary Martin as he prepares to ambush officers as they approach the Henry Pratt building in response to calls of shots being fired on February 15.

Wilmington High School Student Raising Money For Sean Collier Memorial

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A student at Wilmington High School is raising money to build a memorial for MIT Police Officer Sean Collier.

Body Camera Video Shows Chaos Surrounding Michigan Arrest

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dashboard camera video shows the chaotic situation surrounding a second ‘use of force’ arrest by Grand Rapids police in late March.

Woman Gets Nearly 5 Years for Assaulting Deputy With Her Car

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A woman was sentenced Wednesday to nearly five years in prison for striking a Clark County sheriff’s deputy with a car and then fleeing at high speeds.

Driver in Botched Armored Car Heist That Left Two Officers and Security Guard Dead Paroled

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Judith Clark, the one-time radical activist turned longtime inmate after driving the getaway car in a botched 1981 armored car heist that left two police officers and a security guard dead, was paroled Wednesday after 38 years behind bars.

Ohio State Trooper Rescues Teen Sex Trafficking Victim

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Trooper Mitch Ross from the Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Swanton Post stopped a 2013 Nissan Sentra for a failure to move over violation on the Ohio Turnpike.

Union: Rookie Fort Worth Officer’s Firing Rushed to Prevent Appeal

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fort Worth Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald fired Officer Lina Mino on Friday, just seven hours before she would have completed her one-year probationary term, thus stripping her of her right to appeal.

Body Camera Video Shows Oklahoma City Police Officer Shoot Escaped Inmate

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police released body camera video of a police officer shooting an escaped inmate in Oklahoma City in January after a Taser failed to subdue the man.

Former Michigan Trooper Convicted in Death

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A jury on Wednesday found a former Michigan State Police Trooper Mark Bessner guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of 15-Year-old Damon Grimes in 2017.

Dispute between county and defunct Calif. FD headed to legal limbo

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Members of the volunteer department continue to sit in their three-year-old fire station off state Route 79 to make sure the county doesn’t try to swoop in and seize the station and the equipment inside

Suspect faces multiple charges in Mich. ambulance theft

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Damage to the ambulance involved in the chase and crash will make this ambulance a total loss

The Law Enforcement Shotgun: Tried, True & Not Going Away

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With the first patent on a slide action—or pump action—weapon having been issued in 1854, it’s safe to say that the pump action shotgun has been around for quite some time. Long known as a good hunting tool, its value as a self-defense weapon was...

Technology Aids The Domestic Terrorism Fight

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Examples of law enforcement tech to share information, identify and track potential suspects and more.

Are You A Leader Or A Manager?

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Take a look at the cover of Law Enforcement Technology magazine. Above the title there’s a line that says, “The #1 Information Source for Law Enforcement Leadership.” For the purpose of this column, I want you to pay attention to the word...

5 Technologies To Improve SWAT Communications

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

From software that connects multiple jurisdictions to a vehicle that houses it all.

Make Sound Technology Investments: Avoiding The ‘Technology Trap’

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

While the basic premise of law enforcement – ensuring public safety, investigating crimes and bringing offenders to account – has not changed over the last few decades, technology has transformed the operating landscape. Gone are the days of pins...

The Patrol Rifle Necessity

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In the law enforcement world, especially for patrol, the most common calibers for patrol rifles are .223/5.56mm and .308. Prior to the turn of the century, what you found was a bit more varied. The necessity of a rifle was a bit more accepted in the open...

Technology’s Role In The Fight Against Narcotics

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Emerging solutions help agencies reduce manual analysis, increase officer safety and improve situational awareness.

Technology’s Role In The Fight Against Narcotics

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Emerging solutions help agencies reduce manual analysis, increase officer safety and improve situational awareness.

2019 Firearms & Accessories Supplement

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Whether you're considered the firearms expert in your department or not, your firearms education—from learning about developments in related firearms technology to evaluating what your agency is carrying and authorizing—should never stop. Inside the...

2019 Firearms & Accessories Supplement

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Whether you're considered the firearms expert in your department or not, your firearms education—from learning about developments in related firearms technology to evaluating what your agency is carrying and authorizing—should never stop. Inside the...

The Value Of Virtual Simulation Training For Active Shooter Response

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In today’s climate, all law enforcement personnel must be prepared to respond to an active shooter event, whether it’s at a school, workplace or public venue.

The Value Of Virtual Simulation Training For Active Shooter Response

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In today’s climate, all law enforcement personnel must be prepared to respond to an active shooter event, whether it’s at a school, workplace or public venue.

Genetic Genealogy Proves Beneficial For Investigations

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In the last few years there have been tremendous technological advancements and successes for law enforcement in the investigations field, one of which includes law enforcement using a public genealogy database as part of an investigation to identify the...

Genetic Genealogy Proves Beneficial For Investigations

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In the last few years there have been tremendous technological advancements and successes for law enforcement in the investigations field, one of which includes law enforcement using a public genealogy database as part of an investigation to identify the...

Video Evidence: Cloud Vs.On-Site Storage

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Face today’s video storage challenges head on.

Video Evidence: Cloud Vs.On-Site Storage

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Face today’s video storage challenges head on.

From Military Into Law Enforcement: The SIG P320

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A little more than 100 years ago the U.S. Army adopted the Government Model 1911 .45ACP as its standard issue handgun. The selection of that pistol was to replace the .38 caliber revolvers that they were using at the time and the focus had been on a...

Glock’s Handgun Evolution

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At the beginning of 2018, I wrote on the pros and cons of the Glock 19X 9mm. Since then, Glock produced and released the models 45, 43X and 48. All chambered in 9mm, the three weapons fit distinctly different niches in the law enforcement officer’s...

Why You Should Add The 12 Gauge Shotgun To Your Less Lethal Arsenal

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Separate your lethal and less lethal shotguns, properly train with the product and create a solid less lethal policy.

Daniel Dvorak

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Daniel A. Dvorak (Ret.) has 25 years of law enforcement experience with the Newport, RI and Cambridge, MD police departments. He holds a Master’s Degree in Administration of Justice and a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice/Political Science....

Paramedic who lost leg in DUI crash reflects on lenient sentence for driver

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jody Heglar was sentenced to 15 years for driving under the influence and driving with a suspended license, which was reduced to 14 months of time served and probation

The First Line Behind the Front Line: Effects of a Line of Duty Death on Spouses

Posted on April 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Being in relationship or married to a police officer makes you the first line of support. When spouses accept this role they know it comes with some sacrifices, but what they often don't realize is their well-being may not be considered by friends, family members, or even the agency.

France honors Paris firefighters with daylong tribute

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

French President Emmanuel Macron honored firefighters for the bravery and courage in fighting the fire that nearly devoured Notre Dame Cathedral

Off-duty FF-medic praised for helping man shocked by electrical line

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ted Bowers, a firefighter-paramedic in Lebanon, was moving in across the street when he heard the commotion

Off-duty FF-medic praised for helping man shocked by electrical line

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ted Bowers, a firefighter-paramedic in Lebanon, was moving in across the street when he heard the commotion

Pa. church tests water sprinklers in wake of Notre Dame fire

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The system check showed that the church has done all it can do to protect itself from a fire similar to the one that tore through Notre Dame Cathedral

Former NJ paramedic sues for wrongful termination

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Michael Senisch is suing AtlanticCare for wrongful termination after he practiced holistic medicine on a patient who refused traditional treatment

Judge: Drug-addled EMT son of FDNY chief should lose his city job

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert Gala, 26, unsuccessfully argued that his oxycodone addiction was a disability that should have spared him termination after five years on the job

Judge: Drug-addled EMT son of FDNY chief should lose his city job

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert Gala, 26, unsuccessfully argued that his oxycodone addiction was a disability that should have spared him termination after five years on the job

‘Toxic cocktail’ from Camp Fire poisoning Paradise water

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Water officials say they believe the extreme heat of the firestorm created a “toxic cocktail” of gases in burning homes that got sucked into the water pipes when the system depressurized

Houston firefighter layoffs delayed as mayor, fire union continue to spar

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mayor Sylvester Turner and the fire union remain far apart on how to phase in the raises under Prop B

Lawsuit: Texas firefighter died due to malfunctioning safety device

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The suit filed by the family of firefighter Scott Deem alleges he was killed after his Personal Alert Safety Systems, or PASS, device did not sound as intended

Ga. officer remains hospitalized after shooting, 3 surgeries

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

UNION CITY, Ga. — An officer who was wounded in a deadly shootout on April 1 remains in the hospital this week.

According to Fox 5 Atlanta, Officer Jerome Turner Jr. was shot six or seven times during the incident and has undergone three surgeries. He will have another procedure in the coming days.

Turner has only been with the department since December. He previously served as a police chief in Florida and was reportedly the youngest police chief the state when he was sworn-in in 2013.

Turner’s wife, Kyla, says he’s been handling everything well and is ready to get back on the job.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation is investigating the shooting.


Parole granted for driver in deadly 1981 Brink’s heist

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. — Former left-wing revolutionary Judith Clark was granted parole Wednesday after serving more than 37 years behind bars for her role as getaway driver in a 1981 Brink's armored truck robbery that left two police officers and a security guard dead.

"You were wrong. Your behavior was criminal. Your callous disregard for the wellbeing of some, in favor of others, is a disgrace," the parole board wrote in its letter delivered to Clark. "However, this release decision is granted in keeping with applicable factors" including her age, the length of time served, her apologies to victims, her disavowal of radical principles and her accomplishments in prison.

Clark was seen by supporters as a symbol of the need for clemency if the prison system was to live up to its ideals as an institution of rehabilitation rather than retribution.

Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo praised Clark's behavior as a model prisoner when he commuted her 75-years-to-life sentence in 2016 to make her eligible for parole. The 69-year-old inmate has earned a master's degree, trained service dogs, founded an AIDS education program and counseled mothers behind bars during her time in prison.

"We are grateful that the Parole Board affirmed what everyone who has interacted with Judy already knows — that she is a rehabilitated, remorseful woman who poses no threat to society," said Michael Cardozo, who represents Clark pro bono as co-counsel with Steve Zeidman.

Clark is supposed to be released from Bedford Hills Correctional Facility by May 15, Zeidman said, adding "We hope it's much sooner." She plans to live with a friend in New York City and take a job with Hour Children, an organization that helps incarcerated women and their children rejoin the community.

"My great hope is that the Parole Board continues to honor the work people do to transform their lives while in prison and lets more families' loved ones come home," said Clark's daughter, Harriet Clark, in a prepared statement.

At her April 3 parole hearing, Clark presented support statements from more than 2,000 people. They included former Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, 11 members of New York's congressional delegation and Elaine Lord, a former superintendent of Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. A letter signed by more than 70 elected officials said the correctional system exists for rehabilitation as well as punishment.

But some law enforcement officials and families of victims opposed her release. The $1.6 million Brink's heist at a mall in suburban New York led to the shooting deaths of Brink's guard Peter Paige and Nyack police officers Edward O'Grady and Waverly Brown.

The parole board said it considered the letters in support and opposition of Clark's release, as well as her post-release employment plans and low risk of future offenses.

"This perversion of justice is a sad continuation of the deadly assault on police officers happening across our nation and signals to the criminal element that it is open season on cops," Rockland County Executive Ed Day said in a statement Wednesday.

"Judith Clark is a murderer and a terrorist," said Patrick Lynch, president of the Police Benevolent Association of the City of New York. "This is not justice."

Clark participated in the robbery as a member of the Weather Underground, an organization of violent revolutionaries that grew out of the anti-Vietnam war movement. "I look at the world differently now," Clark said in her letter asking Cuomo for clemency. "Instead of abstract slogans, I see and am moved by flesh-and-blood people."

Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, said despite being the getaway driver and not at the scene of the robbery and shooting, Clark was sentenced to die in prison. "Since being incarcerated, she has expressed deep remorse for her role and used every opportunity to better herself and those around her."

The parole board denied Clark's release in 2017, saying she was "still a symbol of violent terroristic crime." A state supreme court judge ordered a new hearing, saying the panel improperly gave more weight to the severity of the crime than to her rehabilitation. But that ruling was overruled by a state appellate court.


CA City to Keep Flag Design on Patrol Vehicles

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"I got 600 emails from people in Laguna, the ratio of support was 100-to-one in support of the design. I got emails from across the country. The flag is a symbol, it doesn’t represent a particular president or political belief,” the mayor said.

Charlotte Officer’s Pet Pigs Cheer Up Kids Mourning Deaths of Brothers, Sisters

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

And that’s the point. The 44-year-old father of four started what he calls the Bacon Response Team about eight months ago. He and the pigs have visited schools, the cancer ward at the hospital and community events, trying to spread joy and help kids and adults get comfortable with police

LAPD OIS Numbers Down 25%

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Los Angeles Police Department saw a 25% reduction in officer-involved shootings last year, compared to the previous year, according to a report presented to the Board of Police Commissioners Tuesday.

Woman Wanted for Threat Against Columbine High Found Dead

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The FBI tweeted shortly after discovery of the body that there was no longer a threat to the community. FBI Special Agent in Charge Dean Phillips said at an afternoon news conference that authorities believed Pais died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound but that a medical examiner would confirm if that was the case.

Former Michigan Trooper Convicted of Manslaughter for Using TASER on Teen Riding ATV

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mark Bessner fired the less-lethal weapon from the passenger seat of a patrol car while he and his partner chased 15-year-old Damon Grimes in August 2017.

KY Volunteer Fire Department Unveils New Apparatus

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Route 377 Volunteer Fire Department's new apparatus replaces a 1977 vehicle, and it comes with a hybrid engine and “pump and roll” capabilities.

Omaha Police Helo Makes Emergency Landing After Mechanical Failure

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Around 7:30 a.m., pilots took emergency action designating a safe landing spot in an open field northwest of the Omaha North Airport.

Vote to Lay Off 220 Houston Firefighters Delayed

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A move by a Houston City Council member Wednesday put off the scheduled vote on whether to lay off firefighters in order to implement pay parity raises for a week.

SC Officer Shoots, Kills Man Dragging Him with Stolen Car

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The officer-involved shooting occurred about 10 a.m., when a Fountain Inn police officer pulled over a car that was listed as stolen, SLED spokesman Thom Berry said.

NM County Could Take Over Volunteer Fire Department

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Village of Loving and Eddy County Fire Services have been discussing consolidation with the village's volunteer fire department, a process that could take up to two years.

NM County Could Take Over Volunteer Fire Department

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Village of Loving and Eddy County Fire Services have been discussing consolidation with the village's volunteer fire department, a process that could take up to two years.

AMPC Pack and All Missions Rig

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Continuing to provide more platforms for the All Missions System, 5.11's AMPC Pack can mount directly to the back of our All Missions and Tactec Plate Carriers or be carried as a stand-alone pack and the innovative All Missions Rig, a low-profile,...

Ala. Senate votes to allow church to form PD

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — The Alabama Senate has voted to allow a church to establish its own police department.

According to FOX 5 Atlanta, lawmakers voted earlier this month to allow Briarwood Presbyterian Church to establish a police department.

The church, which has a school and a 4,000 person congregation, says it needs its own officers to keep its members safe.

Critics argue that a department that reports to church officials could be used to cover up crimes. Police experts have said such a department would be unprecedented in the U.S.

Alabama has given a few private universities authority to have a police force, but never a non-school entity or a church.

A similar bill is also scheduled to be debated in the House.


SecurOS FaceX Analytics

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Intelligent Security Systems' SecurOS™ FaceX facial recognition solution delivers the unique capability to accurately recognize individuals’ faces from different camera angles with a host of specific facial characteristics under various lighting...

Therapy K9s: Changing the way law enforcement serves communities

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Jason Ratcliff

In March 2017 Sheriff Dallas Baldwin of the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office in Columbus, Ohio, began the first law enforcement therapy K9 program in the state. At the time we were one of only six other agencies we could identify nationwide who were utilizing the benefits of therapy dogs.

As an agency that embraces community engagement, we realized therapy dogs could be beneficial tools to serve our citizens in a unique way. Dogs transcend cultures, religious beliefs and political affiliations, so we knew they could provide a segue into establishing stronger relationships with our diverse population.

The program has been such a success in our community that as of this writing, our program has grown to three canines. We have two handlers who are Certified Trauma Practitioner Clinical (CTP-C), as well as two Qualified Behavioral Health Specialists (QBHS) through the state of Ohio.

THERAPY K9 PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

Although public relations and community engagement represent a portion of our efforts, the cornerstone of our program is victim's advocacy, mental health and trauma.

We utilize the dogs in weekly group and individual counseling sessions with children enrolled in the mood and behavioral program at our local children’s hospital. Many of these children suffer from anxiety and are depressed, suicidal or have had suicidal ideations. As part of this partnership, the hospital is collecting outcome data for us. The last set of data indicated that 90% of the children reported an increase in mood when dogs were present, 100% of clients felt the dog's presence was helpful and 100% of clients reported a decrease in the overall SUDs (subjective units of distress scale) ratings of the children.

In addition to this partnership, we work closely with our county children services agency, our prosecutor's office, the FBI, and our veteran’s and drug court, as well as partnerships with several school districts where we specifically target children with behavioral challenges.

THERAPY K9 PROGRAM EXPENSES

The main expenses of a canine program revolve around the care of the dog themselves. We have been very fortunate that our program is funded through donations and community partnerships. All veterinarian care, food, supplies and grooming are provided by community partners free of charge. In addition to those services, we have received approximately $60,000 in monetary donations since the program’s inception from individual and corporate donors that assists us with needs not covered by the service providers.

Marketing our program to let our community know about what we do has been key to our success. Harnessing the power of social media, attending key events and taking advantage of the relationship between our public relations office and the media has been crucial to spreading our message, our needs and our mission.

THERAPY K9 PROGRAM TRAINING

To run a top-notch program, we recently sent one of our handlers through a Master K9 Trainer school and they are now a member of the International Association of Canine Professionals (IACP).

In addition, we have staff who are evaluators for a nationally recognized therapy dog certification body. This enables us to do our training in-house and tailored to our specific needs, as well as assist other agencies who are looking to start a program.

To help us better understand how to use our dogs effectively, several of our handlers are in the process of obtaining their CTP-C designation (Certified Trauma Practitioner-Clinical).

3 CONSIDERATIONS BEFORE LAUNCHING A THERAPY DOGS PROGRAM

The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office has a total of 14 dogs: 11 are dual-purpose K9s and three are therapy K9s. A therapy K9 can be anything from a chihuahua to a pit bull. A therapy K9 is selected by temperament alone, and breed plays no factor.

Agencies interested in starting a therapy K9 program can utilize their local animal shelter or rescue organization who often have dog behavioral specialists to help you select the best dog for your mission. If an agency prefers a breed of dog, they should work with a reputable breeder who can assist them in selecting the best dog for their needs from the available litters.

Here are three steps agencies should take as they plan a therapy dog program:

1. Get leadership support

Key to the success of any new program is buy-in from the top. Because the concept of therapy K9s is so unfamiliar to the world of law enforcement, I recommend doing thorough research before presenting the idea to decision-makers. Plead your case as to why it works. There are plenty of studies on the benefits of therapy dogs and, as with any new venture, it is a good idea to see who is being successful and reach out for advice and trusted counsel to not only gain insight but to save time. Don't reinvent the wheel. It is much easier to take an existing model and tweak it to your needs.

2. Establish funding for the program

Economic factors are next in importance. We are fortunate that our community has financially supported us, but that support didn't fall into our laps. Many hours have been, and continue to be, dedicated to marketing and spreading our message. Only you can decide if that is the right course for you. If your canine remains healthy, yearly maintenance costs should hover somewhere between $1,000 to $2,000. This is a small price to pay for the return on investment your agency and community will receive through strengthened relationships.

3. Review liability concerns

Liability issues and concerns will differ from agency to agency, especially with organizations that currently do not have a traditional K9 program in place. Behavior/temperament testing is crucial to a successful program. I would not recommend an agency select a dog without a temperament test from a trained professional, which should be a documented part of a dog’s file. In addition, ongoing training should be documented. An agency also needs to incorporate a comprehensive set of standard operating procedures for all handlers to follow. At the end of the day, even a well-trained dog has the propensity to bite, which is why it’s so crucial a therapy K9 program is ran with the same professionalism as any other unit in an agency.

LE THERAPY K9 SCHOOL ESTABLISHED

We routinely field calls and emails regarding how we managed to create a successful program. Questions range from how we pick and train dogs, liability issues, financing and our standard operating procedures.

Due to the amount of questions we receive, we created a week-long Law Enforcement Therapy K9 school through a partnership with our county Animal Control office where we will be selecting and training therapy dog candidates from the shelter. Our first class will be held in late summer of 2019. There will be no costs to agencies other than travel and lodging expenses if needed. At the end of the school, we will send officers home with a fully trained canine ready to serve their community free of charge.

Since we began this venture almost two years ago we have identified approximately 40 law enforcement agencies nationwide deploying therapy dogs in their communities. We have seen tremendous results from our program and community support has been overwhelming. It is my hope that other agencies will consider bringing this innovative concept to the communities they are sworn to serve and protect.


About the author Jason Ratcliff is a 23-year law enforcement veteran. He has served the last 20 of those years with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office in Columbus, Ohio, where he has worked in corrections, patrol, investigations and now as a sergeant on the community relations team. Contact Jason at jvratcliff@franklincountyohio.gov.


Watch Paris Firefighters’ Footage of Notre Dame Blaze

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Raw video captured by Paris fire crews shows their battle to save the 850-year cathedral from being consumed by flames this week.

Why addressing animal cruelty crimes matters

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By John Thompson

I have been in law enforcement for nearly 50 years, starting out as a volunteer firefighter and EMT, and later serving as a military police officer, a canine handler and intelligence officer in the U.S. Army; a police chief in Mt. Rainier, Maryland; and assistant sheriff for Prince Georges County. I then spent 16 years at the National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA). There were a lot of things I had to think about on the job, but animal cruelty wasn’t one of them. Policing has changed a lot since I began my career, and my thinking has changed about animal abuse and its connection to the goal of good police work, which is to protect our communities.

Getting there involved a transformative lightbulb moment. While in law school, my daughter worked as an intern at the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys, and she reviewed the research on the link between animal abuse and other crimes. Her findings opened my eyes and made me ask, “How have I missed this?” About the same time, a small dog named Mr. Po came into my family’s life. Although I had been a canine officer and around dogs and other animals all my life, nothing prepared me for the deep and lasting influence Mr. Po would have on me. My world changed and as it did, I realized the many ways in which paying attention to animal cruelty could provide law enforcement with more and better tools for keeping communities safe. Let me explain.

Animal cruelty often occurs alongside other offenses

There is quite a large body of research – as well as first-hand experiences from officers in the field – showing that animal cruelty crimes occur alongside other serious offenses, such as child abuse, domestic violence, interpersonal violence, gang activity and illegal drug dealing. If you pay attention to animal cruelty, you may be able to identify – or even avert – other crimes more quickly. If there are neglected dogs on a property, there might be an animal fighting ring, children exposed to violence, or other criminal acts. When you arrive at a domestic violence call, look to see if there are animals in the household. Have they been injured? If, as often happens, the victim of domestic violence is hesitant to press charges, perhaps an alleged offender could be charged with animal cruelty. Paying attention to animal cruelty not only protects animals, but the families and communities in which they live.

Animal cruelty crime added to NIBRS

I am not the only law enforcement professional to think this way. In September 2016 the FBI added animal cruelty crime incidents to Group A of the National Incident Based Reporting System. The National Sheriffs’ Association, as well as the Animal Welfare Institute, submitted proposals to the Advisory Policy Board to request this addition.

In July 2018, the Joint Counterterrorism Assessment Team (JCAT) of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence issued a statement in its First Responder’s Toolkit advising law enforcement that animal cruelty could be a warning behavior for terrorism or other acts of premeditated violence against humans. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently agreed animal cruelty should be a data element in its National Violent Death Reporting System. A search of that database reveals a correlation between animal abuse and some violent deaths.

Resources and training on animal cruelty recognition

The National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA) has taken this matter to heart, publishing special issues of its magazine “Sheriff & Deputy” on the link between animal cruelty and other crimes; the most recent edition can be downloaded here. Current NSA President John Layton created an Animal Cruelty and Abuse Committee. NSA also houses the National Law Enforcement Center on Animal Abuse (NLECAA), which has a number of practical resources for law enforcement. Two roll call videos are available, “Cruelty and Neglect” and “Dog Fighting,” with plans for additional videos in the future. NLECAA has also collaborated with the Justice Clearinghouse to provide free webinars on topics related to law enforcement and animal cruelty.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) provides free training and support to law enforcement agencies in handling animal abuse cases. To request a training, contact Ashley Mauceri. Similarly, the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys conducts an annual training conference and occasional webinars on enforcing animal cruelty laws and investigating animal cruelty crimes.

Now that animal cruelty incidents are part of NIBRS, we need to ensure we collect reliable data on animal cruelty crimes. If your agency participates in NIBRS – the FBI has a goal of 100% national participation by 2020 – be sure your department is reporting animal abuse incidents. Incidents are categorized as neglect, intentional cruelty, animal fighting and animal sexual assault. This information will enable effective targeting of resources, determine where interventions are needed or are working, and track how animal cruelty is related to other crimes.

As executive director of the National Animal Care & Control Association (NACA), one of my goals is to create bridges between law enforcement agencies and those animal service agencies not located within law enforcement. Animal control officers often are the first responders on an animal cruelty call. They also provide assistance when animals need to be removed from a situation. The NACA website has more information on the role animal control officers play in the law enforcement community.

Since reading that law school paper that changed my life, I have committed myself to urging law enforcement to pay attention to animal cruelty crimes and to offer them resources for doing that. Vigorous enforcement of animal cruelty laws not only can prevent or end animal suffering, but it can also protect our families and communities.


About the author John Thompson is executive director of the National Animal Care and Control Association (NACA) and former deputy executive director and COO of the National Sheriffs’ Association. Contact him at JThompson@nacanet.org.


Opinion: Overhauling police use of force in California

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Ron Hernandez and Robert Harris

We are currently witnessing a tale of two bills in California regarding police use of force. The approaches are as different as night and day. One approach is grounded in emotion and seeks to score political points by throwing officers in jail when they use force during life and death situations. The other is grounded in sound policy and science, which seeks to reduce all uses of force by preventing them from occurring in the first place through stronger policies and improved training.

Assembly Bill 392

The ACLU and California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber are taking the politicization of officer-involved shootings to new heights with their bill, AB 392.

The ACLU wants to eliminate the reasonable standard that governs the legality of officer-involved shootings that was established by the Supreme Court in Graham v. Connor. They want to replace it with a necessary standard and apply a totality of circumstances lens to look at these incidents.

What does this mean? Essentially, under current U.S. Constitutional law, if an officer pulls someone over and the driver pulls a gun on the officer or others, then the officer may use deadly force to protect themselves and others. Under the ACLU’s bill, that officer would lose their right to self-defense if it is later determined the officer could have deployed a TASER, not pursued the fleeing bank robber or could’ve retreated out of the way. Furthermore, the officer can lose their right to self-defense if its determined that the officer lacked probable cause for a stop, regardless of the threat presented. It’s ridiculous.

To sell the bill, the ACLU has deployed a well-orchestrated disinformation campaign. The organization claims there is an epidemic of police violence in California, yet according to the Washington Post’s Fatal Force Database fatal officer-involved shootings have declined 40% since 2015. The ACLU and their supporters repeat over and over that California is 37% above the national average for fatal officer-involved shootings. In fact, according to the Washington Post data, California is 5.43% below the national average.

Senate Bill 230

On the other hand, top law enforcement associations in California are working with State Senator Anna Caballero on SB 230, a bill grounded in science, facts and data. SB 230 is an essential component of a comprehensive plan to reduce uses of force.

SB 230 will establish a clear standard for authorizing the use of force, standardizes use of force training and enacts evidence-based policies to minimize uses of force. For example, SB 230 mandates that all California law enforcement agencies adopt policies, and train on, de-escalation, managing mental health crisis situations and requiring an officer to intercede if they witness the use of excessive force.

SB 230 incorporates best practices from jurisdictions that have seen improvements in reducing uses of force. It provides public safety officers the necessary tools to safely do their jobs. But our collective goal ought to be to prevent as many dangerous encounters as possible and a new organization has been formed to do just that.

A holistic approach to crime reduction

Protect California, a non-profit organization, is committed to taking a more holistic approach to crime reduction and neighborhood safety. The organization’s plan addresses the root causes of crime by pulling virtually every public policy lever available to ensure positive outcomes between public safety officers and the community by:

Creating economic and educational opportunities in communities disproportionately impacted by crime and poverty; Adequately funding the delivery of treatment and services for those diagnosed with mental illness; Making sure convicted felons and those with diagnosed mental illness do not have access to guns; Equipping public safety officers with the necessary tools and training to safely respond to and manage dangerous situations and individuals with mental illness.

The debate over how best to safely reduce police use of force and make California neighborhoods safer is an important one. It’s one that must be grounded in facts and not driven by emotion. We can all agree the best outcome to any use of force is to prevent the dangerous encounter before it occurs. To learn more about the plan to protect California go to www.ProtectCA.com.


About the authors Ron Hernandez is treasurer of Protect California and president of the Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs.

Robert Harris is president of Protect California and a director with the Los Angeles Police Protective League.


Axon Partners with Border Patrol Foundation to Help Families of the Fallen

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Axon has announced a partnership with the Border Patrol Foundation, a non-profit organization that honors the memory of fallen US Border Patrol agents and supports the families of those fallen

$40 million for federal sexual assault kits initiative

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Rachel Engel, P1 Staff

The Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance is allotting $40 million for the Sexual Assault Kits Initiative, a competitive grant program designed to assist jurisdiction officials in processing SAKs, utilizing evidence obtained from SAKs to seek convictions and gathering DNA samples to submit to the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS).

Each grant request must include three elements:

Inventory of all unsubmitted SAKs in the jurisdiction, regardless of where they are stored; Create a multidisciplinary working group to address the reason for the high number of unsubmitted SAKs; Designate a site coordinator to keep team members up to date on SAK numbers. SAKI Grant Purpose Areas

Selected applicants will focus their projects on one of four purpose areas determined by BJA. They are:

Purpose 1: Comprehensive approach to unsubmitted Sexual Assault Kits; Purpose 2: SAKI for small agencies (under 250 sworn officers); Purpose 3: Expansion of DNA database by collecting lawfully owed DNA samples; Purpose 4: Investigation and prosecution of cold case sexual assaults.

Purpose 1: Comprehensive approach to unsubmitted SAKs

Grant recipients must submit a comprehensive approach to submitting previously unsubmitted SAKs, and for cataloging future kits. Funding can also be requested to assist with testing of other evidence relating to SAKs, but all projects must include the three elements required by BJA as outlined above.

Purpose 2: SAKI for small agencies

For recipients in this purpose area, all three of the elements required by BJA are necessary, but as scaled-down versions. For this funding, applicants should:

Create a point of contact to keep all team members up to date on SAKs submissions Establish a multidisciplinary working group to address the reason for unsubmitted SAKs that includes a prosecutor, an investigator and a community advocate (at a minimum)

Purpose 3: Expansion of DNA databases

Funding in this area will be used to expand DNA databases by locating and collecting samples from convicted offenders who should have samples in CODIS, but have never been tested.

This purpose area is a follow-up to the main goal of submitting all untested SAK, and jurisdictions should only seek funding for the Purpose Area 3 if they have submitted all previously unsubmitted SAKs and have a comprehensive plan in place to prevent a backlog from reoccurring.

Purpose 4: Investigation and prosecution of cold case sexual assaults

This funding area follows the submission of untested kits and the collection of needed DNA samples as the next logical step. Jurisdictions can receive funds in order to hire additional personnel for the specific task of investigating cold case sexual assaults, as well as for training purposes, enhancing victim services, travel costs associated with victim engagement or suspect interviews, and for using advanced DNA practices and search methods.

Get free toolkits that can assist public safety with SAKI here.


Retired NYPD Detective Dies From 9/11-Related Illness

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NYPD Detective Lisa Rosado, who was recently retired from the NYPD's Real Time Crime Center, died nearly 18 years after responding to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center

Florida Teen Who Threatened Colorado Schools Found Dead

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Authorities in Colorado have found the 18-year-old Miami Beach High student who traveled to Colorado, bought a shotgun and threatened violence against schools days before the anniversary of the mass shooting at Columbine High.

American Flag Design Will Remain on Laguna Beach Police Cruisers

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Laguna Beach police cars will keep the American flag-adorned lettering that became the subject of a nationwide debate over whether the design is patriotic or "threatening."

Sourcewell Partners with National Procurement Experts

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Crosby Grindle and Keely Maroney of Cooperative Services LLC are partnering with Sourcewell, a leader in cooperative purchasing solutions; bringing with them a combined 40-plus years of experience in public safety, procurement, and purchasing.

Sourcewell Membership

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FDNY Firefighter Injured in Five-Alarm Restaurant Fire

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At least one firefighter was taken to the hospital after suffering injuries while battling a blaze that broke out at a Brooklyn sushi restaurant Wednesday morning.

FDNY Firefighters Injured in Five-Alarm Restaurant Fire

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 200 firefighters battled a "very challenging, very stubborn fire" that broke out at a Brooklyn sushi restaurant Wednesday morning.

CA Volunteer Fire Department Standoff in Legal Limbo

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A judge has agreed to oversee three separate cases involving the Julian-Cuyamaca Fire Protection District, and San Diego County will handle calls in the area while that happens.

TX Firefighter Creates New Time-Saving Gear Dryer

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The machine, which was designed by an engineer in the Fort Worth Fire Department, can dry soaking wet turnout gear in a fourth of the time of commercial dryers.

