Video Shows Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Dragged by Fleeing Car

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Florida Highway Patrol trooper was dragged about 100 feet from a car fleeing a traffic stop early this morning, according to FHP officials, and one person now faces a charge of attempted first-degree murder.

Nebraska Trooper Killed in Head-On Crash

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nebraska State Patrol Trooper Jerry L. Smith was traveling on Highway 26 in Morrill County Thursday morning when another vehicle crossed the center line and struck his patrol car.

PA Fire Departments Merge over FF Shortage

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The merger between West Hills Regional Fire Department and the Westwood Volunteer Fire Company was prompted by a shortage of volunteer firefighters.

Wilson Electronics Announces Release of New Vehicular Cellular Signal Booster

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Compatible with all mobile phones and wireless carriers in North America, it allows users to enjoy strong call quality, fewer dead zones and faster data upload/download speeds while on the road.

Parents, Kids Pull Out of OH Fire Cadets Program

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The resignations from the Mad River Township Fire and EMS cadet program are part of the fallout over the department's hiring practices, which led to firefighter walkouts.

The All-Weather Thin Blue Line Notebook

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Through hostile interactions and hostile weather, the men and women of law enforcement diligently work to maintain civility and peace in society. The Thin Blue Line Notebook honors the law enforcement community and attends to their needs in field...

Safe Fleet Fire EMS and Industrial Announces Promotions

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Each individual will continue to focus on the Safe Fleet Fire, EMS, and Industrial Market brands; FRC, Elkhart Brass, FoamPro, and R•O•M.

Outpouring of Support After California Officer Shot, Killed in Ambush

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Sacramento Police Department who was shot by a gunman at a domestic violence call on Wednesday night has died from her wounds, and agency leaders, elected officials, and individual citizens have all shown their deep condolences in online comments.

Lake Assault Boats Names Exclusive Service Center for NC

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ed Watkins Marine of Denver, North Carolina is now the service center for Lake Assault Boats vessels in North Carolina.

Firefighter

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The City of Bowling Green, KY, is accepting applications for the position of firefighter.

Off-Duty Ohio Deputy Dies Suddenly, Reportedly of Natural Causes

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A deputy with the Montgomery County (OH) Sheriff's Office died suddenly on Wednesday, the agency announced on its Facebook page.

Video: LAPD Motor Officer Thrown from Motorcycle in Collision with SUV

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A motor officer with the Los Angeles Police Department was thrown from his motorcycle in a collision with an SUV and the entire event was captured on dramatic video.

Alabama Officer in ICU After Rattle Snake Bite

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Greenville (AL) Police Department was hospitalized Monday after being bitten by a rattle snake.

More than 70 Philadelphia Officers Placed on Desk Duty Following Facebook Posts

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 70 officers with the Philadelphia Police Department have been placed on desk duty while the agency conducts an internal investigation into hundreds of officers' social media posts.

Suspect Who Killed Officer by Running Red Light had 4 Previous DUI Infractions

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The man who is suspected of running a red light and killing an off-duty Milwaukee police officer in a traffic collision at an intersection on Tuesday morning had four previous OWI convictions, including one in May 2017 for which he was still on probation.

Florida Officer Who Shot Caregiver of Autistic Man Found Guilty of Negligence

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the North Miami Police Department was found guilty of culpable negligence—a misdemeanor—but not guilty of other felony charges in a 2016 incident involving an Autistic subject and his caregiver.

CT Firefighter, Paramedic Save Woman in Compactor

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The woman is in critical condition after she was almost crushed in a store trash compactor before she was rescued by a New London firefighter and hospital paramedic.

Houston Chief Criticizes Judges, DA for Lenient Sentences for Violent Offenders

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo expressed frustration over the practice of deferred adjudication, in which defendants can plead guilty of a crime and be given a sentence of probation. When the probation period is successfully completed, the case is dismissed.

Motorist Thanks Virginia State Police Officer on Facebook for Changing Her Tire

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Virginia State Police received some gratitude from a stranded motorist after he changed the left rear tire of her minivan.

Florida Police Officer Acquitted of Attempted Manslaughter

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Jonathan Aledda was instead convicted of a misdemeanor count of culpable negligence, which carries a penalty of up to one year behind bars.

Shot Mo. LEO meets good Samaritans who helped her

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By News Staff

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An officer who was shot last week while transporting an inmate met the two good Samaritans who helped her during her time of need.

According to local news station KSHB, Officer Jasmine Diab was able to meet her two heroes, Rich Shannon and Jason Gamm, on Tuesday.

Diab was transporting 38-year-old inmate Jamey Griffin to a local hospital for a mental evaluation when Griffin tried to grab Diab’s handgun. Diab was shot during the incident.

The officer said Shannon and Gamm helped get the attacker offr and that she may have died from blood loss if it wasn’t for them stepping in to help.

In a Facebook post, Diab thanked the heroes and everyone else for their support.

“I may be a hero, but these two will always be my heroes,” Diab said.

A GoFundMe page has been created to help with the officer’s expenses.

First off I'd like to thank everyone for this support through this emotional tragedy I've been going through. It means...

Posted by Jasmine Diab on Tuesday, June 18, 2019


Two Chicago Police Officers Cleared in Controversial Shooting

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two police officers have been cleared of wrongdoing in the fatal shooting of an African American man in the Mount Greenwood neighborhood that sparked days of protests and unrest.

Video Released of Los Angeles Deputy-Involved Shooting

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department released a video Thursday morning of the shooting of a 24-year-old man in the parking lot of a Willowbrook apartment complex earlier this month, saying that the car involved in the incident was used as a weapon.

Alabama Police Officer in ICU After Being Bitten by Rattlesnake

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Greenville Police Officer Marissa Morrison has been in the ICU at Jackson Hospital in Montgomery since early Monday morning and has received 16 vials of antivenin.

NC bill directing immigration holds advances

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Amid accusations of extreme ideology and racism, North Carolina Republican lawmakers advanced a bill Wednesday that would force sheriffs to recognize federal requests to hold jail inmates who may be in the country illegally.

Nearly all of the state's 100 county sheriffs voluntarily comply with Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers upon people charged with state crimes. Those documents aren't actual criminal arrest warrants, but if accepted, give ICE up to 48 hours to pick up suspects.

But several recently elected black Democratic county sheriffs — most from metropolitan areas — have refused to comply, saying it diverts resources and doesn't promote community safety. Some ran last year on ending voluntary cooperation with ICE.

The bill language that passed the Senate Judiciary Committee has been eased somewhat from what the full House passed in April. Instead of sheriffs having to comply with detainers unilaterally, the latest edition requires a judge or magistrate to issue an order to hold the inmate.

But it still sends the message that sheriffs must cooperate. The bill also demands that no matter how minor a suspect's alleged crime is, sheriffs must check the records of anyone jailed to see if they are sought by federal immigrant agents. Sheriffs who don't comply would be removed from office, even though they are elected by county residents.

"Nobody's threatening sheriffs," said GOP Sen. Chuck Edwards of Henderson County, who is helping shepherd the bill, but "we feel like there should be a consequence for not going one step further and asking if there is any reason to detain this person further."

Three sheriffs who don't comply held a news conference before the committee meeting and accused Republican lawmakers of unfairly targeting them. According to Sheriff Garry McFadden of Mecklenburg County, the state's largest county, legislators have been using "code words" like "urban sheriffs" and "sanctuary sheriffs" to highlight their partisan and racial makeup.

The bill represents a "clear agenda against the newly elected African American sheriffs, to erode the powers of the sheriff's office that we individually hold," McFadden said. He later told committee members that their comments about duly elected sheriffs are "disrespectful. And I can't sit back and watch that."

Other opponents say due process problems remain that make the bill unconstitutional because the suspects would be held without a warrant even after meeting other release terms. The judge or magistrate would issue the order simply if the official determines the prisoner is the same person subject to a detainer.

The North Carolina Sheriffs' Association, representing all sheriffs, initially opposed the House version but reversed course last week with the Senate language.

Bill proponents have highlighted a Mecklenburg County case to support the necessity for the bill. A suspect arrested twice on local charges last month related to domestic violence was released, only to be arrested by ICE soon after. But advocates for immigrants and their allies said the measure will discourage victims of crime who are in the country unlawfully from alerting law enforcement for fear they also will end up getting arrested and deported.

"How many victims of domestic violence will never come forward if we pass this?" asked Democratic Sen. Natasha Marcus of Mecklenburg County. "If you listen to the experts who work in this field, they will tell you hundreds."

The debate got testier before the committee's voice vote. Bill co-sponsor Rep. Destin Hall of Caldwell County blamed sheriffs' unwillingness to cooperate with ICE the result of "simply extremist left-wing ideology that says we should have open borders." A Wake County woman who through a translator told the committee she was living in the country unlawfully called the bill "racist and unconstitutional."

Two other spectators in the committee opposed to the bill were led out of the meeting room by legislative workers just before the voice vote. They had started yelling at Rep. Brenden Jones of Columbus County after the Republican said the legislation is "going to make these guys do what's right to protect the citizens of North Carolina."

The bill next goes to another Senate committee before heading to the floor. Any final legislation approved would be sent to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper, whose office has said he had concerns with the House version. Immigrant and civil rights groups have urged Cooper to promise to veto the measure.


72 officers off streets amid probe into social media posts

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Police Commissioner Richard Ross says 72 Philadelphia police officers have been placed on administrative duty amid an initial investigation into a national group's accusation of officers in at least five states posting racist and anti-Muslim comments on social media.

Ross said he believed at least "several dozen" people would be disciplined and he expects some to be fired. The commissioner said the internal affairs division prioritized posts "clearly advocating violence or death against any protected class such as ethnicity, national origin, sex, religion and race." An independent law firm had been hired to determine whether posts were constitutionally protected before any discipline is imposed.

"I am not prepared to tell you at this point who's being disciplined and how many may be terminated, but I can tell you with a degree of certainty there are some people who will meet with that fate," Ross said Wednesday.

John McNesby, president of the Philadelphia police union, said the Fraternal Order of Police leadership and attorneys will protect the officers' free speech.

"It's premature and irresponsible for the commissioner to tell the public that police officers will be fired without a complete investigation into officers' social media use," he said in an emailed statement. "Our officers are entitled to due process just like any other citizen."

The posts were uncovered by a team of researchers who spent two years looking at the personal Facebook accounts of police officers from Arizona to Florida. They said they found officers bashing immigrants and Muslims, promoting racist stereotypes, identifying with right-wing militia groups and, especially, glorifying police brutality. All the posts were public.

"We've talked about, from the outset, how disturbing, how disappointing and upsetting these posts are, and they will undeniably impact police-community relations," Ross said. "There's no question that this puts us in a position to work even harder than we already do to cultivate relationships with neighborhoods and individual groups who we struggle to work with or struggle to maintain relationships with now."

Ross also announced other steps, including measures to monitor social media posts by officers, anti-bias training for officers and preparation of a training video.

"I can't think of any other investigation that we've undertaken, at least in my 30 years, where that many people were taken off the street at one time," Ross said. He said he was a "dinosaur" who didn't use social media, but he couldn't understand how police officers who come into contact with many different people — and who were themselves part of a diverse recruiting class — could make what he called "ridiculous assertions" about whole groups of people.

"It really makes me sick, because we are in a position to know better, we are in a position by virtue of what we do every day, and how many people you see in different walks of life that people are the same — people want the same thing out of life," he said. "It angers me beyond belief, because it just makes our job far more difficult than it needs to be."

Following publication of the alleged posts, St. Louis' top prosecutor added 22 more names to a list of officers in that city who are not allowed to bring cases to her office.


MI Firefighter Wins NHL’s Community Service Award

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Flint firefighter Rico Phillips received the Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award on Wednesday for founding the Flint Inner City Youth Hockey Program in 2010.

Cardiac Events Again Top NFPA Fatalities Report

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Fire Protection Association has released its annual report on firefighter fatalities, and cardiac events were again the leading cause of LODDs.

Video shows Mich. LEOs arrest suspect after wild vehicle pursuit

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Charles E. Ramirez The Detroit News

CLINTON TOWNSHIP, Mich. — A Ray Township man is facing several charges after allegedly throwing packages of drugs out of a car while fleeing from police Sunday.

Aniano Arreola-Mora, 28, was charged in court Monday with third-degree fleeing police, possession of less than 25 grams of a controlled substance, having an open container of alcohol in a vehicle and driving with a suspended license, according to Clinton Township Police.

A magistrate ordered Arreola-Mora held on a $5,000 bond, officials said.

If convicted, he faces up to five years in prison for the fleeing police charge and four years for the controlled substance charge. The other two charges are misdemeanors.

Police said an officer was monitoring traffic for speeders at about 2:50 p.m. Sunday when a 2003 tan Cadillac passed him on 19 Mile near Garfield. The officer activated his lights and siren and attempted to execute a traffic stop on the Cadillac.

As the two vehicles traveled northbound on Dalcoma Drive, the officer saw the driver throw four packages out of the driver's side door. Another officer recovered the packages and the substance inside tested positive for cocaine, authorities said.

The suspect drove to Hall Road, then west to Garfield and south to Canal Road.

He then drove into the city of Sterling Heights on 19 Mile and took Van Dyke Road north to 26 Mile. The suspect continued on 26 Mile to Romeo Plank and north to 27 Mile to Teller Road until he reached 28 Mile. He took 28 Mile to Ray Center Road where he began heading south.

Police said while he was on Ray Center Road, the suspect drove onto a home's lawn and got stuck on the muddy grass.

He got out of the car and was taken into custody by Clinton Township police officers and Macomb County Sheriff's deputies.

He is lodged at the Macomb County Jail.

———

©2019 The Detroit News


OK Firefighters Ask for Chief’s Firing

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

All 31 Altus firefighters have given Fire Chief Kyle Davis a vote of no confidence, and they have accused him of creating toxic working conditions in the department.

Fla. officer guilty of negligence for shooting caretaker

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

MIAMI — A Florida police officer has been convicted of a misdemeanor but acquitted of attempted manslaughter for shooting at a severely autistic man and wounding the man's caretaker.

A jury deliberated for four hours late Monday before finding North Miami police Officer Jonathan Aledda guilty of culpable negligence in the 2016 shooting of caretaker Charles Kinsey, who was trying to protect 27-year-old Arnaldo Rios Soto. Aledda faces up to a year in jail but because he was acquitted of a felony, he might be able to remain a police officer.

A jury found the LEO guilty of culpable negligence in the 2016 shooting of a caretaker that was trying to protect a severely autistic man

Prosecutor Don Horn called the verdict "fair," while Aledda's attorney said he was disappointed.

"We thought he should have never been charged," Douglas Hartman said. A March trial had ended with a hung jury.

Kinsey was shot after Rios fled his group home carrying a shiny silver toy truck and Kinsey went after him. Rios sat down in the street, playing with the truck, and a passer-by reported he was possibly armed. Police soon surrounded Rios and Kinsey at a residential neighborhood intersection.

Video taken by a bystander showed Rios sitting with the truck. Kinsey lay on his back next to him with his hands in the air, begging officers not to shoot. Rios shouted "shut up." The video ended before the shooting.

Aledda, armed with a rifle, took cover behind a car 50 yards (45 meters) away. Two officers who were closer to Kinsey and Rios said they could tell the silver object was a toy, but a commander radioed that it appeared Rios was reloading.

Aledda fired three shots at Rios. Two missed but one hit Kinsey in the leg.

Aledda testified Monday that he thought it was a hostage situation and he needed to fire to protect Kinsey and his fellow officers.

"It appeared he (Kinsey) was screaming for mercy or for help or something. In my mind, the white male had a gun," Aledda testified, according to the Miami Herald.

Jury forewoman Stacy Sarna told the newspaper that jurors didn't necessarily believe Aledda, but didn't think his actions reached the level of attempted manslaughter.

"What he was saying was very carefully considered. He was very calculated and practiced," she said.

Kinsey and the Rios family are suing North Miami. Kinsey's attorney, Hilton Napoleon II, said he respects the jury's decision and is glad they held Aledda accountable.

"It sends the message that before you squeeze the trigger, you need to take into account the lives that could be affected," Napoleon said.

Napoleon wouldn't comment on Kinsey's federal civil rights case against the city but acknowledged that they're still preparing for trial. Napoleon said the past three years of meeting with prosecutors, investigators and doctors have taken a toll on Kinsey, who still has shrapnel in his leg and needs physical therapy.

"There are certain services that he needs that he's not currently getting," Napoleon said.


Seattle FFs Move Out of Station Known as ‘Cancer House’

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

City officials say the move is a temporary precaution while testing is done at Station 31, a firehouse that Seattle firefighters have expressed concerns about over the years.

Ala. officer recovering after on-duty rattlesnake bite

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Carol Robinson Alabama Media Group, Birmingham

GREENVILLE, Ala. — Police officers never know what kind of danger they may face on any given shift, but what landed one Alabama cop in the Intensive Care Unit is the stuff of nightmares.

Greenville Police Officer Marissa Morrison, the city’s only female officer, has been in the ICU at Jackson Hospital in Montgomery since early Monday morning when she was bitten by a timber rattlesnake while on duty.

More than two days, and 16 vials of antivenin later, the 28-year-old mother of three is praising her fellow officers and co-workers for the way they jumped in to rescue her and quickly get her the help she needed.

“It scared me, and it scared my brothers,’’ Morrison told AL.com Wednesday in an interview from the ICU. “You hear about stuff like this, but it never happens to you.”

Until it does.

Morrison works the 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. patrol shift in the south Alabama town below Montgomery. As she has done many times before, she parked her cruiser in a quiet, scenic spot behind the airport to finish her paperwork before wrapping up her shift.

It was about 5:20 a.m. and she got out of her patrol car to stretch her legs. She walked a short distance to snap a photo of the sunrise and was walking back to her vehicle when terror struck.

Morrison felt a sting, and then heard the unmistakable rattle. “He was huge, and he gave me no warning,’’ she said. “I remember screaming and I ran away from him.”

The officer, who has been on the force for two years, quickly got on her radio to call for help. She issued an emergency alert. “I know they heard the panic in my voice,’’ Morrison said. “Usually my radio traffic is pretty calm.”

She said her corporal, Jimmy Oliver, knew exactly where to find her. The quiet spot is a place she goes often to unwind after a shift. Oliver got to her before the ambulance did and another fellow officer, Tom Powell, was close behind.

Oliver put Morrison in his cruiser and rushed her to the hospital. She was bitten in the calf muscle and her leg quickly swelled. The bite span was 1 ½ - inches wide.

Oliver asked Morrison if she could walk into the hospital on her own, but she could not. “I had started feeling lightheaded and I was shaking,’’ she said. “He just scooped me up and carried me inside.”

“They were panicking. They did their best to get me to where I needed to be,’’ Morrison said. “They did an outstanding job. I’m so lucky and blessed to have them.”

Morrison’s co-workers went back to the scene of the bite and found the snake still coiled in the same spot and still rattling. They killed the snake, and later brought her the rattle.

As badly as she was hurt, she said she knows it could have been worse. “I’m 5-feet, 6-inches tall so I wasn’t that far from him,’’ she said. “It could have bitten me in my arm, or somewhere else closer to my heart. I’m thankful it wasn’t.”

As of Wednesday afternoon, Morrison was preparing to move out of ICU and into a private room. She’s hoping to be released from the hospital by the weekend, so she can get home to her babies – ages 8, 7 and 3 months – and also ready to get back to work. She’s been warned it could be more than a month before she can return to duty.

“I love my job,’’ she said, “and I can’t wait to get back out there.”

———

©2019 Alabama Media Group, Birmingham


WY Firefighter Dies in Off-Duty Accident

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"He’s certainly gonna be missed," Casper's fire chief said about Capt. Scott Low, 50, who had been with the department for 22 years and headed Engine 6.

STREAMLIGHT® RENEWS C.O.P.S. SUPPORT FOR 20TH YEAR IN A ROW

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Company Also Donates Proceeds from Product Sales to Concerns of Police Survivors

U.S. Marine Corps Adoption of M18 Underscores Success of SIG SAUER Modular Handgun System Program

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

SIG SAUER, Inc. is honored to announce that the United States Marine Corps (USMC) is set to adopt the M18, the compact variant of the U.S. Army’s Modular Handgun System (MHS), as their official duty pistol.

Barlow Vol. Fire Dept., Cumberland Township, PA, Gets Big Water Tender

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Barlow Volunteer Fire Company, Cumberland Township, Adams County, PA, has taken delivery of a 2019 Pierce water tender built on a Freightliner SD cab and chassis.

RI Firefighter Hurts Shoulder Battling 2-Alarm Blaze

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 50 Providence firefighters were needed to put out Wednesday night's building fire, which sent one firefighter to the hospital.

GA Transgender Fire Chief Demands Job Back in Letter

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"The reasons the city has cited for its termination of (Byron Chief Rachel Mosby) are both inaccurate and wholly inadequate reasons," a letter from her lawyer states.

Tribute Held for Florida K-9s Killed In Line Of Duty

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Miami-Dade police held a special memorial for police dogs killed in the line of duty.

New Technology Helps Identify Victim in Decades Old Maryland Cold Case

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New technology has helped Anne Arundel County Police identify a body found in a trash can in 1985 as Roger Kelso, a Glen Burnie High School graduate.

Police Officer Fired for Handling of Fort Worth Kidnapping Case

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Forest Hill Police Officer Richardson Wolfe was placed on indefinite suspension which under civil service rules is the same as termination.

There’s a Real-Life Michael Connelly Character in the LAPD

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Veteran LAPD Detective Mitzi Roberts' career history may read like it borrows a bit from the jacket copy of a popular crime novel, but it's actually the other way around.

Oregon Lawmaker Threatens Troopers, Warns Them to ‘Come Heavily Armed’

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Tensions were already smoldering in the Oregon Senate Wednesday, when Sen. Brian Boquist, R-Dallas, poured gasoline on the situation, suggesting he would shoot and potentially kill any state trooper sent to haul him unwillingly back to the Capitol.

California captain launches “Firefighters in Fire Trucks Getting Ice Cream” video series

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Video series will feature Quinalty interviewing fire service leaders about hot topics in the industry

Golden State Killer/East Area Rapist Probe Wins International DNA Investigation Award

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Golden State Killer/East Area Rapist investigation has been selected as the top DNA case in the world, honoring the agencies that helped lead to the arrest of suspect Joseph James DeAngelo.

Video Shows Michigan Officers Arrest Driver After Wild Pursuit

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Aniano Arreola-Mora is facing several charges after allegedly throwing packages of drugs out of a car while fleeing from police Sunday.

Wounded Missouri Police Officer Recovering

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Trenton Police Officer Jasmine Diab was shot Friday afternoon during a struggle with 38-year-old Jamey Aaron Griffin inside a police vehicle.

72 Philadelphia Police Officers Off Streets Amid Probe Into Facebook Posts

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Philadelphia Police Department has taken 72 officers off street duty as it continues to investigate scores of racist or offensive Facebook posts allegedly made by city cops.

Sacramento Police Officer Killed in Ambush

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sacramento Police Officer Tara O'Sullivan, who was responding to a domestic violence incident, was killed Wednesday night after being ambushed by a gunman with a rifle who held off officers from inside a house for nearly eight hours before surrendering.

New air ambulance opens in Texas county

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Hidalgo County was left without this service after Missouri-based Air Evac Lifeteam stopped operations in the region earlier this year

HFUSA launches US-based firefighting trade show event

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The five-day event will highlight the latest strategies and operations, cutting edge technology and advances in safety

55-crewmember response required for NY apartment building fire

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ten firefighters were sent to the hospital with minor injuries after battling the two-alarm fire

3 universities receive grant to research cardiac arrest drugs

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The research will dive into the effectiveness of two drugs that can improve patients cognitive and survival rates after experiencing cardiac arrest

Wash. volunteer FF breaks world record for running one mile in full turnout gear

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

South Whatcom Fire Authority Firefighter James Jasperson ran a mile in full firefighting gear in 6:33.28 seconds to raise money for charity

NFPA releases annual firefighters fatalities report for 2018

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The report breaks down the year’s fatalities to 34 volunteer firefighters, 25 career firefighters, four state or federal contractors or employees and one prison inmate

Calif. police officer shot, in serious condition

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A Sacramento police officer was shot and seriously wounded Wednesday evening by a rifleman who blasted away at officers trying to rescue her, police said.

Several officers were on a domestic disturbance call, helping a woman collect her belongings and leave a home in the North Sacramento neighborhood, when the officer was wounded, Sgt. Vance Chandler said.

She lay in the backyard of a home and officers couldn't reach her because the gunman kept firing, Chandler said.

"Our officers maintained cover in safe positions until we were able to get an armored vehicle in the area," he said.

It took more than 45 minutes to get her to the hospital, where the officer was in serious condition, he said.

"All I know right now that the officer is hurt bad, is at the hospital now and we're praying for her recovery and for her to make it through," City Councilman Allen Warren, who represents the area, told the Sacramento Bee.

The other woman wasn't hurt.

Chandler didn't immediately know the relationship between her and the gunman.

The rifleman kept shooting for at least two hours and as of late Wednesday night, Chandler said negotiators hadn't been able to contact him.

Heavily-armored police from several agencies swarmed the residential neighborhood, where a couple dozen marked and unmarked police cars had gathered.

Police warned residents by loudspeaker to stay out of the area near the intersection of Redwood Avenue and Edgewater Road. Police were keeping media and onlookers out of sight of the scene.

BREAKING: We've just been moved back to Grove Ave & Barrette Ave. as @SacPolice @sacsheriff investigate an officer down on Redwood in the yard of one home and a suspect shooting a rifle from another home on Redwood. @FOX40 pic.twitter.com/OOt9wch2Dh

— Sonseeahray Tonsall (@tonsalltv) June 20, 2019


Calif. officer fatally shot during domestic call

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Sacramento police on Thursday were trying to negotiate the surrender of a gunman suspected of killing a police officer during a domestic dispute.

Tara O'Sullivan, 26, died at UC Davis Medical Center hours after the gunman opened fire on her Wednesday, Deputy Chief Dave Peletta said during a news conference.

Several officers were on a domestic disturbance call, helping a woman collect her belongings and leave a home in the north Sacramento neighborhood, when the officer was wounded, Sgt. Vance Chandler said. The other woman wasn't hurt, and the relationship between her and the gunman wasn't immediately known.

Peletta said O'Sullivan was partnered with a training officer when she was shot just before 6 p.m.

O'Sullivan was in a backyard and officers couldn't reach her because the gunman kept firing, Chandler said.

"Our officers maintained cover in safe positions until we were able to get an armored vehicle in the area," he said.

It took more than 45 minutes to get her to the hospital, he said.

The rifleman kept shooting for at least two hours and as of late Wednesday night, Chandler said negotiators hadn't been able to contact him.

Heavily armored police from several agencies swarmed the residential neighborhood, where a couple dozen marked and unmarked police cars had gathered.

Police warned residents by loudspeaker to stay out of the area near the intersection of Redwood Avenue and Edgewater Road. Police were keeping media and onlookers out of sight of the scene.

According to city records, O'Sullivan had been working for the city since January 2018, The Sacramento Bee reported. She was part of the first class of graduates of Sacramento State's Law Enforcement Candidate Scholars program in 2017 and went on to the Sacramento Police Academy.

It is with a broken heart that we have to share with all of you that earlier today we lost one of our own. While on a...

Posted by Sacramento Police Department on Thursday, June 20, 2019


Slain Calif. officer had been on force just 6 months

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A man suspected of fatally shooting a Sacramento police officer surrendered after a standoff in which he repeatedly fired his rifle, preventing officers from reaching their wounded colleague for nearly an hour, authorities said Thursday.

Officer Tara O'Sullivan, 26, was gathering evidence in a domestic violence case at the home where she was shot Wednesday evening, police said in a statement.

"We are devastated tonight," Deputy Chief Dave Peletta said. "There are no words to convey the depth of sadness we feel or how heartbroken we are for the family of our young, brave officer."

The suspect, who has not been identified, was taken into custody around 2 a.m.

O'Sullivan had been on the force for just six months and was still completing her training with another officer when she was killed. She died at UC Davis Medical Center.

She had been helping a woman collect her belongings to leave the home when the shooting occurred, police Sgt. Vance Chandler said.

The standoff lasted about eight hours.

"Our officers maintained cover in safe positions until we were able to get an armored vehicle in the area," Chandler said.

The other woman was not hurt, and the relationship between her and the gunman was not immediately known.

Heavily armed police from several agencies swarmed the neighborhood during the standoff and residents were told to stay away.

In a post on his Facebook page addressed to O'Sullivan's parents, Mayor Darrell Steinberg wrote that O'Sullivan was in the first graduating class of a groundbreaking program at Sacramento State University that "emphasizes the importance of inclusion and cultural competence for future law enforcement leaders — of which Tara undoubtedly would have been."

O'Sullivan, who grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, graduated from the police academy in December.

Before that, she worked with the Police Department as part of a community service program providing crime prevention support. She graduated from Sacramento State with a degree in child development a year ago.

It is with a broken heart that we have to share with all of you that earlier today we lost one of our own. While on a...

Posted by Sacramento Police Department on Thursday, June 20, 2019


Product of the Day: Kochek — PVC Suction Hose

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Kochek's PVC suction hose is specifically designed for the firefighting market and meets the company's proprietary fire grade specifications.

Response time performance improvement through system re-design

Posted on June 20, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Policies, training and practice changes resulted in faster response time, penalty savings and improved morale across EMTs, paramedics and EMS leadership

Alabama governor lowers flags to honor fallen Springville FF-paramedicJared Echols

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The governor said the flags will remain lowered until sunset on Friday, June 21

Alabama governor lowers flags to honor fallen Springville FF-paramedicJared Echols

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The governor said the flags will remain lowered until sunset on Friday, June 21

Alabama governor lowers flags to honor fallen Springville FF-paramedic Jared Echols

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The governor said the flags will remain lowered until sunset on Friday, June 21

Alabama governor lowers flags to honor fallen Springville FF-paramedic Jared Echols

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The governor said the flags will remain lowered until sunset on Friday, June 21

Firefighters in Fire Trucks Getting Ice Cream – Chief Peter Van Dorpe

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Van Dorpe relays a riveting story about one of his most memorable fires

9/11 memorial at Riverfront Park complete after years of planning

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The dedication of the monument was initially planned on Sept. 11, 2018, marking the 17th anniversary of the attacks, but organizers decided that more time was needed to complete the project

9/11 memorial at Riverfront Park complete after years of planning

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The dedication of the monument was initially planned on Sept. 11, 2018, marking the 17th anniversary of the attacks, but organizers decided that more time was needed to complete the project

Ind. county looking at increasing wages for local dispatchers

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The move, pending an August meeting of the board prior to budget approval, would reduce the number of active dispatching positions from 16 to 14

Houston man shoots at first responders trying to help him

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The paramedics immediately radioed for help from police but wrestled the gun away from the man on their own

Houston man shoots at first responders trying to help him

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The paramedics immediately radioed for help from police but wrestled the gun away from the man on their own

$2.5M grants to enhance child exploitation investigations by police

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Andrea Fox, EfficientGov.com

Up to $2.5 million in federal funding will be awarded to support the development and advancement of investigative technology tools by local police and partner agencies to enhance child exploitation investigations.

Cities, towns, counties, tribal and state governments and non-profit or higher education partners can apply to increase the technological investigative capacity and implement training for law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies under the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs’ Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s (OJJDP) Strengthening Investigative Tools and Technology for Combating Child Sexual Exploitation grant program.

The discretionary grant program is expected to make up to six awards and will focus on methods and technologies that address child pornography, exploitation and sex trafficking of minors.

Proposed approaches may include:

Developing new protocols for ascertaining the identity of child exploitation offenders using anonymization networks, in particular, Tor and Freenet. Targeting offenders who exploit children through webcams, including online enticement, sextortion and live-streaming of child sexual abuse. Exploring legal and technological tools to ensure access to evidence encrypted by offenders. Building forensic capacity and expertise to meet the challenges that mobile devices with built-in encryptions and cloud-based storage pose to online child exploitation investigations. Identifying gaps in existing tools and resources. Developing tools that use artificial intelligence to assist law enforcement in efficiently processing large amounts of investigatory leads. Developing new software programs or investigative tools to fill the gaps; increase capacity and assist federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement partners in covert investigative work. Supporting research activities that help to identify characteristics, patterns or other indicators that predict which offenders are likely to be the most dangerous/high-priority suspects.

There is no matching requirement. The deadline to apply is July 29, 2019.

Awards are expected to be made under cooperative agreement beginning on October 1, 2019. Review the solicitation on OJJDP.gov. Apply on Grants.gov.


TX Firefighter Suspended for Home Stop During Call

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A San Antonio fire engineer was suspended 90 days after he was accused of going home to pick up a stethoscope before responding to an emergency call.

Phoenix Chief Promises Changes in Department During Angry Meeting Over Shoplifting Incident

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Appearing frustrated at times, Williams assured those gathered that the meeting would not be the last. "We are here to listen, we are here to make change," she said.

Glock G48 Pistol Review

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Glock's new Slimline pistol, the G48, offers a great balance of size, capacity, caliber, and ease of concealment without sacrificing combat capability.

How To Spot PTSD in Yourself

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Know what to look for so you can seek help for PTSD when needed.