Iowa LEO says she was forced to resign after sexual harassment complaints

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Erin Jordan The Gazette, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

WEST UNION, Iowa — West Union’s only female police officer says she was forced to resign last week in retaliation for complaining about sexual harassment and gender discrimination in the department.

Sierra Fox, who had worked in the West Union Police Department since July 2015, alleges Police Chief Paul Bechtold treated her differently from male officers, denied her a women’s uniform, insulted her and called her vulgar names to other officers.

Two male police officers who used to work with Fox at the northeast Iowa department corroborated her statements, adding that Bechtold made sexual comments about Fox and told them to ignore her calls for emergency help because she probably was being “dramatic.”

“Chief Bechtold told me that if Officer Fox was in a chase and called for help, there was no need to rush to get to the chase to assist her because the suspect ‘would just stop anyway,’” Officer Makenz Kriener, who worked with Fox from December 2017 to June 2018, wrote in an affidavit provided to The Gazette by Fox’s attorney, Katie Ervin Carlson.

“I never would have abided by this command, but it was a dangerous and completely unacceptable order,” he said.

City Administrator Nick McIntyre on Friday confirmed Fox’s resignation, but said she was not required to step down or be fired.

“That’s a misinterpretation,” he said.

A message left for Bechtold by The Gazette had not been returned by Friday evening.

West Union, a city of about 2,300 in Fayette County, has a four-person police department.

Fox complained to McIntyre on Jan. 23 and filed a complaint with the Iowa Civil Rights Commission on Feb. 9, according to paperwork from her attorney.

McIntyre called Fox to a meeting Wednesday and placed her on administrative leave, Fox reported.

In an audio recording of that meeting provided by Ervin Carlson, McIntyre tells Fox she must resign by April 12 or he would “recommend dismissal to council on Monday.”

Fox submitted her resignation letter Thursday, Ervin Carlson said.

In the recording, McIntyre listed a half-dozen incidents since March 27 in which Fox is alleged to have broken department rules. These include spending unproductive time at the Fayette County Sheriff’s Office, failing to respond to medical pages and responding to a K-9 police dog assist in another county without authorization.

“Do I get to say anything?” Fox asks McIntyre, according to the recording.

“You can, yeah. Absolutely,” he replies.

While Fox is looking up some notes, McIntyre continues. “It appears something is going on. You’re not engaged (with work) like you used to be.”

Fox said officers don’t respond to all medical calls because it sometimes isn’t needed, such as when a nursing home has its own medical staff. As the handler of the West Union K-9 officer, Xena, Fox talked about going with the dog to calls at a school and another county. Both calls were requested and provided training for the dog, she said.

“I was given six write-ups for performance issues, every single one of which is alleged to have occurred after I complained about discrimination, harassment, and retaliation,” Fox wrote in her resignation letter.

Fox asked in the letter for West Union to let her keep Xena.

“K9s do not typically change handlers as such a change can cause stress and confusion, causing the dog to shut down and be forced to retire,” Fox wrote. “I worry this will happen if Xena is taken from my care as a result of my forced resignation.”

In an interview, McIntyre said he could not comment on Fox’s assertion she was being retaliated against for her complaints about Bechtold or whether her complaints are being investigated by the city.

West Union Police Department K9 Xena has been awarded “Healthcare for K9 Heroes” Grant Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a...

Posted by West Union, Iowa Police Department on Wednesday, January 9, 2019

———

©2019 The Gazette (Cedar Rapids, Iowa)


Columbine threat by woman with gun shuts down Colo. schools

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colo. — Denver-area public schools will be closed Wednesday as authorities search for a young Florida woman who flew to the city and bought a gun after becoming "infatuated" with the mass shooting at Columbine High School.

The FBI said Sol Pais, 18, is "considered to be extremely dangerous" and "made threats to commit an act of violence in the Denver metropolitan area" just days before the 20th anniversary of the attack that killed 13 people.

All schools in the Denver area were urged to tighten security because the threat was deemed "credible and general," said Patricia Billinger, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Public Safety. Columbine and more than 20 other schools outside Denver lock their doors for nearly three hours Tuesday afternoon before Wednesday's complete closures were announced.

The Jefferson County Sheriff's Office and the FBI say Pais traveled to Colorado from Miami on Monday night and bought a pump-action shotgun and ammunition.

Denver Public Schools said that all facilities and programs will be closed Wednesday, and there will be no afternoon activities or athletic competitions. The district said the decision to close campuses was in collaboration with other Denver metro-area school districts due to the ongoing safety concern.

On Tuesday, some schools released their students after additional security was called in and canceled evening activities or moved them inside.

"We always have heightened awareness close to high-profile anniversaries like this," Billinger said.

Authorities said Pais was last seen near Columbine -- in the Jefferson County foothills outside Denver -- wearing a black T-shirt, camouflage pants and black boots. They appealed for anyone seeing her to call an FBI tip line at 303 630-6227, and said she is too dangerous to be approached by civilians. The alert also said police who come into contact with her should detain her and evaluate her mental health.

"This has become a massive manhunt ... and every law enforcement agency is participating and helping in this effort," Dean Phillips, special agent in charge of the FBI in Denver, said late Tuesday night.

The FBI's Rocky Mountain Safe Streets Task Force issued a notice Tuesday describing Pais as "infatuated with (the) Columbine school shooting."

The @FBIDenver & JCSO are asking for the public’s help regarding a potential credible threat. Last night Sol Pais traveled to Colorado & made threats. She is armed & considered to be extremely dangerous 1/3 pic.twitter.com/2x5iwddsMp

— Jeffco Sheriff (@jeffcosheriffco) April 16, 2019

Sheriff's spokesman Mike Taplin said the threats she made were general and not specific to any school.

The Denver Post reported that a call to a phone number listed for Pais' parents in Surfside, Florida, was interrupted by a man who identified himself as an FBI agent and said he was interviewing them.

Surfside Police Sgt. Marian Cruz confirmed that her parents last saw her on Sunday and reported her missing on Monday. The Miami Herald and WTVJ are reporting that neighbors say the teen is a senior at Miami Beach High School.

The Associated Press left messages at two numbers listed for Pais' relatives in Florida, while another number was disconnected.

Two teenage gunmen attacked Columbine on April 20, 1999, killing 12 classmates and a teacher.


FBI: Woman obsessed with Columbine ‘no longer threat’

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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UPDATE: FBI says Sol Pais is no longer a threat.

UPDATE: THERE IS NO LONGER A THREAT TO THE COMMUNITY. More information to follow shortly. #FindSol

— FBI Denver (@FBIDenver) April 17, 2019

Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colo.— Denver-area public schools closed Wednesday as the FBI hunted for an armed young Florida woman who was allegedly "infatuated" with Columbine and threatened violence just days ahead of the 20th anniversary of the attack.

Sol Pais, an 18-year-old Miami Beach high school student, flew to Colorado on Monday night and bought a pump-action shotgun and ammunition, the FBI and the sheriff's department said.

All classes and extracurricular activities for about a half-million students were canceled as a precaution. Sheriff's spokesman Mike Taplin said the young woman's threats were general and not specific to any school.

"This has become a massive manhunt ... and every law enforcement agency is participating and helping in this effort," said Dean Phillips, agent in charge of the FBI in Denver.

The FBI said Pais is "considered to be extremely dangerous" and "made threats to commit an act of violence in the Denver metropolitan area" ahead of Saturday's anniversary of the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School that killed 13 people.

The FBI described Pais as "infatuated" with the Columbine school shooting.

Authorities said Pais was last seen not far from Columbine — in the Jefferson County foothills outside Denver — in a black T-shirt, camouflage pants and black boots. They appealed for anyone seeing her to call an FBI tip line at (303) 630-6227.

The alert also said police who come into contact with her should detain her and evaluate her mental health.

Because of the threat, Columbine and more than 20 other schools outside Denver locked their doors for nearly three hours Tuesday afternoon, and some canceled evening activities or moved them inside.

"We always have heightened awareness close to high-profile anniversaries like this," said Patricia Billinger, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Public Safety.

Messages left by The Associated Press at two numbers listed for Pais' relatives in Florida were not immediately returned, while another number was disconnected.

The @FBIDenver & JCSO are asking for the public’s help regarding a potential credible threat. Last night Sol Pais traveled to Colorado & made threats. She is armed & considered to be extremely dangerous 1/3 pic.twitter.com/2x5iwddsMp

— Jeffco Sheriff (@jeffcosheriffco) April 16, 2019

Two teenage gunmen attacked Columbine on April 20, 1999, killing 12 classmates and a teacher before taking their own lives.


Woman ‘infatuated’ with Columbine found dead

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colo. — A young Florida woman who traveled to Colorado and bought a shotgun for what authorities feared would be a Columbine-inspired attack just days ahead of the 20th anniversary was found dead Wednesday in an apparent suicide after a nearly 24-hour manhunt.

Jefferson County Sheriff Jeff Shrader said 18-year-old Sol Pais was discovered by the FBI with an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The manhunt had led to the closing of Denver-area schools as a precaution.

During the manhunt, the FBI said Pais was "infatuated" with Columbine and made threats ahead of Saturday's anniversary of the attack that killed 13 people at Columbine High School in 1999. The FBI described her "extremely dangerous."

The Miami Beach high school student flew to Colorado on Monday night and bought a pump-action shotgun and ammunition, authorities said.

Agents had focused the search around the base of Mount Evans, a popular recreational area about 60 miles southwest of Denver.

All classes and extracurricular activities for about a half-million students were canceled as a precaution, though sheriff's spokesman Mike Taplin said the young woman's threats were general and not specific to any school.

"This has become a massive manhunt ... and every law enforcement agency is participating and helping in this effort," said Dean Phillips, agent in charge of the FBI in Denver.

Authorities said Pais was last seen not far from Columbine — in the Jefferson County foothills outside Denver — in a black T-shirt, camouflage pants and black boots.

The alert also said police who come into contact with her should detain her and evaluate her mental health.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis said federal, state and local law enforcement were "dedicating all of their resources to locate this dangerous individual."

"We know that there is a lot of anxiety right now in Colorado," Polis said in a statement.

Because of the threat, Columbine and more than 20 other schools outside Denver locked their doors for nearly three hours Tuesday afternoon, and some canceled evening activities or moved them inside.

Pais' parents last saw her on Sunday and reported her missing to Florida authorities on Monday night, police in Surfside, Florida, said.

Messages left by The Associated Press at two numbers listed for Pais' relatives in Florida were not immediately returned, while another number was disconnected.

Adam Charni, a Miami Beach High School senior, said Pais dressed in black and kept mostly to herself. He said he was "baffled" to learn she was the person authorities in Colorado were searching for.

Another classmate, 17-year-old junior Drew Burnstine, said Pais was a quiet, smart student who sat alone in class and "never caused problems or indicated that she wanted to harm anyone."

Two teenage gunmen attacked Columbine on April 20, 1999, killing 12 classmates and a teacher before taking their own lives.

State Rep. Patrick Neville, the Republican House minority leader, was a 15-year-old sophomore at Columbine High at the time of the shooting and now has three school-age daughters.

"It wasn't easy for me to explain to my kids what was going on last night," Neville said on the House floor Wednesday.


Woman who threatened Columbine found dead after manhunt

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colo. — A young Florida woman who traveled to Colorado and bought a shotgun for what authorities feared would be a Columbine-inspired attack just days ahead of the 20th anniversary was found dead Wednesday in an apparent suicide after a nearly 24-hour manhunt.

Jefferson County Sheriff Jeff Shrader said 18-year-old Sol Pais was discovered by the FBI with an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The manhunt had led to the closing of Denver-area schools as a precaution.

During the manhunt, the FBI said Pais was "infatuated" with Columbine and made threats ahead of Saturday's anniversary of the attack that killed 13 people at Columbine High School in 1999. The FBI described her "extremely dangerous."

The Miami Beach high school student flew to Colorado on Monday night and bought a pump-action shotgun and ammunition, authorities said.

Agents had focused the search around the base of Mount Evans, a popular recreational area about 60 miles southwest of Denver.

All classes and extracurricular activities for about a half-million students were canceled as a precaution, though sheriff's spokesman Mike Taplin said the young woman's threats were general and not specific to any school.

"This has become a massive manhunt ... and every law enforcement agency is participating and helping in this effort," said Dean Phillips, agent in charge of the FBI in Denver.

Authorities said Pais was last seen not far from Columbine — in the Jefferson County foothills outside Denver — in a black T-shirt, camouflage pants and black boots.

The alert also said police who come into contact with her should detain her and evaluate her mental health.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis said federal, state and local law enforcement were "dedicating all of their resources to locate this dangerous individual."

"We know that there is a lot of anxiety right now in Colorado," Polis said in a statement.

Because of the threat, Columbine and more than 20 other schools outside Denver locked their doors for nearly three hours Tuesday afternoon, and some canceled evening activities or moved them inside.

Pais' parents last saw her on Sunday and reported her missing to Florida authorities on Monday night, police in Surfside, Florida, said.

Messages left by The Associated Press at two numbers listed for Pais' relatives in Florida were not immediately returned, while another number was disconnected.

Adam Charni, a Miami Beach High School senior, said Pais dressed in black and kept mostly to herself. He said he was "baffled" to learn she was the person authorities in Colorado were searching for.

Another classmate, 17-year-old junior Drew Burnstine, said Pais was a quiet, smart student who sat alone in class and "never caused problems or indicated that she wanted to harm anyone."

Two teenage gunmen attacked Columbine on April 20, 1999, killing 12 classmates and a teacher before taking their own lives.

State Rep. Patrick Neville, the Republican House minority leader, was a 15-year-old sophomore at Columbine High at the time of the shooting and now has three school-age daughters.

"It wasn't easy for me to explain to my kids what was going on last night," Neville said on the House floor Wednesday.


Roy City, UT, Fire Dept. Puts New Engine in Service

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Roy City, UT, Fire Department has taken delivery of a custom pumper built by Rosenbauer America. It's built on a Rosenbauer RBM Commander cab and chassis powered by a Cummins 500-hp engine and an Allison transmission. To fight fire, it has a Waterous CSU...

Chicago Firefighter Fired After Harassment Allegations

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A college student accused the firefighter of inappropriate touching and comments during a ride-along for her paramedic training, according to Chicago's Inspector General.

Calif. town votes to keep flag on police cars

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. — The flag will continue to wave on police cars in a small Southern California coastal community, the City Council decided Tuesday night.

The Laguna Beach City Council voted Tuesday night to retain a new logo for its 11 police vehicles that uses stars and stripes running through the word "police" on the doors.

Some in the small, artsy coastal community thought the flashy red, white and blue decal was too aggressive and flashy while others were surprised that anyone would object to the American flag.

The council considered whether to keep the design or choose another.

Virtually everyone in the crowded council chamber raised their hand when asked if they supported the design and at one point the crowd sang "The Star-Spangled Banner."

Before the meeting, Mayor Pro Tem Steve Dicterow told the Los Angeles Times the council was simply facing "a very narrow decision" about the brightness of the colors, but that the issue had devolved into a broader national conversation about patriotism.

He said he has received hundreds of emails from people around the country, mostly in support of keeping the flag designs on the car.

The council agreed earlier this year to repaint its squad cars.

The proposed graphic the council approved in February was a more muted version of the design that now appears on the cars.

"Clearly, the way it looks on the car is not what anyone expected it to look like," Dicterow told the Times. "I think it's reasonable that we're going to look at it again so that whatever we (approve) is exactly what we put on the car."


Amid controversy, Calif. town votes to keep flag on police cars

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. — The flag will continue to wave on police cars in a small Southern California coastal community, the City Council decided Tuesday night.

The Laguna Beach City Council voted Tuesday night to retain a new logo for its 11 police vehicles that uses stars and stripes running through the word "police" on the doors.

Some in the small, artsy coastal community thought the flashy red, white and blue decal was too aggressive and flashy while others were surprised that anyone would object to the American flag.

The council considered whether to keep the design or choose another.

Virtually everyone in the crowded council chamber raised their hand when asked if they supported the design and at one point the crowd sang "The Star-Spangled Banner."

Before the meeting, Mayor Pro Tem Steve Dicterow told the Los Angeles Times the council was simply facing "a very narrow decision" about the brightness of the colors, but that the issue had devolved into a broader national conversation about patriotism.

He said he has received hundreds of emails from people around the country, mostly in support of keeping the flag designs on the car.

The council agreed earlier this year to repaint its squad cars.

The proposed graphic the council approved in February was a more muted version of the design that now appears on the cars.

"Clearly, the way it looks on the car is not what anyone expected it to look like," Dicterow told the Times. "I think it's reasonable that we're going to look at it again so that whatever we (approve) is exactly what we put on the car."


FL House to Hear Firefighter Cancer Bill after Pressure

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The bill before state lawmakers would require local governments in Florida to provide full coverage for cancer to firefighters, including disability and death benefits.

NH Firefighters Battle Three-Alarm Blaze

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four people were able to escape a burning home as New Ipswich crews worked for about four hours to put out the fire early Wednesday.

Emotional Farewell for Fallen CHP Sergeant

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Thousands of police officers paid their respects to California Highway Patrol Sgt. Steve Licon on Tuesday.

Patriotic Patrol Cars Approved In Laguna Beach

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The red, white and blue will stay on Laguna Beach police patrol cars following a debate over the use of the flag on the cruisers.

Law Enforcement Officers Lobby Mattel to Bring Back Police Officer Barbie

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A group of Virginia law enforcement officers is calling on toymaker Mattel to bring back Barbie, police officer Barbie that is.

Good Samaritan Stops Attempted Kidnapping in San Francisco

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers responded at 12:24 p.m. to the area of Market and 17th streets, where they found a Good Samaritan holding down the suspect, according to San Francisco police.

FBI and Police Seeking Woman ‘Infatuated With Columbine’

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials secured schools across the Denver area Tuesday as the FBI and local police hunted for a woman who had traveled to Colorado the night before, made threats and was considered armed and "extremely dangerous."

Report: Use of Deadly Force by LAPD Dropped by 25% in 2018

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Los Angeles police officers fired their weapons 33 times last year compared with 44 shootings the previous year — a 25% decrease, according to the report presented to the Police Commission.

Border Patrol Agent Recounts Vicious 2017 Machete Attack

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lorenzo Hernandez, an off-duty Border Patrol agent who was savagely attacked in a bizarre incident in Doña Ana County in 2017, testified Monday in Day 1 of a trial for one of two defendants in the case.

Experts Say Fatal Charlotte Police Shooting Was Justified

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It could be months before authorities determine whether to criminally charge officers involved in a deadly shooting at a Charlotte restaurant, but professors who study use-of-force say that the available facts suggest the shooting was legally justified.

Video Released in Deadly California Traffic Stop Shooting

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Office on Friday released video of a fatal January 2017 shooting of a Paso Robles man the county District Attorney’s Office found deemed lawful after the man pulled a replica BB gun during a traffic stop.

Man Suspected of Killing Washington Deputy is the Brother of Convicted Cop-Killer

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Brian Dee Butts, who is believed to have shot and killed Cowlitz County Deputy Justin DeRosier, is the brother of Daniel Armaugh Butts, who recently was sentenced to nearly 49 years in the fatal shooting of Rain Police Chief Ralph Painter in 2011.

Man Suspected of Killing Washington Deputy is the Brother of Convicted Oregon Cop-Killer

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Brian Dee Butts, who is believed to have shot and killed Cowlitz County Deputy Justin DeRosier, is the brother of Daniel Armaugh Butts, who recently was sentenced to nearly 49 years in the fatal shooting of Rainer Police Chief Ralph Painter in 2011.

The ESO EMS Index: In 2019, data and metrics matter more than ever

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In its second year, the benchmark report based on EMS national data digs deeper into five key metrics and adds two additional measures

‘The Audacious Project’ Looks to Eliminate Child Sexual Abuse Material from the Internet

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The nonprofit, Thorn, co-founded by Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore is one of eight organizations to share millions in funding through TED’s The Audacious Project

Thorn Looks to Eliminate Child Sexual Abuse Material from the Internet

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The nonprofit, Thorn, co-founded by Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore is one of eight organizations to share millions in funding through TED’s The Audacious Project

Article Bites: Measuring the impact of a telehealth program on ambulance transports

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The feasibility of a telehealth program within a large EMS system highlights progress in matching healthcare resources with patient needs

Firehouse World

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firehouse World delivers educational content to the fire service with a focus on training, technology, career development, tactics, research and leadership.

Great learner-centered presentations for EMS presenters

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Follow these 5 tips to captivate your audience, include easy-to-see visuals, follow the rule of sevens and avoid panel discussions that will put your audience to sleep

Notre Dame fire: Paris Fire Brigade deployed unmanned robots and drones

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Key tactics impacted command decisions related to saving iconic bell towers

911 for 911: Dispatcher mutual aid

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Telecommunicator Emergency Response Taskforce (TERT) Initiative is developing dispatcher mutual aid for disaster response

Random Acts inspires new generation of firefighters

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Oakland nonprofit illustrates how simple actions can positively impact community and department members alike

FDIC 2019 Quick Take: 10 policies your fire department needs

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fire department policies go beyond liability to increase firefighter safety and reduce the risk for preventable injuries and line of duty deaths

Clean cabs: A NM fire department takes PPE out of the crew cab

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Bernalillo County Fire and Rescue Department integrates new apparatus in comprehensive firefighter safety, health and wellness initiative

60 people charged in illegal prescription opioid crackdown

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert Duncan, U.S. attorney for eastern Kentucky, called the doctors involved "white-coated drug dealers"

60 people charged in illegal prescription opioid crackdown

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert Duncan, U.S. attorney for eastern Kentucky, called the doctors involved "white-coated drug dealers"

Ohio city Verizon customers without 911 access for hours

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Huron County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) issued a notice via Everbridge shortly before 6 p.m., letting local residents know the cellular company was “experiencing an issue with 9-1-1 calls”

Ohio city Verizon customers without 911 access for hours

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 9-1-1 coordinator said the system is has a back-up plan when such an outage occurs

Ohio city Verizon customers without 911 access for hours

Posted on April 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 9-1-1 coordinator said the system is has a back-up plan when such an outage occurs

6 Pa. first responders honored for saving woman in cardiac arrest

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

EMS Supervisor Diane Fitzhenry said the young woman likely would not have survived if it weren’t for the quick action of six of the municipality’s emergency responders

Chicago firefighter fired for sexually harassing paramedic student on ride-along

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The student immediately complained to her parents and police after the firefighter allegedly made lewd comments and touched her during dinner at the firehouse

Chicago firefighter fired for sexually harassing paramedic student on ride-along

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The student immediately complained to her parents and police after the firefighter allegedly made lewd comments and touched her during dinner at the firehouse

Ill. city fire dept. gets new chassis for old ambulance

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The East Peoria Fire Department found a satisfying way to upgrade its ambulance fleet and save the city money at the same time

Ill. city fire dept. gets new chassis for old ambulance

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The East Peoria Fire Department found a satisfying way to upgrade its ambulance fleet and save the city money at the same time

Texas towns team up to form EMS

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Alton City Manager Jeff Underwood said he believed the move was the better option for the city’s residents

Texas towns team up to form EMS department

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Alton City Manager Jeff Underwood said he believed the move was the better option for the city’s residents

Fla. House will hear firefighters’ cancer bill after public pressure

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The legislation would require local governments to provide full coverage for cancer to firefighters, including disability and death benefits

Is your hood the weak link in your firefighting protective ensemble?

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Gore’s particulate-blocking firefighter hood is durable, affordable and offers increased protection from fireground particulates

NH firefighter runs Boston marathon, raises $15K for charity

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

While he was running Monday's marathon, Fire Lt. Russell Osgood thought about a local fire chief receiving cancer treatment that day and about firefighters who died in the line of duty

Firefighter runs marathon, raises $15K for firefighter cancer charity

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

While he was running the Boston marathon, Fire Lt. Russell Osgood was thinking of firefighters who are currently battling cancer or died from occupational cancer

Fire attack: Old churches, big problems

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

They don't burn often, but when they do legacy churches can hurt or kill firefighters in many ways

Gun control group targets Nev. sheriffs over new law

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — A national gun control lobbying organization on Tuesday made Nevada the latest Western state where it is trying to show that gun rights groups including the National Rifle Association are behind a "Second Amendment sanctuary" drive.

The Brady advocacy group said it believes gun rights advocates improperly orchestrated resolutions by rural lawmakers and sheriffs who say they won't enforce a new state law requiring background checks on all gun sales, including purchases at gun shows and on the internet.

"These Nevada county commissions and sheriffs have gone rogue," Brady President Kris Brown said in a statement saying the officials are endangering public safety by declaring they won't enforce strict background checks.

"If your job is to keep your constituents safe and defend public safety, you should have a vested interest in keeping guns out of dangerous hands," she said.

The National Rifle Association didn't immediately respond to messages about the Brady organization filings seeking emails and communications from commissioners in four of Nevada's 17 counties and sheriffs in three.

Don Turner, head of the pro-gun Nevada Firearms Coalition, said he supports the counties and sheriffs for balking at laws "that infringe on U.S. and Nevada constitutions."

Brady spokesman Max Samis acknowledged that communications and lobbying happens on both sides of the gun issue.

"This is different," he said. "This is telling law enforcement officers not to enforce the law."

The push for documents in Nevada follows requests by the Brady organization for records last month in New Mexico, where at least 26 county commissions approved so-called Second Amendment sanctuary ordinances in opposition to an expanded gun background checks law due to take effect July 1.

Brady is considering similar action in Washington state, Illinois and Colorado, Samis said.

In Washington and Illinois, officials in mostly rural areas have vowed not to enforce new gun buyer screening laws.

In Colorado, gun rights activists say about half the state's 64 counties have symbolically declared themselves Second Amendment sanctuary areas in opposition to a "red flag" gun law signed last week by Democratic Gov. Jared Polis. It allows firearms to be taken from people a judge deems to pose a danger.

The officials in several rural Nevada counties focus on a law set to go into effect next January.

A newly Democratic-majority Legislature passed the measure and Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak quickly signed it in February, more than two years after a background check initiative was passed by voters in 2016.

Sisolak called it a memorial to victims of the October 2017 Las Vegas Strip massacre that became the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Despite lawsuits, the initiative was not enacted during the Republican administration of former Gov. Brian Sandoval and former Attorney General Adam Laxalt. They insisted it was flawed and that the state does a better job of checking records of gun buyers than the FBI.

Elected officials in Nevada's two largest urban areas, Las Vegas and Reno, have said they will enforce the new state background screenings law when it goes into effect.

In rural Nye County, Sheriff Sharon Wehrly said she wanted to see what the Brady campaign seeks before she comments about the public documents filing.

Eureka County Sheriff Jesse Watts referred to a letter he sent in February to Sisolak, saying he would "refuse to participate, or stand idly by, while my citizens are turned into criminals due to the unconstitutional actions of misguided politicians."

"Nowhere in my letter does it say I am not enforcing the law," Watts said Tuesday.


New Orleans Firefighter Promotion Changes Criticized

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Under the proposed rule changes, the New Orleans Fire Department will put less emphasis on test scores, and the city will create a new selection group.

Federal grant to help Ala. establish a civil asset forfeiture database

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

John Sharp Alabama Media Group, Birmingham

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey’s office announced April 10 a $38,336 grant that will go toward establishing a statewide database to enable the tracking of property seized by police during arrests.

The money, which is provided to the state from the U.S. Department of Justice, will go to the Alabama Justice Information Commission for the development of a civil asset forfeiture plan. The plan includes the development of a database.

“Our police and deputies work long and hard to enforce laws and keep our communities safe,” Ivey said in statement. “Establishing these regulations will ensure that seizures related to crimes are done above board and without question.”

Jim Plott, spokesman with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, which is administering the grant, said the database will list all seizures, forfeitures and disposal of property provided by law enforcement agencies.

“That information can be used in requests for statistical data required by federal agencies when local agencies may be seeking grants, and it presents a clear record should any concerns arise involving a law enforcement agency,” said Plott.

A database that tracks civil asset forfeitures has been discussed and debated in Montgomery for some time. Last year, lawmakers nearly approved legislation to require the development of a database but it was defeated during the waning days of the session following opposition from law enforcement groups.

The Alabama Legislature had all the elements in place to pursue bipartisan reform on civil asset forfeiture. But months of negotiations with law enforcement, followed by a key Senate floor debate, resulted in Alabama coming up empty-handed. What happened?

In late February, the Alabama District Attorneys Association announced the creation of the Alabama Forfeiture Accountability system that allows law enforcement to voluntarily provide details on property seized during arrest.

Carla Crowder, executive director of Alabama Appleseed Center for Law & Justice in Montgomery, said “transparency is welcome and needed," but that more was needed. The Institute for Justice, in grading states based on their civil asset forfeiture laws, gave Alabama a “D-“ largely because it maintains a low bar to forfeit an asset even if no criminal conviction is needed.

The practice of property seizures by police has drawn criticism in Alabama and nationally and received new attention with a recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. In an Indiana case, the court ruled that authorities violated the constitutional prohibition on excessive fines when they seized a $42,000 vehicle from a man who pleaded guilty to selling $225 worth of heroin to undercover officers.

Following the ruling, some Alabama-based organizations and lawmakers have called out for civil asset forfeiture reform including possible outright repeal of the practice. A host of lawmakers, including state Sen. Arthur Orr, R-Decatur – who co-sponsored the reform measures last year, and has a similar bill this year – believe a criminal conviction should be required before law enforcement can seize someone’s property.

Crowder said she supports the bipartisan solution that is backed by Orr.

“The sensible solution to the government overreach allowed by our current civil asset forfeiture scheme is to require a criminal conviction before the government can take someone’s property," she said. "Alabama needs the reforms outlined in this bill, not a plan and not more delays.

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©2019 Alabama Media Group, Birmingham


Pa. bill creates police grants for drug-detecting devices

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Times

PHILADELPHIA — U.S. Rep. Conor Lamb has reintroduced legislation creating a grant program to help police obtain portable, chemical-screening devices that can be used to detect the dangerous drug fentanyl.

Lamb, D-17, Mount Lebanon, along with U.S. Reps. David Joyce, R-Ohio, and David Trone, D-Md., introduced the Providing Officers With Electronic Resources Act on April 3. Lamb, a former federal prosecutor, and Joyce, a former Geauga County prosecutor, introduced similar legislation in the House last year.

“The opioid crisis is affecting communities across our region and the country. We need to make sure our local law-enforcement officers are armed with the right tools to stay safe and do their jobs effectively,” Lamb said in a joint statement.

Full story: Lamb bill creates police grants for drug-detecting devices


Ex-FL Fire Chief’s Plea Deal Upsets Residents, Officials

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The arrests of David Freda and two fellow former Hernando Beach fire chiefs came amid allegations of inappropriate station behavior, service complaints and misspent money.

Watch Roof Collapse as NY Crews Battle Fire

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Video footage captured the moment of the roof of a burning two-and-a-half-story that was being renovated broke apart and collapsed.

US Federal Government Agencies Now Authorized to Use Axon Evidence

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With US Government FedRAMP JAB Authorization, Axon Evidence can be used by US Federal Government agencies

Georgia Officer Wounded in Gunfight Has Undergone 3 Surgeries

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Fox News, Officer Jerome Turner Jr.—who was shot as many as six times in the gun battle—has undergone three surgeries and will have another procedure in the coming days.

North Carolina Officer Involved in Rollover Crash Expected to be Okay

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Raleigh (NC) Police Department was transporting two K-9s when he lost control of his patrol vehicle on an interstate exit ramp, struck another vehicle, and then exited the roadway, flipping the car several times down an embankment.

Video: Louisiana Officer Saves Woman from Flooded Car

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Bastrop (LA) Police Department came upon a vehicle overtaken with flood waters with a woman trapped inside over the weekend and immediately took life-saving action.

World Series Champion Takes on New Career as California Deputy

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Deputy Justin Christian—who won a World Series ring with the San Francisco Giants in 2012—entered law enforcement after leaving the game of baseball a couple of years later.

California Helicopter Crew Safely Makes Emergency Landing

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The agency said on Facebook, “The helicopter was being flown by a 10-year veteran pilot and his co-pilot. As they were flying, they experienced a major mechanical failure and radioed to John Wayne Airport to request permission for an emergency landing.”

Virginia Officer Wants Mattel to Bring Back Police Barbie Doll

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Virginia Beach homicide detective Angela Murphy wanted to get a crime-fighting Barbie doll for her six-year-old daughter, but discovered that the toy company no longer makes this version of the iconic toy.

Massachusetts Officer Wounded in Gunfight Expected to be Okay

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Springfield (MA) Police Department was wounded in an exchange of gunfire in the early hours on Sunday morning. The officer—identified as Edwin Irizarry—was struck twice in the arm by two .22 caliber bullets.

New York Police Shoot, Kill Knife-Wielding Man

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Fox News, an officer first gave verbal commands to get the man—identified as 32-year-old Kawaski Trawick—to drop his weapons, and then when the subject didn’t' comply, deployed a TASER on him. The subject went to the ground but did not disarm himself of his weapons. As officers closed in to disarm the subject, he jumped to his feet and charged at the officers.

IDEX Fire & Safety Introduced SAM at Indy Trade Show

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The innovative SAM system makes complex pump operations simple by managing the water flow so the operator can focus on the fireground and the safety of their crew.

4 charged in connection with chemical bomb thrown at Colo. officer

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sam Tabachnik The Denver Post

Four 19-year-old men face charges in connection with a chemical bomb that injured two people, including a police officer, the 17th Judicial District Attorney’s Office announced.

On Friday, Braiden Ulmer, Gavin Dawson, Isaac Koch, and Maxwell McCann, all 19 years old, posted bond and appeared in court to be advised of their charges.

On April 7, an officer arrived at 72nd Avenue and Beech Street to clear a barricade blocking the street. As the officer and a civilian picked up the debris, someone threw a plastic bottle toward the officer, which began releasing white smoke, police said.

The officer soon lost consciousness and was taken to the hospital, suffering from chlorine gas exposure, the DA’s office said. The civilian suffered minor symptoms and was treated at the scene.

The four men, plus one unnamed juvenile, were arrested the next day on suspicion of first-degree assault; criminal attempt of second-degree assault; two counts of possession, use or removal of explosives or incendiary devices; and conspiracy to commit possession, use or removal of explosives or incendiary devices.

Ulmer, Dawson and McCann and Koch will appear in court for preliminary hearings on May 10.

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©2019 The Denver Post


Polaris Growth Fund Makes Strategic Investment in Emergency Reporting

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Emergency Reporting (ER), the global leader in cloud-based reporting and records management software for Fire and EMS agencies, has received a significant growth investment from the Polaris Growth Fund.

REV Group Announces Tribute to First Responders

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

REV Group and Road America thank first responders with FREE entry to the NTT INDYCAR Series REV Group Grand Prix June 20-23.

HURST Jaws of Life Installs New Manufacturing Machines at NC Plant

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two new machines improve efficiency and quality control in the Shelby plant.

Nasco Healthcare Releases New 2019-2020 Healthcare Product Guide

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 268-page product guide includes Nasco Healthcare’s Life/form and Simulaids lines, as well as many other teaching aids and models of outstanding quality.

Man Runs Red Light, Hits Houston Police Investigator

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Houston police investigator was involved in a crash early Tuesday while he was on the way to a fatal robbery shooting near NRG Stadium.

Florida Governor Asks State’s Supreme Court to Uphold Suspension of Sheriff

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Gov. Ron DeSantis told the Florida Supreme Court on Tuesday that there are no grounds to overturn his suspension of Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel.

Hard Hat Inventor Bullard Donates to Firefighter Cancer Support Network

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Bullard plans to continue its support of the FCSN throughout 2019 by donating a portion of all proceeds from the sale of their Bullard Care Kits and Decon Cloths.

Get more bang for your training buck with a simulation training subscription

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Sponsored by VirTra

At the end of 2018, PoliceOne issued its annual list of trends and predictions for the year ahead, including a forecast of a coming funding crunch for law enforcement agencies that will put extreme pressure on operational effectiveness.

That article quotes Jim Bueermann, a retired police chief and former National Police Federation president, warning that police agencies will begin to feel the effects of a coming global recession in the latter half of 2019, which will kick off a noticeable reduction in personnel in many law enforcement agencies and force the re-examination of basic service delivery models.

In other words, law enforcement will once again be asked to do even more for less budget, and department leaders may be tempted to economize in non-public facing areas, such as officer training. However, skimping on training increases the risk of negative outcomes that damage confidence and open the door to costly lawsuits. Consequently, legislators may then feel pressure to pull back on the budgetary reins even harder, cutting off funds for capital equipment purchases necessary to make policing safer for officers and the community.

Custom Subscription Training

In response to these challenges, VirTra developed a subscription approach to help bring essential training technology within reach for more departments, even those facing reductions in capital expense budgets. The Subscription Training & Equipment Partnership, or STEP program, enables departments of all sizes to benefit from VirTra’s training solutions, including multi-screen training simulators, courseware and development tools.

The program offers the option to finance through a monthly, quarterly or annual subscription basis rather than an up-front outlay. That enables departments to move long-term investments in officer training from capital expenses (that require administrative and legislative approval) to a single payment that’s just a line item in the operational budget.

Converting capital expenses to operating costs through a subscription service model is the basis of the cloud computing revolution that has transformed the information technology industry. Tech companies refer to this as Software as a Service, or SaaS model, and this approach has made computing power available to smaller businesses by eliminating the need to invest in costly data centers.

VirTra applied this approach, dubbed “Training Solution as a Service (TSaaS),” to help law enforcement agencies that need but may not be able to afford the advanced, immersive training that simulators deliver. Budgeting for a training service instead of a capital purchase solves the funding problem for many agencies.

“The STEP program provides agencies an immediate path to train with the industry’s best, at an affordable price point and without the uncertainties that a large capital purchase decision can induce,” said Jason Mulcahy, VirTra general manager. “We’ve already begun providing STEP to eager customers, and the initial reaction is extremely positive. We expect to continue to see positive reviews and benefits as we ramp up the new program.”

Choose your own adventure

The STEP program offers a customizable solution that allows an agency to select a combination of equipment, software training solutions, certified coursework and tools that best fit its training needs and budget. Available options include:

V-VICTA interactive coursework (nationally certified coursework accompanies the scenarios for CE credit hours). Immersive training simulators, such as V-300, V-180, V-ST or portable single-screen V-100. Hundreds of branching training scenarios, skill drills and courses of fire. V-Marksmanship, which provides ballistically accurate advanced skill drills training. Realistic drop-in recoil kits for the most widely used firearms. The stress inducing Threat-Fire training tool to simulate return fire. V-Author, VirTra’s exclusive software tool that allows customers to edit, create or author training scenarios from scratch with their own characters or scenery. TASER, OC spray and low-light training support for safe training any time of day.

Previously, departments needed to procure hundreds of thousands of dollars to implement these capabilities. That meant going up the chain of command, seeking legislative authorization, applying for grants and spending valuable time and resources jumping through hoops to bring necessary safety and training improvements in de-escalation and use-of-force measures.

Even authorities who recognize the need and value of an officer training program may balk at the price tag for a suite of new equipment and instead choose a subpar option that doesn’t train officers properly. But with the subscription option, departments can select the elements that best fit their needs and budgets.

“The STEP program allows departments to rent the VirTra system on an annual basis, which is perfect for government entities due to our yearly budget cycles,” said Captain Jody Hayes of the West Des Moines Iowa Police Department. “We never know exactly what our budget lines will be from year to year, so it’s very difficult to commit to multi-year or large-scale purchases.”

Hayes says purchasing a system outright wasn’t the best solution for West Des Moines because technology is improving so quickly, and the department did not want to risk getting locked into an antiquated system that would end up incurring further costs to maintain and update.

The STEP program includes a lifetime warranty and service for the product, as well as providing the replacement equipment and the newest technology as an agency renews its contract.

“Since they own it, they service it and update it,” said Hayes. “It’s not your worry.”


HURST Jaws of Life Adds 59.1-Inch Telescopic Rescue Ram to Battery-powered eDRAULIC Line

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The battery-powered tool also offers easy maneuverability with an ergonomically designed star-grip.

Hurst Introduces Industry’s First Watertight Battery-Powered Extrication Tool Line

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The company’s EWXT water-resistant casing debuts in three tools, which also feature a new brushless motor for greater efficiency and a longer run time.

Watch NJ Firefighters Tackle Three-Alarm Blaze

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Crews from Rutherford and neighboring departments battled the house fire, which investigators believe was started by a lightning strike.

Fla. Sheriff’s Department Uses Mobile Fingerprinting to Catch Criminals Faster

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Escambia County Sheriff’s Department demonstrates the power of instant mobile identity verification using DataWorks Plus’s Evolution, powered by Integrated Biometrics’ Columbo FAP 30 sensor

GA Fire Department Breaks Ground on $3M Station

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Once the new downtown firehouse is complete, the Augusta Fire Department will have 20 stations throughout the city.

Police History: How Trooper Charlie Hanger caught the Oklahoma City bomber

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lt. Dan Marcou
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

In the years since the deadly blast that killed 168 and injured 680 at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, we in law enforcement have learned numerous lessons.

We’ve improved our tactical response to mass casualty incidents. We’ve become more effective in conducting investigations – and sting operations – that prevent similar incidents from even occurring.

One lesson we must always remember was taught to us by Noble County (Okla.) Trooper Charlie Hanger. Hanger – who now serves as Noble County Sheriff – is proof that one cop can have incredible impact with a single traffic stop.

That stop resulted in the Oklahoma City bombers being brought swiftly to justice – Timothy McVeigh was put to death, and his accomplice, Terry Nichols, is serving a life sentence.

Charlie was on patrol working the day shift when the Oklahoma City bomb exploded. He was initially dispatched from his area to assist, but almost instantly was called off and told to remain in his own area.

A short time later, Charlie passed a yellow Mercury missing a registration tag. Charlie slowed to let the driver of the Mercury get ahead of him. As he did, Charlie hit his overhead lights to begin the vehicle stop.

As the driver pulled his vehicle over, Charlie got a strange feeling about the occupant. Even though the stop was for a minor violation, Charlie sensed something more serious was going on besides a missing registration tag.

The Arrest of timothy mcveigh

Charlie paid attention to his inner voice and orchestrated a non-approach vehicle contact. Instead of just walking up on the Mercury, he called for the driver to step out of the vehicle. Hanger watched the suspect exit his car. He had the man walk to the area between the squad and the Mercury.

When Charlie asked for the suspect’s driver’s license, the suspect reached for it. This movement alerted Hanger to the outline of a weapon impressed under the suspect's jacket. During a verbal exchange, the suspect – now known to be Timothy McVeigh – admitted to having a weapon and said it was loaded.

Charlie had drawn his own weapon, and as he covered the suspect he replied, “So is mine.”

Charlie handcuffed McVeigh and discovered he had a .45 caliber Glock loaded with the devastating Black Talon rounds. McVeigh carried his Glock in a quick-draw “suicide holster.” Charlie’s search also revealed McVeigh had a spare magazine and a knife hidden on his person.

Charlie took McVeigh to jail and booked him on a carrying a concealed weapon charge. It was here that McVeigh gave his address in Michigan – the address he gave was that of the brother of his accomplice, Terry Nichols.

A Little Bit of Luck

McVeigh would probably have been given a court appearance date and released either the next day – or at the latest, the day after – except for a little bit of luck. The judge he was to appear in front of was unavailable because of family issues.

This was a blessing in disguise to FBI investigators, because as their investigation led them to focus on McVeigh, they discovered they didn’t have to look far. He was but a few miles from the scene, already in jail courtesy of Trooper Charlie Hanger.

During a routine search of his own squad, Charlie found a business card discarded by McVeigh while he was squirming and handcuffed in the back seat of the squad. The card would turn out to be quite damning – it was the card of a military surplus store in Wisconsin. Written on the back of the card by McVeigh were the words, “Will need more TNT – $10 a stick.”

The Lesson Learned

Charlie believed that by increasing his stops, he was increasing the odds that he would make a difference, and that one stop he made years ago proved him right.

He always modestly claimed he was just “in right place at the right time.”

But it was much more than that. Any police officer can be at the right place at the right time and still choose to do nothing. Charlie proves that the right cop at the right place at the right time can do the right thing and make a difference in this world.

IN HIS OWN WORDS

In this video for the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, Charlie Hanger details the routine traffic stop that ended with the arrest of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.

This article, originally published 04/17/2015, has been updated.


911 Emergency Dispatcher: The calm voice in the dark

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

Charlene Belew The Duncan Banner, Okla.

Most people have heard about the “thin red line” and the “thin blue line,” but what about the thinest gold line in the middle? That thin gold line represents those who aren’t ever seen, but are mostly heard. That thin gold line stands for dispatchers, who act as “the golden glue that holds it all together” when it comes to receiving emergency calls and sending out first responders.

National Public Safety Telecommunications Week falls between April 14-20. This week is a time to honor those dispatchers and public safety telecommunicators for the jobs they perform behind the scenes.

Heather George, who works with the Stephens County Sheriff’s Office as the 911 dispatch supervisor, said there are 10 total dispatchers from the county. From just Jan. 1 - March 31, these dispatchers have taken a total of 6,045 calls, both inbound and outbound, not including internal calls between the departments, which can sometimes fall in the 400-600 range each month. Usually, according to George, there are at least two dispatchers on duty at a time, except some early morning hours where there may only be one.

The dispatch center George works for handles calls for the county and dispatch for deputies, while also dispatching for Velma and some for Comanche. In total, there are seven rural fire department they dispatch for, along with Velma EMS.

George, who has been with the department since it began in 2011, has six employees of her own which have been in service for more than six years and three more employees who have served for right at or under three years apiece.

“Dispatchers work 12 hour shifts and when they come into the office, they get briefed by the shift that they are relieving. This is for any pertinent information that may be needed during another shift — ongoing calls or calls that haven’t been completed yet,” George said. “The dispatcher sits in front of four or five computer screens depending on which station they sit at. One works County for the deputies and works fire and phones. The fire/phones person also has the OLETS computer (Oklahoma Law Enforcement Telecommunications System) which lets us communicate with every other law enforcement agency in the U.S.”

These dispatchers use multiple systems they log into before they can actually begin their shift. These programs include ODIS, the data entry system that houses all the logs created for everything that comes over the radio and phone, CallWorks which is for 911 phone system and 911 mapping, a warrants system, recording system, OLETS and other resources which can be used to find locations, land or cow owners and more.

“We have clerical functions that have to be performed during the shift — warrant and protective order entries, citation and warning entries, etc. — but really, we wait,” George said. “We wait for someone to call or to key up on the radio, we wait to gather information, we wait for that person to call who is experiencing the worst day of their life and try to handle the call as professionally and efficiently as possible. I have been doing this job for 11 years and my heart still drops a little every time 911 rings and every time an officer out on a traffic stop or a call doesn’t answer their radio. You always know it’s going to be a bad call when you can hear the screams before you even get the receiver to your ear.”

For George and other dispatchers, this recognition week is extremely important, because most of the general public don’t realize the dispatchers are truly the first responders to the situations they’re calling about.

“We are the first person who knows what’s going on and we are the only reason anyone ever gets help. Police and Firefighters are always recognized as they should be, but without us, that police officer and firefighter would never come,” George said. “We work the shift work and spend the nights, weekends and holidays away from our families just like they do, we put our blood, sweat and tears into the job, just like they do, but we are invisible. Just a voice.”

George described taking calls where the dispatcher must remain calm to help save a life until a physical first responder can arrive to the scene.

“If an officer shows up to a house where, lets say, a woman is not breathing and the husband has started CPR, the officer goes in and takes over compressions and saves that individual, they are a hero — and they are — but what you won’t hear about is how we got all the information from a screaming husband quickly and gave it to the officer,” George said. “We convinced that horrified husband to get his wife to a flat surface and talked him through how to start CPR, we stayed on the phone to be his comfort and his cheerleader to get him through until the officer arrived. Then once they get there, we hang up, most of the time never to hear what happened, to know if she lived or died, we just move on to the next call. We get no closure.”

Handling dispatch calls calmly while the caller on the other line is having the worst day of their life isn’t where the job stops, though. Sometimes dispatchers receive calls about their own families and can’t do anything but their job until it’s over. Other times, the call is much darker and dispatchers hear tragedy happening actively.

“We have dispatchers that have taken calls involving their own families. Just a couple weeks ago, one of our dispatchers, while at work, heard his own address come over the radio as his house was burning down,” she said. “One dispatcher got a 911 call that his daughter wasn’t breathing. I myself was at work when a call came across of my sister and her kids being in a car accident. We have had people hurt while we are on the phone, and have people even commit suicide while on the phone with us. And even in all those situations, we finish taking care of the call before reacting to the incidents.”

George said there isn’t a specific type of person attracted to the job. Sometimes, people end up in dispatch simply because they needed the paycheck, or maybe because they wanted a stepping stone into actual law enforcement. With George, it wasn’t something she had thought about until her first day when she realized this is how she would spend the rest of her life.

“I loved being the person that was there in someone’s greatest time of need,” she said. “My very first 911 call I ever took was a screaming mother that had woke up to find her child had died during the night. It was terrifying, but also when I knew it’s what I would do for the rest of my life. I went outside and cried after that call. I have never worked with anyone or interviewed anyone who said that this is just what they have always wanted to do … but I don’t think it’s one kind of person that wants to be a dispatcher and strives to become one, it takes all kinds.”

A personal story of George’s that has never slipped her memory includes a call from an older gentleman advising someone came to his home and told him about a car accident.

“The accident was a mother and two children, and it was bad. Ejections and fatalities, the husband of the driver was the one who came upon the accident and went to the callers house for help. The caller told me he was going to the crash and would call me back with the details I needed. I of course started everyone that way while waiting for his call. This caller was back on the phone with me in what seemed like seconds,” George recalled. “He was at the scene and told me it was bad. He was calm and had such a soothing voice. He started describing the scene for me and it was horrific. He came upon the deceased person from that accident and knew immediately that they were not alive, and he began to pray over them and pray for the survivors. I stayed on the line the whole time and silently sobbed in my chair. It still chokes me up to even talk about it now, it was so sad yet so beautiful all at the same time. I have no idea what happened to the rest of the people involved in that accident nor do I even know who they were because the caller wasn’t involved, but I will never forget it as long as I live. It kept me awake at night for a while as some of our calls do. Another call I will never forget was the Braylee Henry murder in Velma, that night was very difficult for many reasons, but it was a night that I think about often.”

There are a few things the general public can do when it comes to working with these dispatchers. The first is to keep in mind that it’s not at all like what it seems in the movies.

“Yes, we can ping your calls, but not immediately, it takes a few seconds and even then, if you are moving, it takes time to refresh to the new location,” George said. “I can’t tell you how many calls I get that the person says, ‘Get someone here now!’ or ‘I don’t know my address can’t you see it on the map?’ Write your address down, not just for you, and not just for your child in case they ever need to call, but also for those times that you may be so panicked and so distraught, you simply can not think of what it is.”

The second thing people can do when working with dispatchers includes properly handling 911 hang-ups and accidental pocket dials. Dispatchers want to know you’re safe, not get you in trouble.

“If you accidentally call 911, that’s okay,” she said. “We just ask that you stay on the line and let us know it was an accident. If you give your small child an old phone it can still call 911 even if there is no service, again, if they accidentally call just stay on the line. No one will get in trouble for calling, we just want to make sure you are safe.”

When it comes to celebrating these behind the scenes heroes, George said there’s an open selection of what can be done to recognize the dispatchers.

“If you know a dispatcher tell them you appreciate them, if you don’t, call the office, let them know you see them, you know they’re there and you appreciate what they do,” she said. “The biggest thing the public can do for us is trust us. We know that when you call 911, you may be experiencing the worst day of your life and I know our questions seem irritating, but they are necessary. And just because we are still asking questions three minutes into the conversation, doesn’t mean we don’t have people started that way. It is imperative for us to get the most information we can while on the phone, because once we disconnect or if we accidentally get disconnected or if their phone dies, we may not be able to reach them again.”

George also honors those dispatchers in the area, even if it is out of her own pocket. This year, George has reached out and received enthusiasm back from entities including Papa Johns, Chicken Express, Special Days Cakes, Rib Crib, Pizza Hut, Wendy’s and Viridian. George said AMR and Air Evac are also planning to throw a cookout for the dispatchers as a way to thank them.

“It’s a welcome treat in such a thankless job that we all love so much,” she said.

Stephens County Sheriff Wayne McKinney said the week provides a chance to sing the song of the unsung heroes.

“They take the 911 emergency calls and people who are experiencing some of the worst times of their lives and have to talk to that individual, stay on the line with that individual, get deputies or police officers to the scene,” McKinney said. “A lot of times we don’t give them a lot of credit and we should. This is a time for us to recognize them and the job they do and show how much we appreciate them.”

Dispatchers do so much that McKinney couldn’t name just one thing he wanted the public to know about these workers.

“They’re the lifeline,” McKinney said. “If there’s an emergency that comes in, and the family members call 911 trying to get help, whether it be medical attention, whether it be law enforcement to the scene, fire department, whatever, they’re the ones who relay the information to make sure we get to the exact location and stay on the line to keep that person calm or give them instructions if it’s a medical emergency to render some kind of first aid until first responders get there. They do a whole lot that’s normally behind the scenes.”

For more information on National Public Safety Telecommunications Week, visit https://www.npstw.org/.

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©2019 The Duncan Banner (Duncan, Okla.)


NAUMD announces winners of Best Dressed Public Safety Award

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. — The North American Association of Uniform Manufacturers & Distributors (NAUMD) has announced the winners of its annual Best Dressed Public Safety Award ® Competition, a program that calls attention to the important role uniforms play in law enforcement and public safety. The award celebrates the suppliers, law enforcement departments and first responders that go the extra mile to create versatile, functional and stylish uniforms that represent public safety professionals.

To some, uniforms are prosaic and ordinary, but to the countless departments who have entered the NAUMD’s Best Dressed Public Safety Award ® Competition, uniforms have a greater meaning and purpose. “Uniforms have a powerful impact on how employees are perceived, and this is particularly true in law enforcement and public safety,” said Steve Zalkin, NAUMD president. “In law enforcement, a visible, uniformed public safety presence on the street, at a mall or other institution can add a sense of security and help comfort the public or allay fears.”

The 2019 Best Dressed Public Safety Award ® winners, by category, are:

Medium Size Department: Toledo, OH, Police Department, Superior Uniform Sales, Supplier Large Department: D.C. Metropolitan Police, Muscatello's, Supplier First Responders, Medium Department: Lakewood West Metro Fire Protection District, CO, Elbeco, Supplier First Responders, Small Department: City of Oakland Park, FL, Fire Rescue, Global Trading, Supplier

Judges review each department’s professional appearance and uniform diversity, paying close attention to detail and written standards. Since many officers have specific assignments and patrol details, there are many factors to consider, including the following: Does the uniform fit the job function? Is the appearance neat and do the garments fit properly? Most importantly, can the public immediately identify the wearer as a professional law enforcement officer?

Now in its 41 st year, the Best Dressed Public Safety Award ® Competition is open to departments across North America. Entries are solicited throughout fall and winter, and winners are announced at the NAUMD’s annual convention each spring. All winning departments and their suppliers receive plaques.

NAUMD honored its award recipients April 9 th during the association's 2019 Annual Convention, held in New Orleans at the Hyatt Regency.

6 things you need to know before buying your next uniform A Class A uniform that combines comfort, fit and performance


Station Design Conference: Three Things to Know

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Here are a few things you need to know heading into the 2019 Station Design Conference being held May 14-16 in Rosemont, IL.

CT Fire Department Celebrates 75th Anniversary

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 1944 house fire led to the founding of the East Farmington Volunteer Fire Department, which is marking its diamond anniversary.

Salt Lake City, Utah, Fire Department Has New Tiller Called Ladder 5

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Salt Lake City, UT, Fire Department has placed in service a 107-foot Pierce Ascendant tiller aerial in service.

New Orleans PD to review officer’s UOF shown in video

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Emily Lane NOLA Media Group, New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS — The New Orleans Police Department’s investigative unit that probes uses of force on the public by NOPD officers is looking into the takedown of a woman who was handcuffed over the weekend as officers broke up a fight during French Quarter Festival, NOPD said Monday (April 15).

A video posted Saturday on Facebook shows what appears to be a white-shirted NOPD officer twice throwing a woman to the ground before other officers help him handcuff her near the intersection of North Peters and Bienville streets. The woman appears to hit the white-shirted officer during the struggle.

The New Orleans Advocate, which first reported on the video and internal investigation, identified the white-shirted officer as newly promoted 8th District Commander Octavio Baldassaro. Two law enforcement sources who were not authorized to speak confirmed Baldassaro is the white-shirted officer shown in the video.

Baldassaro received scratches to his left arm while trying to separate two women and his uniform was torn, one of the sources said. The woman he is seen apprehending in the video refused medical treatment.

Caught on Camera: NOPD commander in physical altercation; excessive force investigation underway

WATCH THIS VIDEO: Do you think this NOPD Commander used excessive force? An investigation is underway. Meanwhile, the woman involved has been arrested and is facing several charges. Let us know what you think in the comments section. Details --> https://bit.ly/2IkLPnT WDSU News

Posted by Juliana Mazza WDSU on Monday, April 15, 2019

NOPD Superintendent Shaun Ferguson late last month moved Baldassaro from second-in-command in the First District, which polices Mid-City, Bayou St. John and Treme, to the visible post leading the 8th District, which polices the French Quarter, Faubourg Marigny, Central Business District and parts of the Warehouse District.

NOPD spokesman Andy Cunningham said the Force Investigation Team, a unit within the Public Integrity Bureau, was “immediately notified of the incident,” after it occurred, and responded to the scene. Federal consent decree monitors overseeing a mandate in place since 2013 to remedy unconstitutional policing practices were notified, as was the Office of the Independent Police Monitor.

The Force Investigation Team "is conducting a thorough investigation into the incident in its entirety,” Cunningham said.

Superintendent Ferguson also opened a separate and formal disciplinary investigation into the actions of Baldassaro.

“I want our community to know we are taking this incident very seriously and you can be confident the NOPD is committed to conducting a fair and impartial investigation,” Superintendent Ferguson said in a statement Monday night. “Please understand these investigations take time, but that we will continue to be transparent throughout the process.”

Two women, ages 21 and 26, were arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace, NOPD said. The 21-year-old was additionally booked on a second count of disturbing the peace, and on charges of resisting an officer, battery of a police officer and tampering.

Since posted on Saturday, the video has had 48,000 views and 1,300 shares, along with more than 550 comments.

Bonycle Sokunbi, a spokeswoman for the Office of the Independent Police Monitor, confirmed the taxpayer-funded watchdog organization is monitoring NOPD’s internal probe.

“The review of this incident must address if the high-ranking officer involved in this incident used the ‘minimum amount of force that the objectively reasonable officer would use in light of the circumstances to effectively bring an incident or person under control,'" said Sokunbi in a Monday press release that cites NOPD policy.

Update: This story was updated to include a statement from the Independent Police Monitor, as well as the news that Superintendent Ferguson had opened a separate investigation into the use of force.

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©2019 NOLA Media Group, New Orleans


Houston Mayor Opens Books to Firefighters Union

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The move is viewed as progress in talks between Mayor Sylvester Turner and the union as the city considers laying off 220 firefighters to phase in voter-approved pay parity.

Since Columbine, Colorado Schools See Increase in Lockdowns as Students Report More Possible Threats

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It’s an increasingly common scenario across the state as students raised in an era of mass shootings are attuned to any potential threat.

Conn. officer permanently wounded in shooting retires

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pat Tomlinson The Hour, Norwalk, Conn.

NORWALK, Conn. — The Police Commission accepted Officer Phillip Roselle’s retirement on Monday.

While Mayor Harry Rilling said Roselle’s family was “very pleased” with the pension agreement, the retiring officer — a 31-year veteran who was shot and permanently injured in a September 2017 training accident — felt the city should do more for him.

“This is nothing but a forced retirement. I was shot by somebody who was irresponsible. I got a bullet in my chest that I can’t get rid of, and now I have kidneys that don’t work and a hand that doesn’t work — that’s what I got for 31 years of service,” Roselle said. “They don’t give a rat’s behind about me.”

The commission unanimously approved a pension settlement that granted Roselle a full pension instead of the disability pension that had previously been discussed. The pension will be effective retroactively to April 1.

The pension includes a monthly payment of $5,097.20 to Roselle for the rest of his life — a payment that will transfer to his wife if he dies — and a one-time severance package of $32,549.05.

Rilling claims the city will go a step further.

“The city has been working to ensure that the family is going to be taken care of above and beyond what you see here,” Rilling said.

Rilling declined to reveal what was being considered, but said it centered on a workers’ compensation settlement.

“From what I understand, the Roselles are very pleased with what they will be receiving with the pension and workers’ compensation benefits,” Rilling said.

Roselle, who was at dialysis and could not attend his official retirement, confirmed discussions with the city regarding a workers’ compensation settlement.

“They haven’t done anything ‘above and beyond’ for me and my family,” said Roselle, whose workers compensation benefits had previously been denied. “They basically said, ‘this is what we’re going to get, shut the heck up and move on.’”

Roselle also wouldn’t reveal the potential worth of the discussed settlement, but said he expected it to be finalized within two weeks. The settlement, he claimed, would include one lump sum of cash followed by two additional payments over 12 months.

“Whatever it is, though, it certainly won’t be enough,” he said.

Rilling said he empathized with the family’s frustrations, especially given the “extraordinary circumstances” that led to Roselle’s retirement, but also pointed out that the family would be “fairly compensated when all is said and done.”

The agreement comes more than two-and-a-half years after he was shot by his sergeant in a training range accident.

In recent months, Roselle’s wife, Debbie Roselle, has advocated for state legislation to allow municipalities to pay the difference between the disability retirement pay and regular pay rate for public safety employees who are forced to retire due to injury.

“I basically begged and pleaded for the mayor to hold off until the bill I’ve been working so hard on passes in June, but the mayor would not,” Debbie Roselle said. “It’s a very unfortunate situation, but I guess they needed to fill Phil’s spot.”

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©2019 The Hour (Norwalk, Conn.)


Unplug Your Next Fire Station

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Janet Wilmoth describes how Salt Lake City Fire Station No. 14 became the first fire station in the country to achieve Net Zero Energy.

Lighten The Load With The Pelican Air 1465EMS Case

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Easily washed and sterilized, the Pelican Air™ 1465EMS Case is engineered with a next generation Pelican Air polymer construction that is up to 40% lighter than standard Pelican™ Protector Case™ brand cases yet still stands up to the harshest...

Ore. officer wounded in shootout, suspect in custody

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Everton Bailey Jr. The Oregonian, Portland, Ore.

MILWAUKIE, Ore. — A 30-year-old man accused of shooting a Milwaukie police officer during a shootout near a grocery store late Saturday remains held in the Clackamas County Jail.

Douglas J. Teter appeared in county circuit court on suspicion of attempted murder, second-degree assault, resisting arrest and unlawful use of a weapon. He was denied pretrial release by a judge and ordered to next appear in court for a hearing on April 22, court records show.

Teter is accused of trying to kill Officer Daniel J. Duke, according to court documents. State records show Duke was hired by the Milwaukie Police Department last May and has prior law enforcement experience since 2009 outside of Oregon.

Duke was released from a hospital Sunday after being shot several times in his left leg, said Officer Brad Walther, a Milwaukie police spokesman. He said Duke has not yet been interviewed by members of the Clackamas County Major Crimes Team, which is investigating the incident.

“While he is very sore, he is able to get around with the use of crutches,” Milwaukie police said in a statement Monday evening. “Officer Duke is expected to recover fully and is in good spirits.”

According to police, Duke stopped Teter as he was walking near Southeast 42nd Avenue and Monroe Street around 11:20 p.m. because he matched a description of a man suspected of threatening another with a gun earlier. At some point, a TASER was used on Teter, but it didn’t work, police said.

Teter and Duke later exchanged gunfire two blocks north of where Teter was stopped, near the Safeway store at Southeast 42nd Avenue and Harrison Street, and the officer was injured, police said.

Teter then ran away and was later found hiding under a truck and camper, police said.

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©2019 The Oregonian (Portland, Ore.)


In Quarters: Spokane County Fire District #4 – Station #41

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Spokane County Fire District #4's new Station #41 has five drive-through bays, support spaces, and living and sleeping quarters for 16 fire personnel.

NH Firefighters Gives Boy with Cancer Custom Gear

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Keene's firefighters union fitted a 3-year-old boy with leukemia, along with his twin sister and older brother, for personalized turnout gear.

In Quarters: Russellville, AR, Central Fire Station

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The new central station for the Russellville Fire Department was designed to meet the needs of the department and act as a catalyst for the downtown re-development.

In Quarters: Plainfield, IN, Fire Territory Station No. 122

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Plainfield Fire Territory Station No.122 shares a timeless design and contemporary exterior that matches the local community aesthetics.

In Quarters: Gainesville, FL, Fire Station #1

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Gainesville's Fire Station #1 was built with future growth in mind and currently houses 12 firefighters and five emergency response apparatus.

Revised $10.7M NY Station Proposal on May Ballot

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Halfmoon-Waterford Fire Distirct is asking voters to approve the proposed fire station by passing a referendum in May.

KY Firefighter Hurt in Apparatus Crash

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Bell County firefighter suffered minor injuries from a collision while responding to a call about a downed power line Sunday night.

FDNY Head Supports Paris FFs Battling Notre Dame Blaze

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In an online message, Commissioner Daniel Nigro tells Paris firefighters that the thoughts of the FDNY are with them as "they bravely battle this terrible fire."

Earphone Connection Announces the New Black Diamond Acoustic Tube Product Line: Black is the New Clear

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Black Diamond series combines the same high quality audio with the sleek professional look of an acoustic tube in a black color variety.

Body Camera-as-a-Service Helps Agencies Overcome Financial Hurdles

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

WatchGuard Video announces Pay-as-You-Go program for law enforcement.

Body Camera-as-a-Service Helps Agencies Overcome Financial Hurdles

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

WatchGuard Video announces Pay-as-You-Go program for law enforcement.

U.S. Military Academy at West Point Combat Weapons Team Earns Top Honor at 2019 SIG Relentless Warrior Championship

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NEWINGTON, N.H., (April 11, 2019) –SIG SAUER, Inc. is honored to announce the conclusion of the Second Annual SIG Relentless Warrior Championship.  On Saturday, March 30, 2019, ninety cadets from the United States Air Force Academy, United States...

Addison Police Department Implements Mark43 Cloud-Based Records Management System To Bring Efficiency and Data-Sharing To Public Safety Processes

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mark43’s modern technology will facilitate increased collaboration for Addison PD within the department and with other Texas agencies using the same platform.

Boston Pauses to Mark Sixth Anniversary of Marathon Bombings

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Boston paused to mark the sixth anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings as One Boston Day falls on Marathon Monday for the first time.

Boston Pauses to Mark Sixth Anniversary of Marathon Bombings

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Boston paused to mark the sixth anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings as One Boston Day falls on Marathon Monday for the first time.