MI Firefighter, 71, Ends Nearly 50-Year Career

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"Fifty years is a long time to serve in this profession," said Zeeland firefighter Jason Wolters, who will retire from the department at the end of the month.

Accused Gunman to Stand Trial in Death Penalty Case in Slaying of San Diego Police Officer

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The death-penalty case for a man accused of fatally shooting San Diego Officer Jonathan “J.D.” De Guzman and wounding another in 2016 moved forward Wednesday when a judge ordered Jesse Michael Gomez to stand trial on murder and attempted murder charges.

Man Opens Fire as Houston Firefighters Try to Help

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No one was hurt after Houston paramedics wrestled away the gun from the man after they were called to check on him Wednesday.

4 St. Louis Officers Charged in Beating of Undercover Colleague

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four officers with the St. Louis Police Department have been criminally charged in the alleged beating of an undercover officer working the scene of a protest following the acquittal of former police Officer Jason Stockley, who was accused of first-degree murder related to the shooting death of a civilian.

Video: Florida Officer Dragged by Vehicle at 60 MPH

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Orlando Police Department is lucky to be alive after he was dragged by a fleeing vehicle at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour.

TN County Officials Decline to Discipline Detective Over Homophobic Sermon

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Knox County, TN, officials debated on Monday whether or not to approve a strongly worded response to a detective who delivered a sermon at his church earlier this month that called for state-sponsored execution of members of the LGBTQ community.

Deputy in Plain Clothes Shoots Teen Who Attempted Carjacking on Him

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A deputy with the Cook County Sheriff’s Office shot and wounded a teen who attempted to carjack him overnight.

New York Officer Injured in Struggle with Motorist Following Vehicle Pursuit

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Westchester County, NY, police officer was injured in a physical altercation with a motorist who had led him on a high-speed pursuit after the man fled a traffic stop.

North Carolina Agency Hires Liaison Outreach Coordinator

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Henderson County (NC) Sheriff's Office hired Stephanie Barbosa as the agency's first ever Liaison Outreach Coordinator, a post aimed at improving communications through community outreach.

Wisconsin Agency Asks Citizens to Catch, Not Relocate Stray Cats

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Edgerton (WI) Police Department is asking its citizens to refrain from capturing and then relocating stray cats outside the city after receiving a complaint of someone doing just that.

Iowa Department Offering Autism Safety Training to First Responders

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the West Liberty (IA) Police Department were recently joined by fire and EMS colleagues in a safety and awareness training for encounters with subjects on the autism spectrum.

Judge Blocks City’s Decision to Dissolve Police Department

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A judge has temporarily blocked the decision of the mayor and the city council to dissolve the Ridgetop (TN) Police Department.

Can a bad word be a good tactic?

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lt. Dan Marcou
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

Can the use of bad words sometimes be a good tactic?

As a rule, I have taught officers to develop verbalization discipline to ensure they look like the professionals they are. However sometimes a bad situation can result in a spontaneous leak of “bad” words. Other times officers might even choose to use undeleted expletives.

Let’s discuss the issue of police profanity.

The Spontaneous Leak

There are moments in law enforcement when you see things happen right in front of you that are so dynamic and unexpected, they rip the emotions raw. You might blurt out words in a seemingly Tourette’s-like manner.

For example, I was pursuing a stolen vehicle years ago at over 90 mph on a four-lane highway with a grass median between the northbound two lanes and the southbound two lanes. I could see up ahead a state trooper approaching with lights on, when suddenly the officer swung across the median and set up a stationery roadblock in the path of the stolen car.

The young trooper miscalculated the driver’s propensity to comply and instead of stopping as he was required by law to do, the criminal barreled into the occupied squad at a speed of 93 mph, demolishing both vehicles. I believe the short prayer I prayed was, “HOLY SH-T!” To my surprise both the trooper and the criminal sustained only minor injuries.

Rehearsal to Avoid the Spontaneous Leak

Although such words are not considered the language of the professional, they may spontaneously spurt out during the sudden onset of violent, unexpected events.

In the case of use of force, however, you can prevent such spontaneous leaks from occurring by rehearsing effective combat communication.

For example, when you practice your strikes, shout: “Back.”

When you practice your decentralizations (take downs), shout: “Down.”

When you practice your control holds, communicate: “Police, relax, you’re under arrest. Stop resisting.”

When you practice deployment of your TASER, shout: “TASER! TASER! TASER!

When you are about to deploy your impact munition, shout: “Bean bag! Bean bag! Bean bag!”

If you have trained to say these things during anticipated stressful events, then during street applications these are the words that will come out rather than, “Stop resisting or I’ll break your f----ing arm, you a---hole.” These untrained words will negatively color an otherwise defensible use of force. By using these words, you are loading the defendant’s legal gun, which will later be pointed right at you.

I have always said that we can shoot someone and that can be defensible but calling someone an a—hole, even if the suspect’s photo appears next to the word in the street officer’s dictionary, is not readily defensible.

The Problem with Rough Words

Any use of force is scrutinized. Therefore, for the sake of the officer who uses a level of force that allows them to win on the street, you want all aspects of that force to be defensible, even the verbalization. If you call someone a mother-f--ker just before you use justifiable force on them, that one word will most certainly be used to cast doubt on your use of force, whether you strike them with a punch, a baton, or a bullet.

The Blue-on-Blue Problem

There is another problem with overuse of the street vernacular, especially when you have a weapon directed at a suspect and you are in plain clothes. To any responding uniform officer not fully briefed on what is occurring, your street vernacular may lead to a blue on blue shooting. The uniformed officer will undoubtedly at some point say, “He didn’t sound like a cop.”

Rehearse the Verbal Take Down of the High-Risk Suspect

If you rehearse the verbalization you will use when taking a high-risk suspect down at gun point (while you are utilizing cover), even if you are not dressed like a cop, you will “sound like a cop.”

In other words, if “Police, don’t move!” followed by “Put your arms out, palms up, and don’t move!” are your first choice of words to use in such a situation, practice those words so they professionally roll off the tongue. By practicing these words, they will be there for you when you need them.

Another problem with adlibbing is that during a truly dangerous event your brain will be distracted from the business of trying to keep you alive. When you are pointing your duty weapon at a suspect with a gun in his belt or even worse in his hand you need to be practiced, focused and precise.

The Deliberate, Last Resort Tactical Cuss

Most police policies declare deadly force should only be used as a last resort. If an officer gets to a point where a suspect is armed, non-compliant and the officer is barely, as they say, to the “left of bang,” that officer might reasonably believe one last attempt at verbalization may include a deliberate life-saving tactical cuss.

An officer on the verge of shooting may reasonably decide to try to save a suspect’s life by one last desperate command, “Drop the gun now or I will FUCKING shoot you!” These words said with the right combination of sincerity and urgency might just prevent an officer-involved shooting. You could call this a last resort tactical cuss.

Conclusion

It is easy to say you will try to eliminate your use of language that on its face seems unprofessional and difficult to defend; however, to suggest that every expletive must or even can be deleted in the world we police in is unrealistic.


General Tactic Evaluation

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Thank you for helping General Tactic evaluate the short/long sleeve stretch shirt!

General Tactic Evaluation

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Thank you for helping General Tactic evaluate the short/long sleeve stretch shirt!

At Least Two Killed by Semi Explosion on WI Interstate

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A semi-tractor trailer explosion in Racine County on Wednesday has shut down a stretch of Interstate 41/94, and it's expected to be closed for more than two hours.

Philadelphia police seize $1B of cocaine from ship

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

By Jeremy Roebuck The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — Federal authorities on Tuesday seized more than 16 tons of cocaine from a cargo ship docked at the Port of Philadelphia — a massive haul whose estimated worth of more than $1 billion made it one of the largest cocaine busts in the nation’s history.

Two members of the ship’s crew, including its second mate, were charged with violations of federal maritime drug trafficking laws. According to court filings, both men confessed to helping haul dozens of bales of cocaine aboard from at least 14 smaller boats that approached the vessel while plying waters to and from Peru.

The investigation appeared to be far from over. Investigators from at least six city, state and federal agencies — including U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Homeland Security Investigations — continued to scour the ship Tuesday night, while authorities said others could be charged in the coming days.

“This is one of the largest seizures in United States history,” U.S. Attorney William M. McSwain said in a tweet. “This amount of cocaine could kill millions — MILLIONS — of people.”

It was unclear Tuesday when investigators discovered the drugs aboard the MSC Gayane, which according to shipping records docked around 5 a.m. Monday in the port’s Packer Avenue Marine Terminal, near the Walt Whitman Bridge. It had arrived after a monthslong journey with stops in Peru, Colombia, Panama and the Bahamas.

A port employee who was not authorized to discuss the matter said investigators boarded the ship with drug-sniffing dogs sometime before 7 p.m. Monday and eventually discovered the cocaine, hidden in bags and housed among legitimate cargo in seven shipping containers bound for the U.S. and Europe.

Coast Guard officials swabbed members of the crew for cocaine residue and found it on the hands and arms of the second mate, Ivan Durasevic, according to his arrest affidavit.

Durasevic told investigators that he had been recruited by the ship’s chief officer, who was unnamed in the document, to help at least two other crew members and four people wearing ski masks haul bales of cocaine aboard the Gayane from smaller ships that approached it shortly after it left Peru. He was paid $50,000 for his effort, he said.

The second crew member charged Tuesday, Fonofaavae Tiasaga, blamed Durasevic for recruiting him into the smuggling effort. He told investigators that the second mate had paid him 50,000 euro to clandestinely load cocaine on one of the ship’s previous trips, according to his arrest affidavit.

On the Gayane’s current voyage, Tiasaga said, he was approached by Durasevic as well as the chief mate, an electrician, and an engineer — all of whom independently sought his aid in sneaking separate loads of cocaine aboard.

He described six boats, each carrying cocaine, that rendezvoused at different times with the Gayane under cover of darkness as it voyaged south from Panama to Peru. On the way back north, eight boats approached the cargo ship at night to unload their illicit cargo, the affidavit states.

Durasevic and Tiasaga remained in custody Tuesday night after appearing in federal court in Philadelphia during the afternoon. Detention hearings for both men are scheduled for later this week.

The Gayane will remain moored in Philadelphia until given the all-clear by investigators. The cargo vessel is owned by Mediterranean Shipping Co., a Geneva-based firm with operations in several U.S. cities.

In a statement posted on its website Tuesday, the company said it was taking the seizure “very seriously.”

“Unfortunately, shipping and logistics companies are from time to time affected by trafficking problems,” it read. “MSC has a longstanding history of cooperating with U.S. federal law enforcement agencies to help disrupt illegal narcotics trafficking.”

Tuesday’s seizure breaks a record set just three months ago, when customs agents reported another unprecedented cocaine seizure — 1,815 pounds worth an estimated $38 million and the largest in the Philadelphia port’s history — on a cargo ship carrying natural rubber from Guatemala and bound for the Netherlands. No arrests have been reported in that case.

The Philadelphia busts come amid a series of large cocaine seizures across the Northeast. New York saw its largest in a quarter-century in March with $77 million worth of the drug seized from a cargo ship in the Port of New York and New Jersey.

In fiscal year 2018, agents seized an average of 4,657 pounds of narcotics per day, U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported on its website.

A report issued last year by the Drug Enforcement Administration said that cocaine’s “availability and use in the United States continued to rise between 2016 and 2017,” and that customs agents seized more cocaine in 2017 than any year since at least 2010.

———

©2019 The Philadelphia Inquirer


Wash. PD announces $20K bonus incentive program to attract lateral LEOs

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

EVERETT, Wash. — A Washington police department is offering an additional financial incentive to bring in more lateral officers.

Starting in June, hired state lateral police officers can receive a $20,000 bonus from the Everett Police Department. The bonus will be paid in installments, beginning on the officer’s hire date and ending when the officer completes probation.

The incentive program is an effort to attract officers from within the state of Washington because hiring, training and relocating takes less time than with a new recruit and allows the officers to get out into the community quicker.

The department currently has five vacant officer positions with additional vacancies anticipated this summer due to retirements. The department hopes to fill the openings and have a fully-staffed team within the next six to 12 months.


Alabama Police: Man Gave ‘Attack Squirrel’ Meth to Keep it Aggressive

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A caged squirrel allegedly fed meth to make it aggressive has been set free, but Limestone County authorities want to arrest the animal's former owner on drug and other charges.

North Carolina Sheriffs Now Support Mandate to Help ICE

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association has reversed its position on an effort by state lawmakers to require law enforcement agencies to cooperate with immigration authorities.

Oregon Bill Would Make Killing of an Officer Fall Under Death Penalty

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A bill that narrows the crimes eligible for the death penalty heads to a vote of the Oregon House on Wednesday with a new provision: A last-minute change adds back the killing of law enforcement officers to the definition of aggravated murder.

Oregon Bill Would Make Killing of an Officer Fall Under Death Penalty

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A bill that narrows the crimes eligible for the death penalty heads to a vote of the Oregon House on Wednesday with a new provision: A last-minute change adds back the killing of law enforcement officers to the definition of aggravated murder.

Stripped of His Job, Former Florida Sheriff is Fighting Back

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Attorneys for a defiant Scott Israel told a state Senate hearing officer Tuesday that the former Broward County sheriff was the victim of a politically motivated ploy by Gov. Ron DeSantis.

Phenix Technology Creates Custom Leather Helmet in Memory of the Charleston 9

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The exclusive helmet features a unique Charleston 9 logo on the rear brim that was created in memory the 9 Charleston firefighters that were lost on June 18, 2007, in the Sofa Super Store Fire.

Tyler Technologies Acquires MobileEyes

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

As one of the fastest-growing fire prevention solutions in the U.S., MobileEyes serves 240 clients, including the City of Indianapolis Fire Department in Indiana, the Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District in California, and Palm Beach County, Florida.

Sheriff suspended after Parkland shooting continues to fight for job

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis' decision to suspend the sheriff who oversaw the response to the Parkland school shooting was a knee-jerk reaction based on politics, not facts, a lawyer said Tuesday as a Senate hearing began on whether to uphold the suspension.

The lawyer for suspended Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel portrayed DeSantis as using the deaths of 17 students and staff members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School for political gain, saying DeSantis was promising to remove Israel even before the governor was elected in November.

"This is sad, to have politicized the lives of children and adults who were lost to a terrorist at Marjory Stoneman Douglas," said Benedict Kuehne. "Before any facts were laid bare, (DeSantis) began the mantra that Sheriff Israel must go, almost a political mantra."

The hearing was being held before former state Rep. Dudley Goodlette, who was appointed by Senate President Bill Galvano to hear facts in the case and make a recommendation on whether Israel should be removed from office. The full Senate will later decide Israel's fate.

DeSantis suspended Israel three days after taking office in January, saying the response to the Parkland massacre showed incompetence and neglect of duty. Israel said neither was true.

"I've been called some names in my time, but on my 63 years on earth ... I have never been called incompetent and I have never been called negligent," Israel said. "I know these hearings are about taking my livelihood away from me, but incompetent and negligent? No sir."

A lawyer for DeSantis said the suspension was justified, and that the department was unprepared for another mass shooting 13 months prior to Parkland that left five people dead.

The chaos that broke out after a shooting at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood airport on Jan. 6, 2017, Nicholas Primrose said, was due to Israel's failure "to adequately prepare his deputies for an active duty situation in one of the fastest growing airports in the United States."

"Confusion, unclear command orders and a lack of training resulted in unnecessary chaos and injuries to more individuals, which can only be described as an abysmal response."

Israel said that his department had trained for an active shooter situation at the airport, and that other than the five people who died, he wouldn't change a thing about that day.

"I don't get offended very easily, but to hear (Primrose) this morning say there was confusion and chaos at the airport, of course there was confusion and chaos at the airport. There were 20,000 people running haphazardly, people didn't know where gunshots were coming from, there were people hiding under cars," Israel said. "I'm so proud of the fact that after we arrived only one person was injured, and not seriously."

Primrose also said Israel should be held responsible for the actions of former Deputy Scot Peterson, a school resource officer at Marjory Stoneman Douglas who failed to enter the school after former student Nikolas Cruz began firing inside. Peterson was charged earlier this month with 11 criminal counts for failing to confront Cruz.

"Any failure of Deputy Peterson is also a failure of Scott Israel," Primrose said. "It's baffling that Scott Israel accepts zero responsibility for the admissions and neglect of the deputies he appoints."

Kuehne said Peterson had received training for active shooter situations and there is nothing in his personnel file that indicated he would fail to act. He also noted that the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, overseen by DeSantis and the independently elected Cabinet, doesn't require active shooter training for local law enforcement. He said DeSantis has had nearly half a year to demand that the department set standards for active shooter training and hasn't done so. DeSantis decided to suspend Israel before the department completed an investigation into law enforcement's response to the Parkland shooting, Kuehne added.

Israel will continue testifying Wednesday.


Sheriff suspended after Parkland shooting continues to fight for job

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis' decision to suspend the sheriff who oversaw the response to the Parkland school shooting was a knee-jerk reaction based on politics, not facts, a lawyer said Tuesday as a Senate hearing began on whether to uphold the suspension.

The lawyer for suspended Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel portrayed DeSantis as using the deaths of 17 students and staff members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School for political gain, saying DeSantis was promising to remove Israel even before the governor was elected in November.

"This is sad, to have politicized the lives of children and adults who were lost to a terrorist at Marjory Stoneman Douglas," said Benedict Kuehne. "Before any facts were laid bare, (DeSantis) began the mantra that Sheriff Israel must go, almost a political mantra."

The hearing was being held before former state Rep. Dudley Goodlette, who was appointed by Senate President Bill Galvano to hear facts in the case and make a recommendation on whether Israel should be removed from office. The full Senate will later decide Israel's fate.

DeSantis suspended Israel three days after taking office in January, saying the response to the Parkland massacre showed incompetence and neglect of duty. Israel said neither was true.

"I've been called some names in my time, but on my 63 years on earth ... I have never been called incompetent and I have never been called negligent," Israel said. "I know these hearings are about taking my livelihood away from me, but incompetent and negligent? No sir."

A lawyer for DeSantis said the suspension was justified, and that the department was unprepared for another mass shooting 13 months prior to Parkland that left five people dead.

The chaos that broke out after a shooting at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood airport on Jan. 6, 2017, Nicholas Primrose said, was due to Israel's failure "to adequately prepare his deputies for an active duty situation in one of the fastest growing airports in the United States."

"Confusion, unclear command orders and a lack of training resulted in unnecessary chaos and injuries to more individuals, which can only be described as an abysmal response."

Israel said that his department had trained for an active shooter situation at the airport, and that other than the five people who died, he wouldn't change a thing about that day.

"I don't get offended very easily, but to hear (Primrose) this morning say there was confusion and chaos at the airport, of course there was confusion and chaos at the airport. There were 20,000 people running haphazardly, people didn't know where gunshots were coming from, there were people hiding under cars," Israel said. "I'm so proud of the fact that after we arrived only one person was injured, and not seriously."

Primrose also said Israel should be held responsible for the actions of former Deputy Scot Peterson, a school resource officer at Marjory Stoneman Douglas who failed to enter the school after former student Nikolas Cruz began firing inside. Peterson was charged earlier this month with 11 criminal counts for failing to confront Cruz.

"Any failure of Deputy Peterson is also a failure of Scott Israel," Primrose said. "It's baffling that Scott Israel accepts zero responsibility for the admissions and neglect of the deputies he appoints."

Kuehne said Peterson had received training for active shooter situations and there is nothing in his personnel file that indicated he would fail to act. He also noted that the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, overseen by DeSantis and the independently elected Cabinet, doesn't require active shooter training for local law enforcement. He said DeSantis has had nearly half a year to demand that the department set standards for active shooter training and hasn't done so. DeSantis decided to suspend Israel before the department completed an investigation into law enforcement's response to the Parkland shooting, Kuehne added.

Israel will continue testifying Wednesday.


Chief: Fallen AL Firefighter ‘Had a True Servant’s Heart’

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"He’s touched many, many lives, even in the short time he was with us," said the Springville fire chief about Jared Wayne Echols, who died after a training drill this week.

Chief: Fallen AL Firefighter ‘Had a True Servant’s Heart’

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"He’s touched many, many lives, even in the short time he was with us," said the Springville fire chief about Jared Wayne Echols, who died after a training drill this week.

Chief: Fallen AL Firefighter ‘Had a True Servant’s Heart’

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"He’s touched many, many lives, even in the short time he was with us," said the Springville fire chief about Jared Wayne Echols, who died after a training drill this week.

How mobile-first apps are changing law enforcement

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Sponsored by Tyler Technologies

By Laura Neitzel for PoliceOne BrandFocus

When the first desktop personal computers arrived on the scene in the late ’70s and early ’80s, data storage maxed out at about 2.5 gigabytes. Graphics were rudimentary (think the original Mario Brothers video game). The first short message service, or SMS, note, which we now call a “text,” was sent in 1992. If you wanted to photograph a crime scene, you probably used a 35 mm film camera, since the first digital camera was not perfected until almost a decade later.

Fast forward to today, when most Americans have a smartphone, tablet or even a smartwatch that is more powerful than the supercomputers used to guide the Apollo 11 capsule to the moon. Now, anyone can use a handheld device to text, video chat, capture high-resolution images, play their favorite music, socialize with their friends, map the quickest way to a destination or even see a live view of Earth from the International Space Station.

Now that mobile technologies are fully integrated into our personal lives, police agencies are more open to equipping their superheroes with supercomputers: mobile devices and applications that leverage the ease of consumer applications but are built specifically to address the needs of law enforcement. Mobile apps can help keep officers more situationally aware while making tasks like reporting and evidence collection in the field more efficient and accurate.

Not only does the embrace of mobile technology make sense for safety, efficiency and accuracy, it will become increasingly necessary as the new generation of digital natives enters the profession already accustomed to mobile technology and the expectation of being constantly connected.

Here is a look at a few mobile-first apps that will soon put supercomputer capabilities in the hands of police officers – no matter where they are.

What is driving a mobile-first approach?

Mobile-first is basically the ability for folks to be able to perform their jobs out in the field on devices like a smartphone or tablet, says Russell Gainford, vice president of software strategy and development for Tyler Technologies’ public safety division.

Tyler is committed to developing increasingly sophisticated yet user-friendly and intuitive mobile applications for public safety, made possible by rapid advances in the devices themselves and the impending arrival of 5G, the next-generation wireless network that promises unprecedented speed and data storage capacity.

“The No. 1 thing we’re seeing is the improvement of device technology, the graphics processing, the chip processing, the memory and the ability for these phones and devices to be as powerful as your laptops and computers,” said Gainford. “We also expect over the next three years that the 5G wireless network will be out and available across the United States, which will dramatically improve the speed of an individual’s phone download by over 20 times. 5G will open up a realm of possibilities for mobility applications.”

Apps to enhance situational awareness and safety

One of the areas where officers are most exposed day-to-day in the field is when they leave their vehicle and dispatchers are not able to locate them.

One of Tyler’s mobile-first tools, New World ShieldForce, extends the computer-aided dispatch functionality onto a smartphone, tablet or watch, so a dispatcher can track an officer, first in their vehicle, then by their phone and then their watch as they move, says Gainford. The application can also trigger an emergency beacon if it recognizes that an officer is in a foot chase.

In addition to being able to track a single officer, command staff can view real-time positioning of all units and personnel during a large-scale incident, which helps when backup is required.

ShieldForce was also designed to provide critical information to officers in the field to keep them more situationally aware. With information instantly accessible, law enforcement officers do not need to radio into dispatch for additional information or return to their patrol vehicles to request or pull data from their MDTs.

“An officer can scan a driver’s license directly next to an individual in a car,” said Gainford. “They can search for vehicles. They can search for individuals. It’s a full-fledged dispatch application set that is meant to be the next generation of what’s done in the MDT today.”

Coming soon: An app for the smart watch

In addition to apps for smartphones and tablets, Tyler is working on an app that can push alerts, narratives and emergency notifications to an officer’s smartwatch. This will allow an officer to stay situationally aware even in instances where they may want to be more discreet or when a phone or tablet is not accessible or convenient.

“One of the things we’ve heard from police officers is, ‘Hey, when I’m out there and I’m talking directly to a potential suspect on a stop or something that’s occurring, I’m not looking directly at my phone all the time,” said Gainford. “Our goal with a smart watch application is to provide all the critical information that a first responder would need without them ever having to take a phone out of their pocket.”

Biometric sensors in the smartwatch can also monitor an officer’s heart or breathing rate and be configured to send alerts accordingly.

Evidence collection

Another area where the mobile-first approach has gained traction is evidence collection. Tyler’s New World Scene Collect app gives investigators the ability to take notes, take photos or record videos in the field and automatically upload them to secure, CJIS-compliant cloud storage.

“An officer can take a narration from a citizen who witnessed an accident, get pictures and video of the surrounding scene and then that information instantly gets stored to the cloud,” said Gainford. “Then that evidence will link back to the records management system so when an investigator goes into the records to look at the case or incident, they can view all the related files there instantly without having to navigate in multiple systems.”

Access information from other departments

Tyler recently acquired MobileEyes, a mobile-centric application designed to allow fire inspectors to essentially perform fire inspections using national fire code standards and violations. Although designed for the fire service, the information gathered from the fire inspection can be valuable to law enforcement officers as well.

“The results of those inspections can flow back into the city’s permitting software and also into the police department’s CAD and records dispatch software,” said Gainford. “That way, when a law enforcement officer is dispatched to a scene, they have information about that building, such as number of occupants, the nature of the business, whether there are hazardous materials stored at the location or whether there are fences, gates or security systems to be navigated.”

The future is coming: Are you ready?

Gainford has been surprised at how quickly police agencies are embracing mobile-first technology.

“We expected that, at least for quite a few years, our mobile applications would be used more as a supplementary application to a mobile device terminal in the car that would be used to capture some evidence or look up certain information,” he said. “But what we’re seeing right now is that many agencies, especially smaller agencies with volunteers, are just getting rid of the laptops altogether and using mobile devices as their primary device for their job.”

As millennials and Gen Z (born after 1995) enter the workforce, mobility will be the norm. Tyler Technologies is preparing for this near future, when mobile devices on 5G networks will give law enforcement unprecedented capabilities to share vital information that will lead to safer, smarter and more connected communities.


Man found guilty of fatally shooting Maine LEO

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Seth Koenig Bangor Daily News, Maine

BANGOR, Maine — A Cumberland County jury of six men and six women found John D. Williams guilty of murder in the April 2018 fatal shooting of Cpl. Eugene Cole of the Somerset County Sheriff’s Office.

The death of Cole, who was the first Maine law enforcement officer fatally shot in the line of duty in nearly 30 years, and ensuing four-day manhunt for Williams garnered intense media coverage.

The jurors deliberated less than three hours before handing up their verdict.

“This won’t bring Gene back,” Tom Cole, Eugene Cole’s brother, told reporters outside the courthouse after the verdict. “There are no winners in a case like this, but maybe now we can start to get some closure. Hopefully we’ll start to sleep at night again and maybe it won’t be out there as much, so maybe the wounds can start to heal.”

Deputy Attorney General Lisa Marchese, who led the prosecution, said her team is “very grateful for the thorough job the jury did in rendering their guilty verdict.”

“They obviously agreed with the state’s view of the case,” she continued. “They weren’t out that long, so we’re thrilled.”

The fact that John Williams shot and killed the Somerset County Sheriff’s Office deputy was not disputed in the seven-day trial. Rather, Williams’ defense team argued that he was so impaired by drugs at the time he couldn’t have formed the intent to kill Cole when he pulled the trigger.

“That was the defense’s only argument and we didn’t buy it,” Marchese told reporters. “We thought his actions around the time of the homicide clearly showed he intended to cause the death of Cpl. Cole.”

If jurors had agreed he didn’t intend to kill, they could have downgraded the charge from murder to manslaughter.

A murder conviction carries a sentence of between 25 years and life in prison, while a manslaughter conviction has no minimum sentence and a maximum term of 30 years.

Williams, 30, had pleaded not guilty to murder. Defense attorney Verne Paradie, who represented Williams, told reporters he plans to appeal the verdict.

“I’m obviously disappointed,” Paradie said. “It’s not an entirely surprising verdict. It was a tough case. … [Williams] is obviously disappointed as well.”

Marchese reiterated to reporters that prosecutors will seek a life sentence. She said she expects the sentencing to take place in early September.

Somerset County Sheriff Dale Lancaster was in court Tuesday and emailed his department once the jury handed up its guilty verdict, said Detective Jeremy Leal.

It came as a relief to the detective, who developed a close friendship with Cole when they were partners on patrol for between 2009 and 2013. Leal was one of the first Somerset County officers to arrive in Norridgewock in the early hours of April 25, 2018, after Cole went silent on his radio, and spent the next four sleepless days helping in the massive search for Williams.

“I was in my office and the new chief deputy was with me [when I saw the verdict]. We were elated that justice was served and I’m sure that was the sentiment throughout our department and law enforcement in Maine,” Leal said Tuesday afternoon. “It’s a good day.”

Monuments have gone up and a bridge has been dedicated in Cole’s name in the year since he died, and a few Somerset County deputies even have his call number, 1312, tattooed on their bodies, Leal said. For younger deputies who saw the 61-year-old corporal as a mentor, they see his legacy in their police work.

“He really took me under his wing,” said Deputy Logan Roberts, who was supervised by Cole during his first five months with the department, after he was hired at age 22 in November of 2017. “He always told me that I should treat people at work how I’d want my parents to be treated by the police. That’s something I carry with me every day.”

During the trial, prosecutors called a range of law enforcement officers and forensics specialists to testify that, based in part on the gunpowder marks left on the entrance wound on Cole’s neck and lead found on his uniform collar, Williams shot the deputy at contact range.

Under the definitions in Maine law, defendants can be found guilty of “knowing and intentional” murder if they “can be practically certain” their actions would cause death.

“John Williams knows exactly what happens when you put a .9 mm to a person’s neck and pull the trigger,” Marchese told jurors. “The target is eliminated.”

Marchese used the term “eliminated,” because jurors heard Williams tell detectives he “eliminated” Cole in a recorded interview. Prosecutors played the nearly 90-minute video of detectives interviewing Williams on the third day of the trial.

“I pulled my pistol,” Williams says in the video. “I got the jump on him. I shot him.”

“Where did you shoot him,” one of the detectives asks.

“I shot him in the head,” Williams answers.

“The confession, in my view, was the most compelling piece of evidence in the case,” Marchese told reporters. “Once you had the confession, it was never a ‘whodunit,’ so that, to me, was the most compelling.”

The prosecution also called witnesses who interacted with Williams during the hours before and after the crime, including two current or former friends and a convenience store cashier, who testified that Williams was able to steal and drive away Cole’s police truck, among other actions.

A former friend, Christopher Williams, no relation to the defendant, testified for the prosecution that John Williams was a knowledgeable and responsible gun owner.

Prosecutors hoped those testimonies would sway the jury that John Williams was not so impaired at the time he couldn’t have understood the close-range shot would be fatal.

Marchese said during her closing argument Tuesday that the defendant’s familiarity with his firearms proved he knew how to use them lethally.

“This man knew exactly what he was doing,” she told jurors.

Paradie disputed that Williams was at “contact range” when he shot Cole, saying during his closing argument the deputy’s blood would’ve been on the handgun or the police truck steering wheel, which Williams stole after the crime, had he been as close as prosecutors said.

During the trial, defense attorneys called only two witnesses: a forensic psychology professor and an addiction specialist, who told jurors on Friday that Williams’ drug use, exhaustion, hunger and isolation made him “irrational, destructive and self-defeating” in the days leading up to Cole’s shooting.

“Nobody has claimed Mr. Williams, when you’re as high as he was, can’t function,” Paradie said during his closing argument Tuesday, adding that jurors just need to agree that Williams didn’t understand that the shot would be fatal in the “instant” he pulled the trigger in order to find him not guilty of murder.

“He told [state forensic expert] Dr. April O’Grady, ‘It was like I was watching another person … then after the shot, I snapped back into reality like a rubber band,’” Paradie told the jury.

While the two sides disagreed whether Williams knowingly or intentionally killed Cole, the timeline of events was largely undisputed.

Under the prosecution’s timeline — which went unchallenged by the defense — Williams was attempting to get into a Mercer Road home in Norridgewock in the early morning hours of April 25, 2018, where he’d previously been living.

Cole — who had recently encountered Williams on a traffic stop in which drugs were allegedly found in the vehicle and Williams’ girlfriend, the driver, was arrested — approached to arrest Williams as well.

Williams pulled away from Cole, took out his Ruger .9 mm handgun and fatally shot the deputy in the neck.

Williams then stole Cole’s police truck and went on the run, starting a nearly four-day manhunt that ended on April 28, 2019, when police found him hiding in a small cabin in the Fairfield woods near the Norridgewock town line.

Williams’ defense team sought to downplay the video of his interview with detectives, arguing that police “beat and pummeled” him after finding him in the woods and that Williams only confessed to the crime to avoid further abuse.

But Superior Court Justice Robert Mullen ruled the video was admissible after a multi-day hearing in late February-early March.

Glenn Lang of the Maine State Police said Williams was reluctant to offer his hands to be cuffed, and acknowledged on the witness stand that he hit him “two or three times” in order to get handcuffs on the suspect as quickly as possible.