FBI Working With Dallas Police In Transgender Beating Case

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The FBI is looking into the assault caught on-camera to see if it meets the requirements of a hate crime.

FBI Working With Dallas Police In Transgender Beating Case

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The FBI is looking into the assault caught on-camera to see if it meets the requirements of a hate crime.

Minnesota Corrections Officers Remembered Through Basketball

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dozens of law enforcement agencies played Saturday in a charity basketball tournament at Burnsville High School. Money raised is being donated to the families of officers Joseph Gomm and Joseph Parise. Both corrections officers died in the line of duty la

Minnesota Corrections Officers Remembered Through Basketball

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dozens of law enforcement agencies played Saturday in a charity basketball tournament at Burnsville High School. Money raised is being donated to the families of officers Joseph Gomm and Joseph Parise. Both corrections officers died in the line of duty la

Four Charged After Chemical Bomb Thrown at Colorado Police Officer

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four 19-year-old men face charges in connection with a chemical bomb that injured two people, including a police officer, the 17th Judicial District Attorney’s Office announced.

Four Charged After Chemical Bomb Thrown at Colorado Police Officer

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four 19-year-old men face charges in connection with a chemical bomb that injured two people, including a police officer, the 17th Judicial District Attorney’s Office announced.

New Orleans Police Review Use of Force Shown in Video

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The New Orleans Police Department is reviewing whether a district commander acted appropriately when he twice tossed a woman to the ground while trying to break up a fight during French Quarter Fest over the weekend, officials said Monday.

New Orleans Police Review Use of Force Shown in Video

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The New Orleans Police Department is reviewing whether a district commander acted appropriately when he twice tossed a woman to the ground while trying to break up a fight during French Quarter Fest over the weekend, officials said Monday.

Connecticut Police Officer Permanently Injured in Shooting Forced to Retire

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Norwalk Police Officer Phillip Roselle, a 31-year veteran who was shot and permanently injured in a September 2017 training accident, felt the city should do more for him.

Woman Charged With Dragging Washington Police Officer 30 Feet

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A woman suspected of hit-and-run and first-degree assault after reportedly dragging a Burlington police officer 30 feet and then striking a vehicle on Saturday has been charged in Skagit County Superior Court.

NYPD Officer Fatally Shoots Man Who Lunged at Cops With Knife

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man armed with a knife and wooden stick was shot dead by a Bronx cop after a Taser failed to subdue him, police said Monday.

Oregon Police Officer Shot; Suspect in Custody

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Douglas J. Teter, accused of shooting a Milwaukie police officer during a shootout near a grocery store late Saturday, remains held in the Clackamas County Jail Monday.

Body Cam Video Released in Fatal Charlotte Police-Involved Shooting of Armed Man

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Officer Wende Kerl’s body camera shows that she and another officer instructed Danquirs Franklin to put the gun down more than 15 times in the roughly 40 seconds before he was shot and killed.

Rapid Response: Notre Dame fire poses unique challenges for Paris Fire Brigade

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters face multiple hazards at cultural icon as it continues to burn

The Siren Act and EMS grants for emergency medical equipment

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

AFG, Highway Safety Grant Programs and the Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation can help fund AEDs and EMS equipment

Study: Hands-Only CPR encourages bystander assistance

Posted on April 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A new study published by the American Heart Association shows that hands-only CPR encourages cardiac arrest help

Houston mayor to open city’s financial data for fire union ahead of 220 firefighter layoffs

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Houston city council is scheduled to consider a measure to lay off 220 Houston firefighters

911 Emergency Dispatcher: The calm voice in the dark

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The thin gold line represents those who aren’t ever seen, but are mostly heard; it stands for dispatchers

911 Emergency Dispatcher: The calm voice in the dark

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The thin gold line represents those who aren’t ever seen, but are mostly heard; it stands for dispatchers

Budget for Md. county EMS continues to skyrocket

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"To put it in perspective (the EMS budget) is more than we spend on the state attorney's office, the airport and election office and tax office combined"

Firefighters, EMS rescue man trapped in mechanical bull

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters had to use hydraulic rescue tools, the Jaws of Life, to disassemble the bull and save the man

Firefighters, EMS rescue man trapped in mechanical bull

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters had to use hydraulic rescue tools, the Jaws of Life, to disassemble the bull and save the man

Firefighters, EMS rescue man trapped in mechanical bull

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters had to use hydraulic rescue tools, the Jaws of Life, to disassemble the bull and save the man

Smokey Bear gets digital makeover for 75th birthday

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Now, in addition to being a burly, upright bear in a ranger hat, Smokey is an animated emoji that celebrities — including Stephen Colbert, Jeff Foxworthy and Al Roker — are speaking through

NH firefighters give custom gear to 3-year-old battling leukemia

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After learning one of their littlest fans was battling cancer, the Professional Firefighters of Keene had custom fire gear made for him, as well as his twin sister and older brother

How one county fire department ensures the fastest response times

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Cradlepoint’s in-vehicle networking solution offers the always-on connectivity the department needs for its new automatic vehicle location dispatching systems

Pittsburgh EMS swears in first woman, minority as deputy chief

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“Today a glass ceiling has been broken,” Amera Gilchrist said after she was sworn in as deputy chief by Mayor Bill Peduto

NY fire department seeks approval for $10 million station

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The original $12.3 million project, which was rejected in November, will return for a referendum on Tuesday, May 7, at a reduced price tag of $10.7 million

400 Parisian firefighters save Notre Dame structure

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fire Chief Jean-Claude Gallet said that the structure of the cathedral had been "saved and preserved overall" and its bell towers were safe

Charles Remsberg retires as editor in chief of Force Science News

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

CHICAGO — Legendary law enforcement educator and trainer Charles Remsberg has retired from his role as editor in chief of Force Science News.

According to Force Science News, the long time editor in chief retired earlier this month.

Remsberg, who has written numerous articles for PoliceOne, has provided his expertise to the law enforcement profession for decades. Along with co-authoring books Street Survival, The Tactical Edge and Tactics for Criminal Patrol with his then-partner, Dennis Anderson, he also co-founded Calibre Press and the Street Survival Seminar.

Remsberg also co-authored Street Survival II: Tactics for Deadly Force Encounters with P1 Columnist Dan Marcou.

learn more

Read Chuck Remsberg's columns on P1 here. Find articles from Force Science News here.


IACP, civil rights organizations team up to help PDs address hate crimes

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (Lawyers’ Committee) released an action agenda to help agencies effectively address hate crimes.

The organizations are encouraging stakeholders to use the “Action Agenda for Enhancing the Response to Hate Crimes” as a guide to respond to and work towards preventing hate crimes.

The agenda includes information on how community leaders, civil rights organizations, and law enforcement can work together to combat hate crimes and how law enforcement can break down barriers in the community to more effectively prevent and investigate hate crimes.

The release of the report comes at a time where hate crimes are on the rise in the U.S.

More information can be found on IACP’s website.


Mississippi Deputy Shot, Saved by Body Armor

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The sheriff said Deputy Tatum played dead but that Vaught walked up to him and shot him several more times in the chest area. Dickerson estimated Tatum was shot three to eight times total with wounds in the chest area, an arm and a leg.

DC Court ‘STRmix Declared Suitable for DNA Forensic Testing by FBI’

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

WASHINGTON, April 11, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Noting that STRmix™ – the sophisticated forensic software used to resolve mixed DNA profiles – "is not a secret product, as defendant characterizes it," a Washington, DC Superior Court has denied a...

APCO Celebrates National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Alexandria, VA –  Sunday, April 14, 2019, marked the beginning of National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week (NPSTW), a week that gives communities and emergency communications centers a chance to honor those who help save lives in times...

The K1 Camera – FLIR’s Most Affordable Thermal Imaging Camera

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FLIR's K1 handheld thermal imaging camera (TIC), their most affordable TIC for first responder officers and fire investigators at $599, detects heat and provides visibility through smoke and in total darkness to enhance situational awareness for use in...

911 for 911: Deploying dispatcher mutual aid during major incident response

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Randall D. Larson, P1 Contributor

With the increased number of large-scale mass casualty incidents and major natural disasters in recent years, proficient emergency communications are more significant than ever. But what happens when a 911 Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) becomes overwhelmed by the sheer magnitude of incoming calls during a disaster?

To address this need, Telecommunicator Emergency Response Taskforce (TERT) programs began developing at the state level in 2001 and, by 2005, became credentialed by the National Incident Management System (NIMS). By 2017, 23 states had active TERT programs. Public safety dispatchers on these teams complete FEMA-certified training courses and have authorization from their home agencies to deploy.

Since the program was formalized in 2009, these teams have responded to dozens of major emergencies – from East Coast hurricanes to West Coast wildfires. Their efforts have been shown to be critical during numerous recent disasters, and they have been recognized as an essential support resource to incident management.

The Need for Telecommunicator Mutual Aid

“Historically, nearly all areas of public safety have had some type of mutual aid program,” said Jonathan Jones, a 12-year veteran of emergency communications and currently the operations coordinator for the Athens-Clarke County 911 Center in Athens, Georgia. “911 communications did not. There was no one for a 911 center to call when it needed help.”

The concept of large-scale PSAP mutual aid had been used in Florida following Hurricane Andrew in 1992, which resulted in a formal program within the state in 1993. But it took another decade before the concept was established as an active resource, and then embraced on a national level.

California began to develop its TERT in 2017, and the state’s fledgling team experienced its first trial by fire, literally, during 2018’s devastating Camp Fire, assisting local PSAPs as the deadly inferno exploded across Butte County, turning day into night and reducing the town of Paradise to little more than ash. Over a four-week period, 144 dispatchers from 30 different agencies were deployed to assist at PSAPs and the Incident Command Post (ICP), as well as subordinate search and rescue bases and the animal rescue ICP.

Developing the Concept

The first emergent TERT program were developed in the aftermath of 9/11 by members of the North Carolina Chapter of the National Emergency Number Association (NENA). In September 2003, NC TERT deployed 19 telecommunicators to assist in four counties in the aftermath of Hurricane Isabel; further in-state TERT deployments were made in 2004 and 2005 to assist with hurricane-affected PSAPs. NC TERT’s first out-of-state deployment came in 2005 with Hurricane Katrina, to assist St. Tammany Parrish, Louisiana for 10 days.

The lessons learned in these early experiences helped provide guidelines that refined and solidified ensuing TERT programs. Among the concerns encountered by TERT during the Hurricane Katrina deployment were:

Emergency Management Agencies (EMAs) were not aware of the TERT program or of local PSAP’s need for assistance; PSAPs were unaware of the availability of mutual aid; The TERT program was not identified as an established resource by the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC); PSAP mutual aid was not addressed by DHS/FEMA; Local/state governments attempted to treat PSAP mutual aid differently than other first responder mutual aid in terms of housing, travel, cost recovery and responder liability.

In response, TERT met with DHS and FEMA officials to discuss solutions, which led to the program being credentialed through NIMS (National Incident Management System), the establishment of training standards and the availability of funding through the Office of Domestic Preparedness. In 2006, the National Joint TERT Initiative (NJTI) was created, which became the national governance body for TERT, although individual states have their own coordinators and leadership. In May 2009, NJTI’s Model Recommendations for TERT Deployment were approved as a standard by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

“Initial deployments proved the need for a mutual aid response concept for 911 centers,” explained Jones, who also serves as deputy state coordinator for Georgia TERT, and is a board member on the National NJTI committee. The Georgia TERT program currently falls under oversight from the Georgia Emergency Management Agency and Georgia Chapters of APCO and NENA. The state’s TERT members must complete the FEMA IS-144 TERT Basic Course (developed in 2013 with NJTI), as well as Basic ICS and NIMS courses. TERT dispatchers must also have the approval of their PSAP supervisor to be considered for assignment to a team.

In 2017, Georgia TERT deployed six telecommunicators to Collier County, Florida during Hurricane Irma. Last year, eight TERT members deployed to Sampson County, NC, for Hurricane Florence, and last October, 13 were deployed from five different in-state teams to various areas in South Georgia. “These deployments continued to validate the importance and need for organized TERT programs,” Jones said. “But to that end, it reiterated the importance of considering requests for TERT teams sooner rather than later. TERT needs to be on the list of things to consider in planning, not after an incident has already occurred.”

Thinking Ahead on TERT

The duration of TERT responses average multiple days to weeks for PSAP to PSAP deployments, while field deployments of TERT-member tactical dispatchers to ICPs and the like range from less than 18 hours to several days.

“We did not want to rush into creating this program,” said Jamie Hudson, dispatch supervisor for California’s Elk Grove Police Department, with 26 years of law enforcement dispatch, who assumed the role of acting state TERT coordinator. “We knew the program needed to be comprehensive, but also that there were some unique deployment circumstances we would have to plan for. For instance, California agencies have been using field-deployed tactical dispatchers significantly in the past 20 years. We felt there needed to be an element for these resources included in this program.”

While California, with its newer TERT program, has the potential staffing of 7,000 public safety dispatchers across 58 counties, their PSAPs have routinely maintained minimum staffing levels and could not easily commit dispatchers to a one or two-week deployment. “Because of this,” Hudson said, “we needed to create and test models where mutual aid is brought in by individual shifts on a commuting basis as much as possible. This allows them to respond [with pay] on a day off, as opposed to creating significant staffing impacts at their PSAP.”

3 key steps to building a TERT program

These experiences have all proven the TERT concept’s merit, and there are more than a dozen states reported to have teams in development.

1. Learn from the framework

Jones recommends NJTI’s easy-to-follow framework for establishing a TERT program. “While considering the unique needs of Georgia, we felt it was very important to not completely deviate from the original mission of the NJTI, while having some variances based on regional or state need,” he said.

2. Bring everyone to the table

Hudson feels that one of the most important elements in creating California’s TERT program was to ensure all public safety disciplines are represented on the creation committee. “This allows a broad spectrum of potential needs to be addressed,” he said. “We also determined our state needed a Tactical Dispatch element as well as a commutable response element to deployments.”

3. Acquire and maintain commitment

Jones sees continuing expansion of the TERT initiative throughout states and regions that don’t currently have such a program, or lack support for developing one. “It’s worth it to take the necessary time and effort into building the program,” he urged. “Utilize 911 professionals from a variety of levels – line-level, supervisors, managers/directors, and so on. Involve your state associations – APCO and NENA chapters and your State Emergency Management Agencies. Understand EMAC and its reimbursement process. Reach out to agencies that have experienced the need for TERT to reveal where improvements can be made. Build TERT education into conference sessions in your state. We could not have gotten to the point we are currently at without the help of several TERT coordinators around the country, willing to share their manuals, MOUs, lessons learned, and other resources.”

Learn more about TERT and how to develop a team on the National TERT Joint Initiative website

Review and download the Standard for Telecommunicator Emergency Response Taskforce (TERT) Deployment:

APCO-NENA_ANS_1_105_2-2015_T by on Scribd


About the author Randall D. Larson retired after 20 years in public safety communications, serving as a shift supervisor, trainer and field communications supervisor for the San Jose (Calif.) Fire Department. Larson was also the editor of 9-1-1 Magazine from 1995 to 2009 and its online version from 2009 to 2018. He currently resides among the northern California Redwoods writing in a number of fields of interest.


Suspected Cop-Killer Shot, Killed in Washington State

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The man suspected of shooting and killing Deputy Sheriff Justin DeRosier of the Cowlitz County (WA) Sheriff's Office was shot in a confrontation with members of the Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office and the Kalama Police Department on Sunday.

New Orleans Officer Shot in Leg Expected to be Okay

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Fox News, the officer was struck in the leg. He was transported to a nearby hospital where he was treated and subsequently released.

New Orleans Officer Shot in Leg Expected to be Okay

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Fox News, the officer was struck in the leg. He was transported to a nearby hospital where he was treated and subsequently released.

California Motor Officer Injured in Collision with Vehicle

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A motorcycle officer with the East Bay Regional Park District was injured Friday when he collided with a vehicle on an interstate freeway.

Investigators Reveal Details of Chemical Attack on Colorado Officer

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Fox News, an officer was responding to a suspicious package call when a young man threw a bottle at him. The bottle began to emit smoke containing chlorine, which caused the officer to pass out.

Alabama Department Hosts Chili “Cook Off” Fundraiser

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Employees from various sections of the Mobile, Alabama Police Department faced off in a heated battle on Saturday. The heat came from steaming bowls of homemade chili.

Officer Escorts Child to “Father/Student” Day at School on Behalf of Deployed Military Serviceman

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Raymond Seehousen with the Mount Healthy (OH) Police Department escorted a little girl to school for the annual Father/Student day on Friday because the child's dad had recently been deployed for duty with the United States Army.

California Department Uses Drones as “First Responders” to Incidents

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Chula Vista Police Department is sending one or more of its four drones to the scene of an emergency call to offer the watch commander a bird's eye view of the scene before officers even arrive.

Video: Massachusetts Officer Retires with Emotional Final Radio Call

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

For 41 years, Officer Steve Zecco of the Leicester Police Department served his community. On Friday he entered into retirement with an emotional final radio call.

Tips for rookie cops for common patrol calls

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Xavier Wells, P1 Contributor

Departments nationwide are starting to do a great job of providing in-service training for their officers to meet the ever-changing needs of the communities they serve. There is, however, one group in our profession experiencing a gap in training: rookie cops.

Currently, most rookie training takes place on the streets under the guidance of field training officers. While this aspect of learning is critical, it can place young officers in situations they are ill-equipped to handle, where their jobs are at risk if they make a mistake as they are still on some form of probation or at-will status.

The problem is there is no feasible way for a police academy to cover in detail every tip, trick and strategy for every call an officer may come across.

When I went through the police academy I was trained in a variety of topics and situations, many of which were high-stress calls like active shooter, felony car stops and pursuits.

But I can still remember the sheer nervousness I felt during my first day of field training when I realized I didn’t know how to handle a simple theft call. I simply hadn’t been taught how to deal with the type of calls officers experience every day. The academy prepared me for the 1%, but not the 99% of service calls that are the foundation of the policing profession. If handled incorrectly, these “routine” calls can cost rookie officers their jobs, or sometimes their lives.

As theft calls and disturbance calls are extremely common, here are some helpful tips for a rookie officer to consider while headed to the scene:

THEFT CALLS: Subject in Custody

Officer safety considerations:

Secure the scene. Make contact with the subject in custody. Immediately frisk, detain and identify. Never take a loss prevention officer’s word that a suspect is unarmed or has already been searched. Always conduct a frisk/search yourself according to your training.

Objectives/outcomes:

Identify and interview the complainant and any witnesses. Review any surveillance video of the theft. Get a copy of the video if necessary. Get an itemized receipt of the items that were stolen to use in your report and submit for evidence. Retrieve and return stolen property to original owner. Check to see if there are any enhancements for the offense. Take appropriate enforcement action based on the level of offense. Document and report the incident as required by your department. DISTURBANCE CALLS: Family Disturbances

Officer safety considerations:

Secure the scene. Establish police presence to deescalate any ongoing conflict. Frisk and identify the aggravating party; detain in handcuffs if necessary. Frisk immediate area for weapons. Separate both parties physically and by line of sight. Be aware that family disturbances often take place in people’s own homes. Hence, weapons can be stashed anywhere.

Objectives/outcomes:

Identify and run all parties involved unless there is a clear primary complainant, and/or you believe there is a potential victim of family violence. Interview all parties involved. Attempt to find a resolution to the immediate problem. Often, this is accomplished by having one subject leave the scene for a while to let things calm down. Remember if both subjects are residents and there is no crime, you have no legal ground to make a subject leave. You can only suggest so. If during the interview you discover a crime has taken place, take appropriate enforcement action. Document and report the incident in accordance with your department’s guidelines.

Fully commissioned officers have access to hundreds of training programs throughout their careers, while too often we expect rookie cops to learn on the fly. But in today’s climate young officers can’t afford the luxury of learning from their mistakes. They should be afforded the same, if not more, training and professional resources as senior officers.


About the author Xavier Wells is a Texas peace officer, disabled veteran and author of The Rookie Handbook. He created Cadet, Rookie, Cop LLC to fill training gaps for new officers.


American Flags on California Patrol Vehicles Sparks Backlash

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Laguna Beach Police department recently repainted a number of squad cars to include an American flag theme across the front and rear doors. Some citizens are crying foul, saying that the new design is "aggressive" and not reflective of the community.

8 things rookie cops can do to improve their safety

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Tyson Kilbey, P1 Contributor

Without question, the job of a modern law enforcement officer comes with certain risks, especially for new cops. As we face the challenges that come with policing, we owe it to our fellow officers, our community and ourselves to prioritize officer safety. Here are eight things rookie officers can do to be safer.

1. Conduct mental rehearsals

Even in the busiest jurisdictions, there is a certain amount of discretionary time during a typical patrol shift. Officers should use this time while they patrol a district to mentally play out scenarios and priority calls at local businesses and buildings. This will not only improve response, but also allow officers to focus on additional threats as they respond.

Mentally preparing for things like ideal tactical positioning prior to the call, possible response options and terrain considerations takes some of the unknowns out of potentially stressful situations. Professional athletes have used mental rehearsal as an effective form of preparation for decades. There is no reason law enforcement should not use this approach as well.

2. Learn pre-attack indicators

If you analyze police use of force videos, you will discover that in most incidents, pre-attack indicators were presented to the officer and either completely ignored or recognized too late.

There are pre-attack indicators that should immediately be addressed by officers. Clinched fists, pre-fight stretches, target glances, subjects who conspicuously looking around, and subjects saying “huh” or even making comments about not going back to jail, are just a few potential indicators of an impending attack. Learning and understanding pre-attack indicators is a critical step toward avoiding use of force incidents.

3. Get training repetitions through equipment checks

An officer must ensure the tools they carry on their duty belts or load-bearing vests are in good working order and can be easily accessed and deployed when required.

To that end, when officers check their gear before each shift, they should also practice accessing that gear. Five draws of a gun, TASER or flashlight adds up to hundreds of draws each month.

Finding a safe location to conduct these draws and function tests only takes a small amount of time but pays off big.

4. Consistently polish communication skills

The more experience you gain as a law enforcement officer, the more you recognize the value of excellent communication skills.

Use of force incidents can be minimized or avoided through effective communication. The keys to improved communication skills are active listening, clear and confident speaking without sounding arrogant or condescending, and the ability to respond to verbal confrontations without taking it personally.

5. Train in defensive driving and eliminate distractions

Too many officers are killed in traffic collisions. For a patrol officer, a tremendous portion of the shift is spent on the roadways. Not only should an officer be extremely confident in their driving ability and familiar with the maneuverability of their patrol vehicle, but they should also understand the importance of observation and awareness of other vehicles.

The same, if not an even greater level of awareness, should be dedicated to scanning and maintaining reactionary gaps while driving as you would while responding to active disturbances. The principles of officer safety carry over to defensive driving more than most officers realize.

6. Make physical fitness and healthy eating a priority

While this is important for everyone, it is even more important in a high-stress profession like law enforcement. A fitness program and a healthy diet are essential tools for you to effectively perform your job. Stop making excuses about time, budget, convenience, or any other reason you use for being out of shape. If you have been putting this off, now is the time to make the change.

7. Invest in your mental and emotional well-being

Officer suicides have a devastating effect on both the agency and the community. While we have a clearer understanding of the effects of depression and post-traumatic stress than ever before, there is still a lot of work to be done.

Officers must learn to recognize when the job is taking an emotional toll and understand that reaching out for help is not only the correct thing to do, but the imperative thing to do for the officer, his or her family, coworkers, friends and the community.

8. Start training Jiu Jitsu

There is a growing movement in the law enforcement community to incorporate Gracie or Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in defensive tactics programs. The reasons for this are simple. Jiu Jitsu is a highly effective means of controlling or disengaging from a bigger and stronger attacker while at the same time inflicting a minimal amount of damage. The implications of this for law enforcement are tremendous.

As a bonus, physical fitness and healthy eating, as well as on the ability to be confident in stressful situations and find efficiency in all situations, are key components of Jiu Jitsu. The bottom line is the modern law enforcement officer can benefit greatly from Jiu Jitsu.

As a law enforcement officer, trainer and supervisor, studying and understanding ways for officers to be safer and more effective is one of my most important duties. While firearms and defensive tactics are part of the equation, there is more to officer safety than those two elements. By training and improving in some of the areas mentioned in this article, officers can approach safety in a more holistic, productive and layered way. Train hard and be safe.


About the author Tyson Kilbey has more than 20 years of experience in law enforcement, consisting of three years as a hotel security supervisor and 18 years as a deputy sheriff for the Johnson County Kansas Sheriff’s Office. He has worked in the detention, patrol and training divisions, as well SWAT and accident investigation units. He is currently a lieutenant for the Sheriff’s Office.

Kilbey owns Top Firearms Instruction, LLC, and recently authored “Fundamental Handgun Mastery.” He is a certified instructor for the Gracie University in Torrance, California, and a Master Instructor for the Carotid Restraint Training Institute. He is also the Match Director for the Brandon Collins Memorial Shootout, which is a shooting competition named in honor of a deputy who lost his life in the line of duty. Proceeds from the match go to charitable causes.


Kahr Arms Celebrates 25th Anniversary

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Kahr Firearms Group, a leader in innovative firearms design and manufacturing, is pleased to celebrate Kahr Arms' 25th Anniversary this year.

First responders to be honored at inaugural REV Group Grand Prix

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By News Staff

MILWAUKEE — First responders will be honored at the inaugural REV Group Grand Prix, to be held in June, with free entry the entire week of activities.

REV Group, a Milwaukee-based manufacturer of specialty vehicle brands, and Road America, are teaming up to create a unique race experience for first reponders during the inaugural NTT IndyCar series in late June.

All active-duty first responders, including law enforcement, fire, paramedics and emergency medical technicians, will receive free entry. They have to show valid identification indicating active service.

Fire and ambulance vehicles from REV's E-ONE, KME, Horton, AEV, and Wheeled Coach brands will also be on display, allowing race fans to get a close look at some of the vehicles that equip the nation’s first responders.

“We are honored to have the REV Group Grand Prix as a platform to recognize first responders. The employees of REV wanted to share our appreciation for the dedicated people who use our vehicles each day to serve their communities,” said Tim Sullivan, president, and CEO of REV Group.

An international lineup of drivers will compete at Road America in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin from June 20-23.


Proscreen 900 Plus Threat Detection Solution

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Metrasens' mass casualty threat detection solution, Proscreen 900 Plus, bolsters Metrasens’ impressive ferromagnetic screening product line and provides a higher level of security for stadiums, arenas, event venues, hotels, campuses and other areas...

South Carolina Suspect Let’s Child Burn to Death While Fleeing Pursuit

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 1-year-old girl died in a burning car when her father got out and ran away during a pursuit on Interstate 85, according to South Carolina law enforcement officials.

Valeria Donoghue

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Texas Sheriff’s Commander Allegedly Challenged Deputies to Have Sex With ‘Live PD’ Producer

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Williamson County sheriff's commander during a staff meeting challenged his deputies to have sex with a "Live PD" television show producer, according to a grievance filed last week.

Viral Louisville traffic stop: Putting the video into perspective

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

We all know the parable of the three blind men describing an elephant. The first feels the side of the elephant and describes the beast as a wall. The second feels the trunk and describes the creature as long and skinny like a fire hose. The third touches the tusk and describes a spiked, barbed creature. The same thing happens when a viral video hits the internet.

Nearing a million views, a video titled “Louisville Metro PD Falsely Alert K-9 To Conduct An Illegally Search” of a traffic stop by a Louisville, Kentucky crime interdiction team, has generated headlines and commentary questioning the officers’ actions. The scene is an unmarked detective unit tasked with reducing violent crime. The officers make a car stop based on an improper turn violation, pull the apparently cooperative driver out of the car, pat him down and handcuff him while a K9 unit searches the car. The driver is an 18-year-old black male with no criminal history. The dog reportedly alerts in a manner imperceptible on the 32-minute video, which is edited from multiple officers’ body worn cameras. The driver’s mother arrives, argues with officers, then the driver is released with a traffic summons.

SCENE 1: THE TRAFFIC STOP

The driver, Tae-Ahn Lea, answers his cell phone, then begins to narrate his experience for the benefit of his mother on the phone. An officer instructs him to get out of the car, then grabs Lea’s wrists and guides him out of the driver’s seat.

Civilian: Detectives stopping a kid for a rinky-dink traffic violation. That doesn’t sound right. Then he gets dragged out of the car for talking on his cell phone. They didn’t need to do that!

Cops: When a subject starts talking on a cell phone he’s not paying attention to me and that’s dangerous. Plus, he could be calling other people to the scene, which can cause conflict, which is exactly what ended up happening. We’re not worried about him telling somebody since it’s all on our body cams anyway. It’s a safety issue.

Policy wonk: There are specific policies and laws that cover when you can require people to get out of their vehicles and how much physical control police can exercise. If the officers can articulate the reasons for their actions their response is lawful. Stopping cars for a traffic violation with an ulterior motive for the contact is legal.

SCENE 2: THE PAT DOWN

Lea is patted down for weapons and repeatedly asked if there are drugs in the car. He is asked for consent to search and refuses. He becomes frustrated and officers ask why he is acting so nervous. A K-9 unit is called.

Civilian: Come on, man. He told you he had no drugs and he was within his rights to refuse consent to search. And you think he’s acting nervous? Of course, he is, there’s a swarm of cops there!

Cops: There are behaviors that are characteristic of persons who are guilty and at immediate risk of getting caught. When he declined consent to search we didn’t search. But a minimal detention for a canine sniff around the car is legal. The pat down was for officer safety.

Policy Wonk: Once consent to search is denied, any further pressure to cause the person to change their mind could be construed as intimidation that could lead to subsequent consent being ruled as coerced. Officers must articulate a reasonable belief that a person is armed and poses a danger before conducting a lawful Terry search. They may have had other facts known to them or not seen on this edited video, but justification for a frisk here is hard to find. Lea’s behavior seems anything but inappropriately nervous given the circumstances.

SCENE 3: THE FAMILY ARRIVES

Officer tells Lea to stop with the attitude. The K9 begins a search, reportedly showing an alert that is narrated by its handler but not visible on the video. Lea is handcuffed. An officer begins a search of the car, removing the bagged food and drinks, placing them on the roof of the car. An officer calls for an additional unit due to family showing up to “cause a ruckus.” The detective making the stop talks to the mother who arrived and engages in a relatively calm argument over the stop, including a threat to arrest the mother. Lea is questioned and searched for drugs based on the K9 alert. Officers end the encounter with a traffic summons and the question to Lea, “Why do you have this negative view of the police?”

Civilian: If my son was pulled over I’d want to see what’s going on and talk to the officer, too. There was no reason to threaten to arrest the mom!

Cops: There are few things more volatile than an audience. It distracts the officers and they are invariably emotional and defensive. Once the dog alerted, we have grounds to do a more extensive search. Every officer exercised restraint and calm professionalism. We try to explain our strategy to deal with violent crime. We know it’s an inconvenience to be stopped by the police, but that’s how we are trying to find criminals before they hurt someone.

Policy Wonk: This kind of interdiction effort has little support based on research, and clearly has trust and public relations costs. The officer’s question of why this young, black driver has a negative view of the police can be answered by the man’s present experience. It is hard to appreciate the efforts of police when you are standing in the roadway handcuffed while a police dog is walking around in your car when all you were trying to do was make a run to the convenience store. While the interaction with the mother was reasonably calm, talking to someone who desperately needs to be heard means that neither person is heard.

And so, the elephant remains.


Minneapolis Police Chief: Body Cameras Should Have Been Turned On Before Fatal Shooting

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said officers were expected to have their body cameras activated when responding to potentially dangerous incidents, such as the "unknown trouble" call that preceded the fatal shooting of Justine Ruszczyk Damond.

Massive Working Fire Hits Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The roof of the landmark cathedral collapsed at 8 pm local time.

IL City Sues Apartment Complex Over Alleged Fire Code Violations

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Belleville officials say a fire in a downtown complex would have a "catastrophic impact and high loss of life," because of alleged code violations.

CA Firefighters Rescue 13 Ducklings from Storm Drain

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chula Vista fire officials suspect the ducklings may have fallen through holes in the grate covering the drain during a walk through the parking lot.

Miss. deputy saved by vest after being shot several times by suspect

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

MARSHALL COUNTY, Miss. — A deputy who was shot several times Friday was likely saved by his vest.

Suspect Randy Vaught led police on a high-speed pursuit after Deputy Daniel Tatum tried to pull him over after seeing him and two others leave a suspected drug house, WREG reports. Vaught fled to his mother’s house.

When Tatum opened the door to the house, Vaught shot him. Tatum played dead, but Vaught shot him several more times.

Marshall County Sheriff Kenny Dickerson says Tatum was shot three to eight times total, suffering wounds in his chest area, arm and leg.

Vaught barricaded himself inside the house for hours. When he emerged, he pulled out a handgun and fatally shot himself.

Officers were able to get Tatum to a fire station where they airlifted him to a local hospital. Dickerson credits Tatum’s ballistic vest with saving his life.

LIVE: Marshall County Sheriff's Office press conference about suspect in barricade and officer-involved shooting incident

WATCH LIVE: The Marshall County Sheriff's Office is hosting a press conference about Friday's officer-involved shooting and barricade situation. Officials identified the deceased suspect on Saturday as Randy Vaught. MORE: http://via.wreg.com/xCSQt

Posted by WREG News Channel 3 on Saturday, April 13, 2019

Driver arrested after dragging Wash. officer 30 feet

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

BURLINGTON, Wash. — A woman has been arrested after dragging an officer with her car 30 feet while he attempted to arrest her for multiple warrants on Saturday.

According to local news station KIRO 7, the officer attempted to take the 29-year-old woman into custody when she drove away in a truck, dragging the officer on the ground behind the vehicle.

More officers responded and attempted to help the officer being dragged, but the woman continued to accelerate, running a red light and hitting a car that had two people inside.

When police went to give aid to the two people in the vehicle that was hit, the woman fled.

The officer and a 78-year-old woman were transported to a local hospital.

The woman was found and taken into custody on Sunday afternoon.


Big Tanker Delivered to Swanton Village, VT, Fire Dept.

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Swanton Village, VT, Fire Department has taken delivery of a 2,800-gallon tanker built by HME Ahrens-Fox.

Hackers publish personal data on thousands of US officers and federal agents

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

QUANTICO, Va. — A group of hackers breached several FBI-affiliated websites and uploaded dozens of files containing the personal information of thousands of law enforcement officers and federal agents.

According to TechCrunch, the hackers breached three sites associated with the FBI National Academy Association and put the data up for download on their website.

The information contained 4,000 unique records including member names, personal and government email addresses, job titles, postal addresses and phone numbers.

The hackers say they hacked more than 1,000 sites and have “over a million data” on employees across several U.S. federal agencies and public service organizations.

“Now we are structuring all the data, and soon they will be sold. I think something else will publish from the list of hacked government sites,” they told TechCrunch.

When asked if they were worried that the leaked information would put law enforcement and federal agents at risk, they responded, “probably, yes.”

The FBINAA released a statement on Saturday saying they were working with federal authorities to investigate the breach.


LEO’s son accused of setting church fires charged with hate crimes

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

OPELOUSAS, La. — The white man suspected in the burnings of three African-American churches in Louisiana will remain in jail, denied bond Monday by a judge, as state prosecutors added new charges declaring the arsons a hate crime.

Twenty-one-year-old Holden Matthews, the son of a sheriff's deputy, entered his not guilty plea via video conference from the St. Landry Parish jail. The judge set a September trial date.

In denying bail, state District Judge James Doherty sided with law enforcement officials who said they worried Matthews would try to flee the area or set more fires.

"We felt that he was an immediate risk to public safety," said Louisiana Fire Marshal Butch Browning. "In my mind, I felt another fire was imminent."

Testifying in court, Browning outlined a litany of evidence, including some new details of the investigation, that he said tied Matthews to the crime, including images on Matthews' cell phone in which Browning said he "claimed responsibility" for torching the three black churches over 10 days.

Matthews was arrested Wednesday on three charges of arson of a religious building. Prosecutors filed documents Monday adding three more charges, accusing Matthews of violating Louisiana's hate crime law, confirming that they believe the fires were racially motivated, a link authorities had previously stopped short of making.

Browning said federal officials also are considering filing additional federal hate crime and arson charges against Matthews.

Matthews, shackled and wearing an orange prison jumpsuit, never spoke to the court during the hearing, letting his court-appointed lawyer enter the not guilty plea for him. His parents watched their son's appearance on video conference from the courtroom, his dad repeatedly wringing his hands and, at one point, leaving the room in tears.

The fires occurred in and around Opelousas, about 60 miles west of Louisiana's capital city of Baton Rouge.

Matthews' arrest came a little more than two weeks after the first blaze at the St. Mary Baptist Church on March 26 in Port Barre, a town just outside of Opelousas. Days later, the Greater Union Baptist Church and Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in Opelousas were burned. Each was more than 100 years old.

The churches were empty at the time, and no one was injured.

The fires set the community on edge. Gov. John Bel Edwards said the fires were a reminder "of a very dark past of intimidation and fear."


Man accused of setting church fires charged with hate crimes

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

OPELOUSAS, La. — The white man suspected in the burnings of three African-American churches in Louisiana will remain in jail, denied bond Monday by a judge, as state prosecutors added new charges declaring the arsons a hate crime.

Twenty-one-year-old Holden Matthews, the son of a sheriff's deputy, entered his not guilty plea via video conference from the St. Landry Parish jail. The judge set a September trial date.

In denying bail, state District Judge James Doherty sided with law enforcement officials who said they worried Matthews would try to flee the area or set more fires.

"We felt that he was an immediate risk to public safety," said Louisiana Fire Marshal Butch Browning. "In my mind, I felt another fire was imminent."

Testifying in court, Browning outlined a litany of evidence, including some new details of the investigation, that he said tied Matthews to the crime, including images on Matthews' cell phone in which Browning said he "claimed responsibility" for torching the three black churches over 10 days.

Matthews was arrested Wednesday on three charges of arson of a religious building. Prosecutors filed documents Monday adding three more charges, accusing Matthews of violating Louisiana's hate crime law, confirming that they believe the fires were racially motivated, a link authorities had previously stopped short of making.

Browning said federal officials also are considering filing additional federal hate crime and arson charges against Matthews.

Matthews, shackled and wearing an orange prison jumpsuit, never spoke to the court during the hearing, letting his court-appointed lawyer enter the not guilty plea for him. His parents watched their son's appearance on video conference from the courtroom, his dad repeatedly wringing his hands and, at one point, leaving the room in tears.

The fires occurred in and around Opelousas, about 60 miles west of Louisiana's capital city of Baton Rouge.

Matthews' arrest came a little more than two weeks after the first blaze at the St. Mary Baptist Church on March 26 in Port Barre, a town just outside of Opelousas. Days later, the Greater Union Baptist Church and Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in Opelousas were burned. Each was more than 100 years old.

The churches were empty at the time, and no one was injured.

The fires set the community on edge. Gov. John Bel Edwards said the fires were a reminder "of a very dark past of intimidation and fear."


Bobcat Struck by California Police Cruiser, Rescued by Officers

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The one-year-old bobcat was recovering at Weldy’s facility for two months, after being struck by a Laguna Beach Police Department patrol car along Laguna Canyon Road.

Former Minneapolis Police Officer’s Trial Unfolding Amid Debate Over ‘Blue Wall of Silence’

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prosecutors in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor are determined to put his onetime partner on the stand, despite raising questions about his ability to accurately testify about the night Justine Ruszczyk Damond was shot.

American Flag Image on Police Cruisers Divides California City

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A decision to affix an American flag graphic to the side of Laguna Beach police cars is dividing residents who are alternately praising the image as patriotic or panning it as too aggressive.

RI officer crashes patrol SUV into building to avoid vehicle

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Donita Naylor The Providence Journal, R.I.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A patrol officer was injured Saturday night when he swerved to avoid a vehicle and the police SUV he was driving jumped the curb and hit a brick building.

Police Chief Col. Hugh T. Clements Jr. said Sunday evening that the officer was responding just before 11 p.m. to a disturbance in progress, weapons involved, at the beginning of his shift.

He was outbound on Broadway, Clements said, when a vehicle emerged from the right. The officer swerved left, hitting a building at Vinton Street and Broadway, where signs say Mike the Tailor and direct deliveries to another address.

The injured officer was taken to the hospital, Clements said, "and thank God he's recovering."

Clements said the circumstances are being investigated. But accidents do happen, he said, especially when police try to reach a potentially violent situation in time to prevent a tragedy. "Unfortunately, officers get injured."

———

©2019 The Providence Journal (Providence, R.I.)


Actor donates dog wheelchair to retired Philly K-9

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Stephanie Farr The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — Hairy, handsome, and brave, Philadelphia Police Department K-9 Thor served the department for five years alongside his partner, Officer Alvin Outlaw, sniffing out drugs and sending out ruminations on Twitter, where at one time he was the second-most-followed officer in the department.

But while time has been good to Outlaw, who was promoted to sergeant in West Philly’s 19th District in November, it has not been as good to Thor, who is quickly losing the use of his hind legs.

Soon, though, Thor will be getting a new leash on life thanks to a wheely great donation by actor Trevor Donovan, who, after hearing the German shepherd’s tail, offered to donate a doggie wheelchair to the now-retired officer. News of the donation was first reported by celebrity website TMZ.

“Thor doesn’t know how to stay out of the limelight,” Outlaw said. “His stardom follows him everywhere, even in retirement.”

In 2013, after 960 hours of training, Outlaw and Thor officially became partners in the K-9 Unit. Thor also quickly became a part of Outlaw’s family, joining his wife, Shirena; their two kids; and their Shih Tzu, Bandit, in the family’s home.

About a year and a half later, Outlaw took on a second K-9 partner, Storm, a German shepherd cadaver dog who, in 2017, helped uncover the buried bodies of three of the four young men killed in Bucks County by Cosmo DiNardo. Storm also quickly became a member of the Outlaw family.

When Outlaw passed his promotion test and was being transferred into the 19th District, he asked to adopt both of his fuzzy partners and was given the department’s blessing. The dogs were officially retired from the force on Dec. 1.

Around that time, Outlaw and his wife began to notice that Thor, now 7, was losing the use of his hind legs. He was diagnosed with intervertebral disc disease, which caused a ruptured disc and a nerve pinch that made his legs go numb.

“It’s been progressing and progressing,” Outlaw said. “He can still walk but he stumbles and the thing we’re dealing with now is that he drags his back legs when he does walk so he gets sores and scratches on his feet.”

Thor went to therapy and surgery was suggested, but success isn’t guaranteed and Thor lost his health insurance with the department when he retired.

It’s been heartbreaking for the Outlaws to watch their family member’s body degenerate while his spirit is still fully intact.

“Mentally, he’s still the same,” Outlaw said. “That’s part of the problem, because one of the things he loved was playing with our other dogs. Now we let him out and he goes to run and he’s just dragging his feet behind him.”

One day, Shirena Outlaw saw Donovan — who starred in the reboot of 90210 and several TV holiday movies like Snow Globe Christmas — on TMZ Live talking about the loss of his own German shepherd, Dogbert. Donovan said his dog, which also had a degenerative disease, used a wheelchair and he’d like to find another good dog to benefit from it.

Shirena wrote an email to Donovan about Thor and among the throng of requests he received, Donovan chose the retired four-legged cop, noting that Shirena’s letter had “won over my heart.”

Outlaw said Donovan has decided to buy Thor a brand-new wheelchair instead of donating the used one.

While it hasn’t arrived yet, Outlaw said he was moved that someone from the 90210 wanted to help someone who responded to calls from 911.

“I was very happy to see that somebody was willing to make that kind of purchase for us just by hearing the story,” he said.

———

©2019 Philly.com


Los Angeles School Officer Injured In Chaotic Incident

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The chaos in the Westlake district included several vehicles smashed, a Los Angeles school officer injured and the person apparently behind it in custody.

Minuteman Folding Ballistic Shields

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Minuteman Folding Ballistic shield is available in NIJ IIIA and NIJ III with four different models that can fit any Patrol, SWAT, VIP Protection, Harbor or Airport Security team's needs. The Minuteman, which carries a US ...

Denver Police Officer Honored for Saving a Life

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Denver Police Officer Travis Lloyd is being recognized for his bravery in the line of fire, literally. He will receive the Denver Police Department Medal of Honor.

NYPD Hunting for Man Wanted for Disgusting Acts

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NYPD officers are searching for a man they say threw cups of urine at female MTA workers on Friday.

Suspect who fatally shot Wash. deputy killed in shootout

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Jim Ryan The Oregonian, Portland, Ore.

COWLITZ COUNTY, Wash. — A man suspected in the killing of a southwest Washington sheriff’s deputy is dead after an encounter with law enforcement officers Sunday evening.

The Cowlitz County sheriff told KGW (8) that police fatally shot the man thought to have killed Deputy Justin DeRosier the night before. Two other men are in custody, according to the news station.

None of the men have been publicly identified.

Cowlitz County Sheriff's Deputy Justin DeRosier and his wife had their first child in October.

The Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office said the Sunday evening shooting happened in the area of Spencer Creek Road in Kalama. No officers were hurt.

The shooting came amid a manhunt for the suspect or suspects responsible for the death of DeRosier, who was shot after being sent to check on a disabled vehicle that was blocking a road about three miles east of Interstate 5 late Saturday, authorities said.

DeRosier, a 29-year-old father and husband, died during surgery at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver.

He graduated from Kelso High School and Washington State University and signed on with the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office in 2016.

Darren Ullmann, Cowlitz County undersheriff, said few law enforcement officers want to serve more than DeRosier did. The deputy loved his job, Ullmann said, and “was incredibly good at it.”

“He will be with us forever, and he’ll be truly missed,” Ullmann said.

Deputy Justin Derosier End of Watch April 13, 2019

Posted by Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office on Sunday, April 14, 2019

MANHUNT UPDATE: April 14 @ 10:17pm At approximately 7:05 this evening, information came in of a suspicious person near...

Posted by Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office on Sunday, April 14, 2019

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©2019 The Oregonian (Portland, Ore.)


MS Fire Station Destroyed by Tornado

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Hamilton Volunteer Fire Department's station took a direct hit from a tornado on Saturday. The building was destroyed and the apparatus inside was damaged.

Fire Truck Burns in Fiery Crash on GA Highway

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Cobb County Fire & Emergency Services fire engine was a total loss as a result of the crash

On-Scene GSR Detection: Solid Forensic Science – Solid Forensic Results

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

XCAT GSR tests are the number 1 product used by law enforcement for rapid, on-scene GSR identification. Use the tests for SEM analysis to obtain solid forensic evidence from presumptive to confirmatory with the same sample.

Firefighters Are Among Highest Paid Employees in CT City

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The deputy fire chief of the New Haven Fire Department was the highest paid employee with a salary of $312,663 of with a combined salary, overtime and retirement payout.

Boxing Legend George Foreman’s TX Garage Catches Fire, 40 Cars Damaged

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Investigators determined the fire in the Harris County home was sparked by a faulty golf cart.

Towers Keep MA Firefighters on Top of Brush Fires

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The state Department of Conservation and Recreation's Fire District 7, which encompasses 32 cities and towns, including Worcester, keeps tabs on the wooded landscape from watch towers spread throughout the region.

Ex LA Fire Inspector Convicted of Felony in Fatal Motel Blaze

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Louisiana State Fire Marshal's inspector was accused of hiding the fact he did not inspect a New Orleans hotel that was later the site of a fatal fire.

FL Firefighter Hospitalized After Battling Apartment Fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Daytona Beach firefighter suffered non-burn related injuries while fighting an apartment fire Monday morning.

CA Firefighters with PTSD Seek Workers’ Comp Coverage for Mental Health Trauma

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After consecutive record-breaking fire seasons and a deluge of mass shootings, California firefighters and police organizations are pushing for a new law that would help first responders.

MA Woman Charged with Spitting on, Fighting Ambulance Workers

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Brockton woman is being summonsed to court on a charge of assault and battery on ambulance personnel, in addition to driving under the influence and leaving the scene of property damage after a crash.

IL Assistant Fire Chief Reflects on 50 Years of Service

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Effingham's second assistant chief is retiring after 50 years in the fire service, saying he won't miss getting up in the middle of the night to answer calls.

Mother, Daughter Died of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in LA Apartment Fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Investigators concluded the fire began in the kitchen, where unattended cooking materials were left on a stove.

Providence Police Officer Crashes SUV Into Building

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Providence police officer was injured Saturday night when he swerved to avoid a vehicle and the police SUV he was driving jumped the curb and hit a brick building.

Providence Police Officer Crashes SUV Into Building

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Providence police officer was injured Saturday night when he swerved to avoid a vehicle and the police SUV he was driving jumped the curb and hit a brick building.

Providence Police Officer Crashes SUV Into Building

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Providence police officer was injured Saturday night when he swerved to avoid a vehicle and the police SUV he was driving jumped the curb and hit a brick building.

No Charges for Pennsylvania Police Officer Who Mistook Gun for Taser

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A New Hope officer who accidentally shot a suspect in the stomach inside a New Hope police station last month will not face criminal charges, officials said.

No Charges for Pennsylvania Police Officer Who Mistook Gun for Taser

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A New Hope officer who accidentally shot a suspect in the stomach inside a New Hope police station last month will not face criminal charges, officials said.

No Charges for Pennsylvania Police Officer Who Mistook Gun for Taser

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A New Hope officer who accidentally shot a suspect in the stomach inside a New Hope police station last month will not face criminal charges, officials said.

371 Fallen Officers to be Honored During 31st Annual Candlelight Vigil

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund has released the list of names of officers being added to the national monument this year.

Massachusetts Police Officer Shot Twice, Suspect Arrested

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Springfield police officer remains in the hospital after being shot twice and a 25-year-old man has been arrested in what was described as a gun battle outside a nightclub early Sunday morning.

Massachusetts Police Officer Shot Twice, Suspect Arrested

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Springfield police officer remains in the hospital after being shot twice and a 25-year-old man has been arrested in what was described as a gun battle outside a nightclub early Sunday morning.

Body Camera Video Shows Dramatic Florida Shootout

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Video taken from deputy's body-worn cameras and the Volusia County Sheriff's Office's Air One helicopter was released to the media Friday.

Mississippi Sheriff’s Deputy Who ‘Played Dead’ Saved by Vest

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Marshall County Sheriff’s Deputy Daniel Tatum was saved by his ballistic vest after he was shot several times by a suspect as he 'played dead' Friday night.

Washington Sheriff’s Deputy Fatally Shot, Suspect in Custody Following Manhunt

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Law enforcement officers Sunday night shot and killed a suspect who is believed to have killed Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Deputy Justin DeRosier nearly 24 hours earlier.

Washington Sheriff’s Deputy Fatally Shot, Suspect Dead Following Manhunt

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Law enforcement officers Sunday night shot and killed a suspect who is believed to have killed Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Deputy Justin DeRosier nearly 24 hours earlier.

Rapid Response: Historic landmark fires are a tactical and emotional challenge for firefighters

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Your jurisdiction likely does not have a building as old or as historic as the Notre Dame cathedral, but it is sure to have buildings of local importance that need preplans

Photos: Roof, spire collapse on historic Notre Dame cathedral

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The iconic spire of the Notre Dame cathedral collapsed as a fire raged on the roof of the cathedral

Photos: Roof, spire collapse on historic Notre Dame cathedral

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The iconic spire of the Notre Dame cathedral collapsed as a fire raged on the roof of the cathedral

FDIC 2019 product showcase

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Check out the products the FireRescue1 team had a first-hand look at during the week-long conference in Indianapolis

First responders to be honored at inaugural REV Group Grand Prix

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

All active-duty first responders will receive free entry to the inaugural REV Group Grand Prix

First responders to be honored at inaugural REV Group Grand Prix

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

All active-duty first responders will receive free entry to the inaugural REV Group Grand Prix

Industry Insights: How One Fire Department Reduced Fire Calls by 35 Percent with Their Community Risk Reduction Plan

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Using Emergency Reporting software, Thomasville, GA, Fire Rescue helped contribute to a 35 percent decrease in fire calls over the span of four years.

Industry Insights: How One Fire Department Reduced Fire Calls by 35 Percent with Their Community Risk Reduction Plan

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Using Emergency Reporting software, Thomasville, GA, Fire Rescue helped contribute to a 35 percent decrease in fire calls over the span of four years.

Industry Insights: How One Fire Department Reduced Fire Calls by 35 Percent with Their Community Risk Reduction Plan

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Using Emergency Reporting software, Thomasville, GA, Fire Rescue helped contribute to a 35 percent decrease in fire calls over the span of four years.

Industry Insights: How One Department’s CRR Plan Reduced Calls by 35 Percent

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Using Emergency Reporting software helped Thomasville, GA, Fire Rescue achieve a 35 percent decrease in fire calls over the span of four years.

Trauma takes its toll on EMS providers, 911 telecommunicators

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Local leaders, communities, agency leaders and the media all have a responsibility to help support emergency responders’ well-being through research, intervention, policy and education

Trauma takes its toll on EMS providers, 911 telecommunicators

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Local leaders, communities, agency leaders and the media all have a responsibility to help support emergency responders’ well-being through research, intervention, policy and education

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Reports on social media of a fire at the cathedral were confirmed by Parisian firefighters

Historic Notre Dame cathedral in Paris on fire

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The iconic spire of the Notre Dame cathedral collapsed as a fire raged on the roof of the cathedral

What are you bringing home with you?

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Understand how the experiences you have as an EMS provider can shape your relationships with your family

Get It Done! 10 Strategies for Success

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dennis Ross offers 10 tips for a successful station design project.

Focusing on connections in community paramedicine

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Data analysis is important to evaluating MIH programs, but it will never show the whole picture of community paramedicine success

Focusing on connections in community paramedicine

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Data analysis is important to evaluating MIH programs, but it will never show the whole picture of community paramedicine success

NY volunteer firefighters seek billing authority for ambulance calls

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The state association said volunteer fire companies are the only providers of emergency medical services that are not allowed to bill users

Ambulance service sues Ga. nursing home over non-emergency calls

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The lawsuit alleges that the home bills Medicare for patients services and could apply for reimbursement for non-emergency ambulance transport

Ariz. firefighter writes tribute poem for neighboring city fallen firefighter

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Glendale Fire Department Firefighter Alex Mathews paid tribute to fallen firefighter Nikki Sullivan in a poem shared by the department on social media

Mass. woman charged with spitting on, fighting EMS personnel

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"Jefferson was spitting on and fighting medical workers who were trying to render aid to her," police said

Ariz. firefighter-paramedic awarded $3.8M for lack of private place to pump breast milk

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The city of Tucson was ordered to pay Carrie Clark after she says she was retaliated against for requesting a private place to pump upon returning from maternity leave

Ariz. firefighter-paramedic awarded $3.8M for lack of private breast pumping room

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to her attorney not all stations complied with federal law regarding pumping rooms

Ariz. firefighter-paramedic awarded $3.8M for lack of private breast pumping room

Posted on April 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to her attorney not all stations complied with federal law regarding pumping rooms

Maine officials consider stocking all middle, high schools with naloxone

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Gordon Smith, the state’s director of opioid response, said having the antidote on hand in a school building could save the life of a student, staff member or visitor

Using data to pinpoint Calif. houses threatened by wildfire

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

California knows how to protect homes from fires. Why did most Paradise homes burn?

8 dead after violent weekend storms

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Weather Service said two EF-3 tornadoes touched down in Texas, while eight tornadoes were confirmed in Mississippi and three in Alabama

8 dead after violent weekend storms

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Weather Service said two EF-3 tornadoes touched down in Texas, while eight tornadoes were confirmed in Mississippi and three in Alabama

Video: Calif. firefighters rescue 13 ducklings from storm drain

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Crews briefly located the mother duck and tried to capture her in an effort to relocate the entire family, but she flew away

Maine firefighters: Town is ‘playing with fire’ with understaffed department

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With a 66 percent increase in calls over the last 10 years and no change in staffing since 2006, fire leaders in Brunswick are hoping for a change

MA Chemical Blast Prompts Hazmat Response

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Taunton's hazmat crew responded when three workers at a manufacturing plant suffered burns in a chemical explosion early Sunday.

Emergency Reporting

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Emergency Reporting (ER) offers a cloud-based records management software (RMS) solution to Fire/EMS agencies worldwide. Founded in 2003, ER empowers first responders with secure, easy-to-use station management tools that offer one-report filing of NFIRS...

Wreck Sends MO Apparatus into School

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Three people were injured Sunday when a Kansas City ladder truck careened into the front of a charter school after colliding with a Cadillac.

Wash. deputy killed while investigating disabled vehicle

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mark Bowder The Columbian, Vancouver, Wash.

COWLITZ COUNTY, Wash. — A Cowlitz County Sheriff’s deputy was fatally wounded late Saturday while investigating a disabled vehicle in a rural area northeast of Kalama, according to the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office.

The shooting occurred at 10:11 p.m. near the intersection of Kalama River Road and Fallert Road, according to a press release issued Sunday.

The deputy, whose name had not been released, had been dispatched to a report of a vehicle blocking the roadway in the 100 block of Fallert Road. He was shot shortly after he arrived at the scene, the press release said.

Other officers provided aid at the scene, and the deputy was transported by LifeFlight to PeaceHealth Medical Center in Vancouver, but he died a short time after arriving, the press release said.

The Clark County Major Crimes Unit is assisting in the investigation, which has located a person of interest and is following up on other leads related to the case.

The area where the shooting occurred is closed with the exception to local traffic only on Fallert Road. Investigators are asking the public to avoid the area unless absolutely necessary. There is no timeline currently available for reopening.

Investigators ask that anyone with information related to to the shooting to contact Sergeant Todd Barsness with the Clark County Major Crimes Unit at 360-397-2020 or todd.barsness@clark.wa.gov.

April 14, 2019 Cowlitz County Deputy Shooting Cowlitz County – On April 13, 2019, at approximately 10:11 pm, a Cowlitz...

Posted by Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office on Sunday, April 14, 2019

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©2019 The Columbian (Vancouver, Wash.)


Massive Blaze Destroys NJ Shore Landmark

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Saturday’s five-alarm fire burned for nearly 12 hours and engulfed the North End Pavilion on the boardwalk in Ocean Grove on the Jersey Shore.

Watch Milwaukee Crews Battle Third-Alarm Blaze

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Raw video shows the Milwaukee Fire Department battling a third-alarm fire that destroyed a furniture store and damaged a nearby home Saturday.

Firefighter Protections Bill Goes to MT Governor

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A bill that would increase protections for Montana firefighters who develop cancer or other illnesses has cleared its last legislative hurdle.

VFD Standoff Heads to CA Court Tuesday

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Julian-Cuyamaca volunteer firefighters remain holed up in their station, unable to respond to calls, while San Diego County crews handle emergencies.

Mass. officer shot twice, suspect arrested in gun battle outside nightclub

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jeanette DeForge The Republican, Springfield, Mass.

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – A police officer remains in the hospital after being shot twice and a 25-year-old man has been arrested in what was described as a gun battle outside a nightclub early Saturday morning.

The officer, Edwin Irizarry, who has served at least 20 years on the department, was grazed in the left arm and shot in the left elbow during the incident that occurred shortly before 2 a.m. at the corner of State and Benton Street, Police Commissioner Cheryl Clapprood said.

Kenneth Hernandez, of Dickinson Street, Springfield, was charged with two counts of assault within intent to murder with a firearm, carrying a firearm without a license, discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a building, assault with a dangerous weapon and three counts of malicious damage. He could face other charges in the future, said Ryan Walsh, police spokesman.

“It was quite the gunfight the officers were involved in,” Clapprood said.

A second person was also injured in the shooting. The victim was driven taken to Baystate Medical Center by a friend and treated for two graze wounds and released, she said.

He is cooperating with police, she said.

Irizarry and a second officer, who are both long-term officers, were working a private detail at the Aquarious nightclub when they were told by the manager that there was a disturbance outside. Both went outside and found a man, who had been hit with a bottle, bleeding by the head across the street at the Dunkin’ Donuts parking lot on State Street, Clapprood said.

While they were investigating, one of the officers heard a woman yelling in Spanish to Hernandez, “What are you getting? What are you getting?" she said.

The two officers then saw the man walk to a vehicle and then turn around with his hands behind his back. They then repeatedly ordered him to show his hands, Clapprood said.

“At which time he produces a .22 caliber firearm and fires at the officers,” she said

The second officer took cover in a vehicle. At the same time there was also gunfire coming from behind the police, Clapprood said.

In total investigators recovered three different types of ammunition. One came from one of the officers who returned fire and one came from Hernandez’s gun, which was recovered at the scene when he was arrested.

Police are continuing to search for a third suspect and have a description of a car that left the scene that may have been part of the shooting, she said.

“It is a very fluid and active investigation,” she said.

———

©2019 The Republican, Springfield, Mass.


Bodycam footage shows deadly shootout that wounds Fla. deputy

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Bodycam footage shows deadly shootout after carjacker leads cops on pursuit

Bodycam footage shows deadly shootout that wounds Fla. deputy

Howard Cohen Miami Herald

VOLUSIA COUNTY, Fla. — An armed carjacker who earlier had made threats of “suicide by cop” apparently made good on his intentions. He led a terrifying police chase amid startled motorists near Interstate 4 that ended with a shootout with five Florida officers.

When it ended Thursday in the DeLand area of Florida — about 34 miles north of Orlando — the suspect was dead and a Volusia County Sheriff’s Office deputy was grazed in the head with one of his bullets.

Volusia deputies identified Phillip Thomas Marsh as the Lake Helen, Florida, man who led to the intense afternoon chase and shootout. On Friday, the Volusia sheriff’s office posted a video of seven-minutes’ worth of body cam footage that had been viewed more than half a million times by Saturday morning.

Deputies say that Marsh. 30, carjacked a woman at gunpoint in Deltona shortly after 2 p.m. Thursday. The woman told officers he got into her white pickup truck, pointed his gun, demanded her keys and took off.

Marsh was so determined, Volusia deputies say, he swerved at a deputy who threw stop sticks on the road to blow out the tires.

“The suspect appeared to be waving a handgun out the driver’s side window,” deputies said.

Marsh kept driving for miles after the truck’s four tires were blown out by stop sticks.

The shirtless Marsh got out of the disabled vehicle on State Road 44 in front of the Volusia County Fairgrounds, with his handgun pointed to his head, ran toward motorists, approached a driver in a black SUV, and “appeared to be ready to carjack another innocent person,” Sheriff Mike Chitwood said at a press conference on Thursday.

Marsh was blocked from doing so by a deputy.

When Marsh opened fire on the deputies, they fired back, striking him several times.

It still wasn’t enough to take Marsh down.

“Still armed with the handgun, the suspect went into the woods, where deputies ultimately took him into custody, brought him out and performed first aid before he was transported to the hospital, where he was later pronounced dead,” Volusia deputies said in their report.

Chitwood said Marsh had been reported missing and suicidal earlier in the week. “He was known to act violently toward law enforcement and has made threats of ‘suicide by cop’ and suicide by other means.”

Marsh’s bullet grazed the head of Sgt. Thomas Dane, 54, a 30-year-veteran. As blood gushed from his head, and his hat with the “Sheriff’s K-9 Unit” logo lay on the ground next to him with a bullet hole a few inches above the logo, he told fellow officers, “I think I’ve been shot,” Chitwood said at the press conference.

Dane was treated at a Daytona Beach hospital and is expected to make a full recovery.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating the shooting.

Chitwood commended his fellow deputies.

“Everything that they did was to try to prevent what happened — knowing that this was probably what was going to happen,” Chitwood said.

Marsh had a lengthy arrest record dating back to 2007, when he was 19, in Volusia County. He’s had arrests for offenses including home invasion with a deadly weapon, grand theft, dealing in stolen property, aggravated battery, and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

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©2019 Miami Herald


American flag graphic on police cars divides Calif. town

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. — An American flag graphic on the side of freshly painted police cars is dividing a small coastal city in Southern California.

Some people in Laguna Beach feel the flag design is too aggressive while others are astonished that anyone would object to the American flag, The Los Angeles Times reported Saturday.

The city council will decide at its Tuesday meeting whether to keep the logo or choose an alternative.

Artist Carrie Woodburn said at a March council meeting that it was "shocking to see the boldness of the design" when the newly painted Ford Explorers rolled out.

"We have such an amazing community of artists here, and I thought the aesthetic didn't really represent our community," Woodburn said. "It feels very aggressive."

But attorney Jennifer Welsh Zeiter said that she found the police cars "exceptional" and questioned the loyalty of anyone who objected to the American flag display.

Critics are so blinded by their hatred of President Donald Trump, she said, "that they cannot see through their current biases to realize that a police vehicle with the American flag is the ultimate American expression."

The city council agreed in February to repaint its all-white squad cars in black and white with the stars and stripes running through the word "police" on the doors. The police department has 11 squad cars.

The proposed graphic that the council unanimously approved in February was a more muted version of the design that now appears on the cars.

Laguna Beach has about 23,000 people and is 55 miles (88 kilometers) south of Los Angeles.


Ala. business owner sues city for failing to put out fire, claimes firefighter negligence

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 2018 fire destroyed more than 50 golf carts and sent four firefighters to the hospital with heat exhaustion

Ala. business owner sues city for failing to put out fire, claims firefighter negligence

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 2018 fire destroyed more than 50 golf carts and sent four firefighters to the hospital with heat exhaustion

Report: Human error broke Fla. county 911 system, made fixing it harder

Posted on April 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Hillsborough County’s 911 system failed for just over 22 hours in September, leaving 768 calls for help unanswered while officials struggled to fix the problem

NM hospital patient steals ambulance, crashes into light pole

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ashley Ulibarri, 25, faces a charge of unlawful taking of the motor vehicle

Police Searching for Fake TX Firefighter

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Authorities say a man who has made a habit of posing as a firefighter convinced Dallas firefighters to take him on a ride-along before they grew suspicious.

Hackers Steal, Publish Personal Data on FBI NA Attendees

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The hackers then put the data up for download on their own website. The spreadsheets contained about 4,000 unique records after duplicates were removed, including member names, a mix of personal and government email addresses, job titles, phone numbers and postal addresses.

MD County Sees Sharp Drop in Opioid ODs

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New fire and police programs that include Safe Stations have helped Anne Arundel County decrease opioid overdoses by nearly 25 percent.

Man Injures Family Before Setting Brooklyn Blaze

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

About 60 FDNY firefighters responded Friday when a Brooklyn man slashed his wife and stabbed his daughter before setting their apartment on fire.

Land Acquisition Slows Progress on IL Fire Stations

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Decatur officials say lengthy land acquisition efforts have slowed progress on two fire stations they hope to start building before construction season ends.

‘How dare you:’ Brother of Ohio officer killed in hit-and-run chides man who struck him

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Kaylee Remington Advance Ohio Media, Cleveland

PAINESVILLE, Ohio — A judge sentenced a Kirtland man to 11 1/2 years in prison Friday for killing Mentor police officer Mathew Mazany in a hit-and-run-crash last year.