Marchese said during her closing argument Tuesday that Williams was heavily armed and had already killed one police officer at the time, and that the arresting officers didn’t know whether there was an accomplice somewhere in the area. She argued the additional force was understandable under the circumstances.

Paradie told reporters he plans to appeal Mullen’s decision to allow the admission of the confession video, as well as the prosecution’s depiction of the positions Williams and Cole were in at the time of the shooting.

———

©2019 the Bangor Daily News (Bangor, Maine)


Firefighter Hurt in ‘Massive’ FL Panhandle Condo Blaze

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A resident also suffered minor injuries from the fire in Perdido Key, near the Florida-Alabama border, that 14 of 20 condominium units early Wednesday.

Firefighter Hurt in ‘Massive’ FL Panhandle Condo Blaze

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A resident also suffered minor injuries from the fire in Perdido Key, near the Florida-Alabama border, that destroyed 14 of 20 condominium units early Wednesday.

Bill adds killing Ore. LE back to crimes eligible for death penalty

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Noelle Crombie The Oregonian, Portland, Ore.

PORTLAND, Ore. — A bill that narrows the crimes eligible for the death penalty heads to a vote of the Oregon House on Wednesday with a new provision: A last-minute change adds back the killing of law enforcement, corrections and parole and probation officers to the definition of aggravated murder.

The bill now defines aggravated murder to apply to acts of terror that kill two or more people, killings in jail or prison by people already convicted of aggravated murder, the premeditated murder of a someone younger than 14 and the killing of officers.

Under current state law, aggravated murder covers crimes such as killing more than one person or killing someone during a rape or robbery. Senate Bill 1013 would reclassify those crimes as first-degree murder, carrying a maximum sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole.

House Majority Jennifer Williamson, D-Portland, said during a committee vote Monday that the inclusion of law enforcement in the bill is “appropriate.”

“What we talked about in the hearing was ensuring that our death penalty is available for the worst of the worst crimes,” she said.

Aliza Kaplan, a professor at Lewis & Clark Law School and director of the Criminal Justice Reform Clinic, called the bill a compromise and a start to fixing what she called a broken system.

“While we might not all agree -- some people want more things, some people want less things -- we are at least discussing the issue and focusing on what is best for our state so we are not wasting money,” she said.

The proposed legislation also would change one of the four questions juries must decide when considering whether to impose a death sentence. Under Oregon’s system, jurors must determine that a person guilty of aggravated murder is at risk of being a danger in the future. The bill would remove that question.

———

©2019 The Oregonian (Portland, Ore.)


After fatal OIS, Ind. mayor says police must activate cameras

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg is telling officers after a fatal police shooting that they must activate their body cameras during any interaction with civilians.

The Democratic presidential candidate asked his police chief to issue an executive order Tuesday confirming an existing department policy about use of body cameras. The order came two days after a white officer fatally shot a 54-year-old black man. The officer said the man refused commands to drop a knife.

Prosecutors investigating Eric Logan's death say the shooting was not recorded on Sgt. Ryan O'Neill's body camera because the officer was driving without emergency lights while responding to a call about a suspicious person going through vehicles.

Buttigieg says the city has been working for years to improve relations between police and the community. He says that "must continue with more urgency than ever" after Sunday's shooting.


Police: Los Angeles Fire Official Used City Car in Dispute

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Los Angeles Fire Department's spokesman is accused of using his city car's lights and sirens to chase down an Uber driver who argued with his wife, a police report states.

3 NC sheriffs to speak out against detainer bill

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Some North Carolina sheriffs who've refused to hold people who would otherwise be released from jail if federal agents say they might be in the country unlawfully are still opposed to updated legislation aiming to address the issue.

Sheriffs from Mecklenburg, Wake and Buncombe counties plan to speak at a Legislative Building news conference on Wednesday before a Senate committee debates and votes on the bill.

These recently elected sheriffs announced they wouldn't comply with Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers for people charged with state crimes, saying it's not in the best interest of community safety and may be unconstitutional.

House legislation forcing sheriffs to fulfill those requests was changed in the Senate, to require orders from judges or magistrates. These sheriffs still have concerns about due process.


Phoenix Police Chief Responds to Criticism During Community Meeting

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams responds to criticism during community meeting, amid boos from audience.

Dallas Police Uncover Biggest ‘Chop Shop’ In Last Decade

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police also found circular saw blades where its believed stolen vehicles were brought before they were cut up and sold for parts.

Dallas Police Uncover Biggest ‘Chop Shop’ In Last Decade

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police also found circular saw blades where its believed stolen vehicles were brought before they were cut up and sold for parts.

Phoenix police chief promises change amid civil rights claim

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

PHOENIX — Police Chief Jeri Williams promised change in her department after being booed by some of hundreds of people gathered to discuss a videotaped police encounter that has caused a national outcry.

The meeting at a downtown church Tuesday night was called by the city in the wake of the release of a bystander's video of police officers who pointed their guns and shouted obscenities last month at a black family. Dravon Ames and his pregnant fiancee Iesha Harper, who was holding their 1-year-old daughter, say their 4-year-old daughter had stolen a doll from a store without their knowledge.

"Real change starts with the community," Williams said to a sometimes hostile crowd comprised mainly of blacks and Hispanics.

"Real change starts with the firing of the officers! Fire them!" one woman shouted toward the stage, where Williams, who is herself black, was seated next to Mayor Kate Gallego and other Phoenix city leaders.

Appearing frustrated at times, Williams assured those gathered that the meeting would not be the last.

"We are here to listen, we are here to make change," she said.

The couple has called for the officers to be fired.

Ames addressed the crowd briefly, drawing applause when he said he and his family were lucky to be alive after the incident.

"No one should ever try to justify what happened that day," he said.

"We matter," said Harper, holding the couple's 1-year-old.

The father of Jacob Harris, a black 19-year-old man who was shot and killed by a Phoenix officer in January following an armed robbery at a fast food restaurant, also spoke at the meeting along with others who have had loved ones killed in police-related shootings.

Earlier Tuesday, Phoenix police released surveillance video aimed at backing up their assertion that adults and not just a child were shoplifting before the incident.

The store video is difficult to follow because it has been edited and the subjects' faces are blurred. It shows a man taking something from a display rack and examining it, but it's unclear what happened to the package when he walked off camera.

Another snippet of video later shows a little girl with a doll in a box walking out of the store accompanied by adults.

A police statement last week about the incident in late May states Dravon Ames told police he threw a pair of stolen underwear out of his car. Police also say a woman traveling in a different vehicle was arrested separately for stealing aluminum foil.

A bystander's video that came to light last week shows officers aiming guns and yelling profane commands at Ames and his pregnant fiancée, Iesha Harper, as she held their 1-year-old daughter. They say their 4-year-old daughter had taken a doll from a store without their knowledge.

The store decided not to prosecute and no charges have been filed.

The couple filed a $10 million claim against the city alleging civil rights violations as a precursor to a lawsuit. The race of the officers is not known.

Ames has a pending case on charges of aggravated assault of a police officer in an unrelated case that followed a traffic accident in suburban Tempe, Arizona, last year. Court documents say Ames unsuccessfully tried to kick officers several times when they arrested him on suspicion of driving under the influence of marijuana.

One Tempe officer used a stun gun on Ames because he thought he was trying to grab the other officer's gun, according to documents.

Phoenix police have not responded to repeated questions about whether the officers in the videotaped encounter following the alleged shoplifting were aware of, or influenced by, Ames' earlier case. Civil liberties attorney Sandra Slaton said Monday the prior case was irrelevant.

The police chief has said an investigation into the officers' actions is under way. The Phoenix police union is urging calm, saying it will not express an opinion until the investigation is completed.

The bystander's video comes amid an investigation by police departments in Phoenix and other cities into a database that appears to catalog thousands of bigoted or violent social media posts by active-duty and former officers.

Williams, has moved some officers to "non-enforcement" assignments while the department looks into Facebook posts she called "embarrassing and disturbing."

The database published by Plain View Project earlier this month included nearly 180 posts tied to current Phoenix police officers that disparage Muslims, black people, transgender people and other groups.


NYPD: Prop Mistaken for Dead Baby Found In Queens Park

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police were called at 8:15 a.m. for an unconscious and unresponsive child at 215th Street and 35th Avenue, near Crocheron Park in Bayside. EMS rushed to the scene and initially pronounced the “child” dead before realizing it was a doll.

FDNY: Firefighter Wasn’t Hooked in Basket When He Fell

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FDNY firefighter William Tolley "may have removed his safety belt" before falling five-stories to his death while fighting a 2017 apartment fire, an internal probe determined.

FDNY: Firefighter Wasn’t Hooked in Bucket When He Fell

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FDNY firefighter William Tolley "may have removed his safety belt" before falling five-stories to his death while fighting a 2017 apartment fire, an internal probe determined.

Curt Isakson to Deliver Firehouse Expo 2019 Keynote

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Curt Isakson will deliver the Firehouse Expo 2019 keynote address with the message “It’s Worth the Risk.”

Container Led to Arson Probe in MA Firefighter’s LODD

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An unsealed search warrant reveals that a plastic container and signs of gasoline were found at the scene of the fire that killed Worcester firefighter Christopher Roy.

Container Led to Arson Probe in MA Firefighter’s LODD

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An unsealed search warrant reveals that a plastic container and signs of gasoline were found at the scene of the fire that killed Worcester firefighter Christopher Roy.

MI Fire Station Open Since 1889 Earns World Record

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Manistee Fire Department, which is celebrating its 130th anniversary, received the Guiness World Record for having the world's oldest continuously staffed fire station.

Two Wounded in Shootout With Los Angeles County Deputies

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two men were shot Tuesday by Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies after one man fired at them while attempting to flee a pursuit.

Texas Police Officers Fatally Shoot Man Who Rammed Cruisers

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Brownsville police shot and killed a 20-year-old man early Monday morning after he rammed several squad cars while leading officers on a chase, authorities said.

California Deputy Allegedly Assaulted by NBA Executive Suffered Concussion

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Alameda County Sheriff’s deputy involved in the incident was later diagnosed with a concussion and will be off duty until medically cleared to return.

Indiana Police Shooting Exposes Limits of Body Camera Program

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The shooting exposed the limitations of the city’s body camera program, just a year after the South Bend Police Department issued the devices to all of its patrol officers at a cost of $1.5 million.

St. Louis Police Officer Shot by Colleague Sues City

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

St. Louis Police Officer Milton Green, who was shot while off duty by a fellow cop in 2017, filed a federal lawsuit Monday, alleging abuse by his own department and offering new details of the controversial shooting.

Black Forest, CO, Fire Rescue Gets 4×4 Rescue-Pumper

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Black Forest, CO Fire Rescue has taken delivery of a rescue-pumper built by SVI Trucks on a Spartan cab and chassis. The Metro Star cab and chassis is powered by a Cummins L9 450-hp engine and an Allison 3000EVS transmission. For incident responses, it...

Body Camera Video Shows Orlando Police Officer Dragged

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Orlando Police released body cam footage of an officer being dragged by suspect’s car that hit speeds of up to 60 mph.

Man Convicted in Slaying of Maine Deputy

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Cumberland County jury of six men and six women found John D. Williams guilty of murder in the April 2018 fatal shooting of Cpl. Eugene Cole of the Somerset County Sheriff’s Office.

Be prepared for anything with a multi-tool built for the fire service

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Channellock’s compact and light rescue tools combine the cutting tool head of an electrical lineman’s pliers with five other tools in one

RI FD celebrates helping 100th person in fight of drug addiction through ‘Safe Stations’ program

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fire Capt. Zachariah Kenyon modeled the program after those at fire departments in Manchester and Nashua, New Hampshire, and said he hopes to see the program spread throughout the state and region

NY ambulance network opposes bill to allow FDs to charge for services

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The United New York Ambulance Network fears the bill will hurt the ambulance industry, while fire departments are looking to recoup the costs of medical calls

NY ambulance network opposes bill to allow FDs to charge for services

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The United New York Ambulance Network fears the bill will hurt the ambulance industry, while fire departments are looking to recoup the costs of medical calls

University of Washington develops cardiac arrest monitoring tool for smart speakers

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The tool can detect agonal breathing 97% of the time and researchers hope to make it into an app

Clarius Mobile Health launches Clarius Live – a real-time, live ultrasound feature

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When a live connection is initiated, the receiver will open a secure link via email or text message, which provides two-way audio and visual images

Product of the Day: Idex Fire & Safety — SAM Flows

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The innovative SAM system makes complex pump operations simple by managing the water flow so the operator can focus on the fireground.

Moving patients from point A to point B … safely

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Know when and how to use the tools in your ambulance to safely transport a patient from their home

Regulating New Mexico air ambulance fees are ongoing

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The costs of ambulance services have skyrocketed nearly 230% in the last 15 years

NM officials struggle to regulate air ambulance fees

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The costs of ambulance services have skyrocketed nearly 230% in the last 15 years

Are your clinicians ready to clear C-spine in the field?

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Implementing a new procedure for clearing C-spines requires supplementary data, buy-in from leadership and hands-on training

Veteran Texas firefighter sentenced for intoxicated crash that injured two children in March 2018

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Eddie Ehrenzweig, 46, pleaded guilty to intoxication assault a few weeks ago before 111th District Judge Monica Z. Notzon

Former Texas firefighter sentenced for DWI crash that injured 2 children

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Eddie Ehrenzweig, 46, pleaded guilty to intoxication assault a few weeks ago before 111th District Judge Monica Z. Notzon

EMS chief sentenced to 30 days in jail for insurance fraud

Posted on June 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In addition to his jail sentence, Donald Horner forfeits his EMT certification and must reimburse the insurance companies

FF not attached by safety harness to bucket when he fell to his death in April 2017

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William Tolley, 42, of Bethpage, plummeted to the ground fighting a Ridgewood, Queens, apartment fire on April 20, 2017

NY firefighter not attached to bucket during fatal April 2017 fall

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William Tolley, 42, of Bethpage, plummeted to the ground fighting a Ridgewood, Queens, apartment fire on April 20, 2017

Dead baby found in New York park turns out to be hoax

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Medics had declared the infant dead and an active crime scene was established before the hoax was discovered

Off-duty Idaho FF-EMT dies in motorcycle crash

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Hyrum Nielsen was driving a black 1982 Suzuki motorcycle when he hit a tree and was ejected from his vehicle

Off-duty Idaho FF-EMT dies in motorcycle crash

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Hyrum Nielsen was driving a black 1982 Suzuki motorcycle when he hit a tree and was ejected from his vehicle

Ore. volunteer firefighter dies in boating incident

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Janice Arsenault, 44, of Umatilla, was remembered for her positive outlook on life, contagious laugh and desire to live life to its fullest

Federal Authorities: Philadelphia Port Bust Nets More Than $1 Billion Worth of Cocaine

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Authorities Tuesday seized more than 16 tons of cocaine from a cargo ship docked at the Port of Philadelphia — a massive haul they estimated was worth more than $1 billion and described as one of the largest busts in the nation’s history.

OSCR360: Empowering First Responders

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

OSCR360 is empowering First responders to plan and prepare for any situational threat to schools, universities, government & public spaces.

OSCR360: Empowering First Responders

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

OSCR360 is empowering First responders to plan and prepare for any situational threat to schools, universities, government & public spaces.

POLICE Webinar Focuses on Body Camera Data Storage Solutions

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In the June 20 Webinar, Derrington will discuss the challenge of storing video data, finding a fluid storage solution that can accommodate increasing amounts of video, and the security of stored data.

CAL FIRE: Farming Equipment Sparked McMillan Wildfire

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Machinery used to harvest hay accidentally started the fire last week, and the blaze burned through more than 1,700 acres near Shandon, fire officials said.

FL Officer Dies of Heart Attack at Police Athletic Camp

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Steven Brown, 40, suffered a fatal heart attack June 12 after completing his third day leading the Port St. Lucie Police Athletic League's Police Camp.

MO Crews Save 93-Year-Old Driver Who Crashed into Pool

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Swimmers kept the woman's car in the shallow end of the pool so it wouldn't fill up with water before Gravois Fire Protection District firefighters arrived.

Summer Uniform Wear 2019

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When the weather heats up, these shirts will help keep you cool and dry on duty.

Elucd – Community/Resident Survey and Poll App

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Elucd is a modern, efficient and effective way for police leaders to hear directly from their constituents in every neighborhood, community and precinct. Between work, childcare and other obligations, community meetings are not always accessible to...

Off-Duty Wisconsin Officer Killed During Armed Robbery at Bar

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty officer with the Racine (WI) Police Department was shot and killed while trying to intervene in an armed robbery in progress in a local bar on Monday night.

Gunfire Erupts at Toronto Raptors Victory Rally, 4 Reportedly Injured

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Shots were fired near the stage in Nathan Phillips Square—where the Toronto Raptors victory celebration was taking place on Monday—causing the crowd to disperse.

Suspect Shot Dead After Ramming Police Cruiser During Vehicle Pursuit

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man is dead after leading Texas police on a vehicle pursuit and ramming several police vehicles on Monday.

Border Patrol Agents Fatally Shoot Man Who Shot at Police in New Mexico

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Agents with the United States Border Patrol shot and killed a man who had shot and wounded an officer with the Las Cruces Police Department on Monday.

Border Patrol Agents Fatally Shoot Man Who Shot at Police in New Mexico

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Agents with the United States Border Patrol shot and killed a man who had shot and wounded an officer with the Las Cruces Police Department on Monday.

Off-Duty Officer Saves Man from Massive Home Explosion

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty police officer was in the right place at the right time when a home in Ridgefield (NJ) suddenly exploded, leaving a man injured.

Wisconsin Man Pleads Guilty to Attack on Officer in 2018

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man who attacked an officer with the Portage (WI) Police Department in 2018 has been found guilty on a felony charge of battery on a police officer in court proceedings Monday. Additional charges, including bail jumping, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct were dismissed, but read into the record.

Canadian Officer Severely Injured in Single-Vehicle Crash

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Montreal Police was badly injured when his patrol vehicle crashed into a tree while en route to a call for service.

Houston Police Department Launches Spanish-Language Radio Show

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Houston Police Department has launched a Spanish-Language radio show as part of the programming lineup of a local Spanish-language Christian station.

Verizon Connect Redefines Workforce Management for Government Customers

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Verizon Connect Government is designed to meet the specific workforce management needs of government customers, including vehicle inspection automation, asset visibility and management.

Indiana Agency Hires Full-Time Social Worker

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Bloomington Police Department recently hired a full-time professionally trained social worker to help the agency serve members of the public who are struggling with addiction, homelessness, or mental health issues.

Indiana Agency Hires Full-Time Social Worker

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Bloomington Police Department recently hired a full-time professionally trained social worker to help the agency serve members of the public who are struggling with addiction, homelessness, or mental health issues.

California Police Participate in Nine-Mile Special Olympics Run

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The San Francisco Police Department hosted a nine-mile run in support of Special Olympics of California that drew nearly 3,000 participants from across the Golden State.

PA Department to Hire 10 to 12 More Firefighters

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Wilkes-Barre fire chief and city officials will start interviewing candidates next week to increase staffing following 16 retirements last year and a resignation this year.

FL Crews Help Rescue Three after Chopper Ocean Crash

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Key West and Monroe County firefighters, as well as police and sheriff's deputies, pulled the helicopter pilot and two passengers from the water following an emergency landing.

Metro Chiefs Meet in Alberta, Canada, Select New Officers

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 110 Metro chiefs from Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Mexico, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States attended the conference.

New York Police: Suspect Used Uber to Flee Robbery

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Suffolk County police said a Brentwood man was arrested Sunday night after he robbed a Dunkin’ store on Suffolk Avenue, then entered “an awaiting Uber” — and had the driver take him home.

FBI Appoints New Head of Bureau’s Baltimore Field Office

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The FBI has named Jennifer C. Boone as the special agent in charge of the bureau’s Baltimore office.

Alligator Bites, Injures Louisiana Sheriff’s Deputy Trying to Capture the Animal

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A St. Charles Parish deputy was bit on the arm by an alligator as deputies tried to catch it.

Acting MS Fire Captain Dies of Heart Attack

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Todd Lathrip, a 53-year-old acting captain with the Mathiston Volunteer Fire Department, suffered the medical emergency at home after he had responded to a car crash.

Calif. LEO weighs lawsuit after altercation with Toronto Raptors’ president

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

OAKLAND, Calif. — A sheriff’s deputy is considering filing a lawsuit after claiming he was seriously injured by Toronto Raptors President Masai Ujiri last week.

According to CBS San Francisco, Ujiri allegedly hit the deputy with his arm on the side of his face and shoved him while trying to get to the court after the Raptors won the NBA Finals.

The deputy told investigators that he was trying to stop Ujiri because he didn’t know who he was and wasn’t wearing proper credentials. That’s when Ujiri gave “an unprovoked significant hit to the jaw” to the deputy.

The 20-year veteran suffered a serious concussion and jaw injury and hasn’t been able to return to work.

The Almeda County sheriff says he supports the deputy and is recommending the case move forward to the district attorney for criminal charges against Ujiri.


Spartan ER Displayed New Rescue-Pumper at NY Chiefs’ Show

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Spartan rescue pumper, “Engine 32,” featuring a safety-first design, has been recently added to the Moyers Corners, NY, Fire Department’s emergency response fleet.

Ind. mayor cancels presidential campaign events after fatal OIS

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WASHINGTON — An Indiana mayor who is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination canceled his campaign events to return to his city after a fatal officer-involved shooting occurred.

According to Reuters, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg canceled his Monday campaign events after the fatal officer-involved shooting of 53-year-old Eric Jack Logan on Sunday. The mayor had been scheduled to appear at events in New York.

Buttigieg held a late night news conference Sunday explaining next steps in the investigation of the shooting. The mayor told reporters that he learned from criticism he received after previous use of force incidents and that it was important for leaders to get in front of the cameras even if there’s not much information to give.

Police say Logan approached an officer with a knife, prompting the LEO to shoot him. Logan was transported to a local hospital where he later died.

The unidentified officer is on administrative leave, per policy.

A separate internal affairs investigation at the police department is underway to determine if its policies and procedures were followed.


GA Fire Chief Sworn In: ‘I Accept with a Servant’s Heart’

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"This is a position I accept with a servant's heart and humility," said Savannah Fire Rescue Chief Derik Minard, who officially became the department's 35th chief Monday.

Silent no more: Officers need a lifeline, too

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Liz Barton

After retiring from a long career as a police officer, my grandfather died by suicide in 2012.

My grandfather wasn’t the only one I watched suffer in silence. Growing up as a multi-generational police officer’s daughter, and being married to a firefighter, I witnessed firsthand the devastating effects being a first responder can have on the brain. I watched as my loved ones and family friends battled depression, anxiety, PTSD, alcoholism, substance use disorder and, for my grandfather, suicide. After his death and the death of a close family friend, I knew I could no longer be silent.

I’m now an advocate for first responders struggling with mental health and substance use disorder. Every day, I get to help someone find healing as the national administrator for first responder services for American Addiction Centers. I also travel around the country working with law enforcement agencies to bring these issues to the forefront. My message: It’s OK to not be OK – but it’s not OK to live in silence.

Responders still afraid to seek help

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, nearly one in four police officers has thoughts of suicide at some point in their life. In fact, more police officers die by suicide than in the line of duty.

It’s easy to understand when you consider most officers and other first responders experience more trauma in a single day than most people will experience in a lifetime. Despite this, I’ve found first responders are afraid to come forward and get help because they fear people will look down on them or they could lose their weapons and jobs.

Over the last several years, we’ve seen advancements in the policies and procedures for law enforcement agencies nationwide. But until we get to the point where officers do not fear repercussions for reaching out for help, there’s still much to do. For example, I would like to see every agency have a health and wellness committee and offer continuing education for officers around mental health.

Signs and symptoms of a mental health concern

We must continue to raise awareness about the early warning signs of a mental health concern. Those signs can include, but are not limited to:

Lack of sleep/nightmares; Sudden relationship issues; Increase in reckless behaviors; Loss of appetite; Lack of self-care; Anger/rage/change in personality; Isolation; Loss of interest in activities; Increased alcohol consumption or substance use as a coping mechanism.

Some first responders mistakenly believe these symptoms will get better over time. The reality is that they typically only get worse. The data shows the sooner you can get help after a traumatic event, the better the outcome. Unfortunately, officers are waiting too long to get help and it’s leading to an increased risk for substance use and addiction. And for some people like my grandfather, it becomes too much to bear and ends in death by suicide.

Reaching out for help

The good news is there is help. Taking the first step can include reaching out to a peer support team or chaplain, connecting with an EAP program, or contacting a confidential helpline. American Addiction Centers operates a 24/7 confidential law enforcement helpline at 855-997-6542.

What my family endured was heartbreaking. If I can help even one officer from going down that path, then I will continue to speak out and raise the alarm. This is my life’s calling and my way of honoring my family’s legacy.


About the author Liz Barton is a trained first responder addiction specialist and mental health champion. Liz works alongside Responder Rescue in St. Louis, Missouri, and HERO (Helping Emergency Responders Overcome) program, which offers confidential counseling for first responders and their families as well as support groups. Liz also works and advocates alongside many law enforcement organizations to support officer mental wellness. In 2014, she joined American Addiction Centers and eventually assumed the role of national administrator of first responder services. Liz also advocates for first responders on the legislative level. She has written several bills and lobbied to Congress to adopt laws accepting PTSI as a work-related injury under workers’ compensation.


OH Crews Need 27K Gallons of Water to Extinguish Fire

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lightning is being blamed for setting a house ablaze Monday night in Jefferson Township and drawing firefighters from nearly 20 neighboring departments.

WA Firefighters Bring Down Roof to Put Out Fire

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Crews from Benton County Fire District 4 and several other fire departments used a backhoe in order to knock down the home's roof in order to extinguish the blaze.

AL Firefighter Who Died in Training Identified

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springville firefighter-paramedic Jared Echols, 35, became ill while participating in a recruit training drill Monday at the Anniston Regional Training Center.

St. Louis LEO sues city after being shot by colleague

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Erin Heffernan St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — A St. Louis police officer who was shot while off duty by a fellow cop in 2017 filed a federal lawsuit Monday, alleging abuse by his own department and offering new details of the controversial shooting.

Officer Milton Green filed suit in U.S. District Court in St. Louis two years after he was shot on June 21, 2017, outside his home in the city's North Pointe neighborhood while officers were searching for suspects. The shooter, identified as Officer Christopher Tanner, and the city of St. Louis are named as defendants.

Court documents lay out Green's account of the shooting and, according to the suit, a lack of support from the department in the two years since. Police declined to comment.

In an exclusive interview with Post-Dispatch metro columnist Tony Messenger, Green said that if he were a white officer, he believes the department would have handled things differently. Green is black and the shooter, Tanner, is white.

“I wouldn't have gotten shot,” Green said. “How did he not see my badge in my hand? My gun was pointed down, and the other officers were calm. The detective told them who I was and told them not to shoot.”

According to the lawsuit, Green was working on his neighbor's car in their shared driveway when he heard a vehicle crash into another car at the nearby intersection of Park Lane and Astra Avenue.

Police said they were chasing a stolen white sedan. Occupants inside had shot at officers, striking police vehicles. When the car crashed, the occupants fled, police said.

Green says one of the suspects ran next to his house and dropped to the ground when police shot at him. The man then pointed his gun at Green and Green's neighbor. Green pulled out his department-issued gun and yelled: 'Police! Drop your gun!" the suit says.

The suit says the suspect ran off, and an officer told Green to drop his weapon and get to the ground; Green complied. Green alleges he told officers he was a police officer and a detective told Green to stand up and approach him.

When he stood up, the suit alleges, Tanner walked up and shouted for him to drop the weapon while simultaneously shooting Green.

"The racial implications of how Officer Green has been treated cannot be ignored," the suit states.

Green was shot in the arm and is still on medical leave. The suit says he cannot grip with the arm that was shot.

The suit also says Green faced a lack of support from the department and his fellow officers after the shooting.

"Had he been shot by the perps everyone would have considered him a hero," Green's attorney Javad Khazaeli said Monday. "It happened while he was trying to stop a criminal and now he's permanently disabled."

Since the shooting, Green has been disappointed by the department's handling of the situation.

“If I was white, I feel like I would have been taken care of,” he told Messenger. “That's how I feel.”

The suit asserts the department "has not handled its investigation of Officer Green's shooting with any solemnity."

The department's Force Investigative Unit investigated, but, according to the suit, placed the father of Tanner's police partner in charge of the review. The suit says Green has not been interviewed by the department as part of the investigation.

In 2017, the shooting prompted then-acting Chief Lawrence O’Toole to form a committee to decide how best to train officers for similar situations. St. Louis police did not immediately say the committee produced results.

The Ethical Society of Police, which represents many St. Louis minority officers, has routinely criticized the department's response to the shooting. The group suggested more racial bias training was needed instead of friendly-fire training.

Green also says he's suffered financially. His pension claim has not been resolved, while other claims from injured officers are quickly granted, the suit alleges.

Court documents claim the St. Louis Police Officer's Association raised $2,000 for Tanner, the shooter, but held no fundraisers for Green. Jeff Roorda, business manager for the union, denied Monday that the association had hosted a fundraiser for Tanner and said that the union's charitable foundation donated money to Green.

Green, who has been a police officer since 2005, is now "drowning in bills," close to losing his home, and struggling to support himself and his four children, Khazaeli said.

Tanner was placed on administrative leave after the shooting and is no longer employed by the department.

Police took into custody two of the suspects who allegedly fled the car at the shooting scene. They were charged with a combined 31 felonies in 2017, but all charges were dropped by the St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office earlier this month.

The circuit attorney's office has not explained why the charges were dropped.

A third person who had been in the stolen car escaped, police said in 2017.

———

©2019 the St. Louis Post-Dispatch


New Orleans officer, 2 suspects wounded in drugstore shootout

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ramon Antonio Vargas The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La.

NEW ORLEANS — A usually tranquil stretch of Prytania Street in Uptown awoke to gunfire Monday morning after New Orleans police got into a shootout with two men robbing a drugstore, leaving one officer and both suspects wounded, authorities said.

While one of the suspects was quickly arrested, the second ran into a nearby residential neighborhood, sparking an hours-long manhunt through Uptown backyards and alleyways until heavily armed officers captured him.

Police brought their injured colleague to University Medical Center for treatment, and paramedics took the arrested suspects to the hospital. None of the wounded were immediately identified, but all were believed to be in stable condition, authorities said.

“I am just grateful (the officers) are OK,” New Orleans Police Department Superintendent Shaun Ferguson said. “I am grateful no one sustained, that we know of, any serious injuries.”

According to police, a 26-year-old man and an 18-year-old man barged into the 24-hour CVS in the 4900 block of Prytania just after 6:05 a.m. and demanded property from the store at gunpoint. Three officers were at the store within a few minutes to investigate a call. They encountered a pair of armed men inside the store and exchanged fire with them, Ferguson said.

Police didn’t immediately say how many bystanders were inside the store during the shootout, but at least two people wearing CVS shirts could be seen talking to investigators in the parking lot later in the morning.

The wounded officer was hit in the upper left shoulder, police said. Ferguson said he didn’t know where the suspect who was detained at the store had been hit.

Meanwhile, the second suspect, despite being hit, managed to run out of the store toward the Mississippi River on Upperline Street, police said. On a radio channel, police described the man as “limping” and wielding “a black submachine gun.”

Officers cordoned off a large area generally bounded by Prytania, Boudeaux, Coliseum and Robert streets. Pedestrians and motorists were turned away at the edges of the perimeter while police dogs and the NOPD SWAT team combed the area’s yards and alleyways.

By 9 a.m., officers found the second suspect hiding near a home close to the corner of Upperline and Chestnut streets, within the zone that had been cordoned off, according to several neighborhood residents.

Andrea Lockwood, who lives in the area, recorded a cellphone video of that man being loaded into an ambulance on a stretcher. At least three NOPD officers and three Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives agents gathered at the ambulance as paramedics brought the suspect in.

Some residents said they thought they were hearing an early test run of 4th of July fireworks before they realized the situation was much more serious.

One resident, who asked to not be named, recounted how the second suspect hid in between his and his neighbor’s homes. The resident said he looked out his front window because he heard a tarp rustling, and he spotted an officer pointing a gun up an alleyway while shouting into his radio, “I need K-9 backup!”

“I went to the safest room that I could find and laid down. I stayed there for like an hour,” said the resident, who described later seeing blood in the alleyway.

Closer to the CVS, Robert Conner, who identified himself as the pharmacy manager’s father, said he was having coffee at a McDonald’s restaurant when he saw on the television that there had been gunfire at the store.

Conner drove to the CVS and waited across the street, worrying about what had happened as the minutes ticked by. Finally, he received a call from his daughter, who said she was safe.

“It released the burden of my heart,” a visibly relieved Conner told reporters. “God … spared her life.”

Monday was only one of several times that police in New Orleans have been drawn into gun battles this year.

In separate incidents between January and May, three men were fatally shot after video footage showed that they each first fired on police.

Additionally, in July 2017, roughly a half-mile from Monday’s clash, a police officer working a paid detail for an Uptown neighborhood organization was shot in the leg by someone in a passing vehicle.

As is police protocol in deadly police shootings involving NOPD, Monday’s melee is being investigated by the Police Department’s Force Investigation Team, a special unit set up under the agency’s seven-year-old reform agreement with the federal government.

Independent federal and municipal monitors are also reviewing the case, police said.

———

©2019 The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La.


Tarkio, MO, Rural Fire Dept. Gets Flatbed Brush Truck

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Tarkio, MO,  Rural Fire Department has taken delivery of a Midwest Fire brush truck built on a Ford F-550 SuperCab diesel chassis with a 6.7 L 4V OHV Power Stroke V8 turbo diesel B20 engine and a TorqShift 6-Speed automatic...

Off-Duty CA Firefighters Called to Battle 4-Alarm Fire

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Fresno Fire Department needed 11 pieces of apparatus and extra firefighters to extinguish a blaze that broke out in a furniture store Monday night.

Off-duty Milwaukee Police Officer Dies After Being Hit by Driver

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales identified the victim as Officer Kou Her.

Illinois Sheriff’s Deputy Shoots Teenage Carjacker at Car Wash

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Cook County Sheriff’s deputy shot a 16-year-old carjacker Monday night at a car wash in the Little Village neighborhood.

Investigators Update Crash Which Killed Colorado State Patrol Trooper

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Colorado State Patrol offered new details about the crash that killed one of their own on Friday night.

Texas motorcycle LEO struck, dragged by truck

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jay R. Jordan Houston Chronicle

ROMAN FOREST, Texas — A Roman Forest police officer hit and dragged by a pickup truck along North Loop 610 on Monday morning is in good condition.

Veteran officer Greg Sammon and a Harris County Precinct 1 Constable's Office deputy were escorting a large load along the highway around 9:50 a.m. when a pickup truck involved in a crash rear-ended Sammon, Roman Forest Police Chief Stephen Carlisle said. Both the officer and his motorcycle were dragged for an unknown distance before the truck came to a stop near Kirkpatrick.

The officer was rushed by police escort to Memorial Hermann Hospital in an unknown condition, but his injuries are not life-threatening, according to Houston police. He was conscious and breathing as he was loaded into an ambulance, constable's office spokesperson Kevin Quinn said.

Sammon has been in law enforcement for 33 years, the last four of which he's spent in Roman Forest after retiring from the Humble Police Department.

"Officer Sammon appears to be in good condition and under great care at Memorial Hermann," Carlisle said. "He is with family and friends."

The pickup truck driver remained on scene and is speaking with crash investigators, Quinn said. It is unclear if the driver will face any charges.

Earlier this morning, Officer Greg Sammon was involved in a crash while escorting a large truck while on his motorcycle....

Posted by Roman Forest Police Department on Monday, June 17, 2019

———

©2019 the Houston Chronicle


FL Firefighters Need Aerial for Yacht Rescue

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 33-year-old worker dislocated his knee, and Broward County Sheriff Fire Rescue crews safely lowered him from the upper deck of a 100-foot yacht Monday.

Off-duty Wis. LEO fatally shot while intervening in robbery

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

RACINE, Wis. — An off-duty officer was shot and killed Monday night while intervening in an armed robbery. According to the Officer Down Memorial Page, Officer John Hetland saw the robbery occurring outside of a bar and took immediate action.

As Hetland was intervening, the suspect opened fire and fatally wounded him. The suspect fled the scene and is still at large.

Hetland served with the Racine Police Department for 24 years and is survived by his parents and two children.


Off-Duty Wisconsin Police Officer Fatally Shot While Intervening in Armed Robbery

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Veteran Racine Police Officer John Hetland was shot and killed after witnessing an armed robbery in progress at Teezer's Tavern Monday night.

Protection Starts With Prevention

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It’s an unfortunate reality of our times that we in law enforcement have to be constantly prepared, at every level, for response to events like active shooters. Perhaps nowhere in our profession does the phrase “Failing to prepare is preparing to...

KY Crews Make ‘Miracle’ Rescue of Woman in Mudslide

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters from several departments pulled out the woman, 90, from "under layers that included a floor and brick wall" after her Stanton house was knocked off its foundation.

Pitbull ‘Hijacks’ Texas Patrol Car, Steals Officer’s Beef Jerky

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In a Facebook post over the weekend, The Kilgore Police Department said the pitbull "hijacked" one of their officer's patrol cars over the weekend, after the officer responded to an animal control call Saturday.

Kansas Police Scrutinized for Father’s Day Tweet, Apology

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Topeka Police tweet, which appeared at 11:06 a.m. Sunday, set off a firestorm of criticism from social justice advocates who see the message as another damaging blow to the relationship between the community and those who serve and protect.

FBI Officials: Dallas Gunman Wore Mask, Combat Gear

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man in a mask and combat gear was fatally shot Monday morning in downtown Dallas after he opened fire with an assault weapon outside the Earle Cabell Federal Building.

Texas Motorcycle Officer Struck, Dragged by Pickup Truck

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Roman Forest Police Officer Greg Sammon was hit and dragged by a pickup truck along North Loop 610 on Monday morning.

Phoenix Police Chief Apologizes for Officers’ Actions During Traffic Stop

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams has issued an apology following the release of a videos showing police drawing guns, shouting profanities at a couple and threatening to shoot the male in front of the couple’s young children during a stop on May 27.

New Orleans Police Officer Shot, Two Suspects Wounded in Shootout

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A usually tranquil stretch of Prytania Street in Uptown awoke to gunfire Monday morning after New Orleans police got into a shootout with two men robbing a drugstore, leaving one officer and both suspects wounded.

Florida School Resource Officer Suffers Fatal Heart Attack After Completing Summer Camp

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Steven Brown had completed the third day of the Port St. Lucie Police Athletic League's Police Camp on June 12 when he collapsed after returning home from his shift.

MRSA: How to stop the spread

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Why EMS should embrace its role as the front line in stopping the pathogen’s journey

How to avoid costly turnover in your EMS service

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

From engaging staff in strategic planning, and collaboration in organization goals, 5 strategies to EMS staff retention

Book Excerpt: Fully Involved Leadership

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Gary Ludwig

PFAS exposure and risks: Your questions answered

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Older bunker gear may exposure firefighters to harmful chemicals

Secure in the bucket: Master stream slams firefighters

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Video of powerful master stream striking firefighters in aerial bucket underscores importance of safety belt

Wis. man arrested for assaulting EMT, police officer

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Scott Politowski, 62, is charged with battery to a law enforcement officer, battery to emergency rescue worker, resisting an officer and disorderly conduct

Wis. man arrested for assaulting EMT, police officer

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Scott Politowski, 62, is charged with battery to a law enforcement officer, battery to emergency rescue worker, resisting an officer and disorderly conduct

Article Bites: How often do they get more than one? Naloxone redosing in the age of the opioid epidemic

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

BLS and law enforcement naloxone administration improves already stretched EMS systems management of increased opioid overdoses

Pa. coalition receives grant to continue community opioids education and prevention

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The coalition collaborates with entities throughout the community, including churches, government agencies, health care providers, law enforcement and nonprofit organizations

When should a firefighter retire?

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It is a very personal question with no easy answer, as our top responses show

Video: Protesters part as ambulance transports patient in Hong Kong

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A viral video shows a massive crowd of protesters part ways to let the ambulance through

Community to gather for Charleston Nine Memorial remembrance ceremony

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters, family and members of the community will gather at the Charleston Nine Memorial Park to pay respects to the nine firefighters that lost their lives 12 years ago

Product of the Day: Hale Products — Qmax-XS Pump

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Qmax-XS pump’s exceptional high-water delivery rate knocks down large fires.

A Chief’s Perspective On Police Week

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Creating a legacy for learning and remembrance.

Cartridge Review: 6.5 Creedmoor

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Test results through the barrel of a Savage AXIS II XP

2019 Active Shooter Response Supplement

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 2019 Active Shooter Supplement provides a discussion on the management of the chaos of an incident as more and more people arrive on scene, tips on evolving response protocols to deliver emergency medical response, ideas for what should be in your...

The Tactical Flashlight Evolution

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When is the last time you purchased a new flashlight? If you can't remember, it might be time to start shopping around.

How To Overcome Target Location Labeling Problems in Prolonged Incidents

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Not all buildings are boxes, count for irregularities in your operational plan to avoid miscommunication and officer confusion.

Manage Your Radar Speed Signs From Anywhere, Anytime with Radarsign Cloud

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Radarsign's Cloud provides the central management of a law enforcement agency's network of devices anytime, anywhere including sign operation settings, alerts, data access, and data collection from any internet connected device.

Why A Variety Of Rally Points Matters

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Amid the chaos of an incident, the appropriate management and planning is vital. Knowing your options can be key to keeping everyone on scene safer.

Electronic Sights For Handguns – Issues and Answers

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With a younger generation coming into law enforcement and older cops losing the ability to focus on the front sight, the discussion has turned to red dot sights.

Trauma Training and Supplies

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It behooves the agencies to evolve along with our response protocols and deliver what is necessary at an accelerated rate.

Small Design Changes Lead To Big Effects On The Range

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Even with limited budgets, agencies can make small changes to their range to maximize value and safety.

The Active Shooter Response Tool Bag

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Whether yours is a body armor carrier or duffel, plan your response kit well, make sure it’s stocked, and know what’s inside like the back of your hand.

How Do You Impact The Direction Of Change At Your Agency?

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When you think about it, the June/July 2019 issue of Law Enforcement Technology is all about evolution. From new optics on handguns to flashlight upgrades to redesigning your firearms range - everything evolves in our industry. There’s an old axiom...

The Process Of Overhauling Dispatch And Radio Systems

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This daunting task can cost millions and easily become overwhelming. Let’s go over the basics.

Ramping Up Manpower When Disaster Strikes

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Online scheduling software can help public safety facilities quickly and effectively meet the massive surge in demand for services during an emergency.

Overcome the Recruitment Gap by Engaging Youth

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It’s no surprise or secret that law enforcement agencies across the U.S. have trouble filling vacancies with qualified candidates. Some agencies such as the New Mexico State Police (NMSP) are combatting this issue through the use of marketing...

27K gallons of water used to extinguish Ohio house fire

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters from 17 neighboring jurisdictions responded to the fire

Firehouse security will increase at 3 NY Middletown FDs

Posted on June 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Amping up security at the firehouses comes in the aftermath of the "Operation Bread, White and Blues" drug-rings case, in which former Middletown fire Lt. Paul G. Smith, of Deerpark, pleaded guilty as a drug trafficker

8 questions to ask apparatus vendors at a trade show or conference

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Apparatus manufacturer representatives offer tips for maximizing your time at fire service trade shows

8 questions to ask apparatus vendors at a trade show or conference

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Apparatus manufacturer representatives offer tips for maximizing your time at fire service trade shows

Alabama FD releases name of FF-paramedic killed in training event

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springville Fire Department Firefighter-Paramedic Jared Echols died while participating in an off-site training exercise

Alabama FD releases name of FF-paramedic killed in training event

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springville Fire Department Firefighter-Paramedic Jared Echols died while participating in an off-site training exercise

Alabama FD releases name of FF-paramedic killed in training event

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springville Fire Department Firefighter-Paramedic Jared Echols died while participating in an off-site training exercise

Alabama FD IDs FF-medic killed in training exercise

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springville Fire Department Firefighter-Paramedic Jared Echols died while participating in an off-site training exercise

Alabama FD IDs FF-medic killed in training exercise

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springville Fire Department Firefighter-Paramedic Jared Echols died while participating in an off-site training exercise

Alabama FD IDs FF-medic killed in training exercise

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springville Fire Department Firefighter-Paramedic Jared Echols died while participating in an off-site training exercise

How to improve fire department visibility and convey relevance to the community

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Employ visual cues, citizen education and engagement, and media to highlight department activities

Ohio county’s active shooter training encompasses 200 people

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This will be a complex, coordinated event that will include multiple first responders, community partners, county, and state agencies in addition to the participating school districts

Ohio county’s active shooter training encompasses 200 people

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This will be a complex, coordinated event that will include multiple first responders, community partners, county, and state agencies in addition to the participating school districts

Ohio county’s active shooter training encompasses 200 people

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This will be a complex, coordinated event that will include multiple first responders, community partners, county, and state agencies in addition to the participating school districts

6 challenges for firefighters at railway disasters

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rail disasters are growing more frequent and more severe and can happen in just about any community

Ore. county emergency communication tower destroyed

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The emergency communication tower necessary for loggers, fire personnel and ham radio operators was cut down over the weekend, causing more than $60,000 in damage

Ore. county emergency communication tower destroyed

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The emergency communication tower necessary for loggers, fire personnel and ham radio operators was cut down over the weekend, causing more than $60,000 in damage

Ore. county emergency communication tower destroyed

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The emergency communication tower necessary for loggers, fire personnel and ham radio operators was cut down over the weekend, causing more than $60,000 in damage

Ore. county emergency communication tower destroyed

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The emergency communication tower necessary for loggers, fire personnel and ham radio operators was cut down over the weekend, causing more than $60,000 in damage

Drug inventory management strategies for EMS agencies (eBook)

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Don’t wait for a drug shortage to affect your agency to figure out how you will respond

Fla. SRO suffers fatal heart attack

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — An officer suffered a fatal heart attack Wednesday.

According to the Officer Down Memorial Page, Officer Steven Brown was a camp leader for the Port St. Lucie Police Athletic League’s Police Camp. After three days of strenuous outdoor activities, Brown had a heart attack and collapsed when he returned home at the end of the third day.

Brown was involved with the camp as part of his summertime duties as a school resource officer.

The officer served with his department for 14 years and is survived by his wife, daughter and son.


AL Firefighter Dies During Training Exercise

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An unidentified Springville firefighter is believed to have suffered a medical incident while training Monday in Anniston, and the death is under investigation, the fire chief said.

Suspect Dies After Exchange of Gunfire With Officers at Federal Courthouse in Dallas

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A suspect was killed Monday morning after he opened fire at the Earle Cabell Federal Building.

AK Firefighters Cautiously Let Wildfire Burn

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fire lines and other precautions have been set up to prevent the 13,000-acre blaze in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in Soldotna from spreading to homes and infrastructure.

AK Firefighters Cautiously Let Wildfire Burn

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fire lines and other precautions have been set up to prevent the 13,000-acre blaze in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge near Sterling from spreading to homes and infrastructure.

Video: Active Shooter Killed by Federal Officers Outside Dallas Courthouse

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Clyde's Facebook page reportedly featured rants about the U.S. government — including talking about Ruby Ridge and the Branch Davidians.

Police: 2 shot at Toronto Raptors championship parade, 2 arrested

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

TORONTO, Canada — Two people were shot at the Toronto Raptors NBA Championship parade on Monday.

According to CNN, two people are in custody after the shooting.

The victims’ wounds are “serious but not life threatening,” Toronto police tweeted.

Police recovered two firearms and emergency responders are on the scene.

This is a breaking story. More information will be updated when available.

SHOOTING: Nathan Phillip's Square -Bay St and Albert St -Police have located 2 victims -Injuries serious but not life threatening -2 people in custody -2 firearms recovered -Investigating ^dh

— Toronto Police OPS (@TPSOperations) June 17, 2019

Shots fired at Nathan Phillips Square. This is shot at the north side of city hall. pic.twitter.com/KhGb5xag02

— Francine Kopun (@KopunF) June 17, 2019


4 shot, 2 in custody after gunfire at Toronto Raptors parade

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Theresa Braine New York Daily News

TORONTO — Four people were reportedly shot Monday in Toronto near where 1.5 million people were reveling in the Raptors’ NBA title victory.

The victims have serious but non-life-threatening injuries, police told Global News. Initially police said that two people had been shot, but later upgraded to four.

“We know that there are four victims right now that have gunshot wounds,” Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders told reporters at the scene, according to Global News. “None of them are life-threatening at this point in time, but I’m grateful that the resolve to this situation was as quick as it was.”

The incident happened around 4 p.m. at the southeast corner of Nathan Phillips Square. Police took two people into custody and recovered two firearms.

It was the first time the Raptors had ever reached the NBA finals in the team’s 24-season history, CNN reported. Elation at the team’s 114-110 win against the Golden State Warriors in Game 6 of the NBA Finals sent throngs into the streets of downtown Toronto.

When gunshots rang out, panicked revelers fled in all directions, according to Global News, and others ran in response as authorities urged everyone to remain calm.

Among those on hand were Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the mayor of Toronto and the Raptors themselves, according to The Associated Press. They stayed onstage while the ceremony was briefly interrupted, AP said.

The parade began at 10 a.m. and ended at Nathan Phillips Square, where a stage was set up, The Washington Post reported. Raptors players arrived after 2. The victory ceremony wrapped up fairly soon after the shooting incident.

The shooting highlighted an increase in gun violence in the Canadian city, and Trudeau’s government has pledged about $5.2 million to quell gun crime. The incident is bound to put gun control on the national agenda as a campaign issue in the upcoming federal elections this October, the Post noted.

©2019 New York Daily News

SHOOTING: Nathan Phillip's Square -Bay St and Albert St -Police have located 2 victims -Injuries serious but not life threatening -2 people in custody -2 firearms recovered -Investigating ^dh

— Toronto Police OPS (@TPSOperations) June 17, 2019

Shots fired at Nathan Phillips Square. This is shot at the north side of city hall. pic.twitter.com/KhGb5xag02

— Francine Kopun (@KopunF) June 17, 2019


Chief: Las Vegas Fire May Have Gone Unnoticed for Hours

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Around 100 firefighters battled a two-story office building blaze on the Las Vegas Strip for more than seven hours early Monday.

Adrienne Zimmer

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Janelle Foskett

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Janelle Foskett served as editorial director of Firehouse Magazine and Firehouse.com, overseeing the editorial operations for the print edition along with working closely with the Web team.

MO Crews Rescue Worker Hit by Object from Crane

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Kansas City firefighters needed their own crane to get the injured construction worker to ground safely after he had been hit in the head Monday morning.

Jury Finds Five Gang Members Guilty in Slaying of Young NYPD Explorer

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five gang members were convicted of first-degree murder Friday for killing a 15-year-old aspiring New York Police Department officer on the night of June 20, 2018.

Colorado Trooper Struck and Killed Working Rollover Crash

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Trooper William Moden, 37, was struck and killed while assisting with the crash, which reportedly resulted from speeds of more than 100 mph, according to witnesses.

10 lessons from the Fairchild AFB shooting

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mike Wood
Author: Mike Wood

On June 20, 1994, a mentally disturbed former airman returned to Fairchild Air Force Base (AFB) to kill the doctors who had previously tried to help him. He took a cab to the base hospital, located near Spokane, Washington, and entered the mental health clinic carrying a duffle bag that contained a rifle and a 75-round drum magazine.

Minutes later, the Fairchild AFB Security Police received the first call about a shooting at the hospital. Senior Airman Andy Brown immediately responded from three-tenths of a mile away on his police bicycle, and confronted the murderer outside the hospital.

When the killer refused commands to disarm and fired shots at the young police officer, Brown fired at him four times with his M9 pistol, striking him in the shoulder and face, and ending the threat. Post-event investigation indicated that Brown’s final pistol shot was fired at a distance between 68 and 71 yards, but his first hit would have been made at an even farther distance, since the killer was advancing on him as he fired.

Brown and his fellow security policemen secured the scene and began to assist the victims. By stopping the killer, Brown enabled medical professionals to provide lifesaving aid, and transport the victims to nearby hospitals. In the end, five victims perished, but 22 were saved.

Critical lessons

Andy Brown’s account of the Fairchild AFB shooting, Warnings Unheeded, was published in 2016. His meticulous detailing of the events leading up to the Fairchild AFB shooting is a cautionary tale about missed and wasted opportunities to short circuit the violence that would come later. It’s instructive, if disappointing, to note that 25 years after the incident, we’re still struggling with the same issues of a lack of detection and intervention that Brown identifies so clearly.

From a tactical perspective, Warnings Unheeded also offers many lessons for today’s law enforcement officers. Although the Fairchild AFB shooting occurred prior to the widespread adoption of the phrase “active shooter,” this active shooter attack is instructive on many levels.

A few of these many lessons addressed by Andy Brown in Warnings Unheeded include:

1. Personal responsibility

Because official training opportunities were limited, and Air Force policies restricted him from taking his duty weapon home, Brown purchased a similar weapon and trained extensively with it, on his own time, at his own expense. His personal effort allowed him to stop a moving, hostile threat at extraordinary distances with incredible efficiency. Brown also remembered to decock the weapon when it was appropriate, and check his ammunition supply after the shooting – good habits that were engrained by his personal dedication to training.

Brown provides us an excellent example here, and reminds us that we are the ones who are most responsible for ensuring our personal readiness.

2. Target discrimination

When Brown arrived on scene, the killer was moving among fleeing victims and was not immediately visible. It took a moment for Brown to identify him and, when he did, there was still a considerable danger that Brown’s fire could wound an innocent. Brown was conscious of the presence of innocents, and exercised great discipline in holding his fire until it was safe to do so. As a result, he stopped the killer without hurting anybody else.

It’s important for officers to realize that active shooting situations are chaotic, with an ever-present risk of “friendly fire.” To assist in building the proper habits for these challenging circumstances, officers should train in environments where they’re required to maneuver to obtain a clear shot on a “shoot” target, without striking “no shoots” in the foreground and background. Incorporating this kind of decision-making during police firearms training will prevent unnecessary casualties later.

3. Software, not hardware

By all accounts, Brown was at a disadvantage from an equipment and tactical perspective. His attacker was armed with a 7.62x39mm rifle, which was fed by a high capacity drum magazine. In contrast, Brown was only equipped with a 9mm pistol and 30 rounds of ball ammunition. Making things worse, the killer fired on Brown from a distance that drastically favored the rifle-armed attacker, and – unlike Brown – didn’t have to worry about hitting innocents. Despite these disadvantages, Brown used his superior mindset, preparation and skill to deliver accurate, fight-stopping shots and end the killing.

It’s important for officers to have the right equipment for the job, and desirable that they have an equipment advantage over criminals, but Andy Brown’s experience reminds us that software is more important than hardware in the final count. Your awareness, preparation, training, tactics and skill are much more important than what’s in your hand.

4. Information quality

There’s usually no shortage of information in an active shooter event, but most of it is poor quality. Frightened witnesses and victims often provide inaccurate information, and in the stress of the moment, additional errors can be introduced when information is relayed between dispatch and responders.

In the Fairchild AFB shooting, there were false reports of multiple shooters, and inaccurate descriptions of the shooter’s physical characteristics, weapon, clothing and location. Delayed reporting introduced more errors, when old information was passed off as current information, making it difficult for police to understand where the shooter was and what he was doing. Echoes made it difficult to fix the shooter’s location as well.

It’s important for officers to understand that much of the information they’ll receive during an active shooting will be inaccurate, and they should be cautious about relying on it for decision making. Officers need to develop their own intelligence, trust their personal observations when they differ from reports, and avoid feeding the “disinformation monster” by mindlessly repeating unverified information from witnesses. Officers (and dispatchers) should practice “information triage” by:

Asking clarifying questions of witnesses to gauge their reliability; Comparing witness reports to identify reoccurring patterns; Seeking reports from witnesses who are in better control of their emotions.

Obtaining and sharing this better information will allow officers to make improved decisions.

5. Communications

Not surprisingly, communications between responders suffered during the Fairchild active shooting. When personnel were subjected to danger and stress, it affected their ability to clearly communicate. Brown, for example, reports that while he thought his radio transmissions were calm and collected after the shooting, the dispatch tapes later betrayed a different reality. The size of the multiagency response – which included personnel from civilian police and fire departments – also complicated communications due to the sheer number of personnel involved, and incompatible radio frequencies. Off-scene leaders burdened phone lines and radio frequencies, seeking information that wasn’t reasonably available or critical at the moment.

Communication is always the second casualty in an active shooter event, so responders need to be jealous about guarding it. Officers and supervisors should be precise with their language, maintain their composure, understand “what’s important now?” and suppress needless chatter to enhance the quality of communications under stress.

6. Physiological changes

Brown experienced a host of physiological changes during his shooting. Auditory effects robbed him of his ability to understand witnesses and hear gunshots clearly (he reports both were “muddled”). Tachypsychia gave him the feeling that time was slowing down as he approached the scene, and tunnel vision led him to think that a man over 70 yards away was much closer, while robbing him of the peripheral vision needed to recognize that there was available cover nearby. Temporal distortions caused a momentary panic when the attacker didn’t seem to be reacting “quickly enough” to Brown’s gunfire, leading him to believe that his bullets were ineffective.

All of these effects are normal reactions to an abnormal circumstance, but they can become fatally distracting to an officer in the middle of the fight if he’s not forewarned about them. Brown’s careful cataloguing of these physiological changes is a potentially lifesaving gift to every officer who might someday face similar danger.

7. Empowering the public

Many victims of the attack took an active role in their defense, and ensured their survival. Some fled the danger, some hid and some sounded warnings and helped others to escape. Some barricaded and kept the killer out, and others physically attacked the killer, driving him off.

If public safety is our objective, it’s important for law enforcement to embrace the idea that we have a responsibility to assist with training, equipping and preparing the public to fend for themselves in the critical gap before professional help arrives. This encompasses everything from awareness to tactics, from armed defense to casualty care. The Fairchild AFB example shows us how lives can be saved when the public is mentally and physically prepared to help themselves, and reminds us that it’s no longer acceptable for police to tell the public to call for help and wait.

8. Indoors and outdoors

The Fairchild AFB shooting began indoors, then moved outdoors as the attacker made his way to the next building. The change from an indoor to an outdoor environment had a dramatic influence on several conditions, such as the type of cover and concealment available, the distances involved, the density of targets and the tactics necessary to counter the threat.

In many agencies, active shooter training and tactics are entirely focused on indoor scenarios, and outdoor considerations are ignored, but it’s important to understand these attacks are fluid and conditions can change rapidly. What begins as an indoor event may quickly turn into an outdoor one as the shooter goes mobile, so agencies cannot afford to ignore outdoor tactics, training and preparations.

9. Casualty care

The Fairchild AFB shooting was unique in that it occurred at a military hospital where there was a large population of people with medical training. Many doctors, nurses and medical technicians made good use of their skills to save lives that day, and they were joined by other personnel who had received first aid training as part of their basic military education. Conditions were extreme, and rescuers had to be resourceful – Brown reports that bandage and dressing materials were improvised, some chest wounds were sealed by cigarette packaging, and a leg was splinted with a “wet floor” sign – but they gave the victims precious time.

It’s a testament to the power of immediate, lifesaving action that all of the injured victims who were transported to outside hospitals survived their wounds. Agencies must heed this critical lesson and ensure that their officers are trained in tactical emergency casualty care, and are equipped with on-body, individual first aid kits, to enhance their survival and the survival of those they protect.

10. Emotional and mental health

Although Andy Brown did everything in his power to stop the killing as soon as he could, he still suffered from the effects of survivor guilt, and wrestled with horrific memories of the scene and its victims. The Air Force, unfortunately, was not attuned to his needs, and failed to give him the help and support he needed to deal with these predictable and understandable injuries. The Air Force wasn’t being malicious in their failure to help Brown, but their lack of preparedness and awareness cost them one of their best, as Brown left the military to fight his battle with PTSD and survivor guilt.

To his great credit and honor, Brown won the struggle and gained control of his life again, but his experience is an important warning to law enforcement leaders. We must be good stewards of our most precious resource – our people! We must ensure that we have people, programs and policies in place to help our people when they need it, and we must create an environment and culture where there is no stigma attached to asking for help. We all need help at times, and there can be no room for shame, embarrassment, or potential career jeopardy to serve as a roadblock. It does nobody – agency, public, or officer – any good if our people win the gunfight, but lose the emotional aftermath.

Warnings unheeded

Andy Brown penned a masterful account of the Fairchild AFB shooting that details these lessons and many more. He traces the development of the killer’s mental health issues and the behavior that led to his discharge, and expertly tells the story of the tragic shooting like nobody else can. He identifies weaknesses in mental healthcare and our uncanny ability to ignore critical danger signs along the way.

PoliceOne readers are highly encouraged to read his book, Warnings Unheeded, to discover more of Brown’s powerful insights and learn what we can do to detect, avoid and prepare for these kinds of incidents. An excerpt is available here.

I would like to thank Andy for sharing his story and these important lessons with us. I respect his accomplishments and service, but even more important, I respect his great strength and character, and his continuing contributions to public safety. He’s a role model for us all.


Texas Officer’s Squad Car “Hijacked” by Aggressive Dog

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Kilgore (TX) Police Department was dispatched over the weekend on an animal control call of an aggressive Pitbull. Upon arriving at the scene and locating the animal, he attempted to put the dog in the back seat of his squad car but the animal had other ideas, instead taking up residence in the front seat of the vehicle.

Texas Motor Officer Struck by Vehicle Suffers Non-Life-Threatening Injuries

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A motor officer with the Roman Forest (TX) Police Department was assisting in escorting a large load on a Montgomery County highway when he was struck and dragged by a pickup truck.

New Orleans Officer Wounded in Gunfight with Armed Robbery Suspect

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A suspected armed robber shot and wounded an officer with the New Orleans Police Department early Monday morning.

Texas Deputy Dies from Injuries Suffered in Serious Fall

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to ABC News, initial reports that Sergeant Keith Shepherd had been shot were inaccurate, with further investigation revealing that he had suffered a serious fall that caused substantial damage to his skull.

Missouri Officer Shot While Transporting Prisoner in “Good Spirits”

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Missouri Highway Patrol was shot in the hand during a struggle with a prisoner she was transporting.

NYPD Officer Dies By Suicide, Third Such Death in 10 Days for the Agency

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On Friday afternoon, an officer with the New York Police Department was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound outside the Staten Island Police precinct where he worked. It was the third death by suicide suffered by the agency in the span of 10 days.

Florida Officer Hospitalized After Early Morning Vehicle Collision

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the North Miami Police Department was hospitalized after an early morning multi-car vehicle collision on Monday.

2 New York Bicycle Officers Struck by Man Erratically Driving ATV

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two officers with the Buffalo Police Department were hospitalized after being struck by a man erratically driving an ATV.

VirTra to Showcase STEP Program at the 2019 National Sheriff’s Association Education and Technology Expo on June 15-18, 2019

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

VirTra a global provider of training simulators for the law enforcement, military, educational and commercial markets, will be exhibiting at the upcoming 2019 NSA Annual Conference, which is being held June 15-18, 2019 in Louisville, KY.

POLARIS WIRELESS AND MARK43 PARTNER TO BRING 3D LOCATION-ENABLED COMPUTER-AIDED DISPATCH SYSTEMS TO POLICE AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Provides real-time tracking of personnel and assets, including in high-rise buildings

Cradlepoint Announces 2019 First Responder Charities For its FirstConnect Program

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Inaugural Charitable Contributions Focus on Helping Children of First Responders Thrive and Equipping Firefighters with the Latest Lifesaving Technology and Training

Florida Deputy Shoots Elderly Woman During Roadside Domestic Dispute

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Polk County Sheriff's Office deputy shot a woman Saturday while investigating a roadside domestic dispute.

NY grants $343K to fight county gun violence

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mid Hudson News

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY — The State Department of Criminal Justice Services has awarded $343,000 to the Dutchess County District Attorney’s Office, Poughkeepsie City Police Department, and the county probation department.

The money comes from the GIVE grant (Gun Involved Violence Elimination) that provides the resources for the agencies to devote more time to the investigation and prosecution of gun crimes and gun-related violence in the City of Poughkeepsie, said District Attorney William Grady.

“The focus of the grant is public safety and this investment by the state has shown significant results,” the DA said. “Latest statistics show that during the last 10 years of this program, violent crime has decreased 50 percent, firearm crimes have dropped 52 percent and robberies have been reduced by 71 percent.”

Full story: State grants $343,000 to fight Dutchess gun violence


Like Father, Like Son: New South Carolina Troopers Follow in Their Fathers’ Footsteps

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

David Knox has an old picture of his son as a little boy, wearing his uniform, but Tuesday, his now 22-year-old son wore his own uniform as he was escorted across the stage by his father to get his patrol commission at the Highway Patrol’s graduation.

Like Father, Like Son: New South Carolina Troopers Follow in Their Fathers’ Footsteps

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

David Knox has an old picture of his son as a little boy, wearing his uniform, but Tuesday, his now 22-year-old son wore his own uniform as he was escorted across the stage by his father to get his patrol commission at the Highway Patrol’s graduation.

Pa. county receives $1.25M in grants to increase security measures, help crime victims

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

MyChesCo

HARRISBURG, PA — Chester County’s Democratic state Reps. Carolyn Comitta, Melissa Shusterman, Kristine Howard, Danielle Friel Otten, Dan Williams and Christina Sappey announced that $1.2 million worth of grant funds from the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency will be distributed across the county to increase safety and help crime victims.

Within Comitta’s legislative district, Domestic Violence Center of Chester County will receive $531,835 to provide direct services for domestic abuse survivors. Additionally, the Crime Victims’ Center of Chester County, Inc. will receive $624,328 to meet the needs of crime victims.

“I am grateful for the grants awarded to the Crime Victims’ Center of Chester County and the Domestic Violence Center of Chester County. These local organizations have a tremendous impact across our county, and they deserve our full support to continue to provide critical services to residents,” Comitta said.