Brian Anthony, 25, pleaded guilty in March to aggravated vehicular homicide, operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol and other charges in the June 24 crash. Prosecutors dismissed one count of failure to stop after an accident, saying in court that they did not have enough evidence to get a conviction on that charge.

Prosecutors in Lake County said that Anthony drank for at least three hours prior to the crash, and he tested positive for drugs including fentanyl, heroin, morphine and codeine after his arrest.

Lake County Common Pleas Court Judge John P. O’Donnell handed down Anthony’s sentence Friday as members of his family watched from the courtroom gallery. Many of them are area police officers and firefighters. Fellow police officers and family members also packed the courtroom on Mazany’s behalf.

Anthony’s attorneys, Richard Perez and Hector Martinez, maintain that he did not know what happened or that he hit a person. His mother, Ann Albrecht, said at the hearing that her son admitted that he has a drinking problem and that he worked hard to keep himself sober. His stepfather also spoke at the hearing. He went to the scene shortly after the crash happened.

“Brian would never choose to bring harm to another human being,” Ann Albrecht said. “He is a good loving man. This accident doesn’t define him as a person. My only wish for my children is for them to be a loving person and a service to others. My prayers will continue for all those impacted.”

Mike Albrecht, who has served as a Mentor Firefighter for more than 35 years, apologized to Mazany’s family, friends and colleagues.

“I pray you (everyone impacted) will one day forgive my son,” he said. “I’m deeply sorry that I had to deliver the news of a fellow officer. I ask you to consider another person’s life, the life of my stepson, Brian.”

Anthony said through tears that he understands that he made a horrible decision that caused “everlasting heartbreak.”

“I made a horrible series of decisions that evening," he said. “I know i need to change my behavior and I promise to do so in my days of incarceration and after.”

Mike Mazany, officer Mazany’s brother, told Anthony he has no sympathy for him and demanded the maximum time for Anthony as his brother did his duty as a police officer with integrity and service.

“How dare you? You knew you hit him,” he said to Anthony. “This family has fought so hard to demand this man time. I’m insulted by it. This man nailed my brother. You grounded him down and flung him through the air. You didn’t know? You’re a liar."

Mazany was fierce a protector of his wife and son, his wife, Lisa Mazany said during a statement to the court.

“With Matt by my side I always felt safe,” his wife said. “He was my heart, and soul.”

He was her everything, she said, and a hero; not because of the badge, but because he was the epitome of what a good man is.

The crash happened about 1 a.m. in the eastbound lanes of Ohio 2 near the exit to Ohio 306. Mazany was stopped along the highway to help another police officer with an unrelated traffic stop.

The crash pinned Mazany between a Jeep and another Mentor police officer’s cruiser.

Anthony also struck another police cruiser. Dashboard camera video showed he stopped for a moment before he drove away.

Mazany, who suffered skull fractures and blunt force trauma in the crash, died after paramedics took him to TriPoint Medical Center in Painesville for treatment.

Anthony went to Mentor Lagoons Nature Preserve & Marina after the crash to celebrate a friend who passed the police academy and told a friend that he hit something, but wasn’t sure what he hit, Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Rocco Dipierro said. Anthony later told investigators he was not aware he hit someone on the side of the highway.

Authorities tracked the Jeep Wrangler after watching the dashboard camera video from the incident and obtaining the license. They found Anthony about 9 a.m. the morning after the crash, sleeping on a hammock at the marina, Dipierro said.

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©2019 Advance Ohio Media, Cleveland


Murder Charges in MO Crash That Killed Firefighter

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man who fled a traffic stop in St. Louis County before a crash that killed an off-duty firefighter has been charged with second-degree murder.

Police say Dallas DA’s plan to give petty criminals a pass could backfire

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sarah Sarder The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — A day after District Attorney John Creuzot announced sweeping changes to Dallas County’s criminal justice system, local police officials and union leaders pushed back, saying his reforms won't change how they approach their jobs and could have disastrous side effects.

Some of the harshest criticism came from DeSoto Police Chief Joseph Costa, who announced Friday afternoon that his officers would disregard Creuzot's plan to decriminalize low-level offenses and decrease the use of excessive probation and bail.

"I understand and appreciate that in Texas, the elected District Attorney can control which cases his office prosecutes and those offenses he chooses not to prosecute. Police officers, however, have to follow state law," Costa said in a written statement. "I have instructed DeSoto Police Officers to continue to make arrests as necessary to protect our citizens and to help prevent crime, regardless of the initiatives implemented by the District Attorney."

Costa promised to attempt to prosecute any cases rejected by the DA's office in municipal court so residents feel the Police Department is "doing all it can to keep the City of DeSoto safe and secure."

Speaking after a Friday morning news conference by Creuzot, Dallas Police Association President Michael Mata acknowledged that Creuzot's changes would have positive effects, from decreasing the jail population to easing the workload for police officers.

But Mata and Sheldon Smith, his counterpart with the National Black Police Association, also voiced disappointment that Creuzot had not sought input from local police chiefs and other "stakeholders," like small businesses, before rolling out his plan.

Creuzot, however, said he had met with local police and city officials, and he had yet to hear a viable solution.

"I've met with the police chiefs," the district attorney said, "and I've met with the City of Dallas and I've asked them to come up with a solution. Today, I've got no response. So we're going to act."

Mata and Smith said they expected multiple problems to arise from the changes, but nothing concerned them more than the decriminalization of theft of necessities worth up to $750.

"This will run people out of business," Mata said. "Hundreds of dollars [in stolen goods] is not low-level theft."

Smith said small businesses won't be able to survive in South Dallas and Oak Cliff if they must absorb the losses from theft.

"We know Walmart is leaving South Dallas," Smith said. "If Walmart is leaving, how much theft do you think is happening? The little store has absolutely no chance of staying in business."

Mata admitted that the Dallas Police Department, shorthanded as it is, can't respond quickly to low-priority crimes like shoplifting. As a result, he said, shopkeepers may feel compelled to do what the police and district attorney won't.

"Either that shop owner is going to have to take matters into his own hands," he said. "Or he's going to have to let $600 worth of merchandise walk out of his store. ... It's sending the wrong message."

Mata argued that most people suffer from lower-level crimes, not violent crime, and the police must serve those residents, as well.

Furthermore, Smith said, dismissing trespassing charges would leave no place for police to take homeless offenders because shelters are often full. Costa echoed that sentiment, adding that often the homeless and mentally ill commit other offenses that Creuzot has also recommended not be prosecuted.

Creuzot acknowledged the issue of mentally ill offenders in his news conference, saying the county would build a dedicated facility to house those homeless individuals.

"There's nothing good that's going to come out of putting a mentally ill person in Dallas County Jail or any other county jail," he said.

The district attorney also announced changes to how law enforcement would deal with second- and third-time marijuana offenders. With some exceptions, Creuzot outlined a plan that would refer those people for intervention and treatment instead of jail. He was unclear on the details of the plan.

Also weighing in on the reform plan Friday was the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas, which lauded Creuzot's sentiment but said the county must ensure that the new policies are constitutional.

"We are pleased that DA Creuzot continues to recognize the need to reform our bail system and the serious harm that comes from detaining people simply because they cannot afford to pay bail," senior staff attorney Trisha Trigilio said in a written statement. "For reforms to become a reality, all stakeholders must join together, including the district judges who continue to resist voluntarily making changes to improve the system in Dallas County."

The leaders of the police associations echoed that call for consensus, saying they would ask to sit down with Creuzot to discuss the plan and its shortcomings.

"We have a responsibility to protect the public," Mata said.

———

©2019 The Dallas Morning News


Firefighters Getting Help at CT Mental Facility

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Manchester nonprofit providing mental health aid to first responders is seeking a grant to ensure patients can continue therapy at no cost.

LA Firefighters Escape Injury in Roof Collapse

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Baton Rouge firefighters safely evacuated the Olive Square Apartments as the roof began to collapse during a fire Friday evening.

CA Fire District Absorbed by City

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After more than six decades in existence, the Roseland Fire Protection District has been taken over by the city of Santa Rosa.

Pa. officer who used gun instead of TASER won’t face charges

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

NEW HOPE, Pa. — A Pennsylvania police officer who mistakenly pulled his weapon rather than his stun gun won't face charges for shooting a man in police custody.

Bucks County District Attorney Matthew Weintraub says last month's shooting was an accident.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports the officer, who retired Wednesday and whose name was not released, shot 38-year-old Brian Riling during a scuffle inside a holding cell at the New Hope Police Department on March 3.

Weintraub says as the officer struggled with Riling, he yelled "TASER!" as a warning, but mistakenly drew his gun and shot him in the stomach. Riling was in critical condition but has been released from the hospital.

Riling was in police custody after an arrest earlier that day on intimidation charges.

His attorney Richard Fink says he has no comment.


LIVE PD celebrates 200th episode

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By PoliceOne Staff

COLUMBIA, SC — LIVE PD will join South Carolina deputies for a celebration of the 200th episode of the show today.

LIVE PD’s Sean “Sticks” Larkin will join Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott and deputies of the department at 6 p.m. until midnight in the Cantey Building at the SC State Fairgrounds to celebrate the show’s milestone.

The episode event will feature K-9 demonstrations, tactical robots, law enforcement static displays, drone flyovers as well as have music, a bounce house for kids and other family activities.

“This is but another way in which our RCSD family, friends, and fans can gather together for a night of family-friendly fun,” says Sheriff Lott. “It’s also a great way of bringing together all of our communities as we celebrate the 200th episode of A&E’s hit TV series which we’ve been a part of since LIVE PD first aired two-and-a-half years ago.”

The event is open to the public and admission is free.


Dallas man accused of impersonating paramedic student

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The man convinced members of Dallas Fire-Rescue to take him on a ride-along, after previously being arrested in 2013 for stealing a firefighter uniform

Dallas man accused of impersonating paramedic student

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The man convinced members of Dallas Fire-Rescue to take him on a ride-along, and was previously arrested in 2013 for stealing a firefighter uniform

Dallas man accused of impersonating EMT student

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The man convinced members of Dallas Fire-Rescue to take him on a ride-along, and was previously arrested in 2013 for stealing a firefighter uniform

Dallas man accused of impersonating EMT student

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The man convinced members of Dallas Fire-Rescue to take him on a ride-along, and was previously arrested in 2013 for stealing a firefighter uniform

Fate of Julian fire department in limbo as court hearing delayed

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“They’ve turned off dispatch,” said district director and volunteer firefighter Brian Kramer. “They’re not dispatching us, but we’re there and ready to answer a call if any come in"

Calif. county battles misuse of 911 system

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

From people calling to ask about the weather and children accidentally dialing 911 on their parents' phone, dispatchers receive hundreds of non-emergency calls

NC county considers Plan B if ambulance service doesn’t recover

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The nonprofit agency was previously handling convalescent calls to transport patients between medical and long-term care facilities or for routine medical transport services

Houston mayor, fire union discuss pay raise phase-in to prevent layoffs

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The meeting marked a rare sign of progress in the long-running feud over the Prop B ballot referendum

Fire at Colo. fire station injures 1, burns brush truck

Posted on April 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Commerce City firefighter was treated for smoke inhalation after a blaze broke out at South Adams County Fire Station No. 8

Less-Lethal: The Guinea Pigs

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A team of Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies tests less-lethal weapons and restraints, even letting themselves become the targets so that they can determine effectiveness.

371 fallen officers to be honored during 31st Annual Candlelight Vigil

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WASHINGTON — Hundreds of fallen officers will be honored during the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund’s 31st Annual Candlelight Vigil in May.

The names of 371 officers in U.S. law enforcement will be formally dedicated on May 13 at the National Mall.

Among the list includes 158 officers who were killed in the line of duty along with 213 officers who were killed in previous years but had been lost to history until the Memorial Fund’s research. Out of that number, 87 officers died of illness related to 9/11 and the recovery efforts.

In addition to the 371 names, the Memorial already bears the names of 21,910 officers nationwide who have sacrificed their lives throughout history.

The names of the 371 officers being added to the National Memorial this year can be found on the NLEOMF’s website.


San Diego Firefighter Hurt in Surfboard Shop Fire

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighter suffered heat exhaustion while fighting a two-alarm surfboard repair and woodworking shop fire on Pacific Highway in the Morena District.

FDNY Firefighter Who Survived 9/11 Snubbed by Texas Congressman

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rob Serra, who's wheelchair-bound and lost several colleagues on Sept. 11, 2001, tried to introduce him self to Dan Crenshaw, the Texas congressman who said he didn't have time to talk to him.

Photo of the Week: The no privacy pooch

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Members

This week's photo comes from Officer Ben Rexroad of the Weld County Sheriff's Office in Colorado. Pictured is his K-9 partner, Ringo, who lacks any sense of personal space. Thank you for your service!

Calling all police photographers! PoliceOne needs pictures of you in action or training. Submit a photo — it could be selected as our Photo of the Week! Be sure to include your name, department information and address (including city, state and ZIP code) where we can reach you — Photo of the Week winners have a chance to win a PoliceOne.com T-shirt!


Summerweight Polo

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

For hot-weather climates, the new ultra-lightweight Summerweight Polo ($39.99) with mesh underarm and back panel augments the Summerweight Collection that has been in Propper’s stable for several years. This polo is made from snag- and...

PA Authorities Launch Investigation into Elementary School Fire

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Buckingham police had reported the day after the Feb. 13 fire that the blaze started in an unoccupied classroom on the second floor.

New Orleans Officer Shot in Leg Responding to Suspicious Person Call

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the New Orleans Police Department was shot in the leg while responding to a call of a suspicious person at a Mid-City gas station, according to the NOPD.

Video released of officers dragging student down stairs

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

CHICAGO — Newly released surveillance video shows Chicago police dragging a high school student down a flight of stairs before striking and kicking her and using a stun gun.

Chicago Public Schools student Dnigma Howard's attorney, Andrew M. Stroth, said Friday that the video contradicts statements the two officers made saying the 16-year-old initiated the January altercation. She was charged with felony aggravated battery. Those charges were later dropped.

Dnigma's father, Laurentio Howard, on Thursday filed an amended federal civil rights lawsuit against the city, the Chicago Board of Education and the officers. The city's Law Department says it doesn't comment on pending litigation. The school district's inspector general and the agency that investigates Chicago police misconduct are both investigating.

Howard is seeking monetary damages. Stroth says the case can also be a "catalyst to influence police reform."


North Carolina Department Mourns Loss of Lieutenant Who Died Unexpectedly

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lieutenant Jimmy Case of the Hendersonville (NC) Police Department died suddenly on April 11, the agency announced on Facebook.

A K-9 Unit Has Benefits for Police Departments the Communities Alike

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A police K-9 unit is instrumental in myriad missions, including drug enforcement, search and rescue, fugitive apprehension, and of course, public relations. So when a K-9 is injured or killed, they are treated with nearly as much reverence and respect as when a police officer suffers a similar fate.

Ohio Cop Killer and Accomplice Now Up for Parole

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Wayne Reed and Russell Bell have both previously been denied parole.

Philadelphia Officer Injured in Head-On Collision

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Philadelphia Police Department was injured in a head-on collision with another vehicle shortly before midnight on Thursday.

Wife of Wounded Florida Officer Sues Estate of Gunman

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Meghan Valencia—the wife of Orlando Police Officer Kevin Valencia—is suing the estate of the man who shot her husband as well as the owner of the apartment complex and its management company.

New York Department Adding Real-Time Intelligence Center

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Syracuse (NY) Police Department is adding a new high-tech capability to monitor and more quickly respond to crimes in progress.

South Carolina First Responders Compete in Cookie Contest to Raise Awareness of Autism

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Charleston (SC) Police Department faced off with their brothers and sisters in the fire service in a contest in which participants were armed with glazing brushes and frosting tubes in an event aimed at raising awareness about Autism.

New York Agency Makes Big Narcotics Seizure

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The agency posted a picture of the haul on Facebook, with the caption, "Who's smiling now? It sure isn't the 11 drug dealers who were peddling heroin in Mount Vernon and environs with a red smiley face stamped on their envelopes."

Tufloc TufBox Locking Drawer Systems

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

TufBox locking drawer systems provide a way to safely secure guns, store equipment and organize belongings. Manufactured with heavy-duty steel, the TufBox is built to withstand the everyday demands that are expected of all Tufloc products. Available...

The Waze craze: Legal insight into LE concerns surrounding popular Google app

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By David Moser, Esq., P1 Contributor

Waze is a navigation app that uses both mapping technology and crowdsourcing to provide drivers with the fastest and easiest routes from point A to B. The app, which hosts 100 million users worldwide, allows drivers to report activity that could influence other drivers’ decisions such as current traffic, road hazards and, among the most controversial, police presence.

The police-tracking feature, which was one reason for the spur in Waze’s popularity, notifies drivers of any nearby law enforcement vehicles and patrol activity, such as speed traps and sobriety checkpoints, allowing drivers time to find alternative routes and potentially avoid these routine precautions.

Are there legal issues associated with this feature? Some law enforcement officials think so, claiming the feature could potentially cause harm to both drivers and officers.

The Developing Waze Debate

This February, the NYPD demanded Google immediately remove the police-notification feature from the Waze app, citing that it encourages irresponsible avoidance of DWI checkpoints that are in place to keep civilians safe.

Google refused the NYPD’s request and fought back, stating that Waze keeps drivers safe with its traffic alerts by encouraging them to drive slower and that it aids traffic enforcement by raising awareness about checkpoints and advocating safe, sober driving, while also providing users with a quick way to find and access police assistance if necessary.

The debate surrounding the app centers around conflicting safety concerns, with opponents citing that the app’s police-reporting tool enables drivers to divert away from cops, drive recklessly and continue endangering others on the road. Some also argue that Waze’s tracking feature provides criminals with the resources to abduct children, rob banks or commit other illegal acts while escaping police detection. The other side of the argument has supporters claiming safer roads due to the app providing location information of police, crashes, debris and other unpredictable hazards.

What Legal Action Can LE Agencies Take?

Claiming that the apps places police officers in jeopardy is an understandable argument but may prove difficult to pursue in a court of law.

Although First Amendment rights, including free speech, are not unlimited, there have never been established rules that would allow law enforcement to covertly operate. To the contrary, in addition to the presence of CB radios and other technologies that have enabled drivers to notify each other of active police presence for years, it is also the right of private citizens to take video and audio recordings of police officers in public places. This said, the Waze tracker is stagnant, simply reporting if there is an officer present. The app does not disclose personal information such as officer names, movements or shift schedules.

There is likely no winning avenue for legal action to aid in the removal of the police-tracker feature. Both National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) standards and the seminal U.S. Supreme Court decision in Michigan v. Sitz, 496 U.S. 444 (1990) require sobriety checkpoints to be publicly announced. Under the First Amendment, Google is entitled to host this tracking feature, and people have the right to communicate information about police presence, even via a crowdsourcing app. Thus, it’s hard to see how Waze’s police feature crosses any First Amendment lines and the argument that the app promotes crime diversion is probably a dead end.

Officers in Danger

The National Sheriff’s Association started a campaign in 2015 urging Google to remove the police-tracking feature from its app to protect law enforcement officers from the possibility of stalking or harm by an app user. This came in response to a surge of viral videos recording controversial and sometimes dangerous police interactions, sparking additional concerns about the potential for criminals to target police officers by using the app’s location tracker.

An example of this scenario played out in December 2014 when two New York police officers were shot and killed by a gunman who, before the attack, posted screenshots from Waze and threatening messages aimed at law enforcement on social media. It is said that he used Waze to pinpoint the location of the two officers in order to assassinate them, before killing himself as well. While this information cannot be confirmed, some cops say the safety concerns surrounding the app are obvious.

What We Can Expect to See, Or Not to See

Given free speech considerations and the public’s right to exchange information, it is unlikely that legal action will result in the termination of the app’s police tracker. With free speech at the center of discussions surrounding the controversy, this is another example of free speech being pitted against safety concerns.


About the author David C. Moser is an associate at Isaac Wiles Burkholder & Teetor, LLC (Columbus) where he focuses his practice on representing clients in the public sector. He handles misdemeanor prosecutions as an assistant prosecutor for several localities and outside of the courtroom, he regularly assists government entities with employment disputes, day-to-day legal advice, and civil litigation.


Woman Caught After Taunting Pennsylvania Sheriff’s Office on Facebook

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Greene County Sheriff’s Office said a woman who commented on a department Facebook page has been arrested as a result of a lead stemming from that post.

Ohio Girls Found Safe, Mother Arrested After Defying Court Order

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 4- and 2-year-old girls were reported missing after their mother, Caryann Sewell, picked them up Monday from their Cleveland daycare, according to a missing persons report.

The importance of being a ‘predator’ in a deadly confrontation

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Policing Matters Podcast

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

During the annual conference of the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA) in St. Louis, Policing Matters podcast co-host Doug Wyllie roamed the hallways and ran into countless law enforcement trainers and experts, some of whom were willing to sit down and talk about what they're teaching and what they're learning.

In this podcast segment, Doug sits down with Lee Shaykhet, a renowned police trainer, who talks about predators versus prey—the importance of moving forward and doing what the subject doesn't expect in order to prevail in a deadly confrontation.

LEARN MORE

Defeating a close-quarters ambush

Using the 'T-Kick'

Basic takedown of a non-compliant subject

Surviving an ambush

Weapon Retention Out of the Holster


Minnesota Man Charged With Selling Fentanyl That Killed 11

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Hopkins man has been charged with selling fentanyl and other drugs that killed 11 people and harmed four.

South Florida Double Murder Suspect Surrenders in NYC

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Cold and hungry and with no place to sleep, Javani Stewart walked into a Bronx police station Tuesday night and casually mentioned to officers that he was wanted for two murders in South Florida, according to police and media reports.

Attorney: Slow-Motion Video Shows Laquan McDonald Was Still a Threat

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In the first day of the disciplinary hearing, an officer's attorney said an FBI-enhanced, slow-motion version of the video of the shooting backs up the officer’s claim that the black teen still posed a threat after he was shot and fell to the street.

NYPD Officer Killed in Motorcycle Crash On Way to Work

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NYPD Officer Marc St. Arromand was killed early Thursday in a motorcycle crash on the Laurelton Parkway in Queens as he rode to work.

Celebrity Donates Dog Wheelchair to Retired Philadelphia Police K-9

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

K-9 Thor will be getting a new leash on life thanks to donation by actor Trevor Donovan, who, after hearing the German shepherd’s tail, offered to donate a wheelchair to the retired dog.

Christiana, DE, Vol. Fire Dept. Put Engine 6 in Service

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Christiana, DE, Volunteer Fire Department, in New Castle County, has taken delivery of a 2019 Pierce Arrow XT pumper.

Colin Oglesbee

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Colin Oglesbee is a 13-year veteran of the fire service.

The Best Dressed Public Safety Departments of 2019

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The NAUMD Best Dressed Public Safety Award Competition recognizes police departments, first responders and the suppliers for their uniform's versatility, functionality, style and professionalism.

Fla. K-9 deputy lucky to be alive after bullet punctures baseball cap

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Tony Holt The News-Journal, Daytona Beach, Fla.

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Sheriff Mike Chitwood said he has never felt luckier during his 32-year law enforcement career than he did Thursday afternoon.

He wasn't going to have to tell a young girl that her father had been killed in the line of duty.

"A millimeter lower and Sgt. Dane is dead," Chitwood told the media a few hours after the shooting during a news conference less than 100 yards from where the face-off took place on State Road 44.

Volusia County Sheriff's Sgt. Thomas Dane, 54, had a round from a .32-caliber handgun graze his skull. The bullet punctured his K-9 baseball cap in two places and cut through his scalp, but Dane was not seriously injured, Chitwood said.

Posted by Volusia County Sheriff's Office on Thursday, April 11, 2019

The shooter, a carjacking suspect who led deputies on a pursuit from Deltona to the Volusia County Fairgrounds outside DeLand, died at the hospital from his bullet wounds, according to the Sheriff's Office. He was identified late Thursday as 30-year-old Phillip Thomas Marsh of Lake Helen.

Chitwood said Marsh had a criminal history and had been declared missing and suicidal for several days before the shooting.

"Clearly ... when he came out of that vehicle, he wanted us to shoot him and he was going to take one of us with him," Chitwood said.

Dane and the suspect were transported to Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach. The sheriff said Dane was airlifted to the hospital while the suspect was taken by ambulance. Dane was released from the hospital Thursday evening.

The violence started around 2:20 p.m. when a woman on Ludlow Street in Deltona was approached by a shirtless and shoe-less man armed with a gun, according to the Sheriff's Office. He pulled a gun on her and demanded she hand over her the keys to the Chevrolet pickup that was parked in her driveway, deputies said.

The woman told a 9-1-1 operator that she had kids in the vehicle, but they safely got out of the truck before the man pulled out of the driveway and fled.

The suspect drove the white pickup out of the neighborhood and headed north along State Road 415, according to the Sheriff's Office. At one point, the suspect swerved toward one deputy and waved his gun out the window, Chitwood said. Marsh headed north on the highway and turned west on S.R. 44. He ran over a set of deployed stop sticks, which punctured all four tires, said Andrew Gant, a Sheriff's Office spokesman.

The rubber on the tires fell off, so Marsh was driving on the bare rims of the pickup going 10-15 mph while deputies continued to follow him, Chitwood said. The vehicle traveled about 3 miles without tires before stopping.

The pickup came to a halt near the fairgrounds, where deputies had set up a roadblock. Marsh got out, held a gun to his head to ward off deputies, crossed the median and tried to carjack another motorist near the roadblock, but another deputy pulled in front of him and blocked him about 10 yards from the vehicle, Chitwood said.

That's when the suspect opened fire on deputies, five of whom returned fire. Chitwood was at the scene and was behind Dane, who was one of the deputies firing at the suspect. Chitwood did not fire his gun because he "couldn't get a clear shot," he said.

Chitwood said he was astonished at what he saw from Dane.

"He never retreated," the sheriff said. "He kept going forward toward the threat.

"You talk (bravery) and just being so focused on what your mission is, I've never (seen) anything like that."

Marsh ran into the woods after he was shot and continued his standoff with deputies. A ballistics team moved in armed with shields and stun guns and eventually subdued the suspect. Deputies loaded the severely injured man into an ambulance, but he was pronounced dead around 5 p.m., Chitwood said.

Court records show Marsh was out on bail awaiting trial on an aggravated battery arrest stemming from an incident in September in Lake Helen. Marsh was accused of running over another man with a golf cart and injuring him.

After everything quieted down Thursday, Chitwood got on the radio and commended deputies and dispatchers.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating the shooting. All of the deputies who fired at the suspect were placed on administrative leave with pay, which is standard following a deputy-involved shooting.

The highway remained closed to traffic until about 8 p.m., Gant said. The S.R. 44 ramps to I-4 also were closed.

Chitwood said he saw Dane, who has served with the Sheriff's Office for more than 30 years, at the hospital. He was surrounded by family and was in good spirits.

"It was a great pleasure ... seeing him in that hospital room with his daughter," Chitwood said.

*Sheriff Chitwood briefing news media on deputy-involved shooting* An armed suspect who fired at Volusia County sheriff’s deputies was fatally wounded Thursday afternoon and a VCSO sergeant survived with a grazing gunshot wound to the head in a shooting that erupted near Interstate 4 after the suspect carjacked a woman at gunpoint in Deltona, led deputies on a pursuit to the DeLand area and appeared to be ready to carjack another innocent person. The initial carjacking was reported around 2:21 p.m. at a home on the 2500 block of Ludlow Street in Deltona, where the victim said a man got in her truck, pointed a gun at her, demanded her keys and then took off in the vehicle. Deputies attempted to stop the stolen truck in Deltona, but the suspect continued fleeing erratically. At one point, the suspect swerved at a deputy who deployed stop sticks on the truck. As he fled, the suspect appeared to be waving a handgun out the driver’s side window. After several stop stick hits, with all four tires appearing to be deflated, the truck slowed to a crawl and came to a stop on State Road 44 in front of the Volusia County Fairgrounds. The suspect got out of the truck with the gun still in his hand and ran in the direction of several motorists who were stopped on the road next to him. A deputy drove his unmarked SUV in the suspect’s direction, preventing him from reaching another potential carjacking victim, and the suspect ran the other direction and opened fire at several other responding deputies. Deputies returned fire, striking the suspect several times. Still armed with the handgun, the suspect went into the woods, where deputies ultimately took him into custody, brought him out and performed first aid before he was transported to the hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. The deceased is Phillip Thomas Marsh, 30 (DOB 12/7/1988), of Lake Helen. Marsh had been reported missing and suicidal earlier this week and at the time, it was noted he was known to act violently toward law enforcement and has made threats of “suicide by cop” and suicide by other means. The sergeant who received the graze wound to the head is Sgt. Thomas Dane, 54, who has been a VCSO deputy for 30 years (hire date in July 1988). Footage from Sgt. Dane’s body-worn camera indicates he was shot soon after emerging from his vehicle. His hat was found lying on the road with an entry hole next to the "SHERIFF’S K-9 UNIT" logo on the front, and an exit hole a few inches above that. He was treated and released from Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach. In total, five deputies fired at Marsh. The exact number of shots fired is unconfirmed at this time. It’s believed Marsh fired multiple times. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is conducting the official investigation into the shooting. Those who fired their weapons have been placed on administrative leave with pay, which is standard following a deputy-involved shooting. Sheriff Mike Chitwood, who was one of several units involved in the pursuit and was on scene during the shooting itself, commended the tactics and coordination of all involved. “Everything that they did was to try to prevent what happened – knowing that this was probably what was going to happen,” Chitwood said, adding: “I know tonight when I go home, I’ll be saying a prayer thanking the good Lord that Sgt. Dane will be back to work real soon.” The area of the incident was reopened to traffic around 8 p.m. Thursday.

Posted by Volusia County Sheriff's Office on Thursday, April 11, 2019

———

©2019 The News-Journal, Daytona Beach, Fla.


New Orleans officer shot at gas station, suspect in custody

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Laura McKnight NOLA Media Group, New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS — A New Orleans police officer was shot in the leg Thursday night as he was responding to a suspicious person call at a Mid-City gas station, NOPD Superintendent Shaun Ferguson said.

The shooter was apprehended and another person also was taken into custody, Ferguson said during a news conference at the scene.

“He’s speaking and alert,” Ferguson said of the officer, who had a bullet lodged in his right calf.

The shooting occurred about 9:15 p.m., as officers responded to a call of a suspicious person at a Shell station in the 3300 block of Tulane Avenue. The caller had reported that the suspicious person could be armed, Ferguson said.

Arriving at the Shell station, the NOPD officer spotted someone matching the description of the suspicious person and, while trying to pat the person down, became involved in a struggle.

The “individual fired his weapon" during that struggle, striking the officer in the right calf, Ferguson said.

“The officer continued to show restraint and professionalism,” detaining the person until help arrived, Ferguson said. “He never removed his weapon from its holster.”

Another officer applied a tourniquet to the wound, Ferguson said. The wounded officer was then taken by EMS to a local hospital, where he was in stable condition late Thursday.

“He’s doing fine,” Ferguson said, and was “ecstatic to see his wife.”

Police have not identified the officer who was shot, but Ferguson said he is a three-year veteran of the force and assigned to the NOPD’s 1st District, which includes a swath of Mid-City, along with parts of neighboring areas of the city.

Ferguson said the suspected shooter was found with a gun believed to be the weapon used to fire on the officer. The NOPD has not identified either the suspected shooter or the other person in custody.

Ferguson said investigators have not determined why the suspected shooter was armed.

“We do not know if the individual was planning to rob the business," he said at the scene. "We do not know what (were) the circumstances behind the individual being armed.”

The intersection of Tulane Avenue and Jefferson Davis Parkway was closed to traffic Thursday night. A large area around the Shell station was cordoned off by police tape. Investigators could be seen going in and out of the gas station, including a group of crime-scene techs who entered the store carrying bags of evidence cones. Though police were focused on the inside of the gas station, at least one cone was placed in the roadway of Tulane Avenue.

Several people stood just outside of the gas station, watching as the cluster of NOPD officers and state police troopers grew.

Other onlookers stood near the police tape, wondering aloud at what had transpired. One woman said she was waiting to check on her son, who works nearby.

“The only person that was hurt is a police officer,” an NOPD officer told the woman.

Another woman, who was sitting outside of a nearby bar, said she saw a scuffle inside of the Shell station shortly before the shooting but could not see who was involved in the struggle.

“I just saw arms swinging,” she said.

The NOPD Force Investigation Team is leading the ongoing investigation. Anyone with any additional information on the shooting is asked to call the NOPD at 504-658-6010.

To our amazing community, thank you for the outpouring of love, support & prayers ???? Our Officer is in good spirits and surrounded by his family. We hope to have more updates soon. Thank you again, #NOPD ??????

— NOPD (@NOPDNews) April 12, 2019

———

©2019 NOLA Media Group, New Orleans


Video Shows Missouri Police Break Window, Pull Driver From SUV During Arrest

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Video recorded by police and witnesses shows Sugar Creek police officers break the driver side window of an SUV and hit a man with a baton while arresting him Monday.

New Orleans Police Officer Shot; Suspect in Custody

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An 18-year-old man has apparently been accused of shooting a New Orleans police officer in the leg Thursday night inside of a Mid-City gasoline station.

Wanted woman’s Facebook taunts help police track her down

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

WAYNESBURG, Pa. — A wanted Pennsylvania woman who taunted a sheriff's department online by asking if they "do pick up or delivery" has gotten a response: They do both, and she's in custody.

Chloe Jones commented on a Facebook post by the Greene County Sheriff's Office featuring her as one of the county's most wanted, writing "Do you guys do pick up or delivery??" followed by four crying-laughing emojis. Police say she had failed to appear in court on assault charges.