Full story: Chester County Receives $1.25 Million in Grants to Increase Security Measures, Help Crime Victims


Verizon Connect Government Provides New Fleet Tech for First Responders

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Verizon Connect Government is designed to meet the specific workforce management needs of government customers, including vehicle inspection automation, asset visibility and management, and tools designed to simplify and streamline processes, helping improve work experience for workers in the field.

Funding your fleet: Grants for police vehicles

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Therese Matthews
Author: Therese Matthews

No matter the size of your police department, maintaining a fleet of vehicles is always a challenge. Competing budget priorities such as officer recruitment, police training and data management technology make new vehicle acquisition even more difficult.

Grants may be a great option to cover new police vehicle purchases. With some creative thinking, strategic writing and matching your needs to the grant agency’s purpose, you could be awarded funding to expand or upgrade your agency’s fleet.

Here are some funding options to consider:

U.S. Department of Justice Grants

I often mention Justice Assistance Grants (JAG) in my articles as not only is it the largest funding source for police and other law enforcement equipment, but JAG supports activity across the criminal justice system.

Vehicles are an allowable cost under this program but only police cruisers.

Many local municipalities across the country receive a local JAG allocation directly from the federal government based on their share of their state’s three-year violent crime average. Most JAG funding is awarded annually to a designated State Administering Agency (SAA). The SAA is required to sub-grant a large percentage of these funds to local and state agencies that don’t qualify for the local allocations. Reach out to your SAA representative to discuss your needs and inquire about the next application period.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has a mission to support states, local communities and tribal jurisdictions in their efforts to develop and implement effective programs for juveniles. Community policing, gang suppression, and gang desistance and diversion are some of the many program areas they support. Vehicles are an allowable cost as long as they are directly tied to the goals and objectives of the OJJDP grant program and can be justified in your proposed project.

Homeland Security Funding

For several years, the Department of Homeland Security has distributed grant funds under several programs aimed at enhancing the ability of regional authorities to prepare, prevent and respond to terrorist attacks and other disasters. Vehicles are an allowable cost, as long as they fit within your state’s core capabilities strategy.

The State Homeland Security Program (SHSP) provides funding to all states based on a Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA)/Stakeholder Preparedness Review (SPR) of 32 core capabilities.

The Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) provides funding to 31 high-risk urban areas across the U.S.

The Port Security Grant Program (PSGP) provides funding to state and local agencies that manage ports and port operations.

The Transit Security Grant Program (TSG) allocates funding to public transit agencies, including their police units, for homeland security preparedness of transportation infrastructure.

Operation Stonegarden (OSG) is funding targeted toward states with proximity to the international border or international waters for providing security in those areas.

The Tribal Homeland Security Grant Program (THSGP) provides funding for tribes to provide them with the ability to develop and deliver core capabilities using the combined efforts of the whole community.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

For several years the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been offering grants and loans to support public safety services and equipment including police vehicles. The USDA’s Rural Development Community Facilities Direct Loan & Grant Program is available to communities across the country. If you are located in a rural area, and qualify because of your population size and poverty level, consider applying for funding under this program.

U.S. Department of Transportation

Federal dollars from Highway Traffic Safety grants are passed down to states through the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. The Section 402 State and Community Highway Safety Grant Program has numerous focus areas, including improving enforcement of traffic safety laws, reducing accidents and enhancing emergency services. Police vehicles have been supported under this program in the past. States typically offer grants to local law enforcement agencies through a competitive application process. Contact your State Transportation Department to inquire how to apply for these funds.

The Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) is a federal grant program that provides funding to states to reduce the number and severity of crashes and hazardous materials incidents involving commercial motor vehicles. Funding has supported several thousand law enforcement officers and equipment necessary to increase enforcement and safety across the U.S. Again, contact your State Transportation Department representatives to find out if funding is available to support your vehicle or in vehicle equipment.

Travel and Tourism

Does your agency provide security for large events, fairs or concerts in your community? Consider reaching out to your state’s Travel and Tourism office to inquire if they have grant funding to support the cost of the equipment and vehicles you need to keep these events safe.

Green Technology/Zero Emissions Grants

Many police departments are replacing their aging vehicle fleet with alternative fuel or electric cars. If your agency is looking at this option, consider applying for funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This agency has several funding options to consider under its Clean Cities Coalition Network. Coalitions operate within each major metropolitan region across the country. Reach out to the Clean Cities Coordinator nearest your area to discuss your project needs and inquire about funding.

Private Funding Sources

A host of corporate and private foundations have supported police equipment requests. Your application will be favorably considered if your agency is geographically located within their operating region or your request falls within their current priority focus.

Some of the nation’s largest insurance companies, such as State Farm and MetLife, and automobile manufacturers and rental car companies like Ford, Toyota and Hertz administer grant programs focus on driving safety, law enforcement and community well-being. Also, law enforcement trade associations such as The Spirit of Blue Foundation have grants available to support your in-car equipment and training needs.

Community Foundations operate across the country by providing funding to non-profit and some government agencies focused on keeping their neighborhoods safe and vibrant. The Foundation Center is a great resource for locating the community foundation that operates in your area. Once you find a contact, reach out to your Community Foundation representatives and inquire if they will support a request for a police vehicle or in-car equipment.

I’ve provided a number of grant options for you to pursue to support the cost of upgrading your police fleet. If you need additional assistance with grant research, writing or application review consider reaching out to the team at PoliceGrantsHelp. The team is staffed with numerous experts from across the country who can assist in your grant seeking and application needs.


4 Major Reasons to Go Back To College

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nowadays, it’s not uncommon for adults to return to college, especially with the flexibility that distance education can provide for busy students. Here are four reasons why you might consider going back to school.

Phoenix police chief apologizes to family over stolen doll incident

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Therese Matthews

Associated Press

PHOENIX — Phoenix's police chief has publicly apologized to members of a family at whom police officers pointed guns and yelled profanities while responding to a report of shoplifting.

The parents say their 4-year-old daughter had stolen a doll from the store, unbeknownst to them. They have filed a $10 million claim against the city alleging civil rights violations by police officers.

A video released Friday shows police officers pointing guns and yelling profane commands to a father and a pregnant woman holding a baby.

Police Chief Jeri Williams apologized to the family, community and public on Sunday at Phoenix TV station KTVK.

Williams added that an internal investigation is underway into the incident from late last month.

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego posted an apology to the family on Twitter on Saturday.

"I thought he was going to shoot us" This is the moment US police confronted a family in Phoenix, Arizona after their four-year-old daughter left a shop without paying for a doll [Tap to expand] https://t.co/bSQAFXuUHw pic.twitter.com/dqe0s5P6VD

— BBC News (World) (@BBCWorld) June 17, 2019

My statement on the May 27th Phoenix Police incident: pic.twitter.com/1mYHQQbhWv

— Mayor Kate Gallego (@MayorGallego) June 16, 2019


Firehouse Expo 2020 Dates Announced

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters will return to Nashville for Firehouse Expo 2020, but it will be held during the summer.

CAL FIRE Union TV Ads Urge Hiring More Firefighters

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

As California's wildfire season begins, commercials by CAL FIRE Local 2881 highlight the low firefighter staffing levels around the state.

Street dedicated to fallen NYPD detective killed in blue-on-blue shooting

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Therese Matthews

Craig Schneider Newsday

Sean Mackie had nearly finished his speech honoring his childhood buddy, the late NYPD Det. Brian Simonsen, when his voice caught, snagged on the emotions he was feeling.

Mackie was standing on the very street where they grew up, South Jamesport Avenue, which was dedicated Saturday as "Det. Brian Simonsen Way."

Mackie, 42, had talked about all the fun memories — the basketball games at the rec center, the backyard barbecues that stretched into sleepovers, the staying up all night playing video games.

"This is where I had my first hello," he said, his voice cracking. Then after collecting himself, he added, "and my last goodbye."

The ceremony, held under a big tent on the tree-lined street, resembled a summer get-together of neighbors, friends and the Simonsen family. People smiled and hugged each other as they celebrated the life of the 19-year veteran of the force who was so beloved for his good cheer that people called him "Smiles."

Joe Hartmann was there, recalling how they had played softball and hung out at the Simonsens' pool as teens.

"We were supposed to go snowmobiling around the time he was killed," said Hartmann, now an assistant chief of the Riverhead Fire Department.

Georgette Case sat toward the back of the rows of white chairs lined up under the tent. The Riverhead town historian recalled Simonsen as the nice boy she'd see in Riverhead United Methodist Church.

But when the color guard stepped forward and the bagpipes began to wail, it summoned the funeral four months ago for the detective killed in a blue-on-blue shooting on Feb. 12. He was responding to an attempted robbery in Queens.

NYPD Police Commissioner James P. O'Neill recalled that ceremony, which drew thousands of police in their dress blues. He said the street-naming will provide an everlasting memorial to the 42-year-old fallen detective.

"Today and for generations to come, people will see this sign and ask about Brian Simonsen," O'Neill said. "It will be another opportunity to tell his story."

The event was one of two street-naming ceremonies held on Long Island Saturday for fallen members of the NYPD.

In Shirley, NYPD officers, family members, and neighbors gathered to honor NYPD Sgt. Paul Ferrara at the intersection of West End Avenue and Flower Hill Drive.

Ferrara had served 22 years on the force. He had responded to the terrorist attacks at Ground Zero and eventually suffered from stage 4 lung cancer, dying Aug. 28, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Kerrie; son Paul Jr., and parents Nick and Diane.

At the Jamesport ceremony honoring Simonsen, friends said that even when he was young, he stepped up when his family faced tragedy. Simonsen's sister, Melissa, died at age 13 when she was struck by a car while walking across a street. His father, Paul, died less than six months later.

"He always said he had to be home for dinner at 5:30," Mackie said. "He couldn't miss family dinner. Then he'd go out again."

Simonsen's wife and mother also attended the dedication. His wife, Leanne, pulled the cord that unveiled the blue street sign, a copy of which was given to her. "It's beautiful," she said. "There's no better way to honor such a beautiful person."

His mother pointed out the tan home where her family lived for 35 years — "just past the stop sign, right before the creek."

Her son is buried not far away in Jamesport Cemetery, near his sister and father.

"It still doesn't seem real," said Linda Simonsen, 70, of her son's death.

Linda, who now lives in Calverton, said she was moved by all the memorials for her son — the scholarships, the charity baseball game, the organ donor drive.

Still, she said, "I'd rather have him."

Det. Brian Simonsen Way

A ceremony was held Saturday to name South Jamesport Avenue "Det. Brian Simonsen Way" in memory of the fallen NYPD detective. See more photos here: https://bit.ly/2XfVO4U

Posted by Riverhead News-Review on Saturday, June 15, 2019

———

©2019 Newsday


Storms Damage Vacant Dallas Fire Station

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No one was hurt when severe weather Sunday put a hole in the roof of a Dallas Fire-Rescue firehouse that had been closed for renovations.

California lawmakers aim to rein in police use of facial recognition

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Sam Dean Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Facial recognition’s first blanket ban arrived in May, when San Francisco became the only city in the nation to bar police and other agencies from using the technology.

Now the powerful software, which uses machine learning algorithms to automatically track human faces in digital footage and match them to names, is facing a broader moratorium.

State lawmakers are considering regulation barring all California police officers from running facial recognition programs on body cameras. Other Bay Area cities such as Berkeley and Oakland are considering following San Francisco’s lead in banning all applications for local police. And federal legislators — from both sides of the aisle — are holding hearings on Capitol Hill to examine how federal agencies are using the technology, and whether it deserves more scrutiny and stricter controls.

Taken together, these efforts, pushed by activists and politicians from the tech industry’s home base in the Bay Area, constitute something not often seen in Silicon Valley: an attempt to impose preemptive regulations on a rapidly developing technology.

From social media to smart speakers, technological innovations have upended entire industries and changed the fabric of everyday life, with minimal public debate beforehand and sometimes significant unintended consequences. What makes facial recognition different is an emerging consensus that it poses a unique and alarming threat to basic civil liberties — and once it becomes widespread, it may be too late to stop it.

“People don’t expect to have their identity, their location, and who they associate with logged every time they step outside and walk down the street,” said Matt Cagle, an attorney for the Northern California chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, which has been a key part of the coalition pushing for stronger regulation. “That’s the kind of world that automated face surveillance would usher in.”

The state measure, Assembly Bill 1215, would ban law enforcement agencies across California from using any “biometric surveillance system” — which includes software that would identify people by tattoo, gait and other individually distinguishable physical characteristics — in real time on police body cameras or on footage collected by those cameras. After passing the Assembly in early May, the bill was set for a key hearing in the Senate Public Safety Committee on June 4.

Assemblyman Phil Ting, the lead author of the bill, sees it as a necessary follow-up to his 2018 legislation requiring law enforcement agencies to release body camera footage within 45 days of incidents in which police kill or seriously injure someone, or any incident in which police shoot their guns.

“Body cameras were deployed to build trust with communities, to build more transparency and more openness,” said Ting, a San Francisco Democrat. “It really was not the intention of body cameras to have roving surveillance cameras on police.”

The bill states biometric surveillance is the “functional equivalent of requiring every person to show a personal photo identification card at all times in violation of recognized constitutional rights,” regardless of consent. It runs the risk of creating massive, unregulated databases about Californians never suspected of committing a crime, and “may chill the exercise of free speech in public places” as the identities of anyone in a crowd could be immediately discerned.

Formal opposition to the bill has come from the California Police Chiefs Assn., which said during an Assembly hearing that “prohibiting the use of biometric surveillance systems severely hinders law enforcement’s ability to identify and detain suspects of criminal activity.” Comparing images of suspects against facial recognition databases has led to cold cases being solved years later, and police commonly cite mass shooting or terrorist attack scenarios as potentially useful applications of facial recognition technology applied across a city.

Ting says that he is unaware of any police departments currently using the technology in concert with body camera footage.

In a statement, the Los Angeles Police Department said it does not use facial recognition technology in the department, though it has been used in limited instances in joint investigations with other agencies.

The Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department has conducted small pilots with body cameras but has not deployed them widely. But the department does rely on facial recognition technology as a way to generate leads in investigations, said Lt. Derek Sabatini, who manages the county biometric identification system.

Comparing suspect images against a database of Los Angeles County mug shots to surface possible persons of interest has proved valuable in solving crimes, said Sabatini, who drew a distinction between how it’s used today and its potential risks as a surveillance tool in real-time deployment.

“Surveillance needs discussion,” Sabatini said. “We should talk about it and understand how it’s used — there’s a lot of trust issues with that, and it’s totally understandable.”

Skeptics say the risks inherent in facial recognition software far outweigh potential benefits.

There’s the problem of false positives. Researchers have shown that the software often turns up incorrect matches, especially when searches are run on images of darker-skinned people and women. An ACLU study found that Amazon’s facial recognition system, Rekognition, incorrectly matched the official photos of 28 sitting members of Congress with mugshots of people who had been arrested for crimes.

The potential real-world effect of relying on unproven algorithms to identify suspects came to life in San Francisco in 2009, when a false positive from an automated license plate reader algorithm led police to believe a woman named Denise Green was driving a stolen Lexus. Green was stopped by police and forced out of her car and onto her knees at gunpoint by six officers, and the city ultimately paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to settle lawsuits linked to her detention.

But even if the software were perfectly accurate, civil libertarians say that allowing police to check the identity of any passersby without consent constitutes an invasion of privacy and undercuts current California laws on the right to anonymity in public.

Their worst fears are already playing out in China, where the government uses facial recognition-equipped surveillance systems to track and target Uighurs, a largely Muslim minority, and maintain a social credit system that ranks — and blacklists — residents based on behaviors such as smoking and jaywalking.

Without going to those extremes, use of facial recognition by American law enforcement nevertheless runs the risk of drifting into uncharted waters. Clare Garvie, a senior associate at the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy and Technology who leads its research on law enforcement facial recognition technology, says the sheer speed and scale of the software’s capabilities imperil the presumption of privacy, especially when used in real time.

A police body camera connected to a facial recognition system could theoretically allow officers working crowd control at a political protest to check protesters for criminal records or simply log their presence. In London, the Metropolitan Police has already begun parking vans equipped with cameras running facial recognition algorithms along busy sidewalks to test out the system, and in one instance reportedly ticketed a man who tried to hide his face from view while walking past.

“We have this idea that law enforcement can’t search you and can’t demand identification unless you are suspected of wrongdoing,” Garvie said. “But if everyone who walks by an officer is being searched and compared against their criminal history or a watch list of crimes, that means there is a search happening before any suspicion is generated.”

Unlike some states, California has no law requiring that people provide identification to law enforcement officers on request, though drivers are required to show licenses during traffic stops.

Deployed in real time on police body cameras, critics say, facial recognition could heighten the potential for deadly escalation. A police officer whose camera misidentifies a stopped motorist as having an outstanding warrant and a history of violent crime might be more likely to approach with a gun drawn.

“Inaccurate technology in the hands of armed law enforcement is not going to make us safer,” Cagle said. “It will result in additional dangerous encounters between law enforcement and the public, and false identifications could lead to the use of force and the loss of life.”

Axon, the Taser manufacturer and leading police body camera provider in the U.S., said in a statement that it is not actively working on facial recognition technology. An April investigation by the Financial Times found that the company had taken out patents and acquired companies related to facial recognition, but Axon said that those systems were only used for automatic face redaction for body camera footage, and noted that it had established a policing technologies ethics board to build in safeguards for any future use of the systems.

Motorola Solutions, another major body camera provider, declined to comment but has stated its intention to develop facial recognition technology for body cameras.

The big software companies building facial recognition software are split on its use. Microsoft President Brad Smith said in April that the company refused to sell its technology to a California law enforcement agency over human rights concerns, and the company has publicly called for regulation of the technology to prevent “a commercial race to the bottom.” Amazon, despite criticism from shareholders and activists over its facial recognition programs, is continuing to sell its Rekognition service to law enforcement.

Facial recognition is quickly making its way into daily life via commercial technologies such as Apple’s FaceID unlocking feature and Facebook’s automated photo tagging. JetBlue recently became the first U.S. airline to allow passengers to submit to a face scan in lieu of showing a ticket and ID at boarding, and some retailers and restaurants already use facial recognition to help with loss prevention and customer tracking.

But companies may not have the final word in how the technology is deployed. Oakland’s and Berkeley’s city governments are considering adding a ban to their local ordinances, and facial recognition has been the subject of two House Oversight Committee hearings, in which both Democratic and Republican representatives have expressed support for a moratorium on the technology’s use.

Those hearings revealed that the FBI has amassed a database of more than 640 million photographs for its facial recognition program, including driver’s license photos from 21 states (not including California).

Brian Hofer, one of the architects of San Francisco’s ban and the chairman of Oakland’s Privacy Advisory Commission, believes the movement for more regulation is still gaining strength.

“People believe that it’s inevitable that there’s going to be more and more surveillance, more and more police state power, and technology is going to keep creeping into our lives,” Hofer said. “But we still have the freedom and ability to say no.”

———

©2019 Los Angeles Times


Super Vac Battery Fan Accessories Includes Mister

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Just when you thought Super Vac’s new battery fan couldn’t be more versatile, they added six accessories, including the Mountain Mister. Not only does the V16-BD and V18-BD work with your DeWalt battery-powered tools, but this fan rehabs...

LAPD investigates officer’s actions in Costco shooting

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles Police Department is gathering evidence and video footage in an administrative investigation into an off-duty officer who shot and killed a man authorities say attacked him inside a Southern California Costco Wholesale warehouse store.

Authorities remained tight-lipped Sunday, not responding to requests for comment about what provoked the Friday night confrontation and whether anyone but the officer was armed. Two others were critically injured in the shooting in Corona, which is about 40 miles (64 kilometers) east of Los Angeles.

The officer opened fire after Kenneth French, 32, of Riverside, assaulted him without provocation as the officer held his young child, Corona police said Saturday.

Bullets struck French and two of his family members, according to police. The officer was the only person who fired shots in the store, police said.

Rick Shureih, French's cousin, told The Press-Enterprise that he was a "gentle giant" who was mentally disabled.

Shureih also identified the other two victims as French's parents, Russell and Paola French, and said they remained in an intensive care unit Sunday. Authorities have not released their names.

French's family is seeking an attorney, Shureih said, and declined to give specifics about his mental condition.

French was "non-violent, non-aggressive, non-verbal," his cousin said, and "he has to be pretty much monitored."

"He's not the kind to trade words, so I don't believe that a verbal confrontation happened," Shureih said.

Shureih posted Sunday on his Facebook page a photo of French and his parents.

"I'm posting this picture because the stories on social media have made them out to be the suspects, and the off duty cop the victim," Shureih wrote. "This is a family that was unarmed and was just grocery shopping. Truth will come out! I'm sure this was a misunderstanding that got escalated for no reason!"

The LAPD will continue its internal probe as Corona police and the Riverside County district attorney's office conduct a separate investigation into the shooting. The LAPD said Sunday it had no further information. Corona police and the district attorney's office did not respond to requests for comment Sunday.

Los Angeles Police Commission President Steve Soboroff said Sunday it is Chief Michel Moore's decision whether to put the officer on leave, but it remained unclear if that happened. The officer's identity has not been released. He was treated and released at a nearby hospital and his child was not injured.

The department's policies allow off-duty officers to carry concealed weapons as long as they are authorized for on-duty use, according to the LAPD manual.

Joseph Giacalone, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a retired New York City Police Department sergeant, said it's justifiable to use deadly force even in a crowded store if the attacker has a weapon.

"If the guy pulled out a pocketknife and approaches him, game over," Giacalone said Sunday.

Police have not said if French had any weapons or if the officer identified himself as police before firing.

Giacalone said video footage from Costco's cameras and shoppers' cellphones will be critical to the dual investigations.

While it's not unusual for police to delay releasing information such as an officer's name in a shooting for safety reasons, Giacalone said it's important to get details out as quickly as possible.

"People start filling in the timelines for you" in the meantime, he said.

The shooting prompted a stampede of frightened shoppers, some who fled the store as others sought cover inside.

Witnesses reported seeing an argument between two people near a freezer section when shots rang out at least six times.


Police respond to active shooter at federal courthouse in Dallas

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

DALLAS — Police responded to shots fired at a Dallas federal courthouse Monday morning.

According to the Dallas Morning News, A Dallas News reporter witnessed the shooter open fire outside the building. Window panes in a revolving door at the courthouse’s entrance were broken, but it’s unclear if the door was shot by a shooter or police.

A suspect is in custody.

Schools in the area are on lockdown.

This is a breaking story. Information will be updated when available.

#Breaking: Shots were fired Monday morning at the Earle Cabell federal courthouse in downtown Dallas Monday morning, officials said. https://t.co/L6AgNEh92c

— Dallas Morning News (@dallasnews) June 17, 2019

#BREAKING: Shots fired outside the Federal Courthouse in Downtown Dallas this morning. You can hear a volley of gunfire in this clip. This went out as an active shooter. Dallas Police have a person in custody. No reports of injuries. pic.twitter.com/tC9WVnB08q

— Jason Whitely (@JasonWhitely) June 17, 2019

BREAKING: First responders are converging on two scenes in Dallas: Earle Cabell Federal Building and Courthouse Omni Dallas Hotel Details unfolding here: https://t.co/dgp86LG0Or pic.twitter.com/FWqnS9lPsZ

— NBC DFW (@NBCDFW) June 17, 2019


Person shot in gunfire with officers near Dallas courthouse

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Author: Therese Matthews

Associated Press

DALLAS — A person was shot in an exchange of gunfire with federal officers outside a federal courthouse in downtown Dallas Monday morning, city police said, and a blast was later heard after the bomb squad said it would perform a controlled explosion on a vehicle.

The injured person was taken to a hospital and no one else was injured by shots fired outside the Earle Cabell Federal Building, Dallas police said via Twitter. A large law enforcement presence was visible downtown late Monday morning, with police closing off several blocks around the federal building.

Police did not immediately release any information about the person or the nature of their injuries. A bomb squad examined a vehicle associated with that person as a precaution and decided to perform a controlled explosion. A loud blast could be heard downtown at 10:38 a.m.

The Dallas Morning News reports that one of its photographers, Tom Fox, was outside the building and witnessed a gunman opening fire. A photograph shows authorities tending to a shirtless man lying on the ground in a parking lot outside the building.

Fox said he was outside the building when a man in a mask parked at the corner of two downtown streets. He said the man ran and began shooting at the courthouse, cracking the glass of the door.

The window panes in the courthouse's revolving door were broken.

Chad Cline, 46, who lives in a building near the courthouse, told The Associated Press that just before 9 a.m. a message was broadcast throughout the building that there was an active shooter in the area and that residents should stay inside. Less than half an hour later, another message said there was a potential bomb threat and that residents needed to leave. He, his wife and their two dogs went to a coffee shop. When he returned to his building later in the morning, he asked an officer armed with a rifle when he would be able to get back in and the officer didn't know.

Police say federal officers are now leading the investigation.

Man shot in gunfire exchange outside Dallas courthouse dies

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Therese Matthews

Associated Press

DALLAS — A masked 22-year-old man was killed in an exchange of gunfire with federal officers outside a federal courthouse in downtown Dallas Monday morning, an FBI official said.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Matthew DeSarno said late Monday morning that Brian Isaack Clyde was pronounced dead at a hospital following the shooting outside the Earle Cabell Federal Building. A large law enforcement presence was visible downtown late Monday morning, with police closing off several blocks around the federal building.

"At this time we have no information indicating that there are other shooters, other threats to the community. We are working on one vehicle, we will have that cleared shortly," DeSarno said.

Following the shooting, a bomb squad examined a vehicle associated with the man as a precaution and performed controlled explosions. Two loud blasts from that could be heard downtown Monday morning.

The Dallas Morning News reports that one of its photographers, Tom Fox, was outside the building and witnessed a gunman opening fire. A photograph shows authorities tending to a shirtless man lying on the ground in a parking lot outside the building.

Fox said he was outside the building when a man in a mask parked at the corner of two downtown streets. He said the man ran and began shooting at the courthouse, cracking the glass of the door.

The window panes in the courthouse's revolving door were broken.

Chad Cline, 46, who lives in a building near the courthouse, told The Associated Press that just before 9 a.m. a message was broadcast throughout the building that there was an active shooter in the area and that residents should stay inside. Less than half an hour later, another message said there was a potential bomb threat and that residents needed to leave. He, his wife and their two dogs went to a coffee shop. When he returned to his building later in the morning, he asked an officer armed with a rifle when he would be able to get back in and the officer didn't know.


Masked gunman fatally shot after opening fire on Dallas courthouse

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Therese Matthews

Associated Press

DALLAS — A masked gunman opened fire Monday on a federal courthouse in downtown Dallas before being fatally shot in an exchange of gunfire with federal officers, witnesses and authorities said.

Brian Isaack Clyde, 22, was pronounced dead at a hospital following the shooting outside the Earle Cabell Federal Building. Authorities offered no hint of his motive, but FBI agent Matthew DeSarno said there was nothing to indicate the presence of any other shooters or threats to the city.

Clyde opened fire about 8:40 a.m., and law enforcement immediately responded, including three officers from the Federal Protective Service who were stationed at the building.

A bomb squad later examined a vehicle associated with the gunman as a precaution and performed controlled explosions, authorities said. Two loud blasts could be heard.

The Dallas Morning News reported that one of its photographers, Tom Fox, was outside the building and witnessed the shooter opening fire.

Fox said he was outside the building when a masked man parked at the corner of two downtown streets. He said the man ran and began shooting at the courthouse, cracking the glass of the door. The window panes in a revolving door were broken.

A photograph posted on the newspaper's website showed authorities tending to a shirtless man lying on the ground in a parking lot outside the building.

Police closed off several blocks around the federal building.

Chad Cline, 46, who lives near the courthouse, told The Associated Press that a message was broadcast throughout his building shortly before 9 a.m. announcing that there was an active shooter in the area and that residents should stay inside.

Less than half an hour later, another message said there was a potential bomb threat and that residents needed to leave. He, his wife and their two dogs went to a coffee shop.


IA Firefighters Show off New Apparatus

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Waterloo Fire Rescue's new pumper, which holds 250 more gallons of water than the vehicle it replaces, began responding to calls late last week.

Another Colorado State Patrol Trooper Killed 2 Years After ‘Move Over Law’ Signed

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two years ago, Colorado State Trooper Cody Donahue was killed after a driver failed to move over on the highway.

Arizona Police Officer’s Patrol Car Struck by Drunk Driver

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Mesa police officer spent his Father's Day recovering after drunk driver plowed into his patrol car.

Chicago Police Officers Help Teen Find Job, Shoes for Work

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Young people across Chicago are now on the hunt to find summer jobs. But Rydiun Walton had a special reason to find work and a new pair of shoes to wear to the job.

Pearl River, NY, Hook and Ladder Puts 78-foot Quint in Service

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pearl River, NY, Fire District, Hook and Ladder has placed into service a Rosenbauer Commander Viper 78-foot, rear-mount quint.

Ohio LEO helps save 6 lives in 2 hours

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Amy L. Knapp The Independent, Massillon, Ohio

MASSILLON, Ohio — Despite the heavy rain that was falling on the city Monday, things were pretty quiet.

Patrolman Aaron Franklin was a little more than an hour into his shift when that all changed. Over the radio came a call for juveniles trapped in water.

He raced to the scene along Tremont Avenue SE. He was the first emergency responder to arrive. He found a teen boy, who frantically told him his friends had been swept into the culvert that carried Sippo Creek to the Tuscarawas River.

The water rescue was just the beginning of a hectic day. With just a few minutes to catch his breath after the water rescue, Franklin responded to a vehicle crash.

Little did he know that within a span of less than two hours, he would be responsible for saving six lives.

All in a day's work

A nearly four-year veteran of the police force, Franklin never had been on a water rescue, but he knew to keep his cool.

After he learned the kids were in the culvert, the officer made his way down a slippery embankment to assess the situation.

The water was moving fast. Hanging onto a tree limb, he peered into the large culvert and spotted two teens clinging to the side of the culvert. They were unscathed and happy to see him. He told them to stay put, and he climbed back out of the water.

The boy's friend, who was able to escape and call for help, told Franklin others may have been swept further into the pipe.

Franklin advised fellow officers to make their way to the end of the spillway to search for the teens.

Knowing he could easily become a victim if he entered the culvert, Franklin tried to keep the boys calm as they waited for the fire department to arrive.

Fire Chief Tom Burgasser didn't hesitate to join Franklin in the water. Tethered to a rope and donning a life jacket, the chief made his way into the culvert to rescue the boys. Franklin remained at the entrance manning a life ring tied to the end of a rope.

The pair, along with other firefighters and officers, managed to rescue the two boys, but two more remained further in the pipe. The third had traveled under the city about half a mile throughout the culvert, where he was able to cling to a ladder in an access tower near state Route 21 and Tremont Avenue. Police found him and got him out.

"I could hear them yelling, but I couldn't make out what they were saying," Franklin said. "I threw the life ring out."

Water rescues are not something you train for, he said.

"It's more making a split second decision of what I should do, what I can do and what am I going to do," he said.

Burgasser praised Franklin for his efforts to save the boys.

"He was hanging onto a tree trunk (in the water). There as no rope tied to him," the chief said. "It was a cooperative effort. It took all of us."

It was a scary situation that could have turned out differently, the officer said.

Wet and weary from the rescue, Franklin joined emergency personnel at Fire Station No. 1, where the teens were reunited with their family.

With the city's emergency personnel stretched thin from the rescue, Franklin was called to respond to a vehicle crash. The vehicle still was in gear, and the driver was slumped over the wheel.

As he approached the scene along Lincoln Way W, bystanders urged Franklin to hurry. The man was turning blue, they said.

The officer pulled the man out of the vehicle and laid him flat on his back in the middle of Lincoln Way. He tilted back his head and made sure his airway was clear.

The man had a faint pulse.

Franklin had no idea what was wrong with the man, but bystanders speculated it was a heroin overdose.

As the only emergency responder, Franklin called on the crowd to help. Someone fetched the Narcan kit from his cruiser, while he asked another person to make sure he was safe from the traffic.

"It wasn't the first and it won't be the last time I use Narcan," the officer said. "But, it was the first time I'd administer it on somebody lying in an active roadway."

Burgasser praised Franklin adding that every minute a person goes by without brain activity is a minute closer to death.

After the first dose, the man's pulse got stronger and he began gasping and awakening. Paramedics arrived and took over. The man lived. He has been charged with driving while under the influence.

Unsung heroes

Franklin is surprised by all of the attention his actions have garnered. Monday was a little out of the ordinary, but the officer said he was just doing his job.

"My stance is every day in this line of work you show up and you never know what's in store for you," he said.

Sometimes it's quiet, and other times you have to be ready for anything to happen.

There is a lot of negativity surrounding police officers, but, every day, law enforcement face life-and-death situations, and they all have a story about a life they saved, Franklin said.

"Deep down, I hope, at least on that day, I did my job," the Army veteran said.

———

©2019 The Independent, Massillon, Ohio


Two FDNY Firefighters Hurt In 3-Alarm Fire

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No residents were injured in the early Sunday blaze in Coney Island that started at a multi-family home and spread to two neighboring houses.

About 100 San Antonio Firefighters Battle Apartment Fire

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No one was hurt in Sunday's three-story building blaze in the Monte Vista neighborhood that had more than 40 San Antonio fire units responding.