She then got into arguments with other commenters and claimed she was at a hospital in Morgantown, West Virginia. Police there tracked her down this week, and she was extradited to Pennsylvania.

Court records don't say whether she has a lawyer to comment on her behalf.

The sheriff's office took to Facebook again to announce her arrest and add that Jones "and her witty comments are taking a hiatus from our Facebook comments section due to the jail not having internet for her to use."

Posted by Greene County Sheriff's Office on Monday, April 8, 2019


Man charged with shooting officer at SC hospital

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. — A shooting inside a South Carolina hospital on Thursday left both a police officer and the suspected gunman wounded, authorities said, in what was the second shooting inside a hospital in the state in two days.

The Thursday shooting happened around 2 a.m., when 27-year-old Kevin Boyce Patterson was spotted with a gun, visiting the emergency room at the Laurens County Memorial Hospital in Clinton, authorities said.

An arrest warrant issued Thursday night said Patterson dragged his father at gunpoint across the waiting room. When a Greenville Health Authority Police Department officer and a state trooper started to ask the man questions, he shot the police officer and tried to run, said Sarah Moore, a spokeswoman for Prisma Health, which runs the hospital.

The officer fired back, hitting Boyce in the arm, investigators said.

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division charged Boyce with attempted murder, kidnapping and pointing and presenting a firearm. He was booked in the Laurens County jail. Records did not indicate whether he had a lawyer who could comment.

Moore said the police officer was treated and released. The officer's name was not released as of Thursday.

The shooting in Laurens County happened a day after a nurse was shot in a hospital emergency room in Orangeburg. According to a police report, 23-year-old Abrian Dayquan Sabb came to the Regional Medical Center with a long gun and shot the nurse in the abdomen Wednesday morning.

A hospital security guard had Sabb in custody by the time the first Orangeburg County deputies arrived three minutes later, a police report said. Sabb had come to the center just a day before, along with family members who were trying to get him mental health treatment.

State Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter said Wednesday that the family was told to come back because there weren't enough treatment beds.

Before the hospital shooting, deputies said they encountered Sabb after his girlfriend called 911 to report that he had fired a gun while she tried to take it from him. The officers gave the gun to Sabb's father, according to the police report.

The gun used in the hospital shooting Wednesday appeared to have been stolen from a nearby home just minutes earlier, deputies said.

Sabb, 23, is charged with attempted murder and possession of a weapon during the commission of violent crime. Police and court records did not list an attorney for him.

Sabb was ordered to remain in jail at a court hearing Thursday. One of the nurse's family members said at the hearing that the nurse was in critical condition. The family member did not identify herself.


Man pleads not guilty to killing Calif. officer

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

MODESTO, Calif. — A man suspected of being in the country illegally has pleaded not guilty to killing a Northern California police officer during a traffic stop in a case that has rekindled a debate over California's sanctuary law that limits law enforcement's cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

An attorney for Paulo Virgen Mendoza entered the not guilty plea to a murder charge in Stanislaus Superior Court, the Modesto Bee reported Thursday. Mendoza is charged with fatally shooting Newman Police Officer Cpl. Ronil Singh on Dec. 26.

Investigators say Singh suspected Mendoza of drunken driving.

Authorities say Mendoza was in the country illegally and was fleeing back to his native Mexico when he was arrested two days after Singh's killing near Bakersfield.

President Donald Trump seized on the case to call for tougher border security amid a fight with congressional Democrats over funding for a border wall, which has forced a partial government shutdown.

The sheriff leading the investigation blamed California's sanctuary law for preventing local authorities from reporting Gustavo Perez Arriaga to U.S. immigration officials for two previous drunken driving arrests. If he had been deported, Stanislaus County Sheriff Adam Christianson said, Cpl. Ronil Singh of the tiny Newman Police Department would still be alive.

The case was put on hold in January to determine if Mendoza was mentally fit to stand trial. On Thursday, a judge determined he was competent to stand trial after Mendoza was examined by a psychiatrist.

Mendoza is still identified in Stanislaus County jail records as Gustavo Perez Arriaga, an alias that he used when arrested. But he's referred to in court by his given name.

Prosecutors say Mendoza is eligible for the death penalty.


Axon Partners with Border Patrol Foundation

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., April 12, 2019 - Axon (Nasdaq: AAXN), the global leader in connected public safety technologies, has announced a partnership with the Border Patrol Foundation, a non-profit organization that honors the memory of fallen US Border Patrol...

DNA Analysis Helps Lead to Arrest in 6-Year-Old California Homicide Case

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man was arrested Wednesday in connection with a six-year-old homicide case, the Yuba City Police Department said.

Man Charged In Death of CHP Officer Pleads Not Guilty to Murder

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prosecutors say Michael Callahan was drunk when he sped down the shoulder of the 15 Freeway and slammed into CHP Sgt. Steve Licon.

Good Samaritan Gets Help For Shooting Victim From Off-Duty Officer Working Movie Shoot

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Angel Ruiz says he found the man with gunshot wounds to his arms and torso and needed help getting him to a hospital.

CO Firefighter Hurt When Brush Truck Burns in Fire Station

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A brush truck, parked in a Commerce City fire station, caught fire, gutting it and damaging the station. One firefighter was sent to the hospital for smoke inhalation treatment.

Former PA Cop Accused of Stealing $315K from Firefighters’ Association

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lehigh Township Fireman's Relief Association claims a former Allentown police officer, who served as its treasurer, used funds to pay for personal expenses.

Son of LA Deputy Sheriff Arrested in Connection with Church Fires

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A suspect has been identified in connection with the three church burnings in Opelousas, Louisiana, and is in state custody.

Three WI EMTs Hurt in Ambulance Rollover Crash

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Sauk Prairie ambulance was on its way to another rollover crash when it apparently slide on icy roads, went on to the shoulder and rolled on to its side.

WI Fire Dept. UTV Destroyed in High Speed Chase

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mauston Fire Department's Utility Transport Vehicle, which was only about a month, fell through the ice while assisting police in chasing a suspect. It was damaged beyond repair.

Coffee Shop Owner Killed in NC Explosion Refused to Evacuate

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Durham fire officials said an evacuation was ordered prior to the explosion and everyone left the coffee shop except the owner.

Cars Crash into OR Sinkhole, Three People Hurt

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 50-foot section of Highway 42S in Bandon collapsed causing two cars to crash, sending three people to the hosptial for treatment.

MO Fire Department to Build New Fire Station on High School Campus in 2021

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Overland Park officials have estimated the new station will cost $5.18 million.

NJ Firefighters Burned Battling Bakery Blaze

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Jersey City firefighter and a captain suffered minor burns when a commercial bakery caught fire.

SC Fire Chiefs Go to High Schools Seeking Volunteer Firefighters

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The York and Clover school districts have new programs for students who want to become professional firefighters. The 18 departments in the county could use more volunteers, experts say, to meet the demand in growing areas.

Two FL Fire Stations Close Due to Poor Air Quality

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Riviera Beach officials moved firefighters out of its Singer Island station and sealed off part of its fire headquarters on Blue Heron Boulevard after tests indicated high concentrations of "unknown particulates" in the air.

Naked Women Lead Florida Troopers on High-Speed Pursuit

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The women led troopers on a high-speed chase across east Pasco, drove the wrong way, tried to drive over a trooper and one even attacked another with a metal baseball bat, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

New York Police Aviation Unit Struggling With Pilot Shortage

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Nassau County Police Department’s Aviation Unit is suffering from a shortage of helicopter pilots, Commissioner Patrick Ryder said.

Rhode Island Bomb Squad Wires Up Easter Eggs for Visually Impaired

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The more than 100 special Easter eggs wired up by the Rhode Island Bomb Squad on Thursday have a similar mixture of components as a typical bomb to make them beep.

Forth Worth Police Using BolaWrap to Make Arrests

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The BolaWrap is Kevlar cord ejected from a small device that will wrap around a suspect’s arms or legs and render the suspect temporarily incapable of free movement.

Dallas Police Officer Recalls Shooting That Killed Her Partner

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nearly a year after she was shot twice in the face and lost a close colleague while assisting with a shoplifting call, Dallas Police Officer Crystal Almeida spoke publicly for the first time.

Driver Charged With Reckless Homicide in Death of Illinois Trooper

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Craig W. Dittmar has been charged with two counts of reckless homicide in the March 28 death of Illinois State Trooper Brooke Jones-Story.

Florida Sheriff’s Deputy Lucky to be Alive After Bullet Punctures Baseball Cap

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Volusia County Sheriff's Sgt. Thomas Dane had a round from a .32-caliber handgun graze his skull after the bullet punctured his K-9 baseball cap in two places and cut through his scalp.

Wash. city fire department gets health, safety upgrades

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In an attempt to reduce the amount of diesel exhaust trapped in the station, a source-capture exhaust system is being installed to be used in the station’s five most-used bays

Ohio city schools launch firefighter career tech program

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Graduates could enter the workforce as emergency medical technicians or continue their education in Sinclair’s Fire Academy program

How the new American Paramedic Association focuses on providers

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our co-hosts discuss the new American Paramedic Association and its creation out of a need to represent the voices of paramedics in the field

San Francisco paramedic rescues surprise family member

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After answering a “career call,” a paramedic was surprised to learn that the woman she saved was a family member

Judge rules against religious firefighter, says he must shave beard

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Alexander Smith, a born-again Christian, says his beard is an expression of his religion and was seeking a ruling that would allow him to keep it

Fire captain arrested after dared to make naked 7-11 trip

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

John Walsh, 60, walked into a convenience store to purchase a Diet Coke completely naked, on a dare from his girlfriend

FDIC 2019 Quick Take: Deploy the fire/EMS RTF to active shooter/hostile events

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NFPA 3000 encourages fire/EMS to enter the warm zone with police, treat at the point of wounding and save more lives during a mass casualty incident

Medic Mindset Podcast: Thinking about Syncope

Posted on April 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Austin Travis County Deputy Medical Director Jason Pickett identifies syncope differential and the applications for spinal motion restriction and point of care ultrasound

Ky. county to pay $253K over claims of false billing

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A lawsuit claimed the ambulance service submitted more than 1,000 fake reimbursement claims to Medicare and Medicaid

Ky. county to pay $253K over claims of false billing

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A lawsuit claimed the ambulance service submitted more than 1,000 fake reimbursement claims to Medicare and Medicaid

Mental health pilot program to give first responders transport flexibility

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A new program would give fire and EMS personnel the ability to transport patients experiencing mental health distress to a specialized facility

Mental health pilot program to give first responders transport flexibility

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A new program would give fire and EMS personnel the ability to transport patients experiencing mental health distress to a specialized facility

10 great YouTube channels for cops

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

This may come as a shock, but there’s a wealth of excellent content for police officers on the internet in addition to what you can find on PoliceOne (we are the best, though). And out of every corner of the web, there’s no better place to find great stuff than on YouTube, which is why we’ve rounded up 10 of the best channels (in no particular order). Give them a try and share any we missed in the comments.

1. Mike The Cop

One of the most popular police humor channels run by an officer, Mike the Cop is arguably one of the pioneers of creating law enforcement content for the platform. Great when you just need a break and want to laugh.

2. Officer401

Officer401 offers tips, advice and general musings that all men and women in blue can enjoy, from lessons on how to be a supportive police spouse to leaving police work at work.

3. LEO Round Table

A panel of law enforcement professionals tackle hot topics in the news and industry. These videos tend to be deep dives into what’s currently capturing the attention of the LE community at large.

4. Officer Daniels

One of the OG police humor channels, you’ve probably heard of Officer Daniels. Another good one if you need a laugh.

5. Tier Talk

Tier Talk host and CorrectionsOne columnist Anthony Gangi features everything from roundtable news analysis to career advice and training tips on his channel. While primarily focused on issues in corrections, there’s a ton of content here that police officers should find interesting or useful.

6. Donut Operator

This list wouldn’t be complete without Donut Operator. One of the most popular LE channels, this one features a wide variety of content ranging from police history to cop humor.

7. The Firearm Blog

PoliceOne features content from TFB twice a month, but it barely scratches the surface of what the channel has to offer. From reviews of the latest products to looks at weapons throughout history, this is a great spot for gun enthusiasts.

8. Free Field Training

Made for both a law enforcement and general audience, Free Field Training features tons of gear reviews and tactical tips.

9. COPS

There’s enough material here to satisfy even the most hardcore fan’s COPS fix. You’re welcome.

10. Ultimate Survival Tips

Subscribe to this one for videos on all things tactical, survival tips and more.


Ind. county says ‘no’ again to request for third ambulance

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

For the second time in a month, the Floyd County Council declined to fund the purchase of a third ambulance, but EMS officials won't take no for an answer

Ind. county says ‘no’ again to request for third ambulance

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

For the second time in a month, the Floyd County Council declined to fund the purchase of a third ambulance, but EMS officials won't take no for an answer

3 EMTs injured during ambulance rollover

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Sauk Prairie ambulance was taking a curve when the combination of ice and harsh winds pushed it off the road

Fla. firefighter cancer coverage bill may die in the House

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

House Speaker José Oliva said that he believes the issue should be dealt with at the local level

Reader poll: 45% get in-service training on interacting with ASD subjects

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

This information comes from a recent PoliceOne poll. Polls are updated on the P1 homepage twice a month and open to all P1 readers. Make your voice heard HERE in our latest poll.

April is World Autism Month, and World Autism Awareness Day was held on April 2. In recognition of this, we asked our P1 readers last week if they’ve received in-service training on how to interact with individuals who have autism spectrum disorder. Here are the results:

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Unfortunately, this training appears to be lacking among those agencies represented in the poll – with only around 45% of officers saying they have received training and another 7% saying it’s in the works at their department.

With the increase in those affected by autism, it’s likely that you will have contact with an ASD subject at some point in your law enforcement career. Check out the following articles to educate yourself further on this issue:

Autism training for police officers: The basics of response

More kids with autism means more police contacts with ASD subjects

Autism FYI offers free training, app and more to law enforcement

3 steps toward understanding autism challenges during traffic stops

Ohio bill creates communication-disability registry for police

Have you had any contacts with ASD subjects in the field? If so, what were some of the challenges? Share your experience in the comments section, and don’t forget to weigh in on our latest poll.


Blasts, Large Fire Rock MI Welding Business

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Authorities evacuated homes and briefly shut down highways surrounding a large fire at an Ann Arbor-area welding business Thursday afternoon.

Ex-Denver Firefighter Charged over Spycam

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A former Denver fire lieutenant was charged Thursday with secretly planting a recording device in the changing room used by a female firefighter.

Patient Shoots Officer in South Carolina Hospital

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Greenville Health Authority Police Department confronted the man, and the suspect pulled out a gun and shot the officer. The officer returned fire.

Wanted woman’s Facebook taunts help police track her down

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

WAYNESBURG, Pa. — A wanted Pennsylvania woman who taunted a sheriff's department online by asking if they "do pick up or delivery" has gotten a response: They do both, and she's in custody.

Chloe Jones commented on a Facebook post by the Greene County Sheriff's Office featuring her as one of the county's most wanted, writing "Do you guys do pick up or delivery??" followed by four crying-laughing emojis. Police say she had failed to appear in court on assault charges.

She then got into arguments with other commenters and claimed she was at a hospital in Morgantown, West Virginia. Police there tracked her down this week, and she was extradited to Pennsylvania.

Court records don't say whether she has a lawyer to comment on her behalf.

The sheriff's office took to Facebook again to announce her arrest and add that Jones "and her witty comments are taking a hiatus from our Facebook comments section due to the jail not having internet for her to use."


Police: Suspect in church fires is son of LEO, dad helped arrange arrest

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Melinda Deslatte and Kevin McGill Associated Press

OPELOUSAS, La. — The suspect in a string of fires that destroyed three black churches in rural Louisiana is the white son of a sheriff's deputy whose father helped arrange for his arrest, authorities said Thursday.

Holden Matthews, 21, was jailed without bail on arson charges in connection with the blazes in and around Opelousas, a city of 16,000 where the flame-gutted remains of the buildings evoked memories of civil rights era violence.

Louisiana Fire Marshal Butch Browning offered no motive for the fires. He and other officials stopped short of calling them hate crimes. Eric Rommal, the agent in charge of the New Orleans FBI office, said investigators were still looking into whether the fires were "bias motivated."

Browning said there were no indications that anyone else was involved and the danger to churches was over.

"This community is safe again," he said at a news conference. "We are extremely, unequivocally confident that we have the person who is responsible for these tragic crimes."

The Rev. Harry Richard, pastor of Greater Union Baptist Church, which was destroyed, said the arrest put him at ease and let him sleep at night.

"I felt relieved my congregation didn't have to worry anymore," said Richard, who was told of the arrest late Wednesday. "I was reassured that law enforcement was on our side, that things were finally coming to an end."

Investigators used surveillance video, cellphone tracking and a Walmart receipt to help identify Matthews, who was arrested late Wednesday. They moved quickly, arresting him within 12 hours because they were worried that "other crimes were imminent," Browning said.

The charred remains of a red gas can recovered at one of the churches was sold at Walmart locations, and the company's investigators found that the same type of gas can was bought March 25 at a store in Opelousas, along with automotive cloths and a lighter.

The debit card used in that purchase belonged to Matthews, according to court documents.

"The purchase time on this receipt is less than three hours before the first church fire was reported," an affidavit said.

In addition, cellphone tower data showed Matthews was in the area of all three fires. Surveillance video from businesses and homes near the churches, and on the roads to and from each fire scene, repeatedly showed a "light colored extended-cab truck" that was consistent with the beige pickup that belonged to Matthews' father. Matthews apparently drove the truck to buy the gas can and other items, according to the court documents.

St. Landry Parish Sheriff Bobby Guidroz confirmed that the suspect was the son of deputy Roy Matthews, whom he described as an excellent employee who knew nothing of his son's actions.

The elder Matthews was heartbroken when told his son was a suspect, the sheriff said.

"He broke down," Guidroz said. "It was hard." He said the father arranged for the son to leave the house and go to a place where he could be arrested without incident. He did not elaborate.

The younger Matthews was arrested on three counts of arson of a religious building. A conviction could bring up to 15 years in prison on each count, Browning said.

The fires set many people on edge in and around Opelousas, about 140 miles northwest of New Orleans.

Gov. John Bel Edwards said the fires were "especially painful" because they were a reminder "of a very dark past of intimidation and fear."

"This is a reflection of one depraved individual," he added. "It is not a reflection on the state of Louisiana."

Matthews had shown interest in "black metal," an extreme subgenre of heavy metal, Browning said. The music has been linked, in some instances, to fires at Christian churches in Norway in the 1990s.

A Facebook page that appeared to belong to Matthews showed him with the words "black metal" spray painted on a wall behind him. He also posted a comment on a movie's portrayal of black metal musician Varg Vikernes, a far-right figure convicted of manslaughter and arson at three churches.

Black metal lyrics often espouse satanism and paganism, and a few bands feature neo-Nazi beliefs.

The fires happened over a 10-day period. The first blaze torched the St. Mary Baptist Church on March 26 in Port Barre, a town just outside of Opelousas. Days later, the Greater Union Baptist Church and Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in Opelousas were burned. Each was more than 100 years old.

The churches were empty at the time, and no one was injured. Investigators with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives were still combing the scene at Mount Pleasant and warning onlookers away on Wednesday, a week after the fire.

At Greater Union, which burned April 2, the flames caused exterior walls of brick and wood to collapse on rows of metal folding chairs. All that was left of an upright piano was the lattice work of steel strings.

Denzel Washington, a 23-year-old black resident of Opelousas, lamented the loss for the congregation that now has to rebuild.

"But what's the sense in hate? Forgiven. Forgive what he's done. It's not going to change nothing," he said.


TLR-VIR II Tactical Illuminator – Rail-mounted with an Infrared LED

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The TLR-VIR II is a lightweight, compact rail-mounted tactical light with a high intensity white LED, an integrated infrared (IR) LED illuminator, and Class 1 “Eye Safe” IR aiming laser with windage and elevation adjustment controls. The new light...

371 Fallen Officers to be Honored During Annual Police Week Vigil

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Included in the list are the names of 158 officers who were killed in the line of duty in 2018 and 213 officers who were killed in prior years but had been forgotten by time until the Memorial Fund’s research staff and a team of dedicated volunteers confirmed their record of law enforcement service.

Colorado Officer Shot in Both Legs, Suspect Dead in Gunfight

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Pueblo (CO) Police Department was shot in both legs and a suspect was shot and killed during a foot pursuit on Tuesday night.

Off-Duty NYPD Officer Dies in Motorcycle Accident on Way to Work

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer on his way to work lost control of his motorcycle and crashed into a guardrail. He was unconscious and unresponsive when he was found in the left shoulder of the freeway, and was transported a nearby hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

Video: Georgia Officer Dragged by Suspected DUI Driver

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Alpharetta Department of Public Safety was dragged by a suspected DUI driver earlier this month. The department released dash-cam video on Wednesday.

Pierce Mfg. Showcases Apparatus and Services at Indy Trade Show

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pierce Manufacturing today highlighted its extensive scope of apparatus and technology offerings, represented by the strongest dealer network in the industry, while also introducing expanded aftermarket support offerings.

SC Department of Natural Resources Selects FN 15 Patrol Carbine

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FN America, LLC has announced that the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources has selected a custom-designed FN 15 Patrol Carbine equipped with agency-selected upgrades.

Suspected DUI Driver Charged with Murder in Death of CHP Officer

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to NBC News, the suspected DUI driver—identified as 36-year-old Michael Joseph Callahan—pleaded not guilty during his arraignment on Wednesday.

New York Officer, K-9 Involved in Traffic Collision While Responding to Man-with-Gun Call

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Jared Domaracki and K-9 Lehner were responding to the call at approximately when another vehicle struck them at an intersection.

Rhode Island Officer Accused of Misconduct Cleared, Returns to Duty

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Providence (RI) Police Department who had been accused of involvement in a scheme to steal tires and rims from local vehicles has been found to have no involvement in the criminal activity.

Colorado Sheriff’s Office Releases Funny Video to Warn Drivers of Impending Blizzard

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two deputies with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office were seen in an amusing video sitting in lawn chairs and eating snacks beside the road of a freeway in their jurisdiction that tends to have foul-weather traffic collisions.

New York Officer Helps Save Life of Suicidal Man on Second Day on the Job

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers John Zonneveld and Angela Acierno responded to a call in which a man was threatening to jump from a freeway overpass. At the time, Zonneveld was training Acierno, who was on her second day on the job.

Small Town in Maine Faces Question of Disbanding Police Department

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The small coastal town of Gouldsboro will vote in June on whether or not to disband its Police Department.

Legally Blind Man Helps Texas Officers Apprehend Armed Suspect

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers Matthew Brazeal and David Woolbright had responded to a report of shots fired at a local bank. As the officers attempted to detain the subjects, a struggle ensued, and 57-year-old James Walker—who was leaving the bank with his service dog—leaped into the fray.

Border Patrol to Carry 5th Generation Glocks

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The contract calls for the replacement of existing .40-caliber duty handguns with 9mm Glock pistols by 2021.

Will your department thrive or be left behind in today’s data-driven world? (eBook)

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Sponsored by Axon

Technology is advancing at such a dizzying speed that it is a challenge for police leaders to stay knowledgeable about the latest developments and how they can transform LE operations. While the goal of technology in policing is simple – to improve situational awareness while delivering a unified, efficient workflow that frees officers from the burdens of administrative tasks – the procurement and implementation of the hardware and software to accomplish this can seem overwhelming.

This eBook provides an essential checklist for police leaders to follow to develop a customized total technology solution for their agency.

Download this free eBook to learn:

How your agency can build a build a digital roadmap and why you need one Best practices and pitfalls to avoid as your agency prepares to leverage artificial intelligence as a tool How to evaluate the efficacy of police training in a data-driven world How RMS platforms can boost policing productivity


X2 All-Natural Energy Partners with Indy Trade Show as Official Drink

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

X2 All-Natural Energy announced that it will serve as the Official Energy Drink of FDIC.

Motorola Solutions Updates CommandCentral Aware Software

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

To bring together and make sense of multiple data sources, Motorola Solutions has announced enhancements to CommandCentral Aware, its situational awareness application designed to provide one cohesive view of an incident as it unfolds.

Baltimore FD Budget Faces Council Hurdles

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Baltimore City Council says the fire department budget won't move forward without a "formal written plan" to address a medic shortage and overspending on overtime.

Sourcewell Adds Two Vendors to Wireless Technology Infrastructure Consultative Services Category

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sourcewell contracts are solicited across North America and competitively awarded on behalf of Sourcewell current and potential government and education member agencies.

Sourcewell

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Save time and money by combining the buying power of more than 50,000 government, education, and nonprofit organizations. Sourcewell holds hundreds of competitively solicited cooperative contracts ready for use.

CFSI and IFSTA Announce the 2019 Leadership Award Recipient

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On April 24-25, 2019, the Congressional Fire Services Institute (CFSI) will host the 31st Annual National Fire and Emergency Services Symposium and Dinner in Washington, DC.

(Video) The Dangers of Traffic Stops

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

LAPD Captain Greg Meyer (ret.) discusses some of the dangers to police officers present during traffic stops, and some of the tactics he teaches officers to help mitigate those dangers.

Son of Louisiana Sheriff’s Deputy Arrested in Connection With Fires at Historically Black Churches

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Holden Matthews has been arrested in connection with the fires at three historically black Baptist churches in St. Landry Parish.

Son of Louisiana Sheriff’s Deputy Arrested in Connection With Fires at Historically Black Churches

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Holden Matthews has been arrested in connection with the fires at three historically black Baptist churches in St. Landry Parish.

Hero Systems announces first purchase of HERODrag System

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By News Staff

CHICAGO, Ill. — Hero Systems, Inc. made the first sale of their new product, the HERODrag System, a victim immobilizing rescue system designed for quick, easy deployment and stabilization, to the Chicago Police Department.

Created by a veteran battalion chief of the Chicago Fire Department, the HERODrag System rescue device is compact, ultra-lightweight, foldable and consists of light, rigid plates allowing for “hands-free” transport by first responders into hostile environments with a carrying case or in firefighter turnout gear pockets.

Once opened, the HERODrag System includes five tie-down locations that can be secured with one buckle and three adjustments. Deployment of the rescue device and stabilization process can be completed in less than 30 seconds using the HERODrag System.

Field tested by police, the rescue device was determined to be a functional tool to pull injured officers away from dangerous scenarios when fire and EMS personnel are unable to reach them.

“The HERODrag is the perfect complement to our mass casualty response,” said Lt. Robert Stasch, commanding officer of the CPD’s Special Functions Detail Section. “The stretcher works as designed, allowing a single officer, if needed, to securely move an injured person over a variety of terrain features, including stairs and escalators in such a way that the injured person is immobilized from further injury. This a well-designed rescue stretcher and is an integral tool of the CPD’s Detail Section.”

Chicago Police Department Special Functions “Detail Section’s” primary responsibility is Homeland Security and crowd management at all major city special events.

Visit Hero R & B Fabrications April 8-13 in booth #3842 at FDIC 2019 for more information about the HERODrag System.


SlashPRO Cut Resistant Neck Guards

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

PPSS Group's SlashPRO® Cut Resistant Neck Guards were designed to help further improve the personal safety of homeland security professionals worldwide. This latest addition to this widely respected brand of slash resistant clothing...

How to get the most out of your LE career: Life after the badge

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jerrod Hardy
Author: Jerrod Hardy

As I prepare to step away from my career as a law enforcement officer after 21 years, I felt an overwhelming need to share my experience with as many others as possible.

For me, there have been four steps I have taken during my police career that has allowed me to leave physically and mentally fit so that I can enjoy the next phase of my life.

In my previous articles, I wrote about remembering your purpose, stress management and self-assessment. This month I address the fourth and final step: life after the badge.

Step Four: Life After the Badge

This is a hard topic to address and talk with inside an agency. If you start talking with people about your “what’s next” transition, you can easily be passed over for promotions or assignments and have your daily motivation questioned. It is almost tradition in law enforcement that you do not talk about your retirement plan and that you are expected to make a switch almost immediately. You go from being part of an agency, shift and team with all the associated structure, comradery and purpose to walking away over a set of normal days off. I recently had to deal with this after retiring in December 2018 and I can tell you my adjustment it is still a work in progress.

Here are several steps I used to prepare myself to make the transition from being active duty to retired:

1. Know what you want to do

Have a plan for how you will spend the new time available to you. There are only so many home improvement projects and chores to complete before you get bored.

Transitioning from a structured, systematic way of life to a completely unscheduled way of living is not for everyone. Many people end up missing the structure and purpose so much they retire for only a short period before returning to the same agency they left.

I have several small businesses I had invested in and had been running for the last few years of my career that now fill my time. Take steps to plan what you will be doing during your retirement prior to leaving your police career so that you can ease the transition from one life to the other.

2. Know what you are good at

This may seem obvious, but I am surprised by the number of people who have never given a thought to how their skills and interests they developed over their career translate to the civilian marketplace.

Not only are there many different fields that need workers with our skills, there is a lot of money to be made outside the government pay scale. The hard part is that we need to know where and how to look for the jobs and have a solid understanding of what we bring to the table!

I found this out first hand sitting at a negotiating table working on a business deal for my gym. On one of the breaks I was told, “You are strictly business when you negotiate, no emotion.” I thought about it for a moment to gather my response and realized that contract and business negotiations are much like handling a routine call for cops. You show up, listen to both sides of the disagreement, stay emotionally unattached to either story and listen for commonality. We know on any disturbance or dispute call, the truth of the matter is usually a combination of both people’s stories, not exclusively one or the other. Negotiating a contract is the same, stay emotionally unattached when you listen to their proposal, then offer yours, and realize the best deal for both parties is a combination of the two in the middle!

Whether you love reconstructing automobile crashes, dealing with credit card fraud or have an affinity for working with kids, there are insurance companies, banks and school districts that would love to have you and your skills on their team.

3. Know who you will spend time with

For the entirety of your police career you work with the same group of people day in and day out. You learn about their families, their interests and their annoying habits. You do this every day without conscious thought. Once you step out of the department doors for the last time, you now must schedule such meetings. Suddenly, people are too busy, do not have time and are constantly having conflicts arise so they must cancel on you.

This has been the hardest part of the journey so far for me. All the people you would run into as part of your daily walk to the break room, gym or restroom are no longer around. You must be intentional in developing your social network and make sure you spend time with people, avoiding falling into the habit of isolation. Sometimes as much as we dislike talking to some of the people on the job, it is these very interactions we find ourselves missing the most when our careers are over.

Conclusion

I hope this series helped provide you with some thought and options as you look to get the most out of your police career and all that it has to offer. Day to day and year to year, we receive fantastic training on the newest gadgets, tactics and procedures. However, far too often we neglect addressing our long-term emotional and mental survival that will set us up to be successful after our police careers are over.


4 tips for successful public safety retirement

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Author: Jerrod Hardy

This article is reprinted with permission from the Lexipol blog.

By Shannon Pieper

Retirement is a big change for any professional. But in public safety, it seems to hit even harder. Perhaps that’s because so many firefighters, police officers and corrections officers retire young, with many good working years ahead of them. The transition is also complicated by the fact that public safety work creates tightly knit communities of personnel held together by their sworn oath to protect the community and one another. Simply walking away from that level of intensity can be difficult.

Many former officers gravitate to second careers where they are still serving law enforcement. Following are four tips for those preparing for retirement from a public safety career from recently retired LEOs now working for Lexipol, which provides mission-critical content, policies and online training for public safety and local government.

1. Be prepared for an identity crisis

“The empty feeling is what surprised me the most,” says Jennie Pierce, a professional services representative for Lexipol and a former New Mexico State Police officer. “I truly felt as if I had lost my identity.”

Pierce is hardly alone. Many public safety employees experience a type of identity crisis when they leave the job.

“This is a family, your family, one you’ve never been without and never want to be without,” says Shirl Tyner, a Lexipol professional services representative with 25 years of experience as a civilian officer. “You’ll miss your partners, those you have worked beside and counted on, vented to, protected and leaned on, the ones who always had your back. And let’s not forget that adrenaline rush, hearing the dispatcher over the radio and the rush of getting to the call.”

Few people are prepared for such feelings. When Tyner presented a session on retirement at a recent public safety show, she was flooded with people thanking her because they had not considered the emotional repercussions of retirement.

“We retire with these giant egos from being on this rush for 20 to 30 years,” Pierce says. “It takes every ounce of strength you have to fill the void of the lifestyle and camaraderie. For me, it took about a year for the empty hole to close and for me to be okay with my new identity.”

Simply knowing such feelings are normal can help. But there are ways to reduce the emotional toll of public safety retirement. Mark Chamberlain, a training coordinator for Lexipol who retired as chief deputy of corrections for the Garland County (AR) Sheriff’s Office, notes that staying connected with the job is possible. “My biggest surprise was the people I worked with for so long have really kept in touch,” he says. “Not a week goes by when I don’t hear from someone back at the agency or from a fellow retiree. Social media has really helped in that regard.”

Developing outside interests long before retirement is also important. In a recent article, Chief (Ret.) Dan Fish explains that law enforcement officers often believe they must dedicate their entire lives to the job when, in fact, practicing self-care and cultivating outside interests can make them better at their jobs. “I believe having several different interests outside of work before retiring goes a long way in staving off issues of depression or feeling a lack of worthiness now that you’re no longer on the job,” Chamberlain says. Pierce agrees: “You have to make sure you have friends and hobbies outside of the job, or you won’t make it!”

2. Do your financial homework

Most public safety personnel retire with some sort of a pension, but it’s a huge mistake to assume retirement won’t bring financial changes. “Even with a pension, retirement requires a clear-eyed look at your finances,” Tyner says. “You may need to see a financial counselor and develop a budget that accounts for expenses such as travel and healthcare.”