Va. church hosts first barbecue to thank first responders

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The church planned on serving members of the police department, fire and emergency services

Va. church hosts first barbecue to thank first responders

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The church planned on serving members of the police department, fire and emergency services

Va. church hosts barbecue to thank first responders

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The church planned on serving members of the police department, fire and emergency services

Va. church hosts barbecue to thank first responders

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The church planned on serving members of the police department, fire and emergency services

Sacramento FD honors innovative longtime fire chief

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William R. Powell created the organization’s first hazmat and swift-water rescue teams, bought three fire trucks with ladders reaching 150 feet and started hiring female firefighters

Sacramento FD honors forward-thinking fire chief

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William R. Powell created the organization’s first hazmat and swift-water rescue teams, bought three fire trucks with ladders reaching 150 feet and started hiring female firefighters

Rural MN Firefighters Turn to Each Other for Help

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Facing staffing shortages, four Minnesota volunteer departments—Olivia, Bird Island, Hector and Danube—are using training sessions to learn how to work together.

Baltimore stabilization centers hope to solve heroin crisis

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nearly 23,000 people in Maryland have been certified to dispense naloxone and reported administering it more than 600 times since a 2013 law expanded access beyond medical professionals, according to health officials

Drug users armed with naloxone double as medics on streets of San Francisco

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2018, San Francisco paramedics administered naloxone to 1,647 people, up from 980 two years earlier, according to numbers from the city’s emergency response system

Drug users armed with naloxone feel safe from OD threats

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2018, San Francisco paramedics administered naloxone to 1,647 people, up from 980 two years earlier, according to numbers from the city’s emergency response system

Powerful Scheduling Software Built by Firefighters for Firefighters

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When an emergency strikes, the public isn’t thinking about their fire department’s staffing levels.

NC firefighter, police officer inspired to follow father’s footsteps

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Union Road Volunteer Fire Department alone has had at least 11 father and son/daughter pairings in its history

Off-Duty LAPD Officer Attacked While Holding Child in Costco Fatally Shoots Man

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Corona police, an off-duty officer with the Los Angeles Police Department was shopping at Costco with his family when he was attacked while holding his young child.

Connecticut State Police Trooper Extricated After Crash

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Connecticut State Police trooper is recovering after he was trapped inside his patrol car following a crash early Sunday morning.

CAL FIRE union launches TV ads pressuring officials to hire more firefighters

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 30- and 60-second spots are meant to be informative, but Cal Fire Local 2881 President Tim Edwards said more aggressive commercials could follow if fire conditions worsen

CAL FIRE launches TV ads pressuring officials to hire more firefighters

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 30- and 60-second spots are meant to be informative, but Cal Fire Local 2881 President Tim Edwards said more aggressive commercials could follow if fire conditions worsen

Alabama firefighter dies during training exercise

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fire Chief Richard Harvey said they believe he died from a medical incident but said the death is under investigation by the Alabama State Fire Marshals Office

Street Dedicated to Fallen NYPD Detective in His Hometown

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

South Jamesport Avenue was dedicated on Saturday as "Det. Brian Simonsen Way."

Street Dedicated to Fallen NYPD Detective in His Hometown

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

South Jamesport Avenue was dedicated on Saturday as "Det. Brian Simonsen Way."

Ohio Police Officer Helps Save Six Lives in Two Hours

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Massillon Police Officer Aaron Franklin was a little more than an hour into his shift when that all changed. Over the radio came a call for juveniles trapped in water.

Ohio Police Officer Helps Save Six Lives in Two Hours

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Massillon Police Officer Aaron Franklin was a little more than an hour into his shift when that all changed. Over the radio came a call for juveniles trapped in water.

Third NYPD Officer Takes Own Life in Two Weeks

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A police officer shot himself to death on Staten Island Friday, the third cop to do so in the past nine days, the NYPD said.

Third NYPD Officer Takes Own Life in Two Weeks

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A police officer shot himself to death on Staten Island Friday, the third cop to do so in the past nine days, the NYPD said.

Missouri Police Officer Critically Wounded While Transporting Inmate

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Trenton police officer is in critical condition after being shot in the abdomen while transporting an inmate to Saint Joseph Friday afternoon.

Missouri Police Officer Critically Wounded While Transporting Inmate

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Trenton police officer is in critical condition after being shot in the abdomen while transporting an inmate to Saint Joseph Friday afternoon.

Jury Finds Five Gang Members Guilty in Slaying of NYPD Explorer

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police said the attack on 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz, who was a member of the NYPD's Explorers Program and dreamed of becoming a detective, was a case of mistaken identity.

Jury Finds Five Gang Members Guilty in Slaying of NYPD Explorer

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police said the attack on 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz, who was a member of the NYPD's Explorers Program and dreamed of becoming a detective, was a case of mistaken identity.

5 EMS timekeeping problems and how to navigate with software

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Manually calculating hours worked, tracking PTO requests and verifying daily schedule questions is time consuming, and vulnerable to human error

Fire department preparation for fireworks season

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters should be familiar with fireworks-focused standards and state regulations

5 steps for gross decon post-fire

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Myrtle Beach company officers share their departments simple steps for reducing exposure to carcinogens

MCC Expo Quick Take: Planning First Responder Incident Preparedness and Recovery Training

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Philip D. White, master fire service instructor, addressed planning effective first responder incident preparedness and recovery training sessions at the recent California Mobile Command Center Expo

MCC Expo Quick Take: Planning First Responder Incident Preparedness and Recovery Training

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Philip D. White, master fire service instructor, addressed planning effective first responder incident preparedness and recovery training sessions at the recent California Mobile Command Center Expo

MCC Expo Quick Take: Planning first responder incident preparedness and recovery training

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Philip D. White, master fire service instructor, addressed planning effective first responder incident preparedness and recovery training sessions at the recent California Mobile Command Center Expo

Off-duty paramedic saves trapped driver from burning SUV

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An Ohio off-duty West Chester paramedic climbed inside a burning SUV after a crash in Franklin to rescue the driver trapped inside

It ain’t easy being wheezy: A pediatric case study

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Learn how to assess, monitor and manage pediatric asthma emergencies, as well as underlying pathophysiologic changes

Fire service stress: Firefighters reflect on the impact of the job

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Study reveals firefighters’ feelings about the trauma witnessed on the job and its impact on homelife and emotions

Product of the Day: Weis Fire & Safety — The Draft Commander 3000 Mobile Fire Pump Testing and Training Unit

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Draft Commander 3000 Mobile Fire Pump Testing and Training Unit allows you to perform a true pump test from draft with clean water.

Ky. county to provide partial tuition for paramedic program

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Scott County officials approved releasing $3,000 in funds at the start of the program and an additional $1,000 if the EMT signs up with Scott county

Ohio fire captain death ruled LODD after 4 years

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Townsend Township Fire Capt. Charles Horning died on Oct. 13, 2015, from a heart attack related to a fire earlier that morning

Fire foam used for training in Conn. could pose serious health, environmental risks

Posted on June 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

State Fire Administrator Jeff Morrissette said there is “no way of knowing” how much of the chemical foam is being used

6 tips for drowning prevention and response

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

First responders can use their status as respected community figures to reduce the risk for drowning

Cops: Ambulance left running with keys in ignition stolen from hospital

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The ambulance later was found unoccupied on Cebra Avenue near Chester Place, according to a spokesman for the NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Public Information

Police: Ambulance stolen after left running in front of hospital

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The ambulance later was found unoccupied on Cebra Avenue near Chester Place, according to a spokesman for the NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Public Information

Georgia Pacific announces grant opening and offers educational materials

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The grant is open to departments located within a 30-mile radius of a Georgia Pacific facility

Longtime CA Firefighter, Chief Dies at 91

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Becoming Sacramento fire chief in 1973, William Powell created the department's first hazmat and swift-water rescue teams during his 13-year tenure.

Two-Alarm Fire Causes $1M in Damage to PA Houses

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Around 50 firefighters from eight different fire companies responded to the blaze Saturday night and were able to contain it in about 15 minutes

Illegal Fireworks Spark Multi-Alarm CA Fire

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Contra Costa County firefighters contained the vegetation blaze Saturday in Antioch that threatened 10 houses but was limited to damaging one home.

OH Firefighters Need Workplace while New Station Built

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

West Chester Township will replace Station 73, but the fire department will need to find a rental space for the year to 18 months it will take to build the new firehouse.

U.S. Rep Calls FDNY Coat ‘Fashion with a Purpose’

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY) took to wearing a custom FDNY turnout coat during recent hearings to make the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund permanent.

Three in CA Small Plane Crash Escape with Minor Injuries

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After Saturday's crash in Upland, the airplane's occupants were sitting on a park bench when San Bernardino County firefighters arrived at the scene.

Texas Sheriff’s Deputy Dies of Embolism While On Duty

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Tarrant County Sheriff's Deputy Keith Darryl Shepherd died of a sudden pulmonary embolism that struck while he was getting out of his car Friday night in downtown Fort Worth.

Colorado State Patrol Trooper Struck, Killed While Assisting at Crash

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Colorado State Patrol Trooper William Moden was struck and killed while assisting at the scene of an earlier crash on the side of Interstate 70 in Arapahoe County Friday night.

Passenger Jet Skids off NJ Airport Runway

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters responded to the incident at Newark's airport Saturday, and while a few of the 166 passengers had bumps and bruises, no one needed medical attention.

Seven Boston Firefighters Injured in 9-Alarm Blaze

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Boston firefighter was hurt jumping out a window during a large fire in the Mattapan neighborhood that spread to eight homes and had about 150 firefighters responding.

Colo. trooper fatally struck while assisting crash

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Sam Tabachnik The Denver Post

ARAPAHOE COUNTY, Colo. — The Colorado State Patrol identified Saturday morning the trooper struck and killed Friday night on Interstate 70 between Limon and Peoria.

Trooper William Moden, 37, was killed while assisting a crash on the side of the highway in Arapahoe County, Col. Matthew Packard, the State Patrol’s chief, said.

“We lost one of our very best,” Packard said at a morning news conference.

Moden is the fifth trooper to be killed on Colorado roads since 2015.

About 9:40 p.m. Friday, Moden stopped to investigate a crash outside his patrol vehicle on eastbound Interstate 70 near Deer Trail, Sgt. Blake White, a State Patrol spokesman, said. While tending to the car, Moden was struck by another vehicle.

The 12-year State Patrol veteran was flown to the University of Colorado Hospital. He was pronounced dead after his arrival, the State Patrol said.

Packard described Moden as a man with a wicked sense of humor, a man who loved his job and lived to help others.

“Will was an incredibly beloved guy,” Packard said. “He has a smile that was eclipsed only by the size of his heart.”

The State Patrol has not identified the driver of the other vehicle or whether any arrests have been made in connection with the incident. Nobody else was injured in the crash.

The highway was closed for several miles in both directions after the incident.

Moden worked as a vehicular crimes investigator based in Adams County, the State Patrol said. It tweeted a picture of Moden taking a selfie, a wry grin on his face.

“He was a great example and amazing human,” the State Patrol said. “You will be missed, Will.”

Colorado leaders on Saturday also expressed their condolences.

“My thoughts are with the family of Colorado State Patrol Trooper William Moden, lost in the line of duty last night,” Gov. Jared Polis tweeted. The governor said flags across the state will be lowered in Moden’s honor. “He served our state in law enforcement for 12 years and loved being a state trooper.”

Sen. Cory Gardner said he and his wife were “extremely saddened” to learn of the trooper’s death: “We owe everything to these brave, selfless heroes and are forever grateful for their sacrifice to protect our communities.”

After Trooper Cody Donahue was struck and killed by a truck driver in November 2016, former Gov. John Hickenlooper signed into law the “Move Over for Cody Act,” which increased penalties for drivers who fail to move over for emergency responders.

But the law has not managed to eliminate these roadside incidents.

“The message hasn’t changed, and that’s what’s frustrating,” Packard said. “If you’re driving a car, it’s worthy of your highest degree of attention. Lives are at stake.”

———

©2019 The Denver Post


Police union: Minn. chief violated law in case of 5 fired officers

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

ST. PAUL, Minn. — The president of the St. Paul police union says the city's police chief broke a state law by revealing details about a case that cost five officers their jobs.

St. Paul Police Federation head Paul Kuntz said Friday that police Chief Todd Axtell gave "an incomplete and false narrative, forcing the media to fill in the blanks." Federation attorney Chris Wachtler said he expects the union to file a grievance next week.

Axtell responded in a statement by calling Kuntz's comments "untrue allegations." The chief said he wants to hear the union's position once it has requested and reviewed the files.

Axtell announced the firings on Thursday. He did not name the officers or give a detailed explanation, other than to say they failed to intervene in an assault last year.


Police: Off-duty officer shot man who hit him in Calif. Costco

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

CORONA, Calif. — An off-duty police officer opened fire inside a Costco Wholesale warehouse store, killing a man who had attacked him and wounding two others, the Corona Police Department said.

Kenneth French, 32, of Riverside assaulted the Los Angeles Police Department officer Friday night while he was holding his young child, the department said in a statement Saturday. The officer fired his gun, hitting French and two of French's relatives, the department said.

French was killed, the department said. The relatives are in critical conditions at hospitals.

The officer, whose identity is being withheld, was treated and released at a nearby hospital, and the officer's child was not injured, the department said.

The officer was the only person who fired shots in the store, the department said.

The shooting prompted a stampede of frightened shoppers to flee the store east of Los Angeles and seek cover inside.

Witnesses said they saw a man with a Mohawk haircut arguing with someone near a freezer section when shots rang out at least six times. The man involved in the argument was killed, Corona police Lt. Jeff Edwards said.

Witnesses said there was an altercation. Shoppers and employees described terror and chaos when shots rang out shortly before 8 p.m. Friday and police swarmed the store.

Shrieks from inside the store were heard on video recorded by shopper Nikki Tate, who had stopped by with her daughter to pick up steaks and lobsters for Father's Day.

Tate said Saturday she was by the meat section when she heard "about six or seven shots." She dropped to the ground and crawled toward her daughter who was at the other end. They huddled until they were able to escape through a side door.

"I saw people and heard shots and my first thought was 'Jesus, is this another mass shooting?'" she said. "I didn't know if this was a random thing or a domestic thing or if this was a mass shooting. Everything was happening so fast, I just wanted to get me and my kid to safety."

In the video, her daughter says, "Mommy, we need to go."

The Los Angeles Police Department said in a statement Saturday afternoon that it has launched its own investigation of the incident.

Christina Colis told the Riverside Press-Enterprise that she was in the produce area when she heard six to seven shots and hid with other shoppers in a refrigerated produce room. She said her mother saw people injured on the floor.

"I thought maybe someone dropped a bottle of wine, but then I kept hearing shots," shopper Will Lungo told the Press-Enterprise newspaper. "An employee came in and helped us out through the emergency exit."

Witnesses told KCAL-TV that shoppers and employees rushed to the exits. The station reported that more than 100 people were outside the store at one point. Left behind inside the store were purses, cellphones and backpacks from panicked shoppers, Corona police said.


Pa. governor signs CPR bill into law

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Act 7 requires PDE to provide a curriculum to schools to teach hands-only CPR, a no-breath, compression-only technique recommended by the American Heart Association for sudden cardiac arrests

Q&A: Taking a stand against firefighter occupational cancer

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Trauernicht is looking for "firefighters brave enough to be champions of the cause”

RI island residents call for more volunteer fire department funding

Posted on June 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Town Council has already provisionally approved $170,540 for the Prudence Island Volunteer Fire Department in the fiscal 2020 budget, a 1.03% increase over last year

Pa. city family inspired five generations of firefighters

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Robert F. MacCallum remains active with the fire company handling the finances, working events and fundraisers, and heads down to the firehouse anytime there’s a call

Ky. county ambulance services transition ongoing

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Owensboro Fire Department, AMR has hired 32 full-time and roughly 24 part-time employees

EMS sees motorcycle crashes increase during ROT rally

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Austin-Travis County Emergency Medical Services officials had reported a total of six motorcycle accidents spread across Friday and Saturday

Austin EMS sees increase in motorcycle crashes during biker rally

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Austin-Travis County Emergency Medical Services officials had reported a total of six motorcycle accidents spread across Friday and Saturday

Nine-alarm Boston fire sends 9 to hospital including 7 firefighters

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

About 150 firefighters battled the blaze, which presented problems because of the “heavy fire,” the “hot night” and the proximity of the affected houses

NLEOMF and Maglite to Present Hero Award to MD Police Department

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF), in partnership with Maglite, will present a Hero Award to the Prince George's County (MD) Police Department for its extraordinary commitment to community engagement through its Prince George's County Police Athletic League (PAL).

Watch Canadian Firefighters Rescue Big Bear in Tree

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Abbottsford, British Columbia, crews helped lowered the large, tranquilized bear to the ground after it was cornered by conservation officers Friday morning.

ID Firefighters Prepare for Hot Wildfire Season

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 80 firefighters recently ran through the Bureau of Land Management Twin Falls District Fire Management's training program to prepare for fire season.

GA Firefighter Hospitalized after Battling House Fire

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An East Point firefighter suffered heat exhaustion following a blaze early Saturday that also sent a resident to the hospital and left two dogs dead.

Atlanta Firefighter Who Lost Leg in Crash Goes Home

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sgt. Darrow Harden, 47, was greeted Friday by his colleagues in the Atlanta Fire Rescue Department as he left the rehabilitation center he had been at for more than a month.

AL Department Considers Four Fire Chief Candidates

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Birmingham Chief Charles Gordon will retire at the end of the year. Two candidates up for the position are from Alabama, and two are from Atlanta and Washington, D.C.

Crews Across WI to Staff Fallen Firefighter’s Department

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters from 19 departments will staff Madison fire stations during a memorial Sunday for firefighter Todd Mahoney, who died this week while competing in a triathlon.

Mo. LEO in critical condition after being shot while transporting inmate

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Katie Bernard The Kansas City Star

TRENTON, Mo. — A Trenton, Missouri, police officer is in critical condition after being shot in the abdomen while transporting an inmate to Saint Joseph Friday afternoon.

Just after 3 p.m., the officer was shot while on southbound U.S 69 highway inside a police vehicle. Missouri State Highway Patrol Troop H tweeted that a struggle occurred.

The inmate, Jamey A Griffin, is still in custody, according to Troop H public information officer Jake Angle.

Griffin, 38, was shot in the hand and taken to the hospital. Missouri State Highway Patrol Troop H tweeted that he is in stable condition.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol is investigating the incident and all information is preliminary at this point.

———

©2019 The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Mo.)


WI Police Cleared in Shooting that Killed Firefighter

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prosecutors determined two police officers were justified in fatally shooting a suspect who shot and killed an Appleton Mitch Lundgaard firefighter in the line of duty in May.

WI Police Cleared in Shooting that Killed Firefighter

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Prosecutors determined two police officers were justified in fatally shooting a suspect who shot and killed an Appleton Mitch Lundgaard firefighter in the line of duty in May.

MO Firefighter Injured in Fatal 2-Alarm Fire

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man in his 60s was found dead in his Wildwood house, which caught fire early Friday. The hurt firefighter was taken to the hospital with "minor injuries."

Jury rejects St. Louis officer’s gender bias lawsuit

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — Jurors have rejected a high-ranking St. Louis police officer's claim that her colleague was promoted to deputy chief instead of her because of gender bias.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the jury ruled against Lt. Col. Rochelle Jones on Thursday. Her lawsuit alleged gender discrimination in the 2015 promotion of Ronnie Robinson to lieutenant colonel, the second-highest rank in the department. Jones was a major at the time.

Jones' lawyer J.C. Pleban said in closing arguments that former police Chief Sam Dotson "picked a man to be elevated to this men's club."

Deputy city counselor Nancy Kistler said Dotson promoted Robinson because he was the strongest candidate. She said Dotson also had a record of promoting women.

Jones and Pleban said they plan to appeal.


Shooting inside Calif. Costco kills 1, injures 2

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

CORONA, Calif. — A gunman opened fire inside a Southern California Costco during an argument Friday night, killing a man, wounding two other people and sparking a stampede of terrified shoppers before he was taken into custody, police said.

Police swarmed the Costco after shots were reported at the huge store about 50 miles (80.5 kilometers) from downtown Los Angeles.

Witnesses told KCAL-TV that a man with a Mohawk haircut was arguing with someone near a freezer section when he pulled a gun and fired at least six shots.

The man involved in the argument was killed and two other people were wounded, Lt. Jeff Edwards said. There was no immediate word on their conditions.

The suspected gunman was apprehended, claimed to be injured and was taken to the hospital, Edwards said. His name and condition were not immediately released.

Shoppers and employees described terror and chaos as the shots rang out.

Christina Colis told the Riverside Press-Enterprise that she was in the produce area when she heard six to seven shots.

Colis told the paper that she and other shoppers hid in a refrigerated produce room. She said her mother saw people injured on the floor.

Will Lungo, 45, of Corona, said he and his wife were near the produce and alcohol sections when he heard gunshots.

"I thought maybe someone dropped a bottle of wine, but then I kept hearing shots," Lungo told the Press-Enterprise. "An employee came in and helped us out through the emergency exit."

Witnesses told KCAL-TV that shoppers and employees rushed to the exits. At one point, the station reported more than 100 people were outside the store.


Off-duty Calif. LEO discharged gun during deadly Costco shooting

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

CORONA, Calif. — An off-duty Los Angeles police officer among three people injured during a shooting inside a Costco Wholesale, killing one person, discharged his firearm inside the store, authorities said Saturday.

It was not immediately clear whether the unidentified officer was the only person who fired shots inside the store Friday night or if another person also opened fire or had a weapon.

Corona Police officer Tobias Kouroubacalis said Saturday he could not confirm if there was more than one shooter and said no one was in custody following the shooting that prompted a stampede of frightened shoppers to flee the store east of Los Angeles and seek cover inside.

Witnesses said they saw a man with a Mohawk haircut arguing with someone near a freezer section when shots rang out at least six times. The man involved in the argument was killed, Corona police Lt. Jeff Edwards said.

The injured officer was treated for minor injuries and released from a hospital, Los Angeles Police officer Greg Kraft said.

Corona police did not disclose details of what led to the shooting but witnesses said there was an altercation. Shoppers and employees described terror and chaos when shots rang out shortly before 8 p.m. Friday and police swarmed the store.

Shrieks from inside the store were heard on video recorded by shopper Nikki Tate, who had stopped by with her daughter to pick up steaks and lobsters for Father's Day.

Tate said Saturday she was by the meat section when she heard "about six or seven shots." She dropped to the ground and crawled toward her daughter who was at the other end. They huddled until they were able to escape through a side door.

"I saw people and heard shots and my first though was 'Jesus, is this another mass shooting?'" she said. "I didn't know if this was a random thing or a domestic thing or if this was a mass shooting. Everything was happening so fast, I just wanted to get me and my kid to safety."

In the video, her daughter says, "Mommy, we need to go."

No identities were immediately released. Police said the name of the deceased won't be released until the Riverside County coroner notifies family.

Christina Colis told the Riverside Press-Enterprise that she was in the produce area when she heard six to seven shots and hid with other shoppers in a refrigerated produce room. She said her mother saw people injured on the floor.

"I thought maybe someone dropped a bottle of wine, but then I kept hearing shots," shopper Will Lungo told the Press-Enterprise newspaper. "An employee came in and helped us out through the emergency exit."

Witnesses told KCAL-TV that shoppers and employees rushed to the exits. The station reported that more than 100 people were outside the store at one point. Left behind inside the store were purses, cellphones and backpacks from panicked shoppers, Corona police said.


Texas sheriff’s deputy found fatally shot in car

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas — A Texas sheriff says one of his deputies was found fatally shot inside his car, near the county jail.

Tarrant County Sheriff Bill Waybourn tells news outlets that Sgt. Keith Shepherd was found Friday night inside his car in a downtown Fort Worth parking lot. The parking lot is across from the county jail, where Sheriff's Department Chief of Staff David McClelland says Shepherd was assigned.

Fort Worth police are leading the investigation into the shooting.

No suspect has been identified, and McClelland says authorities are pulling surveillance video from a three-block radius.

Waybourn says Shepherd worked for the department for 19 years.

Further details have not been released.


Texas sheriff’s deputy dies after being found shot in car

Posted on June 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Tom Steele The Dallas Morning News

FORT WORTH, Texas — A Tarrant County sheriff's deputy has died after being shot in downtown Fort Worth late Friday.

Sheriff Bill Waybourn said just before midnight that Sgt. Keith Shepherd, who worked in the department's detention unit, had died at a hospital.

Authorities were called around 9:30 p.m. to the 100 block of North Burnett Street where Shepherd was found in his personal vehicle with "significant head injuries," Fort Worth police Sgt. Chris Daniels said.

Shepherd was rushed to Texas Health Harris Methodist Fort Worth, where he died a short time later.

Waybourn said Shepherd had been taking a dinner break and was expected to return around 7 or 7:30 p.m., but never did.

He was found in a parking lot near the Sheriff's Department offices and the Tarrant County jail. The parking lot has security cameras, Waybourn said.

Fort Worth police are leading the investigation, the sheriff said. The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives also was on the scene.

Though the investigation was in its early stages and authorities did not have a suspect in the shooting, Waybourn said, "We're confident it will unravel soon."

Waybourn said he did not believe the public was in danger.

Law enforcement officers blocked off several streets, and police with rifles could be seen searching a nearby parking garage not long after the shooting was reported.

Shepherd, a 19-year-veteran of the force, had "a great reputation" in the department and was a strong leader, Waybourn said. He was also a great husband and father, the sheriff said.

———

©2019 The Dallas Morning News


Fla. needle exchange program is new weapon to fight the opioid crisis

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Researchers have found the Miami-Dade program has discarded 11,000 more needles than it gave out and reversed 1,304 overdoses

Wis. FDs, EMS units will cover Madison fire stations during services for firefighter Todd Mahoney

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters from 19 departments across Wisconsin will staff Madison fire stations and ambulances on Sunday so Madison firefighters can attend a memorial service for firefighter Todd Mahoney

Wis. FDs, EMS units will cover Madison fire stations during services for firefighter Todd Mahoney

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters from 19 departments across Wisconsin will staff Madison fire stations and ambulances on Sunday so Madison firefighters can attend a memorial service for firefighter Todd Mahoney

19 FDs across Wis. to cover Madison stations during fallen FF service

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters from 19 departments across Wisconsin will staff Madison fire stations and ambulances on Sunday so Madison firefighters can attend a memorial service for firefighter Todd Mahoney

19 FDs across Wis. to cover Madison stations during fallen FF service

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters from 19 departments across Wisconsin will staff Madison fire stations and ambulances on Sunday so Madison firefighters can attend a memorial service for firefighter Todd Mahoney

State legislation would let Navy SEAL join FDNY after he was rejected because of age

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The department rejected Special Operations Chief Shaun Donovan’s application because the son of Staten Island parents was deemed too old by the current state rules by 6 months and 25 days

Prosecutor: Police justified in gunfight that killed Wis. FF in crossfire

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The prosecutor described a scene that quickly changed from a routine medical call to a chaotic, dangerous situation with multiple shots being fired by Houston and by officers trying to deal with the threat he posed

Prosecutor: Police justified in gunfight that killed Wis. FF in crossfire

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The prosecutor described a scene that quickly changed from a routine medical call to a chaotic, dangerous situation with multiple shots being fired by Houston and by officers trying to deal with the threat he posed

All defendants found guilty of NYPD explorer’s murder

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Molly Crane-Newman and Larry Mcshane New York Daily News

NEW YORK — Five Bronx gang-bangers were convicted of first-degree murder Friday for the gruesome butchering of a 15-year-old aspiring city cop in a lethal case of mistaken identity.

The jury deliberated for eight hours over two days before returning their guilty verdicts against the killer quintet of Trinitarios in the June 20, 2018, murder captured in a heartbreaking video of victim Lesandro "Junior" Guzman-Feliz’s final minutes of life. The verdicts were read in a courtroom filled with more than three dozen court officers.

Defendants Jonaiki Martinez Estrella, Elvin Garcia, Antonio Rodriguez Hernandez Santiago, Miguel Rivera and Jose Muniz all face life in prison for their convictions. They were also found guilty of conspiracy and gang assault, and most showed no reaction as the jury delivered their decision.

“Hasta la muerte!” shouted an unrepentant Muniz — Spanish for “Til death” — in a declaration of gang solidarity after the verdict. Muniz, who also delivered a loud gang greeting in Spanish, attacked the helpless Junior with a machete during the frenzied and fatal attack.

The surveillance video presented by the prosecution showed Estrella plunging what appears to be a bread knife through Junior’s neck as the killing came to an end.

“I’m not going to have my son back, but those killers, those murderers, they’re not going to be outside killing other kids," said his mother, Leandra Feliz. “My son was a good kid, he was only 15 years old ... He was a really good kid. He’d never been in any trouble in his life until those kids murdered (him)."

The mom appeared relieved, as if a heavy weight was lifted by the sweeping verdict nearly a year after her son’s murder.

The defendants, all members of the Trinitarios street gang, descended on the innocent and outnumbered victim with knives and the machete, dragging him to his death outside a Bronx bodega. The first-degree murder conviction meant the jury determined that Junior was tortured before his tormentors finally killed him.

Jurors asked during their first day of deliberations to review the horrifying footage in slow-motion, and Guzman-Feliz’s mother howled in agony last month when she accidentally saw the video in court.

The execution of the innocent youth by the Bronx gang members broke the city’s collective heart, with an outpouring of grief and loss following the brutal murder.

“Junior came to symbolize all of the young people who have lost their lives to brutal gang violence,” said Bronx District Attorney Darcel Clark. “Today’s verdict fortifies the Bronx community’s stand against violence ... We hope that the verdicts bring some consolation to his family, who have endured so much pain.”

A pair of turncoat witnesses testified against their former gang brethren, with one recounting the directions given to the killers by reputed Los Sures boss Diego Suero.

“If you have a gun, you shoot,” he allegedly declared. “If you have a knife, you stab. If you have a machete, use a machete.”

The cooperators avoided any jail time by cutting their deal with prosecutors before the trial started on May 6, with prosecutors arguing the teen’s death was a calculated killing ordered by a gang leaders.

The victim’s mom had wailed incoherently inside the Bronx courtroom during a court session where video of her son clutching at a fatal neck wound was aired. Court officers were needed to remove her from the building.

———

©2019 New York Daily News


Hoarding Conditions Hampered OH Firefighters

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dayton crews were responding to reports of downed utility wires when they noticed smoke coming from a nearby house Friday morning.

MA Fire Department to Merge with Ambulance Service

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

“It streamlines the delivery of the system,” Fire Chief Jeffrey Legendre said about the merger of the Bolton Fire Department and the city’s ambulance department.

NYPD officer dies by suicide, third this month

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NEW YORK — A NYPD officer reportedly died by self-inflicted gunshot wound on Friday.

According to CBS New York, the Staten Island officer was found behind his police department in a locked car by an off-duty officer.

The incident makes the third death by suicide at the NYPD this month.


CA Fire Officials Worry about Wildfire Season

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On the heels of California's deadliest fire season, experts warn that the heavy rains produced an excess of vegetation, which over a hot summer will become dry fuel.

Report: Fatal Shooting of Rapper by California Police ‘Reasonable’

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

David Blake of Blake Consulting and Training concluded that the amount of shots fired was “reasonable based upon my training and experience as a range instructor as well as through applied human factors psychology.”

Maine State Police Arrest Suspect in Connecticut Cold Case Murder

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Marc Karun was arrested on a fugitive from justice warrant connected to the murder and sexual assault of Kathleen Flynn on Sept. 23, 1986 as he left his residence Wednesday Morning.

MS Firefighters Receive Oxygen Masks for Dogs

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A fundraiser raised $800, which was enough to buy 18 masks and put one at each of the fire stations in Tupelo and all the volunteer fire departments in Lee County.

MS Gang Threatens Officers Over Fatal Memphis Shooting

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Mississippi Department of Public Safety released a bulletin to law enforcement on Thursday evening warning of the threat by the Gangster Disciples street gang.

MS Gang Threatens Officers Over Fatal Memphis Shooting

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Mississippi Department of Public Safety released a bulletin to law enforcement on Thursday evening warning of the threat by the Gangster Disciples street gang.

Photo of the Week: Job well done

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

PoliceOne Members
Author: PoliceOne Members

This week's photo comes from Officer John Mason of the Pasco Police Department in Washington. Pictured is Mason and his K-9, Lemon, after capturing a fleeing suspect. Mason has been Lemon's handler since June 2011 and is also on the regional SWAT team. Thank you for your service!

Calling all police photographers! PoliceOne needs pictures of you in action or training. Submit a photo — it could be selected as our Photo of the Week! Be sure to include your name, department information and address (including city, state and ZIP code) where we can reach you — Photo of the Week winners have a chance to win a PoliceOne.com T-shirt!


Ohio Officer Saves the Lives of Seven People in One Day

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Aaron Franklin freed six teens trapped in a storm drain being filled with rushing waters form a local creek. A short time later, he came upon an unconscious man who had crashed his truck into two cars; the officer administered Narcan and then performed CPR.

San Francisco Faces Race and Gender Discrimination Suit from White Male Officers

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to Forbes, plaintiffs claim that although they received higher grades on the civil service promotional exam, minority and female candidates were promoted ahead of them.