Healthcare costs were something for which Chamberlain wished he’d been more prepared. “I knew the cost of health insurance would be a factor, but I did not anticipate how quickly it has risen in the six years since I left my agency, about a 17% increase,” he says. He stresses the importance of running the numbers in advance and educating yourself about your options: “I did a lot of financial comparisons in the months preceding my retirement. Many states offer several different retirement options, mostly concerning beneficiary benefits. I found that a robust life insurance policy, combined with the optimal monetary retirement benefit, worked out very well for me and my family.”

For Pierce, who obtained health insurance through her husband, performing some quick calculations provided stress relief until she found work with Lexipol. “I felt like I wasn’t providing for my family – I can’t just sit here and do nothing!” she says. “Then I figured out I only needed approximately $200 extra a month to make up the difference between my working paycheck and my retirement paycheck. I had a teaching gig doing court-ordered classes a few days a week when needed, so I knew I had the income balanced out. You need to understand your pension and insurance options, so you can figure out how to make it on your new fixed income.”

3. Position yourself to move into satisfying post-retirement employment

Closely related to financial planning is planning what you’ll do after retirement. Even with a pension, it’s likely you’ll need additional employment to maintain your lifestyle. Perhaps more importantly, traditional retirement activities – classes at the senior center, fishing, time with grandkids – are often not enough for public safety employees retiring from fast-paced careers in their 50s.

One important aspect to consider about working after retirement is what level of involvement you’re looking for. “If you are not careful, retirement can mean a second full-time career,” says Kevin Piper, recently retired from Lexipol after serving in several positions, including vice president of operations and who retired as captain for the city of Montclair, Calif., after 30 years in law enforcement. Of course, you may want a second career. But it’s important the job be fulfilling. “At this point, choose whatever you enjoy and want to do,” Piper says. “Don’t punish yourself in a retirement job. You should wake up each work day looking forward to the work you will be doing.”

Chamberlain points to two options when considering post-retirement employment. “One, do something completely different than what you were doing while working. If you were a police officer, go be an usher at a sports venue or the ranger at a golf course,” he says. “Or two, stay connected to public safety. I worked as a reserve deputy with my former agency for two years after I retired. It was great being a line officer again after having the pressures and stress of being a division commander for a decade. Lexipol has offered me the opportunity to do a little of both. I never dreamed I’d be teaching folks about software or web-based training!”

Another aspect is preparation. Pierce wanted and expected to work after retirement, but she found herself unprepared to move into the private sector. “I don’t have a bachelor’s degree, so I didn’t qualify for many jobs I was interested in,” she says. “I’d been an auto theft detective, so I figured I could do insurance fraud. No dice, not qualified. That was a letdown. I have an associate degree, I had an amazing career, I was only 42 years old – and no one wanted me.”

As Pierce experienced, a post-retirement job may require additional education – something best achieved long before you’re retired. “Look at the qualifications of jobs you’re interested in and make sure you prepare before retirement,” she says. “I didn’t look for a job until after I retired. I really should have gone back to school. I understand that now. I didn’t then.”

Piper also stresses the challenge of moving to the private sector.

“The number of job opportunities may surprise you,” he says, “but prepare for a shock in how the private sector operates.”

He provides the following suggestions:

Obtain training that relates to the job you anticipate holding in retirement; Network with private sector leaders and educators; Attend college-level business management courses; Work part-time pre-retirement in the field you anticipate working in prior to retirement. 4. Leave the job better than you found it

Leaving the job you love is never easy, but the transition can be smoother if you’re confident those who succeed you are prepared to build on the foundation you laid. For public safety leaders, a good place to start is with the agency’s policies. Comprehensive, up-to-date policies that truly reflect your practice provide a consistency of operations through leadership changes. If you’re a few years out from retirement and your policies are outdated or incomplete, committing to a full-scale policy review and implementation could make an ideal final project, a way to ensure your influence is felt for years after your departure.

Chamberlain and Piper also stress the need for strong succession planning in public safety.

“The transition plan for replacing you should go into effect prior to your departure,” Piper says. “Either train your replacement or ensure there is a transition plan that includes training.”

Chamberlain notes the importance of sharing your knowledge with those who take over after you leave.

“Keep your door open! Chances are, whoever replaces you did not have the same experiences you did during your career,” he says. “The last 30 years have brought about more significant changes in public safety than the preceding century. In-car computers, body cameras, homeland security, biological incidents and direct supervision are all terms that didn’t exist 30 years ago. We have lived through some of the most rapidly evolving stages of public safety in our nation’s history. We need to continue to mentor and support those who come after us. Offer to be a continued resource for your replacement.”

A New Chapter

Although your retirement story will depend on your specific circumstances, needs and goals, one thing is certain: “Retirement is a huge change,” says Pierce. “And you can either effect change or be affected by it.”

Whatever path you choose, remember that life after a public safety career can and should be challenging, fulfilling and rewarding. “You earned this retirement and you deserve to enjoy it,” Tyner says. “So, make it count! You love what you do, or you would not be doing it. You were born with a servant’s heart. How can you put that to work in your retirement?”


About the author Shannon Pieper is director of marketing communications for Lexipol and former editorial director for PennWell Public Safety.


U.S. Customs and Border Protection Selects GLOCK

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

GLOCK was awarded a contract to replace existing .40 caliber duty handguns with 9X19 pistols by 2021.

Are you ready for your third act? How cops can plan for retirement

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Jerrod Hardy

Whether you intend to pursue a second career after you retire from policing or just spend time on your hobbies, you should start to make plans three to five years before your anticipated retirement date. In this episode of LEO Round Table, host Chip DeBlock asks his guests how they successfully navigated the transition from active to retired cop.


Life after law enforcement

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dr. Brian Kinnaird
Author: Dr. Brian Kinnaird

Article first published on Psychology Today.

For a law enforcement officer, leaving active duty can be a difficult time. Whether or not the person freely chooses to leave, is forced to leave, medically retires, or just hits that “mark” of retirement, a strong camaraderie among fellow officers has been developed.

At some point, officers must be prepared to become civilians. A loss of police power and a feeling that one is no longer part of the cop family strongly accompanies the change. To leave this interpersonal web of protection is not easy and is likened to removing an integral part of your personality. In research conducted by police psychologist and author J.M. Violanti, an officer commented: “It’s like I belonged to a big club. I made my mark, I was one of the guys, I did my job. Everyone in the station respects you. Suddenly, all of that is gone and you are on the outside looking in. I felt so different. I called the guys almost everyday to see if they still related to me the same way. I visited the station, wondering what was going on and wanting to be part of the action. Somehow, it wasn’t the same. I wasn’t one of them anymore. It’s hard to explain. I left, but I couldn’t let go of this strong attachment.”

It is further suggested that officers continue to experience residual trauma even after separating from police service. A residual stress hypothesis proposes that prior trauma exposure leaves residual effects that are widespread, deep and long-lasting.

Consider that officers spend much of their time preparing for the worst. Day in and day out scenarios are played out in their minds. What if? On or off duty, training emphasizes the worst possible case scenarios and prepares officers to deal with that event only. As a result, they become occupationally and personally socialized into approaching situations with considerable suspicion, distrust and anxiety. They are hyper-energized, sensitive, irritable, tired and secreting various stress hormones when seemingly trying to relax on the sofa.

Although law enforcement is often routine, it’s also jumbled with quick cuts – responding to death, destruction, violence, interpersonal human aggression and within a confine of personal excitement – goodwill, compassion, indignation and vigilance. Officers can become addicted to this excitement and cannot function well without it when they separate from service.

An interesting hypothesis by police psychologist K.M. Gilmartin examines adrenaline as an addiction that may be a result of learned behavior. Police work creates a learned perceptual set that causes officers to alter the manner in which they interact with the environment. Statements by officers that “it gets into your blood” are illustrations describing a physiological change that becomes inseparable from the police role. An interpretation of the environment as always dangerous may reprogram the reticular activating system and set into motion physiological consequences. This is interpreted as feelings of energy, rapid thought patterns, and speeding up of cognitive and physical reactions.

The police subculture is another factor and pervasive microcosm in which a closed mini-society perpetuates a sense of strong cohesion, a code of silence and secrecy, and dependence upon one another for survival. Most research suggests that one of the major regrets of separated officers is that they no longer feel a part of the department. Separation and loss of support from the police group may serve to increase the already heightened physiological and psychological state associated with elements of post-traumatic stress disorder up to, and including, guilt.

Upon separation from active law enforcement, officers exposed to trauma will lose ready access to the group and may no longer be able to depend on other officers, the police agency, or police benevolent groups to reinforce a sense of understanding and recognition of their trauma. This is most significant for officers who retire with a disability. While others are in some mode of exit, the disabled officer is immediately “thrown” into a new life and one in which they are often ill-prepared to handle. There’s a great quote from the 2005 war movie “Jarhead”: “A man fires a rifle for many years. Then he goes to war. And afterward, he turns the rifle in to the armory and believes he is finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands – love a woman, build a house, change his son’s diaper – his hands remember the rifle.”

Another factor upon separation is adapting to new work. With such consistent exposure to trauma, cops devote psychic energy to deal with those traumas, often leaving them void of energy to direct towards other things. As as result, a lack of adequate and satisfying work for the trauma-exposed person has its emotional costs in family and friends.

Law enforcement officers will tell you that it is not a job or a career but a way of life – how they look at people, where they sit in restaurants, scanning locations and people, questioning their children and spouse, being suspicious and distrustful of others and hyper vigilant in the safety and security of loved ones. The pendulum will often swing “back” the other way and there are times of great depression, isolation and a sense of being lost that they had never felt before. In essence, many officers define themselves by their job.

The transition to civilianhood is not an easy one, even under the best of circumstances. Transitions are difficult in general. A new baby, divorce or a new relationship and marriage, a new home, a new boss, going back to school or even a new car. The old program is, in a strange sense “safe.” Change is uncomfortable, and no one likes to feel uncomfortable.

Finding relationships that substitute for the police subculture is necessary for officers when they leave (or are forced to leave). When a primary role is no longer there to occupy, they must spend time seeking out activities which structure their lives. Suggestions to buffer the anxiety and toxicity of unchecked post-separation fallout include:

    Use family and friends as support structures; Use department-offered or local mental health services (you’re only as sick as your secrets); Maintain ties with your agency (auxiliary or special duty work); Maintain ties with your police colleagues (coffee, get-togethers); Enjoy a hobby or activity that gives you personal satisfaction and meaning; Be a guest speaker at a police academy (become a point of reference); Write articles or blogs for the law enforcement community; Teach criminal justice at a local college; Enjoy a second career completely outside of law enforcement.

When a law enforcement officer leaves the “job” for another life, some are pleased and yet others will wonder. They know that after a career of camaraderie that few experience, it will remain as a longing and nostalgic outlet for those past times. We know in the law enforcement life there is a fellowship that lasts long after the badge, gun and uniforms have been turned in. Even so, they will be with them every step and breath that remains in their frame.

Vocatio is Latin for “to call.” The burdens of the job are ones claimed by cops who have accepted such a call. Although you will still look at people suspiciously, will see what others do not see (or choose to ignore), you will always look at the rest of the law enforcement world with respect for what they do – accomplished only by a lifetime of knowing.

Copyright © 2007-2019 by Dr. Brian A. Kinnaird. Reprinted with permission by the author.

For more articles, visit The Hero in You column at Psychology Today. For law enforcement-related books, articles, networking, training, or speaking opportunities, contact Brian Kinnaird at brian.kinnaird@gmail.com.

References & Suggested Readings
    Figley CR. Psychological adjustment among Vietnam veterans: an overview of the research. In C.R. Figley (Ed) Stress Disorders Among Vietnam Veterans-Theory, research, and treatment. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1978. Gilmartin KM. Hypervigilance: A learned perceptual set and its consequences on police stress. In J.T. Reese and H.A. Goldstein (Eds) Psychological Services for Law Enforcement, (pp 443-446). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1986. Jarhead. Don Michael Paul. Universal Pictures, 2005. Violanti JM. Traumatic stress in critical occupations: Recognitions, Consequences, and Treatment. Charles C. Thomas Publisher, 1997. Violanti JM. Police Retirement: The impact of change. Springfield, Illinois: Thomas, 1992.

Wis. K-9 continues recovery from stabbing

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By PoliceOne Staff

GREEN BAY, Wis. - A K-9 who was critically stabbed during an arrest last Sunday is recovering.

According to ABC 15, Pyro is in rehab at an animal center with medical staff giving him around-the-clock care. Officer Scott Salzmann, Pyro’s handler, has reportedly been sleeping at the center for the past few days to help him recover.

Pyro was stabbed by a suspect after the K-9 bit him during an arrest, according to a police report. The K-9 was sent to an animal hospital where he endured multiple surgeries.

Since his surgeries, Pyro has been making small strides to recovery. Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt presented Pyro with a rare “Key to the City” on Tuesday.

Good Morning Titletown. Please keep our K-9 Officer Pyro in your thoughts and prayers today. He is continuing to...

Posted by Green Bay Police Department on Monday, April 8, 2019


New technology helps SWAT make arrest without injuring suspect or LEOs

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Mitch Mitchell Fort Worth Star-Telegram

FORT WORTH — It’s a tool that will not work for all arrests in all situations, police say.

But in the right circumstances, the BolaWrap can be a nonlethal and painless way to ensnare an individual who in the past might have required police to use more drastic measures.

The BolaWrap is Kevlar cord ejected from a small device that will wrap around a suspect’s arms or legs and render the suspect temporarily incapable of free movement, Fort Worth police Lt. Todd Plowman explained.

SWAT officers used the tool during a barricaded person call at the Willow Glen Apartment complex, 1301 Sycamore School Road in south Fort Worth, on Saturday, Plowman said. A man with a shotgun was threatening to harm a woman and her mother, Plowman said.

The SWAT officers deployed a quick evaporating chemical agent that forced the suspect outside the apartment, and once he was outside, used the BolaWrap to ensnare him, Plowman said. The suspect left the shotgun inside the apartment, Plowman said. Once the suspect was immobilized, officers were able to move quickly to complete the arrest, Plowman said.

“We are trying to prevent escalation on the part of the officer and on the part of the suspect,” Plowman said.

During a demonstration exercise, SWAT Officer Daniel McCreery used the BolaWrap to lasso Deputy Chief Ty Hadsell. The tool consists of 8 feet of Kevlar cord that is shot from a canister at a range of 10 to 25 feet away from the target, McCreery said.

Barbs at either end of the cord grab hold of the target as the wire wraps tightly around the suspect’s arms or legs, making movement difficult if not impossible.

“The only way we’re going to hurt someone is if the barbs go into someone’s skin,” McCreery said. “And even then it’s not going to hurt that much. We don’t want to hurt anyone.”

The woman and her mother were able to free themselves from the situation before the suspect barricaded himself inside the apartment, according to authorities.

Fort Worth is believed to be the first police department to deploy the tool during an arrest.

“This is an example of the importance of providing the right tools for police officers for the right situations. The BolaWrap 100 was able to be deployed from a distance to assist S.W.A.T. officers in the apprehension, while minimizing injury to the suspect,” according to a statement from Michael Rothans, chief operating officer at Wrap Technologies, the company that makes the BolaWrap.

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©2019 the Fort Worth Star-Telegram


MN Fire Chief Demoted after DUI Arrest

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Duluth Fire Chief Dennis Edwards submitted a letter of resignation and accepted a demotion to assistant chief following his arrest on DUI charges.

MN Fire Chief Demoted after DUI Arrest

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Duluth Fire Chief Dennis Edwards submitted a letter of resignation and accepted a demotion to assistant chief following his arrest on DUI charges.

Staffing Review Follows MA Overtime Scam

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Amesbury Fire Department will undergo a staffing review in the wake of a multi-year overtime scam that was uncovered last year.

Staffing Review Follows MA Overtime Scam

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Amesbury Fire Department will undergo a staffing review in the wake of a multi-year overtime scam that was uncovered last year.

FLIR Announces its Most Affordable Thermal Imaging Camera for First Responders

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At $599, the K1 detects heat and provides visibility through smoke and in total darkness to enhance situational awareness for use in wildland fire control, search and rescue missions, structure damage evaluation, and investigative work.

FLIR Announces its Most Affordable Thermal Imaging Camera for First Responders

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At $599, the K1 detects heat and provides visibility through smoke and in total darkness to enhance situational awareness for use in wildland fire control, search and rescue missions, structure damage evaluation, and investigative work.

South Carolina Police Officer, Gunman Wounded in Shooting Inside Hospital

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Greenville Health Authority police officer confronted the man, who was in the hospital for some type of treatment, early Thursday morning when the suspect pulled out a gun and shot the officer, who was able to return fire.

OH Chief Makes Case for Charging on Calls

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Youngstown Fire Chief Barry Finley is pushing a plan to charge residents for fire-related responses, which could generate $215,000 in revenue annually.

Middlebush, NJ, Vol. Fire Dept. Puts Engine 1 in Service

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Middlebush Volunteer Fire Department, protecting Franklin Township, NJ, has placed into service a 2018 Spartan ERV pumper.

TX Crews Face Hose Issues at Fatal Fire

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Kirby firefighters were unable to use their largest hoses at a fatal fire last Friday because the threads on their adapters did not fit the fire hydrants.

FL Firefighters Frustrated Awaiting Cancer Bill

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters are frustrated by the lack of progress in the Florida House on a bill that would provide protections for families of firefighters with cancer.

Ex-TX Firefighters Question Fatal Fire Response

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Former Leon Valley firefighters are raising questions about what they call a mishandled response to a fire last July that killed a 31-year-old woman.

CA Hearing Delay Extends VFD Standoff

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The standoff in Julian between the community's volunteer fire department and San Diego County will continue until at least next week.

Nude Dare Lands MA Firefighter On Leave

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Lynnfield fire captain has been placed on paid leave after walking into a 7-11 store naked and buying a Coca-Cola on a dare from his girlfriend.

MI City to Launch Its Own Fire Department

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The City of Grand Blanc will begin providing fire protection services July 25, departing from a decades-long partnership with Grand Blanc Township.

Gusty, Dusty Weather Keeps TX Crews Busy

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Strong winds, blowing dust and dry conditions were blamed for numerous crashes and made firefighting efforts more difficult Wednesday around Lubbock.

Polaris presents Fire and Rescue RANGER, PRO XD, GEM and Taylor-Dunn Vehicles at FDIC

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The vehicles deliver on- and off-road, in- and outdoor, gas, diesel and electric options

HURST Jaws of Life to demonstrate eDRAULIC tools on Tesla-donated cars

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rescue specialists will showcase best practices and battery-powered tool performance

Calif. seeks death penalty in ‘Golden State Killer’ case

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California prosecutors announced Wednesday they will seek the death penalty if they convict the man suspected of being the notorious "Golden State Killer" who eluded capture for decades.

The move comes less than a month after Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a moratorium on executing any of the 737 inmates on the nation's largest death row. Newsom's reprieve lasts only so long as he is governor and does not prevent prosecutors from seeking nor judges and juries from imposing death sentences.

Prosecutors from four counties briefly announced their decision during a short court hearing for Joseph DeAngelo. He was arrested a year ago based on DNA evidence linking him to at least 13 murders and more than 50 rapes across California in the 1970s and '80s.

He stood expressionless in an orange jail uniform, staring forward from a courtroom cage, as prosecutors from Sacramento, Santa Barbara, Orange and Ventura spoke. Although prosecutors from six counties were in court for the four-minute hearing, charges in those four counties include the special circumstances that could merit execution for 12 of the 13 murders under California law.

His attorney, public defender Diane Howard, criticized seeking the death penalty against a 73-year-old man, saying in an email that the decision "does not further justice and is wasteful."

With a multicounty prosecution team including more than 30 people, she cited a Sacramento County estimate that the prosecution will cost taxpayers more than $20 million.

DeAngelo has yet to enter a plea and his trial is likely years away.

Prosecutors wouldn't comment after the hearing, but Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer said several prosecutors and family members of murder victims planned a Thursday news conference to denounce Newsom's moratorium. An announcement from Spitzer's office said victims' families "will share their stories of losing their loved ones and how the governor's moratorium has devastated their pursuit of justice."

The serial killer would sneak into suburban homes at night, authorities said. If a couple was home, he would tie up the man, place dishes on his back and threaten to kill both victims if he heard the plates fall while he raped the woman.

"These are horrific crimes. Our sympathies are with the victims and families who have suffered at the hands of the Golden State Killer," Newsom spokesman Brian Ferguson said in a statement acknowledging that the governor's executive order does not affect the ability of local prosecutors to make charging decisions.

California has not executed anyone since 2006, but Newsom said he acted last month because 25 inmates have exhausted their appeals and court challenges to the state's new lethal injection process are potentially nearing their end. He endorsed a repeal of capital punishment but said he could not in good conscious allow executions to resume in the meantime knowing that some innocent inmates could die.

He also said he is exploring ways to commute death sentences, which would permanently end the chance of executions, though he cannot act without permission from the state Supreme Court in many cases.

"The death penalty does serve as a deterrent," Ron Harrington, older brother of Golden State Killer victim Patrick Harrington, said after witnessing Wednesday's announcement. "Unfortunately now our governor has decided to interpose his own personal opinion regarding the death penalty."

Newsom's announcement "places decisions that local prosecutors make in a different light," said Death Penalty Information Center executive director Robert Dunham, whose organization has been critical of how the penalty is administered. Decisions should be made on the facts "and not on their perception of gaining political points by opposing the governor."

Voters narrowly supported capital punishment in 2012 and 2016, when they voted to speed up executions by shortening appeals.

Criminal Justice Legal Foundation legal director Kent Scheidegger said prosecutors' decision made sense despite Newsom's moratorium.

"It's a perfect example of a killer for whom anything less would not be justice," said Scheidegger, who is fighting in court to resume executions. "I think it's entirely appropriate for DAs to continue seeking the death penalty in appropriate cases, because the actual execution will be well down the road and the governor's reprieve won't be in effect by then. Something else will have happened."


Officer, suspect wounded in shooting at SC hospital

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

CLINTON, S.C. — The South Carolina State Law Enforcement Department says a gunman and a health systems police officer have been wounded by gunfire inside a hospital.

News outlets report it happened at about 2 a.m. Thursday at Laurens County Memorial Hospital in Clinton.

SLED spokesman Thom Berry says the suspect was being treated when he shot the officer and tried to flee. The officer returned fire. Their conditions are unclear.

This was the second shooting inside a South Carolina hospital in two days. Authorities said an armed man seeking mental health treatment was turned away and disarmed Tuesday, only to show up with another gun Wednesday and shoot a nurse at the Regional Medical Center in Orangeburg. That suspect was arrested and the nurse was in critical condition.


Florida Deputy Running in Boston Marathon for Charity

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Volusia County Sheriff's deputy is running in the Boston Marathon for charity.

Carjacking Suspects Arrested After Shootout With Denver Police Officers

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The shootout happened at 16th and Quebec in Denver following a police pursuit.

California Police Pursuit, SWAT Standoff Ends With Arrest

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man was taken into custody following a pursuit and SWAT standoff in Rancho Cucamonga Wednesday.

Death Penalty Sought for Golden State Killer Suspect

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. is suspected of raping some 50 women and holding entire families hostage during a reign of terror throughout the state in the late 1970s, then progressing to murder.

Jurors in Trial of Former Minneapolis Police Officer Hear 911 Call, See Photos From Crime Scene

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor, who is charged with killing Justine Ruszczyk Damond on July 15, 2017 after responding to her call about a possible rape behind her home.

U.S. Congressman: FOP is the ‘Sworn Enemy of Black People’

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush blamed Chicago’s Fraternal Order of Police for a Monday confrontation over the Jussie Smollett case that displayed some of the city’s racial and political divisions.

Two Women Were Shot During Vigil for Slain Rapper in L.A.

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Los Angeles police suspect that a gunman tried to kill another person at a vigil outside Nipsey Hussle’s store, another burst of violence in the same spot where the rapper was fatally shot the day before.

Colorado State Patrol Trooper Injured After Snowy Crash

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Colorado State Patrol trooper was injured in a collision in southwestern Colorado on Wednesday as wintry weather hit the area.

Indiana Police Discover the Remains of Missing Woman

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Avon Police Department held a press conference Wednesday afternoon to confirm the human remains found at a pond in Crown Point, were in fact, 30-year-old Najah Ferrell.

LAPD Data Program Draws Scrutiny

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Los Angeles Police Department pioneered the use of data to pinpoint crime hot spots.

ePCR implementation: Changing a hard-copy culture

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New York EMS volunteers swap paper reports for digital documentation

First responders escort 6-year-old daughter of fallen firefighter to school

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighter-EMT Nikki Sullivan died after a long battle with occupational cancer, and first responders escorted her daughter to school on the last engine her mother rode on

Ky. firefighter honored for helping save man’s life

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Shawn Rogers, who just received the plaque, said he likes being involved in the community and helping out when the opportunity arises

Mich. city to start own fire department

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The move comes after Grand Blanc township officials decided to end its joint relationship with the city for fire services

Wash. fire department forms in-house training program

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Instructors tout the inaugural program as cost-effective, incorporative of department-specific techniques and convenient for recruits

Pa. city offering volunteer firefighters, EMS tax credit

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The volunteer service tax credit program was created by state Act 172

Pa. city offering volunteer firefighters, EMS tax credit

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The volunteer service tax credit program was created by state Act 172

MedFlight base closure leads to primary provider change in Ala. county

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“After a thorough review and analysis of the area, and confirmation that the community needs can be fulfilled by our other area bases and aircraft"

Hero Systems announces first purchase of HERODrag System

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Chicago Police Department is the first owner of The HERODrag System, a victim immobilizing rescue system designed for quick, easy deployment and stabilization

Hero Systems announces first purchase of HERODrag System

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Chicago Police Department is the first owner of The HERODrag System, a victim immobilizing rescue system designed for quick, easy deployment and stabilization

Kan. EMS agency hosts 2nd “Day In Our Life” billing workshop

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The annual workshop brings together care providers and billing professionals to “emphasize care beyond transport”

Authorities: 25 injured in NC gas explosion, including 9 FFs

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Durham Deputy Fire Chief Chris Iannuzzi said eight more firefighters were treated at a hospital, in addition to the one who underwent surgery

NAEMT names Ill. Sen. Dick Durbin EMS Legislator of the Year

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians honored Sen. Dick Durbin for his legislative work on behalf of rural EMS providers

NAEMT names Ill. Sen. Dick Durbin EMS Legislator of the Year

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians honored Sen. Dick Durbin for his legislative work on behalf of rural EMS providers

Super Vac introduces DeWalt fan with universal lithium ion batteries

Posted on April 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The fan uses the same lithium ion batteries as those used in the Dewalt or Milwaukee lineup of power tools

How one EMS agency found its body armor solution

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Propper made it easy to find the right fit for EMS providers, says an operations chief with an ambulance district outside St. Louis

FDIC 2019 Quick Take: Building a fire service legacy

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Use your passion to inspire greatness in moments big and small to leave your mark on the fire service

TargetSolutions Presents New Innovations for Workforce and Operations Management at Trade Show

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

TargetSolutions will be presenting new innovations for workforce and operations management at FDIC International 2019.

CA Legislation to Change Lethal Force Justification Passes Committee Hearing

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The bill’s main author, Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, said AB 392 prevents “unnecessary deaths” by “clarifying law enforcement’s obligations.” Weber’s team said the legislation would push officers to rely on de-escalation techniques like verbal persuasion and crisis intervention methods instead of lethal force.

LAPD to Dump Program that Uses Data to ID Likely Offenders

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore plans to scrap a controversial program that uses data to identify individuals who are most likely to commit violent crimes, bowing to criticism included in an audit and by privacy groups.

Stevens 555 Enhanced 16-gauge Shotgun

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Stevens’ 555 Enhanced doles out world-class over-and-under performance — and now does it in 16-gauge.The field- and trap-tested platform is light and handles fast, thanks to a lightweight aluminum receiver that’s scaled to gauge and reinforced...

First Responder/School App Featured With Green Bay PD

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Local ABC TV News Affiliate Airs Report about ReadyOp Communications, Inc.

Wife of Slain CA Officer Slams Presidential Candidate Kamala Harris for Death Penalty Decision

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Asked whether she regrets not speaking to the family before announcing the death penalty would not be sought, Harris said, "I did not ask for permission to make my decision."

LEOs donate their own money to landscaper whose car, tools were stolen

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff SANTA ANA, Calif. — After learning of a man down on his luck, a few officers pitched in to make his day better.

According to CNN, Adrian Salgado, a gardener, was getting ready for work when two thieves hijacked his pickup truck and stole around $3,000 worth of possessions. Along with his truck, $1,000 in cash that he was going to use for rent, his cell phone, leaf blower, hand tools and a mower were stolen.

After learning what happened, Salgado’s daughter reported the incident to police.

Police were able to find the truck and arrest the two men, who each had $500 in their pockets, but officers couldn’t prove it wasn’t their money and weren’t able to return it to Salgado. Most of the equipment was also gone.

That’s when Officer Lysette Murillo came up with an idea to donate their own money to help Salgado replace some of his stolen items.

After officers raised $500, Murillo contacted Santa Ana Officers Association President Gerry Serrano, who donated another $500. Seven officers then went to Home Depot to purchase replacement items. The store ended up donating another $100 and a shopper donated another $40 after learning what the officers were doing.

After Salgado got the items, he immediately returned to work, which “floored everyone,” according to Santa Ana Police Sgt. Michael Gonzalez, who told CNN Salgado reminded him and some of his colleagues of their own fathers.

"We all came from working-class families," Gonzalez told CNN. "It was like, 'hey, that's my dad.’"

SAPD Recover Stolen Landscape Truck Via Phone App

On 27 March 2019, between 11 am - 12 pm, a local man's landscape vehicle was stolen with all of his tools, cash for rent, and a cell phone. Total value estimated at $3k. The man is the sole provider for his family; his daughter called SAPD and reported the crime. Patrol Officers started pursuing the vehicle through an app on the iPhone and were able to locate the truck. The suspects were unwilling to cooperate thus reluctant to provide the location of his property. The Santa Ana Police Officers Association donated funds, and officers escorted the gentleman to purchase new equipment. #sapoa31strong#31strong #santaanapolicedepartment @sapoa31strong

Posted by Santa Ana Police Officers Association on Wednesday, March 27, 2019


First responder #LipSyncChallenge comes to television

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By News Staff

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — A new lip sync battle competition featuring first responders will air on CBS later this year, hosted by Cedric the Entertainer.

Following up on the success of last year’s viral #LipSyncChallenge sensation, “Lip Sync to the Rescue” will give first responders another chance to perform their favorite songs and show off their dancing skills.

“Lip Sync to the Rescue” will air the top 10 user-submitted videos based on online voting during a one-hour special later this year filmed in front of an audience of first responders. The top two videos will then go head-to-head with a live vote during the broadcast, with one organization crowned the winner.

“When CBS first approached us with the idea for a special, we had no idea how deep the vault was of Lip Sync Challenge videos,” Robert Horowitz, president of Juma Entertainment, said in a press release. “Soon, we uncovered video after video, quickly realizing this phenomenon spread to first responder departments in all 50 states. What made me believe we had a hit on our hands was the incredible performances and production value each video seemed to have.”

First responders wishing to submit a video should email their submission to LS2Rescue@gmail.com by Friday, April 12.

Ready for some fun? ?? New interactive countdown special "Lip Sync To The Rescue" is set to be hosted by @CedEntertainer later this year. Learn how you can vote on your favorite performance: https://t.co/embDrDbCOI pic.twitter.com/khD0lhFVr2

— CBS (@CBS) April 2, 2019

“I am so excited to announce that I will be hosting the new entertainment special LIP SYNC TO THE RESCUE, inspired by the viral video sensation #LipSyncChallenge, airing later this year… https://t.co/pP7KUorKYh

— CedricTheEntertainer (@CedEntertainer) April 2, 2019


MA Police Argue Against Movement to Raise Age Limit for Juvenile Legal Status

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

If we raise the age to 19 or 20, then why not 21, 22, 23, 24 or even 25?” said Kyes, president of the Massachusetts Major City Police Chiefs Association. “It is a slippery slope.”

Video: Police Union President Slams Portland City Council for Anti-Cop Sentiment

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Turner said the reason PPB is understaffed is because of the "intense anti-police sentiment in our city, that city council seems to share."

TEXTECH to Offer Free CARBONX Hood Swap, New Products at Indy Trade Show

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

To thank our nation’s heroes for their bravery and help ensure they are highly protected when called upon next time to battle a fire—whether structural or wildland—TexTech Industries is offering free hood swaps at FDIC International.

Woman Driving to Waffle House on Electric Shopping Cart Arrested by Police on TN Highway

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police say Sally Selby took an electric shopping cart from a local Walmart store early Friday morning and drove it down Highway 127 in the slow lane. Police pursued at very low speed.

5 Colorado Teens Accused of Ambushing Officer with Chlorine Bomb

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Grahn and a civilian worked to clear the street when they were attacked with the chemical device. The gas reportedly caused the officer to lose consciousness.

Footprint Situational Awareness Software

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Available through Copp Integrated Systems, one of the licensees of the software, Footprint is a web-based situational awareness software that is capable of aggregating, analyzing and monitoring data from multiple video monitoring systems and other...

TX Department Approved for New Apparatus

Posted on April 10, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"We need good, safe, dependable equipment for us to do our jobs effectively," an Athens firefighter said about the city's decision to replace a 2008 vehicle.

BJA body-worn camera grants for FY 2019 announced

Posted on