Mindset matters: Why you should treat driving with the same respect as weapons training

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: PoliceOne Members

Sponsored by Pursuit Response

By Laura Neitzel for PoliceOne BrandFocus

A law enforcement agency would never let a new officer go on patrol with a firearm and no police training. Even if that officer had years of experience with a personal firearm, an agency would draw the line. The logic makes sense: without the proper training and certification, there’s no way to know whether that officer really knows how to use the weapon, or, more importantly, has the judgment training to know why and when not to.

Why then do some law enforcement agencies seem willing to rely on driving skills an officer may have learned in high school, especially when the consequences can be as deadly as discharging a firearm?

Law enforcement officers and agencies should approach driving, especially vehicle pursuits, with an equal emphasis on training, tactics and de-escalation techniques as they would give to firearms training or other essential skills.

The numbers speak to why: traffic accidents are the second leading cause of death among law enforcement officers. According to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, which tracks causes of law enforcement deaths, 50 officers died in traffic-related incidents in 2018, almost as many as the 52 firearms-related fatalities.

Backup to the rescue?

Of the 16 traffic-related fatalities in 2018 that were single-vehicle crashes, seven of the officers were responding to a call for service or as backup for another officer. While there is no evidence that these officer deaths were caused by reckless driving, agencies should agree that officers should adhere to their Number 1 goal: to get home safely.

“We should be as cool, calm and collected during emergency responses and pursuits as we are in building searches, physical altercations and shoot-outs,” said Chuck Deakins, lieutenant commander (retired) and lead specialist for simulation training at FAAC. “Everyone knows that if you crash on the way, you have only made the situation worse and not helped those that need you the most. You also take the risk of injuring or killing yourself as well as any innocent occupants of the other vehicle or bystanders.“

This means that even in the heat of the moment, law enforcement agencies should take all the commonly held concepts and tactics of field situations and apply them to driving situations.

Here are five ways that law enforcement agencies can apply tactics for safe responses and apply them to driving situations to help ensure that when there is a call for backup, backup actually arrives.

1. De-escalate a high-stress scenario.

De-escalation isn’t a tactic so much as a desired result. It’s about doing what’s necessary to turn a volatile situation into one that’s manageable. In a highly-charged situation, law enforcement officers are advised to approach the scene calmly (considering the circumstances).

The same advice should apply to driving. A traffic stop often turns into a situation where a suspect flees. It’s understandable that an officer might be angry or frustrated by such a flagrant violation but jumping into his or her vehicle during an emotional state to pursue the scofflaw can put the officer, the suspect and innocent bystanders in danger.

“De-escalation commences during the driving response, not after we are on-scene or in the pursuit,” said Deakins. “How can we expect an officer or deputy to respond with lights and sirens at high speeds, going through red lights, chasing suspects, talking on the radio, skidding to a stop, jumping out and running up to a situation, then suddenly expect others to de-escalate?”

2. Train with realistic safety standards in mind

Many law enforcement agencies put their officers through weapons simulation training in order to approximate a real-life scenario. Driving simulation training shares the same goal of putting the officer through an adrenaline-fueled experience in a safe environment where mistakes don’t have the deadly consequences they may have in real life.

In Deakin’s experience, some people believe that driving simulators are, at best, lame versions of a video game and not worth the time or expense. But Deakins says that driving training should get a similar degree of consideration as weapons simulation training. Since there is a real likelihood that a vehicle pursuit or high-speed response will result in a vehicle crash, putting officers through driver training simulation to ensure they are prepared for such an event can minimize the potential risks to officers, innocent civilians and suspects and help inoculate the agency against the cost of a lawsuit or the loss of reputation.

A study by California’s Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training found that driver simulation training was 2 times more effective than an Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (EVOC) training in preventing collisions. When driver training simulation was combined with EVOC track training, it was 2 ½ times more effective than track training alone in reducing law enforcement collisions.

“One of the key advantages of a simulation-based high-speed training program is more crashes. This is a bold statement, but a car crash is a highly instructive experience. We already know that learning by doing only works so long as the feedback from our actions is immediate and unambiguous,” said David Bouwkamp, executive director of business development at FAAC. “The unique aspect of simulator-based training is that you can have that accident, engage in instructor-led after-action review and then reset the simulator. That is real experience that will be retained, but without the disastrous repercussions it would have in real life.”

3. Learn tactics and strategies

Responding to an armed robbery or active shooter involves much more than skills honed during target practice. Similarly, training for a safe emergency response should include more than driving skills. It should also involve driving tactics and strategies.

A police officer doing a building search looking for a man inside with a gun would not just run through the building. The officer would move carefully.

“The same degree of caution should apply to driving,” said Deakins. “An officer shouldn’t just blow through an intersection without scanning and assessing the situation. It may not be a man with a gun that’s going to hit us but it’s a car that’s going to hit us. They can be equally deadly.”

Driving simulation training scenarios such as those at FAAC will teach both driving skills – such as scan and assess – as well as strategies and tactics like isolating and vehicle positioning.

4. Pursue safely with due regard.

“The only difference is in a vehicle pursuit, I'm pursuing an individual or a car,” said Deakins. “In an emergency response I'm pursuing a situation.”

The tactics and strategies involved in pursuits/emergency response are the same as with building searches, high-risk vehicle stops and hostage situations, says Deakins. “Move with precision, move carefully and don’t be reckless. Is this not a practical definition of ‘due regard’?”

5. Don’t make “deadly exceptions”

For some, there’s a double standard when it comes to driving. Some officers will follow safe practices when responding to a citizen emergency, but when another officer is involved, they may throw safety to the wind as they charge to the scene.

“There's a deadly exception out there in the attitude of the officers. If they're in pursuit of a suspect who has shot a cop, they're going to do anything they can to catch that guy,” said Deakins. “That means they're throwing out all their preparation, they're throwing out the seriousness of their risk, they're getting tunnel vision.”

Deakins encourages officers to make an agreement with their partners to uphold the standards of officer safety, especially when they’re behind the wheel.

“Tell your partners that you don’t expect them to take unnecessary risks to help you when you are in great trouble,” he said. “Think of it like those trapped in a burning building; you know when, as a police officer, you can run into the building and attempt the save and when it is simply not worth the risk or danger.”

A police vehicle is as potentially a deadly weapon as a firearm. Just as police agencies understand the value of simulation training for critical situations like an active shooter, FAAC Simulation Training can be used to teach driving skills and tactics that keep officers in the right frame of mind to keep themselves, fellow officers and bystanders safe.


CA City Partially Closes Fire Station to Balance Budget

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Turlock Fire Department will need to close one of its four fire stations one third to one half of the time because of two fewer firefighters and less overtime money.

Video: Washington Department Welcomes New K-9

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The agency posted on Facebook, "Lakewood, meet Kona. Kona, meet Lakewood. Kona and handler Officer Bucat passed their K-9 certification in April, making Kona our third K-9 on active duty in the department. She's pretty cute, but don't mess with her!"

5 Minnesota Officers Fired for Inaction During an Assault

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five officers with the Saint Paul (MN) Police Department have been fired for failing to intervene in an assault outside a local bar.

D.C. Metro Officer Accused of Taking $15,000 in Bribes

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to the Washington Post, Officer Walter Lee was charged in federal court and has been suspended from duty pending the proceedings.

The Perils and Pitfalls for Police Officers Posting on Social Media

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An organization recently made available to the media a significant database of social media posts—that they deem to be potentially offensive—from thousands of officers from places such as Philadelphia, Dallas, Phoenix, St. Louis, and elsewhere. Internal investigations have been launched at several of those agencies. Here's why cops need to use social media cautiously.

Financial planning tips for police officers

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Policing Matters Podcast
Author: Policing Matters Podcast

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

All too often police officers put themselves in unnecessary financial strain, causing them to have to work a ton of overtime or even get a side job. In this podcast segment, Policing Matters podcast co-host Doug Wyllie sits down with Jason Hoschouer, a motor officer and a financial coach who specializes in helping public safety professionals better manage their money.

LEARN MORE

Building financial strength in LEO families: The plan

How police officers can increase their income during the holidays without overtime

3 reasons financial fitness is just as important as physical fitness

7 things you should and should not spend your first paycheck on

5 excuses cops make about their financial mistakes


Milwaukee Man Who Opened Fire on Police is Shot and Wounded

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The gunman—identified as 34-year old Javon Lewis—now faces two counts of attempted first-degree intentional homicide, strangulation and suffocation, misdemeanor battery, and a felon in possession of a firearm.

Milwaukee Man Who Opened Fire on Police is Shot and Wounded

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The gunman—identified as 34-year old Javon Lewis—now faces two counts of attempted first-degree intentional homicide, strangulation and suffocation, misdemeanor battery, and a felon in possession of a firearm.

Delaware Officer Charged in Multi-Car Crash that Left One Woman Dead

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Dover (DE) Police Department has been charged with manslaughter, third-degree assault, speeding, and second offense using an electronic device while operating a motor vehicle.

Michigan K-9 Dies from Recently Diagnosed Medical Condition

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A K-9 with the Battle Creek (MI) Police Department died Wednesday from a medical condition that had been diagnosed over the weekend.

Arizona Police Shoot, Wound Man After Vehicle and Foot Pursuit

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Gang Task Force for the Mesa Police Department shot and wounded a man who fled on foot after a brief vehicle pursuit.

Kentucky Officer Assaulted During Traffic Stop

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Tompkinsville (KY) Police Department was assaulted by a male and female couple during a traffic stop on Wednesday night, leaving the officer with minor injuries including a scraped elbow and a black eye.

Controversial Legislation: The California Compromise

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Golden State politicians wanted to make "necessary" the standard for police to use deadly force, but they settled for "reasonable."

Dave Smith: The Expert Speaks …Wrong Again!

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

If you want to more effectively predict outcomes, learn a little about a lot.

Video shows man falling from Okla. bridge after pursuit

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

TULSA, Okla. — Video from a police body camera shows a shooting suspect falling about 30 feet from an Oklahoma bridge as he fled from officers.

A Tulsa police news release says officers responding to reports of someone shooting at a motorist from a car on April 30 followed the vehicle onto Interstate 244. The vehicle crashed into a barrier.

Police say Damico Taylor of Sand Springs ran from the car to the wall and climbed over.

The video released Thursday shows Taylor hanging from the wall until he either releases or loses his grip. The unidentified officer ran to the concrete ditch, where Taylor said "everything" hurts.

Police said in the news release that Taylor fractured his skull. Police didn't return phone calls Friday. Online court records don't list any charges against him.


Fla. governor signs bill banning sanctuary policies

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — All law enforcement agencies in Florida will have to cooperate with federal immigration authorities under a bill signed by Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday during a ceremony that often felt like a campaign rally for him and President Donald Trump.

The bill prohibits local governments from enacting "sanctuary" polices that protect undocumented immigrants from deportation. It will require law enforcement to honor U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainers for undocumented immigrants who are arrested or convicted of a crime. It exempts crime victims and witnesses.

"Sanctuary cities basically create law-free zones where people can come to our state illegally and our country illegally, commit criminal offenses and then just walk right out the door and continue to do it," DeSantis said. "In Florida, that will not happen."

The bill was signed in the Okaloosa County Commission's meeting room with an overflow crowd dotted with red "Make America Great Again" hats. Okaloosa, in the western Panhandle, is one of the state's most conservative counties. The crowd cheered wildly in support of the bill and equally as loud at the mention of Trump.

Trump, who has made illegal immigration a top priority, helped DeSantis win the GOP primary last year and campaigned for DeSantis in the general election. Republican U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz, another close Trump ally and who campaigned across the state for DeSantis, also spoke at the ceremony.

DeSantis also introduced Kiyan Michael of Jacksonville, whose son Brandon was struck and killed by a driver who had been deported twice and illegally returned to the country again.

"We're blessed to have the best president, we believe, since Ronald Reagan," she said as the crowd roared. "Our fight is not over. Our immigration laws have to be reformed, they have to be changed, so you all don't become us."

The bill caused protests among immigrants and their advocates at the Capitol when it was before the Legislature. They feared it would encourage law enforcement profiling, force people to be deported for minor offenses like traffic infractions, and discourage crime victims and witnesses from coming forward. Opponents also argued that holding people based on an immigration detainer was unconstitutional.

Critics said the bill was politically motivated. Republican Sen. Joe Gruters, who also chairs the Republican Party of Florida, sponsored the bill and repeatedly argued it was simply about following the rule of law.

At the bill signing, he said the bill was about "making sure we protect American citizens from the very bad, criminal illegal aliens that are here committing the worst crimes imaginable. This is not about illegal aliens who are here trying to provide for their families."


New MI Fire Department Introduces Firefighters

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The new firefighters and recruits for the Grand Blanc City Fire Department were introduced this week, along with two of the department's response vehicles.

Street Survival: When it comes to using deadly force, are you a P.O. or a C.O.?

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lt. Dan Marcou
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

“Heads up!”

Remember that? When you were a kid, and you least expected it, one of your friends would shout that phrase and launch a football or a basketball in your direction. If your reactions were sharp enough, you caught it and, if not, you fumbled the ball.

That’s about how suddenly deadly threats develop at times for officers except without anyone having the courtesy to shout, “Heads up!”

Fumbled Balls

Two high-profile incidents recently resulted in – to continue the analogy – fumbled balls.

In the aftermath of these incidents, former officer Mohamed Noor is facing prison after being convicted in Minnesota for what has been deemed by a jury to be not only an overreaction, but “murder.” In the second case, former SRO Scott Peterson finds himself charged by a prosecutor for criminal neglect for an underreaction to the Parkland school shooting.

These cases have inspired me to discuss some impediments to making good decisions when an officer is suddenly thrust into a deadly force decision-making event.

Whether you are an entry-level officer or a veteran you need to be aware if one of these three conditions describe your psyche before someone’s life is on the line and your reactions mean the difference between life or death:

1. Conscientious Objector

For those of you who have read the book “On Killing” by Colonel David Grossman, you realize it is not a natural thing for a human to take a life of another human, even when there is clear justification to do so. Colonel Grossman explains how there is a natural resistance in most, to killing.

When a police officer has to use deadly force to save innocents from a killer, that officer must be unencumbered and purposeful in his mission. They must be able to seek out that killer, take aim and fire a bullet into a vital area to stop the threat.

To be able to do this while making the right decision in doing so takes not only a great deal of ongoing training, but also a quantum of soul-searching in advance to determine that the officer is a P.O. (Police Officer) who can do what needs to be done, and not a C.O. (Conscientious Objector), who can’t.

Now is a good time to do that soul-searching. Ask yourself if you can take the life of another if that dire decision is thrust on you by fate and/or circumstance.

As a career-long field training officer and survival trainer I have had officers on more than one occasion state, “I would rather take one in the chest than ever shoot someone.”

After hearing this, I followed up with this question in each case, “Knowing this, why did you get into law enforcement?”

Their answer was that they wanted to be a police officer to help people. They felt since most officers never have to fire their weapon the odds were in their favor that they might never have to shoot someone. One stated he would just count on someone else doing it.

At least these officers knew they were conscientious objectors. Not all officers are aware they are C.O.s until it’s too late.

If you know you would be unable to fire your duty weapon at a deadly threat, you should find another career.

2. Nervous in the Service

Another condition that can have a debilitating effect on an officer in a deadly situation is being “nervous in the service.” Now let’s be clear that I am not talking about the presence of fear. Fear is a normal reaction to many challenges and is felt by police officers universally.

However, being “nervous in the service” is when out-of-control fear is so debilitating that it causes an officer to freeze, over-react, or under react. All three can lead to unacceptable results.

Controlling and properly channeling fear is what great cops do well.

3. A Dulled Edge

Another situation that often prohibits an effective response in a deadly situation can be called the “dulled edged.” Some officers have been assigned to administrative duties, or “officer-friendly” positions for many years and have few, if any, recent critical experiences. In addition, because of their position they may be rarely offered survival-training opportunities. The survival edge that was once sharp and continually honed through training and experiences may be considerably dulled slowing their reaction time and hampering their critical decision-making capability.

This can also occur in the veteran street officer whose edge has been dulled by complacency and the failure to train.

Unacceptable Corrective Options

Officers, who suffer from these conditions too often:

    Seek out a position in law enforcement where they believe they won’t ever be put into a position where they will have to shoot someone. Deliberately avoid hot calls, or let others arrive first. Go about their day-to-day business of policing and hope a critical situation never happens.
Conclusion

No matter what your job assignment, you need to continually prepare yourself for your “heads-up” moment by:

    Mentally preparing for what you may someday have to do. If you are a C.O., do not accept any armed protective position in law enforcement. Making certain that no matter what your duty assignment is your survival training is realistic, repetitious, regular, recent and at the ready. Don’t pray that it never happens to you. Pray instead that when innocents are endangered by an evil predator, that it will be you that gets that call, because you realize that when things are at their worst, is when you are at your best!

With that said, heads up!


Ariz. LEO saves suicidal man on bridge by offering a hug

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

By PoliceOne Staff

CHANDLER, Ariz. — An officer saved a suicidal man’s life Wednesday by offering him a hug.

According to Fox News, Officer Aaron Little saw a 26-year-old suicidal man climb the railing on a pedestrian bridge with the intent to jump.

In body camera footage, Little is seen talking to the man, asking him to walk towards him.

"I'll hug you, man. I don't care. I just want to talk to you. I swear," Little says.

The officer was able to convince the man to climb back to safety and embrace him.

Officer Talks Suicidal Man Out of Jumping Off Bridge

In the early evening of Thursday, March 28, 2019, a 26-year-old male climbed the protective railing of a pedestrian bridge that spans the Price Freeway with the intent to jump. Officer A. Little arrived at the bridge and, after developing a rapport with the male, Officer Little was able to convince him to climb off the railing and back to the safety of the bridge. While this incident is extraordinary, the compassion Officer Little showed is a common occurrence with the men & women of the Chandler Police Department. Officer Little’s body worn camera captured their interaction:

Posted by Chandler Police Department on Wednesday, June 12, 2019


Milwaukee man fires 4 shots at LEOs before being shot in shoulder

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

By PoliceOne Staff

MILWAUKEE — A man has been charged with two counts of attempted first-degree intentional homicide after opening fire on police during a domestic dispute on Saturday.

According to Journal Sentinel, 34-year-old Javon Lewis opened fire on two officers during a foot pursuit.

The two officers were responding to a home after being called about a domestic dispute between Lewis and his girlfriend. Lewis told a relative who called police that he was going to shoot his girlfriend and that the police were going to have to shoot him, Journal Sentinel reports.

As police approached, Lewis began to walk away from the scene. An officer ordered him to stop, but Lewis began to run.

While the officers were chasing him, Lewis turned around and fired four times at the LEOs. One bullet hit an officer’s holster at his waste and cracked it.

An officer fired nine rounds at Lewis while the other officer dived to the ground to avoid Lewis’s bullets. During the exchange of gunfire, Lewis was shot in the shoulder, causing him to fall to the ground and allowing police to arrest him.

Lewis has also been charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon along with misdemeanor battery and strangulation and suffocation.


Firerfighters to Appear on ‘CBS This Morning’ Sunday to Talk about Cancer

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Boston Fire Chief Joseph Finn and Baytown, TX, firefighter Patrick Mahoney will appear on a report for CBS SUNDAY MORNING to be broadcast Sunday, June 16 (9:00 AM, ET).

New Jersey Police Officer Fatally Shoots Coyote That Attacked Mother and Son

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A New Jersey police officer was forced to kill a coyote Thursday in a city park after it attacked a mom and her 4-year-old son as the boy sat in a baby stroller, according to Fairfield police.

Your agency’s guide to building a real-time operations center (eBook)

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

Sponsored by Motorola Solutions

The abundance of data now available to law enforcement agencies presents both an opportunity and a challenge: How can police correlate information from various sources and in various formats to render actionable data in real time?

This growing need has fueled the development of real-time operations centers to more effectively manage data from myriad sources – body-worn cameras and other video, social media, structured and unstructured data, etc. – to better connect and empower officers on patrol.

Download this free guide to learn about the functions and benefits of an RTOC, including analysis, crime prevention and more efficient investigations, as well as how to build your own RTOC.

What’s inside:

What is a real-time operations center? What are the key steps to building a real-time operations center for your agency? How to overcome common challenges when setting up a real-time operations center. How a real-time operations center has improved productivity and public safety in New Orleans. Resources for more information.

Fill out the form below for your FREE eBook:


Here’s why you should care about the afterlife of your bullet

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Sponsored by Action Target

By Yoona Ha, PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

Cops are serious about recycling. They’re accustomed to dutifully separating coffee cups, used papers and cans of soda from their trash to divert them from heading to the landfill. But what if they could use their spent bullets and empty shells to reduce waste and help the environment as well? Turns out, there’s a reward for recycling metals, too.

Action Target in Provo, Utah, is working with law enforcement agencies and shooting ranges across the country to pay them for their spent brass and lead. In the U.S. alone, metals recycling is a huge industry that handles millions of tons of scrap copper and lead on a yearly basis. It’s estimated by the United States Department of Labor that around 1.5 million tons of copper and 1.3 million tons of scrap lead get recycled each year.

PoliceOne talked to Diana Rotolo, sales manager of range retail programs at Action Target, to understand why law enforcement should care about the afterlife of their spent ammunition.

P1: Tell us about your metal recycling program and why law enforcement should be thinking about metals recycling efforts.

Action Target: Action Target’s metal recycling program offers a turnkey solution for law enforcement shooting ranges that have to dispose of their lead and brass. By law, any agency that disposes of hazardous material or waste, including lead, is responsible for these byproducts from the cradle to the grave – which means that it’s their responsibility for where it ends up and how it gets there. If you’re sending your scrap metals out and don’t know where it’s going and how it’s been disposed of, then you’re legally liable for that and can be subject to hefty fines and costly lawsuits.

Metals recycling can be a challenge, especially for many smaller law enforcement agencies, because it’s easy to lose sight of how their metals recycling is being handled. We’re the one-stop-shop solution for these police departments and are compliant with the Environmental Protection Agency and certified by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. We give our clients all of the paperwork they need to be EPA and OSHA compliant.

P1: Possible risk of lead exposure is a known hazard. How does your organization handle occupational exposure to lead in the recycling and cleanup process?

Action Target: Everything from the range ventilation filters to the personal protective equipment used to clean the range is covered by our hazardous waste disposal program to prevent the risk of lead exposure or cross contamination. Improper disposal is illegal and the handling of lead is nothing to mess around with since it can poison our bodies and poison the environment.

We not only pay for the shipping of the scrap metal, but we also pay for the packaging that’s used to collect these metals. In addition to these protective measures, we also offer transparent pricing details for agencies that sell their metal by relying on numbers from the London Metals Exchange, which is similar to the stock market in that the prices go up and down in real time, so we guarantee our customers the best rate possible. Our goal is to make recycling profitable for our law enforcement agency partners.

P1: Tell us more about the pricing and payment incentives of your metals recycling program.

Action Target: We offer to either cut our sellers a check for the value of metals they sold us, or they can opt to use that value as a credit with Action Target, which gives them a 10% value bonus. This means that customers can buy anything from products to services under the Action Target umbrella, which can include anything from parts, maintenance, service for shooting ranges to range ammo, paper targets or ventilation filters.

P1: What’s one thing that often gets overlooked that you’d like to emphasize to our readers?

Action Target: Metals recycling can be a win-win scenario for everyone involved. Some people don’t understand that if they’re not careful about where their lead and brass are going, they could be held responsible for improper handling or not having the proper documentation as to how those materials were transported and disposed of. In addition, many law enforcement agencies get a budget to purchase range ammunition, and by recycling with Action Target, they can get revenue from the recycled ammo and use that revenue a second time around.


RI Town Residents Call for More Funding for VFD

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials have already tentatively approved $170,540 for the Prudence Island Volunteer Fire Department—a slight increase over last year—but residents say more is needed.

Firefighter Hurt Battling Fire at OH Winery

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A firefighter was hospitalized from fighting a blaze that destroyed a Manchester winery and needed crews from several departments to put out the flames.

Highway Stretch Dedicated to Fallen SC Assistant Chief

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Charlotte Road/Van Wyck Assistant Fire Chief Dennis C. Straight was killed when he was hit by vehicle while directing traffic at a crash scene in November.

5 Minn. LEOs fired for failing to stop 2018 assault

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Five St. Paul police officers were fired Thursday for allegedly failing to intervene in an assault that reportedly was carried out by a former officer.

Chief Todd Axtell announced the firings at an emotional news conference, calling the officers' actions "a violation of trust." But Axtell gave almost no details except to say the assault happened at a business a year earlier and did not involve violence by an officer.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune and the St. Paul Pioneer Press, both citing unidentified people in the department or familiar with the case, said the incident happened in June 2018 when officers responded to an incident at an east side bar involving former St. Paul officer Tou Cha.

A criminal complaint charging Cha with felony assault described a pair of fights breaking out at a gathering at the bar, with Cha caught on video swinging a baton on a defenseless man, the Star Tribune reported. The man was later hospitalized, according to the complaint.

Neither Axtell nor a police spokesman would confirm or deny that the firings were related to the Cha case. "The law won't allow me to say anything further about that," Axtell told the Star Tribune.

At his news conference, Axtell said officers are expected to intervene when a violent act occurs in their presence and to tell the truth.

"When officers fail to live up to these standards, it affects everyone who wears the badge, and that's why I've taken this action," Axtell said. "This community deserves to know that its St. Paul police officers will always do the right thing and to tell the truth."

Axtell said he learned of the incident last summer. The decision to fire the officers was made after an investigation by the police department's internal affairs unit and after recommendations by the Police Civilian Affairs Review Commission, the chief said. The review was completed this week.

Cha has pleaded not guilty. He did not immediately reply to a phone message The Associated Press left Thursday at the restaurant. His attorney, Jack Rice, told the AP that Cha's wife owns the bar, Checkerboard Pizza, and Cha works there.

An attorney for the St. Paul Police Federation, Christopher Wachtler, said the officers did not deserve to be fired, and the union will fight their terminations "all the way."

Wachtler, the union attorney, said the incident was captured on squad car and body camera video.

St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter said in a statement he supports the chief's leadership and the work of the Police Civilian Affairs Review Commission "to enforce strong ethical standards in our police department."

"While the vast majority of our officers meet and exceed these standards every day, the trust we place in them demands accountability for actions that fall below our high standards," Carter said.


Photos: NY police, K-9s train for explosive detection at first ever ‘Canine Week’

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Jolene Cleaver Observer-Dispatch, Utica, N.Y.

ORISKANY, NY — For police officers with canine partners like Utica police Patrolman Sean Bubnis and 4-year-old partner Wolf, there is an ongoing cycle of continuous training so they can be prepared for any incident that arises.

And having that level of training available in the Mohawk Valley is valuable, said Bubnis.

Bubnis and Wolf were among 50 other police canine explosion detection teams participating this week in the first ever "Canine Week" at the State Preparedness Training Center in Oriskany, a training hosted by the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services.

The teams are engaging in "scenario-based training exercises geared toward the detection of explosives," organizers said.

Among simulated trainings, canine teams are operating out of a helicopter during an emergency response, detecting explosives in a maritime environment using the state's Swift Water Rescue site and practicing executing a high-risk warrant situation that might involve explosives, said Meghan Dudley, an intelligence analyst for the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services.

Dudley also said canine teams have been busy this week utilizing the swift water rescue facility in order to train in a maritime setting.

"It's a different environment. ...Most have not had an opportunity to train in water," Dudley said, further noting that since floods are now a common occurrence in New York the water-based training is relevant as, "crime doesn't stop when flooding occurs."

In a detail of the week's trainings, Bubnis added that the new environments and tasks police officers can expose their canine partners to at the training center is beneficial and at a higher level than typical trainings.

Not only do the canines learn to work efficiently in the presence of other police dogs, but they, "work through all these extreme scenarios and perform at a high level."

This week, not only have police agencies from New York attended the canine focused training, but out of state agencies from Connecticut and Georgia have begun to travel to the area for training.

"It's exciting to have this kind of world class training here in Oriskany," Dudley said.

———

©2019 Observer-Dispatch, Utica, N.Y.


TX Firefighters Hurt Saving Disabled Man in House Fire

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Harris County crews were setting up to fight a mobile home fire Thursday night when they discovered an elderly disabled man was in nearby house that started to catch fire.

Tenn. police appeal for calm after marshals fatally shoot wanted man

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Police appealed for calm Thursday in a tense Memphis neighborhood where a rock-throwing crowd gathered after federal marshals fatally shot a black man who, authorities said, had rammed a police vehicle with a stolen car.

Thirty-six officers suffered minor injuries from flying rocks and bricks in the hours following the death of 20-year-old Brandon Webber, who was killed Wednesday evening after he exited the car holding some type of weapon, authorities said.

Webber had been wanted in a June 3 shooting that happened during a car theft about 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Memphis in Hernando, Mississippi. The victim was shot five times and survived. The car was the one used to ram the police vehicle, according to DeSoto County, Mississippi, District Attorney John Champion, who spoke Thursday at a news conference.

Elected officials condemned the violence, and the police chief pleaded for patience while the shooting is investigated. But unanswered questions left many people angry as they recalled other police shootings around the country.

On Thursday evening, dozens — including Webber's father and other friends and relatives — gathered near the house where he was shot.

A couple of men spoke into megaphones and some motorists who drove by honked their horns and shouted messages of encouragement. There was a light police presence with a couple police cars parked at a nearby fire station that was damaged during Wednesday night's unrest.

Shortly after Wednesday's shooting, people began to gather in the area, and their numbers swelled as some livestreamed the scene on social media. Memphis police initially responded in street uniforms, then returned in riot gear as people began hurling rocks and bricks.

During the unrest, officers cordoned off several blocks in the Frayser neighborhood north of downtown and arrested three people. By 11 p.m., officers had used tear gas and most of the crowd dispersed, Police Director Michael Rallings said.

Rallings implored residents to wait until the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, or TBI, finished its investigation. He appealed for people to refrain from violence and from spreading possible misinformation about the shooting.

"I need everyone to stay calm," Rallings said.

He later told WREG-TV that while peaceful protests are allowed, authorities would not tolerate further attacks on officers or any property damage or looting. Among steps designed to maintain public order and protect law enforcement, Rallings said, officers' days off have been canceled and they will ride in two-person cars as a precaution.

Separately, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee said through a spokeswoman that the shooting would be fully investigated. Lee's press secretary, Laine Arnold, said the crowd's actions were "not representative of the community, but we stand firmly against acts of lawlessness that threaten the safety of our neighborhoods."

Webber's home was in a working-class neighborhood of north Memphis. By Thursday afternoon, the police presence was minimal, with two squad cars parked in front of a fire station. No uniformed officers were visible. About 20 people stood outside of Webber's one-story house, and others gathered nearby. One woman wept loudly and hugged a man as she cried.

The Rev. Andre E. Johnson said he was standing among the protesters when tear gas was released. He said he heard no police order to disperse.

People were upset because they initially did not know why the marshals sought to arrest Webber, said Johnson, who called him a beloved member of the community.

"The problem with it is they feel that police and the administration and city officials do not treat them as humans. That's what it really boils down to: You are not worthy of an explanation," said Johnson, speaking hours before the Mississippi prosecutor described the allegations against Webber.

TBI spokeswoman Keli McAlister said a fugitive task force went to a Frayser home to look for a suspect with felony warrants. She said marshals spotted the man getting into a car, which then rammed task force vehicles several times before the man got out with the weapon.

Marshals then opened fire, she said. McAlister did not say how many marshals fired or how many times the man was shot. The TBI identified the dead man as Webber.

Authorities provided no details about the type of weapon or the charges that drew the task force's interest. A criminal history for Webber released by the TBI listed two arrests, in April 2017 and April 2018, on charges including weapons possession, drug dealing and driving without a license.

The 2018 charges were not prosecuted, and the 2017 charges were dismissed, court records showed.

Webber's father, Sonny Webber, told The Associated Press by phone that his son leaves a 2-year-old boy and a young daughter, with another daughter on the way: "He would have had three children. Now he'll have a child that he won't get to meet."

The TBI is routinely called in to investigate police shootings around the state. TBI investigators typically deliver a report to the local district attorney, who then decides whether to pursue charges against officers involved.

At least two journalists also were hurt in Wednesday's violence.

Memphis-area police shootings in the past four years have prompted sporadic protests. Among them was Darrius Stewart, an unarmed 19-year-old who was fatally shot during a fight in 2015 with Connor Schilling, a white officer who was trying to arrest him on outstanding warrants.

A Shelby County district attorney recommended that Schilling be charged with voluntary manslaughter, but a grand jury refused to indict him.


When Are You No Longer a Rookie?

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our Editorial Director weighs in on how long you have to work the street before you're no longer a rookie. What's your take?

When Are You No Longer a Rookie?

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our Editorial Director weighs in on how long you have to work the street before you're no longer a rookie. What's your take?

Texas police release video of fatal OIS of man inside truck

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas — Fort Worth police on Thursday released body camera footage of officers fatally shooting a man who ignored repeated police orders to drop his handgun.

JaQuavion Slaton, 20, died Sunday of multiple gunshot wounds to the head and chest, Dr. Nizam Peerwani, Tarrant County medical examiner, said in a statement. One head wound was self-inflicted and the others were from police bullets, and an investigation continues into whether the self-inflicted gunshot wound was deliberate or accidental, Peerwani said.

Slaton was the fourth suspect Fort Worth police had fired upon in 10 days and the second who was killed.

In introducing the video, interim Police Chief Ed Kraus said three of the department's Special Response Team officers had gone to an east Fort Worth address four times since May 6 to serve Slaton with warrants issued by the University of Texas at Tyler police accusing him of felony aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, assault on a family member and evading arrest. Slaton could not be found the first three times, but he was found Sunday during a traffic stop, and the Special Response Team officers went to the scene.

"They already knew Slaton had several warrants for his arrest, and from previous encounters they knew, they believed he was currently armed with a weapon," Kraus told reporters and community activists.

Kraus they showed body-camera video of a foot pursuit that showed an object in Slaton's hand that appeared to be a handgun. The pursuing officers are heard shouting, "Gun! Gun! Gun!"

After briefly losing contact with Slaton, officers found him in the cab of a pickup truck.

Officers first approached the truck from behind but moved in front to shield nearby pedestrians from any gunfire, Kraus said. Video showed a semicircle of armored officers in front of the truck, guns drawn, amid shouts of "Put your hands up!"

Finally, one officer shouted, "He's reaching!" Officers opened fire. Even after a call of "Cease fire!" an officer is heard warning that Slaton still had a gun in his hand.

Kraus said Slaton's position in the vehicle and the position of body cameras on officers' chests keep the video from capturing clearly what they saw, Kraus noted. "What is depicted, however, is Slaton not complying with multiple requests to show his hands and Slaton making overt actions which led officers to discharge their firearms," he said.

Kraus said he hoped the release of the video and the briefing would be "a first step" toward building public trust in the police.

.mcclatchy-embed{position:relative;padding:40px 0 56.25%;height:0;overflow:hidden;max-width:100%}.mcclatchy-embed iframe{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%}

Richard Vazquez, precinct chairman for the neighborhood where Slaton was shot, said the video was a good first step but that more video and statements from officers involved need to be released.

"My community is not going to be satisfied until we know more," he told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Estella Williams, president of the Fort Worth/Tarrant County branch of the NAACP, also praised the initial release. But she told the Star-Telegram, "I'm hoping there will be some changes. We know there have been lots of shootings in recent weeks and we need information."

News Conference regarding Officer Involved Shooting near 5200 East Berry Street on 06/09/19.

Posted by Fort Worth Police Department on Thursday, June 13, 2019


Somber Vigil Held for Slain Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Los Angeles County Deputy Joseph Gilbert Solano was remembered Thursday evening as a dedicated father and deputy who made everyone around him smile.

Somber Vigil Held for Slain Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Los Angeles County Deputy Joseph Gilbert Solano was remembered Thursday evening as a dedicated father and deputy who made everyone around him smile.

Police Hunt For Suspect Who Stole SUV With 2 Young Sisters Inside

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The girls were found unharmed inside the SUV about a half mile away. The suspect remains at large.

Police Hunt For Suspect Who Stole SUV With 2 Young Sisters Inside

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The girls were found unharmed inside the SUV about a half mile away. The suspect remains at large.

Baltimore Police Officers Coral Bulls That Escaped Slaughterhouse

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two bulls escaped a nearby slaughterhouse and were corralled in west Baltimore on Thursday afternoon.

Baltimore Police Officers Coral Bulls That Escaped Slaughterhouse

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two bulls escaped a nearby slaughterhouse and were corralled in west Baltimore on Thursday afternoon.

‘Everyone Goes Home Speak Up’ Looks at FF Training

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In the new episode, Oneida, NY, Deputy Fire Chief Tim Cowan talks about how firefighter safety hinges on a solid foundation of training and education.

Brookville, IN, Fire Dept. Puts Tanker-Pumper in Service

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Brookville, IN, Fire Dept. has taken delivery of a Midwest Fire side-control tanker-pumper built on a Kenworth T370 chassis.

Editor’s Review: TacShield Belt Set plus

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our Editorial Director reviews the gun belt set from TacShield and gives it favorable marks.

No NJ Salary Cap Turns FF Contract Talks ‘Aggressive’

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New Jersey's 2-percent salary cap expired 18 months ago, and local officials say the tone of contract negotiations with police and firefighter unions has changed.

LAPD on the Hunt for Paintball Culprits Assaulting Bystanders

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Paintball-wielding assailants have been attacking and robbing unsuspecting residents on city streets and in many instances posting the attacks on social media, Los Angeles police said.

Trial in Slaying of NYPD Explorer Draws to a Close

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A jury is considering the fate of five alleged gang members accused in the brutal stabbing of Lesandro Guzman-Feliz, almost a year after the teen’s death sparked community outrage and demands of “Justice for Junior.”

Images: Upstate New York K-9s, Handlers Train for Explosives Detection

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fifty police canine explosion detection teams participated this week in the first ever "Canine Week" at the State Preparedness Training Center in Oriskany, a training hosted by the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services.

Wisconsin Deputy Wounded in Shootout Was Hit by ‘Friendly Fire’

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Wood County Sheriff's Deputy who was wounded while responding to a report of a suicidal man this week was hit by "friendly fire."

Critically Wounded Texas Trooper Taking Assisted Steps

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper Moises Sanchez, who was critically wounded in a shooting in April, has been able to take assisted steps and is being transferred to another rehabilitation center.

Video: Bodycam footage of Wis. firefighter shooting released

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police bodycam footage shows gunfire exchange that led to the death of Wisconsin Firefigher Mitchell Lundgaard

Video: Bodycam footage of Wis. firefighter shooting released

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police bodycam footage shows gunfire exchange that led to the death of Wisconsin Firefigher Mitchell Lundgaard

Florida Deputy Released From Hospital

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pasco County Sheriff’s Deputy Christopher Stone, who was seriously wounded by gunfire in a shoot-out last weekend in New Port Richey, was released from a hospital on Thursday.

Five St. Paul Police Officers Fired for Failing to Stop Assault

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five St. Paul police officers who stood by as a civilian was assaulted last year were fired Thursday in what Chief Todd Axtell called "an ugly day in our department's history."

How to determine if a patient has the mental capacity to decline care

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our co-hosts discuss the three techniques EMS providers should use to determine if a patient has the mental capacity to decline medical treatment

3 EMS agencies submit videos for NAEMSP CPR challenge

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The winner of the challenge gets two free NAEMSP Annual Meeting registration passes

IAFF’s president blasts White House for lack of 9/11 fund support

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“It would also be helpful if the administration would kind of weigh in and I haven’t really seen any specific indication from them on where they stand,” IAFF President Harold Schaitberger said

IAFF’s president blasts White House for lack of 9/11 fund support

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“It would also be helpful if the administration would kind of weigh in and I haven’t really seen any specific indication from them on where they stand,” IAFF President Harold Schaitberger said

La. passes bill giving first responders workers’ comp PTSD benefits

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Louisiana first responders diagnosed with PTSD can now apply for workers’ comp benefits

La. passes bill giving first responders workers’ comp PTSD benefits

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Louisiana first responders diagnosed with PTSD can now apply for workers’ comp benefits

La. passes bill giving first responders workers’ comp PTSD benefits

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Louisiana first responders diagnosed with PTSD can now apply for workers’ comp benefits

La. passes bill giving first responders workers’ comp PTSD benefits

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Louisiana first responders diagnosed with PTSD can now apply for workers’ comp benefits

Product of the Day: Waterax — MARK-3 Portable Fire Pump

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The MARK-3 fire pump is designed to withstand the rigors of firefighting and it is at the core of most water delivery system in wildland operations.

Retired firefighter develops decon kit to battle occupational cancer

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Rehnke Decon Kit is designed to completely detoxify contaminated gear

Retired firefighter develops decon kit to battle occupational cancer

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Rehnke Decon Kit is designed to completely detoxify contaminated gear

Fire, ambulance services to merge in Mass. town

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The merger will start in July and be complete with all paperwork by Jan. 1, 2020

Fire, ambulance services to merge in Mass. town

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The merger will start in July and be complete with all paperwork by Jan. 1, 2020

Fire, ambulance services to merge in Mass. town

Posted on June 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The merger will start in July and be complete with all paperwork by Jan. 1, 2020

Mass. EMT cadets receive Heart Association award

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The American Heart Association challenged high schools and colleges across Massachusetts to participate in this event to teach as many people in their community CPR

Mass. EMT cadets honored by American Heart Association

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The American Heart Association challenged high schools and colleges across Massachusetts to participate in this event to teach as many people in their community CPR

4 things EMS providers need to know about hyperventilation syndrome

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Understand the role of pulse oximetry and waveform capnography to assess and treat patients who are hyperventilating

Judge grants firefighters $345K in ‘frivolous’ leave time suit

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Austin Firefighters Association President Bob Nicks was targeted in a lawsuit that accused the city of paying him and union members for duties outside of work

Judge grants firefighters $345K in ‘frivolous’ leave time suit

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Austin Firefighters Association President Bob Nicks was targeted in a lawsuit that accused the city of paying him and union members for duties outside of work

Ky. counties add 911 text capabilities

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With the Text-to-911 initiative, individuals in four Kentucky counties now have the capability to text authorities during an emergency, effective immediately

4 Ky. counties add 911 text capabilities

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With the Text-to-911 initiative, individuals in four Kentucky counties now have the capability to text authorities during an emergency, effective immediately

Charge against Tiverton fire captain dismissed in court

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Tiverton fire captain had an alleged physical altercation with an 18-year-old tow truck company worker at the scene of a motorcycle accident

Tips for securing water and managing pump pressure

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A back-to-basics drill to ensure crews know how to secure water from various sources

Lancaster fire chief killed directing traffic honored by naming highway after him

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Part of S.C. 5 from the Catawba River bridge bordering York County to U.S. 521 is now named the “Dennis C. Straight Memorial Highway”

Fallen SC fire chief honored with highway dedication

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dennis C. Straight, 59, was struck by a vehicle while working a wreck near a S.C. highway intersection

EMS recognized by American Heart Association for STEMI care

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The award was presented to EMS Chief Steve Eubank by American Heart Association representative Alexander Kuhn

Ky. city EMS recognized by AHA for STEMI care

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The award was presented to EMS Chief Steve Eubank by American Heart Association representative Alexander Kuhn

15 tips from fathers that cops use on patrol

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

Yeah, your dad might've been a bit of a hardass when you were growing up, but he probably gave you some pretty good advice along the way. In honor of Father’s Day, we asked you to share advice from dad that you've found useful on patrol. Below is a collection of the best responses. Be sure to check out top tips from mom here.

    If you’re going to do something and you don’t know if it’s the right thing to do, imagine me standing behind you watching. You’ll make the right decision every time. – Rhonda Trekell Bays Treat every person with respect no matter what. Giving respect to others is more about the man you are than whoever they might be or what they have done. – Derek John Instead of being a hand crank, try being a self-starter. – Franklin Marino Don't take any wooden nickels! – Frank Keough Know that you will not change the world but you have an opportunity to help make a change. – Tim Menard Never turn your back on a woman during a domestic violence call. – Sifu Says Watch their hands but talk to them like your mother's listening. – Michael McKellar Someone is counting on you to do your job so they can do theirs. – Pat Welsh You have two names on your uniform. Your family’s and the community you serve. Don’t bring shame to either one. – William Ferline Be careful what you say at work, you never know who your next boss will be. – Marv Alex Trust your gut. If someone or something doesn’t feel right, trust your gut. – Ashley Brashear Make a new friend every day. – John Paul Always assume no one has done their job; do it again, it could possibly save your life. – David Allen Never forget that no matter how high you go in the police department you will never stand higher than the shoulders of those people below you. – Ed Devennish Nothing good happens after midnight. - Jimmy Andrews
LEARN MORE

Police work as a family affair

How to talk to your kids about the dangers of policing

How to find child care to fit your odd LEO schedule

6 keys to being a better police parent

Keys to successful parenting for police officers


Officer, Am I Free to Go?

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Without reasonable suspicion or probable cause, you cannot legally detain a subject during a consensual contact.

Report: Ex-MT Chief Displayed ‘Unprofessional Behavior’

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Helena officials also claimed that Chief Mark Emert, who resigned in March, showed a "lack of departmental leadership" while he was in charge.

PA Fire Department Spends $2.6M on Apparatus, Boat

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Spotsylvania County Fire Department is buying two new tanker-pumpers and a pumper to replace vehicles from the '80s and '90s, as well as a 24-foot, twin-engine boat.

House Committee Passes Bill Extending Benefits for 9/11 First Responders

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Following Tuesday's emotional testimony by cancer-stricken 9/11 first responders and comedian Jon Stewart, the House Judiciary Committee unanimously passed a bill Wednesday to extend funding for the September 11th Victim's Compensation Fund.

CA Deputy Shot in Fast Food Restaurant Has Died

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Joseph Solano, 50, succumbed to his injuries Wednesday after being shot off duty in a seemingly random attack Monday.

ME Firefighters Rescue 155-Pound St. Bernard on Roof

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

South Portland crews helped get the large dog, Bear, to the ground after the canine broke through a second-floor window and got stuck on the roof.

Network Solutions for Next-Gen First Responder Technology

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Purpose-built to withstand extreme environments, the NetCloud mobile solutions replace multiple “boxes” with a ruggedized, comprehensive mobile network solution that is ideal for in-vehicle and command center installations. Each model supports up to...

(Video) Train and Equip Officers for Self-Care/Buddy Care

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Don Alwes emphasizes the critical life-saving nature of first-aid equipment and training so wounded LEOs can treat themselves and fellow officers.

UK Officer Throws Herself in Front of Stolen Car to Save 10-Year-Old Boy

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to the Yorkshire Evening Post, Officer Sanya Shahid dove in front of a stolen vehicle during a police pursuit and saved the boy's life.

Canadian Agency Approves New Training Facility for Firearms and Defensive Tactics

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Saskatchewan Highway Patrol will soon have a new training facility to work on firearms and defensive tactics skills.

New Bill Would Make Dispatchers and Call Takers First Responders Nationwide

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

According to the website for California Representative Norma Torres—who is a co-sponsor of the bill along with Republican Richard Burr of North Carolina—the proposed legislation seeks to reclassify communications officers nationally from a non-protective service occupation to a protective one in the Standard Occupational Classification system, giving dispatchers recognition as first responders.

Chicago Police Department Holds Two-Day Mental Health Summit

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Chicago Police Department—which has suffered three the loss of three officers to suicide this year—is hosting a two-day seminar to improve mental health treatment for police and other emergency responders.

Appeals Court Sends Houston FFs, City Back to Mediation

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The ruling by Texas' 14th Court of Appeals requires both parties to hold talks within 60 days and comes a day after the city officially reversed 220 Houston firefighter layoffs.

Shorthanded New York Department Uses Billboards to Recruit Officers

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Auburn (NY) Police Department has placed giant "we're hiring" signs in the local area in an effort to fill the ranks as numerous officers are set to retire in coming months.

25 Officers Injured in Protest After Fatal OIS by U.S. Marshals

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

United States Marshals shot and killed a man in Memphis on Wednesday night, sparking a protest that left at least 25 officers injured.

UK Welcomes Law that Increases Penalty for Subjects that Attack K-9s

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Handlers and K-9s in the United Kingdom are welcoming a new law that went into effect earlier this week that significantly increases the maximum penalty for offenders who attack a service dog.

First-Grade Girl Holds Fundraisers for Police Department to Get K-9

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A little girl who just finished first grade at Highlands Elementary School in Harrison Township (PA) is aiming to raise $10,000 for her police department through things like lemonade stands, car washes, and cookie sales.

CA Crews Save Two Trapped in Elevator for Three Hours

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The two women suffered minor injuries Wednesday after their elevator dropped several stories, and San Diego firefighters were needed to rescue the women from the car.

Florida Officer Buys Taco Bell for Stranded Family

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When an officer with the Lynn Haven (FL) Police Department came upon a mother and her three children in a broken down car at a local fast food restaurant and discovered that the hungry family didn't have enough money to buy a meal, she opened her wallet and bought them dinner.

Video: Arizona Officer Talks Suicidal Man Out of Jumping from Bridge

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Chandler (AZ) Police Department saved a suicidal man from jumping off a bridge early Thursday morning.

Video Shows Fort Worth Police Shouting, ‘Drop the Gun!’ Before Fatal Shooting

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fort Worth police on Thursday released dramatic video of three officers standing in front of a white pickup repeatedly shouting orders at a man to drop his gun before they opened fire.

The FLIR K2 – Save much more than lives.

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FLIR is on a mission to ensure a TIC is standard issue equipment for every firefighter. The FLIR K2 makes that possible by providing capability, ruggedness, and reliability at an affordable price. With easy-to-use buttons and operability in ...

The FLIR K2

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FLIR is on a mission to ensure a TIC is standard issue equipment for every firefighter. The FLIR K2 makes that possible by providing capability, ruggedness, and reliability at an affordable price. With easy to use buttons and operability in temperatures...

12 White Male San Francisco Police Officers Sue for Gender and Race Discrimination

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Twelve white male San Francisco police officers who were passed over for promotions are suing the city for race and sex discrimination, led by a lieutenant whose similar suit 16 years ago netted a $1.6 million settlement.

Iowa sheriff won’t honor neighboring town’s arrests

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

DURANT, Iowa — An unusual circumstance let a speeding drunken driver avoid a trip to jail after her recent arrest in this small eastern Iowa town: the sheriff isn't honoring arrests made in Durant.

Saying he cannot rely on the truthfulness of officers in the farming community of 1,800 people about 165 miles (265 kilometers) east of Des Moines, Cedar County Sheriff Warren Wethington has declared that his jail will not book any suspects whom they arrest for the foreseeable future. He has barred Durant officers from setting foot in the county law enforcement center and ordered his own deputies to not base any arrests on the observations of Durant officers.

Wethington's directive, issued last month, has won him praise from residents, who see it as a rare public stand against police misconduct by a law enforcement official. But it has escalated his long-running feud with Dawn Smith, chairwoman of the Cedar County Board of Supervisors, whose husband, Robert Smith, is the Durant officer at the center of the sheriff's allegations.

Wethington said the main problem is that Robert Smith, one of the town's three full-time officers, has a history of being untruthful, using questionable force and generating complaints about his harsh demeanor. And Durant's police chief, he says, is aware of the problems but hired Smith anyway last year even though some of them have to be disclosed to criminal defendants.

"I'm not saying they can't do their jobs. I'm just saying that I'm not going to vouch for their integrity," Wethington said in an interview at the sheriff's office in the county seat of Tipton, population 3,200, which is 150 miles (241 kilometers) east of Des Moines. "When you allow somebody to bring a suspect to your jail, you are saying 'I believe this officer is credible and that there is probable cause this happened.' That's not the case here."

Robert Smith retired from the Iowa State Patrol last year after a 30-year career and then was hired by Durant, where his wife previously served as mayor and one of her supporters is the police chief. Dawn and Robert Smith said that he left the patrol in good standing; a patrol spokesman had no immediate comment.

But court records show that the Cedar County prosecutor's office routinely discloses to criminal defendants that Smith's truthfulness as a witness may be called into question by issues that surfaced during his job as a trooper. Such disclosures are referred to as Giglio notices because they are required under a Supreme Court decision by that name and can be a career-ender for officers subjected to them.

Records detailing Robert Smith's past issues are maintained in a sealed file at the courthouse that defense lawyers and judges have been allowed to review in-person.

Robert Smith declined comment on the contents of the file but said, "My record stands by itself and that's all I have to say." Durant Police Chief Orville Randolph declined comment, citing the advice of the city attorney.

Dawn Smith called the sheriff's move an attempt to get back at her after the two elected officials have clashed on other issues. She said Wethington "chose to target me, my family, my friends and my community" after she looked into his admitted unprofessional behavior at a May 1 meeting of the county's 911 board, which he chairs.

Wethington acknowledged that he used foul language and was "downright mean" to vendors of the county's radio system because he was outraged their equipment isn't working and he demanded answers. However, he says Dawn Smith has made an issue of the meeting only to try to discredit him after she caught wind of his plan. He said their feud "makes it easy" to speak out against Durant officers but that's not why he's doing it.

Randolph, the Durant chief, said his department is continuing business as usual amid the situation. But it is having a real-world impact.

A 43-year-old woman was charged with operating while intoxicated last month after she was pulled over for speeding 24 miles per hour over the limit in Durant and had a blood alcohol level over the limit. A criminal complaint says she was released with a date to appear in court rather than jailed because the "Cedar County Sheriff refused to take defendant."

Calling the situation unfortunate, the chief judge of the judicial district has ordered that people who are arrested in the Cedar County part of Durant can be taken to the Scott County jail in Davenport. If that jail is full, they are to be taken to the Muscatine County jail. Durant, despite its small population, stretches into all three counties.

After they make court appearances, the suspects can then be ordered sent back to the Cedar County jail in Tipton pending further proceedings.

Wethington says that he's willing to accept the inmates at that point since their charges have been reviewed by the court — even though it means an 85-mile roundtrip for one of his deputies to pick them up. In addition to the transportation costs, the arrangement could mean additional hearings for the judges and clerks in Scott County.

The sheriff said the response has been "overwhelmingly good" despite those costs, pointing to social media posts cheering him on.

"I even got an 'I Stand With Warren' hashtag," he said with a laugh.


Case study: How bar codes boosted productivity for one Texas sheriff’s office

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Sponsored by QueTel

By Rachel Zoch for PoliceOne BrandFocus

Change is tough for any organization. Add in the need to maintain a clear chain of custody for evidence management and you have a significant challenge.

Last year, the Comal County Sheriff’s Office in Texas took on that challenge, transitioning its evidence intake and management from a semi-manual add-on to its RMS to an automated bar code system from QueTel.

Det. Sgt. Ronald Womack, a 30-plus year veteran officer who oversees the department’s evidence operations, was initially resistant because the transition would pose a significant burden on his staff of four – but the added functionality of the bar codes quickly won him over.

“I knew there would be growing pains,” he said, “but now that I have it and we’ve done a lot of work with it, I think the bar code system is really cool. It’s been a blessing in disguise.”

SAVING TIME ON EVIDENCE ENTRY AND TRACKING

The CCSO adopted the QueTel Evidence TraQ system last year, and although Womack’s team is still working to tag all the department’s roughly 45,000 items, he says they are already seeing the benefits.

Before adopting the bar code system, the department was using a “very limited, very bare bones” evidence processing module tacked onto its RMS, says Womack. Officers would file incident reports, and then evidence techs would have to use that information for intake and processing.

Now, officers log in using their unique employee numbers and bar code the evidence themselves before handing it over to the property room.

“It took away our need to have a lot of man hours inputting all the evidence,” said Womack. “It's already put in the system, so when we pull it from the one-way intake bins it’s already bar coded, and all we do is accept it and assign it a locker. That sped up the process.”

Womack says many of the officers, like him, were initially resistant to the change, but once they realized they no longer had to do chain of custody labels because the bar code provides that, they recognized that the change cut down on paperwork tremendously, saving them time and hassle.

“If you have 20 pieces of evidence, you have to put a chain of custody label on each one of those pieces of evidence,” said Womack. “You don’t have to do that anymore. You just bar code it. You put it in, run the barcode, boom, slap it on the evidence and it’s done. That’s your chain of custody installed on it, meaning that whenever it changes hands, whatever is done with that evidence, no matter what, you can always see what was done.”

This automated tracking also cuts down on the potential for discrepancies, he adds, a key safeguard for everyone involved.

“Anything you’re allowed to get into in an evidence room, you’re subject to recall five, 10 years down the road,” he said. “I could be retired and they could call me to court on a piece of evidence.”

ADDING SEARCH CAPABILITES

Another key benefit of the new system is that it can be easily searched, which Womack says is a “night and day” difference from before. Every piece of evidence, no matter how small, gets a bar code that is logged by the QueTel system, and an evidence locker holding multiple items can be assigned a bar code that can be scanned to list everything inside. The software can then be queried to list what’s in a given locker or where to find a particular item.

“We’ve been doing a massive item inventory as every item in here is being bar coded. If we have 10 pieces in an envelope and they’re in different bags, each one of them gets a bar code,” he said. “What I like about it that we couldn’t do before is I can go in and put ‘locker A’ and it’ll tell me everything in locker A. The other system didn’t do that.”

HAVE THE RIGHT SUPPORT IN PLACE

Womack credits his team with making the transition a success and says it’s important to have the right people in place.

“Anytime you go to a new software system, make sure that you have the people around you to grab the bull by the horns,” he said, crediting evidence tech Caitlin Buckman for taking the lead on implementing the bar codes.

Womack also emphasizes the importance of a software provider that will work with your agency to get the new software system up and running and provide ongoing support.

“Support was a key factor,” he said. “The team they have are very positive and very helpful. They didn’t just drop us by the wayside. They were very good to us, and they took care of us. You can call them and basically they’ll bend over backwards. Of course, there were a few bumps in the road during the transition like any time you merge two systems, but they were quick to correct those problems.”

He says the experience with QueTel has been very positive overall, and the department will likely expand with other modules, such as those for quartermaster or impound management.

“On a scale of one to 10, I give them a nine,” he said. “What we lacked is the bar code system. It brings us into the 21st century.”


Iowa PD turn to private doorbell cameras to help catch criminals

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WAUKEE, Iowa — Police are asking residents to register their home security cameras to help them solve crimes.

According to the Des Moines Register, the Waukee Police Department are following departments across the nation to encourage their community to register their home doorbell cameras so police can quickly request footage if an incident occurs nearby.

Departments in New York, Virginia and Texas have already established programs that take advantage of the growing number of home cameras.

“It’s crazy how many people have doorbell cameras ... it’s going to be an advantage for us,” Waukee police Sgt. Mackenzie Sposeto said.

More than 3.4 million doorbell recording devices were expected to be sold last year with reports saying the devices will be in 22 million homes by 2020.

Some departments are offering discounts on doorbell cameras in exchange for access to their footage. Waukee police aren’t offering subsidies on devices, but since launching their program a few weeks ago, they’ve received around 20 applications.

Registering these devices doesn’t give police automatic access to footage, but if a crime occurs in a neighborhood with a registered camera, police can contact the owner and request recordings.


The importance of report writing skills for career development

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lindsey J. Bertomen
Author: Lindsey J. Bertomen

Report writing skills are just as important for career survival as any other police skill, such as defensive tactics, firearms handling, and knowledge of statutes and codes.

I’ve been teaching report writing to students for more than 15 years. I don’t make it complicated. There are only two rules to follow for writing excellent reports:

    Write in the first person/active voice. Do not make legal conclusions.
First Person/Active Voice

Writing in the active voice means that the subject of a sentence does the action indicated by the verb.

Active voice sentences are structured as “This (he, she, etc.) did that.” For example, Officer Smith drove his patrol car to the morgue. When an officer uses active voice correctly, it reduces confusion.

Active voice sentences directly answer the question, "Who did this?" They center on the active verb, which allow the reader to quickly grasp who performed the activity.

Understanding active voice also enables a writer to use natural language. Natural language is one a writer writes the same way that people talk. The opposite of this is institutionalized language.

Let’s look at institutionalized language first:

Upon arrival, I made contact with…

People don’t generally talk like this, but for some reason we have decided that writing like this in reports makes us sound more intelligent. Does the previous sentence mean a person landed on top of their arrival? When they made contact with someone, does that mean that, before anything else, they walked up and touched them? This could be awkward.

The natural language equivalent would be something like:

“When I arrived, I talked to…”

Sometimes, institutionalized language sounds like total nonsense. For example, officers might write, “He was ambulatory, so the ambulance crew did not use a gurney.” Instead, how about, “Smith walked into the ambulance”?

The worst violators of institutionalized language use are traffic accident investigators. Writing that, “The point of impact was arrived upon by the damage to Vehicle 1 and scuff marks on the pavement,” is just awkward.

Writing the same way as we naturally speak becomes important when we use our reports to refresh our memory on the stand. We can simplify language by using the active voice and natural language:

The two of them became engaged in an argument.

They argued.

The vehicle appeared in good repair and appeared new in appearance.

The car looked new.

As of this date, the anticipated response has not been delivered.

I don’t have an answer yet.

The two of them were engaged in a physical altercation.

They fought.

Is there a time when passive voice is appropriate in a report? Yes, but only when it is productive to emphasize the object of the sentence. For example:

After a few minutes, Blanco was finished with Chief Sill’s boring monologue.

Legal Conclusions

Perhaps the most uncomfortable cross examinations stem from officers who make legal conclusions in their reports. It happens like this:

Officer Blanco, according to your report, you stated that “…the car careened off the guardrail, causing it to strike the pickup truck in the other lane.” Is this correct?

That’s correct.

What sort of training do you have in physics, Officer?

I’m sorry?

Let me rephrase. How did you know that the car bounced off the guardrail, rather than the driver steered the car into my client after hitting the guardrail?

You can see where this is going. Creating a conclusion or an assumption in a report is dangerous, especially when it comes to criminal cases.

The way to avoid making legal conclusions is to look for language that suggests “this caused that” or things that the officer could not possibly know from their vantage point.

Sometimes officers string facts together creating a conclusion. Not only is this problematic, it is a poor investigatory habit. For example:

Marie Smith said that she was in the bedroom when suspect Scranton approached the front porch. Scranton banged on the door, then Scranton kicked it in. Smith opened the bedroom window and crawled out.

If Marie Smith didn’t actually see or hear Scranton bang on the door, the information cannot be confirmed. This is not only poor writing; it is poor investigatory technique. That is, what if there was a second suspect and Scranton was not the one who banged on the door?

Sometimes officers will make legal conclusions that stem from information they could not possibly know. For example:

By this time, Smith was thinking that he was going to assault Dean for molesting his daughter.

Imagine the question on the stand:

Officer, what degree of clairvoyance do you have?

What?

Oh, you didn’t know this question was coming? Why not?

Investigators cannot possibly know what someone was thinking, but I see this in reports all the time.

Becoming a better report writer

It probably would not surprise anyone to know that I have students with graduate degrees who have trouble with simple incident report writing. I encourage recruits to take a writing class before they enter the police academy.

Just like many college writing classes, my incident report writing classes are entirely online. I work closely with local agencies and often get the “My rookie needs to take your short course” phone call occasionally.

I also encourage students to read. Even reading popular novels will mold language skill development. Many “college-ready” students have not read much beyond an 8th-grade level. If you are a potential recruit, pick up something like “Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins. I read the trilogy over a weekend. There are plenty of similar reading experiences from “The Cold Dish: A Longmire Mystery” to “Orange is the New Black.”

Stay safe!


Be the smartest person in the room

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Duane Wolfe
Author: Duane Wolfe

Over the past several months I’ve had the opportunity to attend courses taught by some of the top police trainers in the country, including Courageous Leadership with Travis Yates, Bulletproof with Jim Glennon and Lt. Col. Dave Grossman, and Decision-Making: Foundation of Reasonable Force with John Bostain.

Despite the variety of topics covered in these courses, the trainers all had one unifying message: When it comes to police-related issues, you need to be the smartest person in the room. Why? Because all too often law enforcement’s message doesn’t get heard.

Anti-police groups have their agenda, which doesn’t include acknowledging any information outside their own message. Too often, those at the top of our organizations cannot or will not speak out on hot-button topics for fear of losing their jobs. The media, while it occasionally shares stories showing the police in a positive light, focuses on those news items that will result in the most hits, clicks and shares.

So, the only one left to tell law enforcement’s story is you. Know that most people view the police in a positive light. Understand there are those who will never change their negative mindset about law enforcement. Your message needs to be focused on those in the middle whose opinions can be swayed through a logical presentation of facts.

In order to do that you need to be armed with researched responses that address hotly debated issues. Here are a few you can use to debate some of the most common criticisms of law enforcement.

Police violence is an epidemic

According to a 2011 NIJ study, there are approximately 40 million police contacts with citizens each year. Less than 1% of those contacts require use of force beyond an application of handcuffs and low-level control holds. Use of deadly force – police shootings, not just deaths – occurred in only 0.00002865% of those estimated 40,000,000 contacts.

A research study published in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery in March 2018 showed that out of 1,041,737 police contacts, force was only used in 0.086% (1 in 1167) of those contacts and in 114,064 criminal arrests, force was used only in 0.78% of (1 in 128) of those arrests. These low numbers indicate police are frequently deploying their de-escalation skills.

Police training exaggerates the dangers of the job

Police don’t even make the top 10 most dangerous jobs by accidents lists like crab fishermen and loggers. However, when looking at the murder rate by profession, the 2013 Bureau of Labor Statistics lists police work as the second most dangerous profession.

Police are trigger happy

The FBI’s 2012 Restraint in Use of Deadly Force study showed that when involved in a situation where they were legally authorized to use deadly force, 70% of officers chose other means to deal with the threat.

Police use of force is racially biased

In a 2017 study published in the American Journal of Public Health, researchers analyzed 5,630 Dallas Police Department use of force reports from 2014-15. They found there was no racial disparity in the use of force. This is just one of several studies that refute this assertion.

A 2018 study on use of deadly force and racial disparity concluded, “When adjusting for crime, we find no systematic evidence of anti-black disparities in fatal shootings, fatal shootings of unarmed citizens, or fatal shootings involving misidentification of harmless objects.”

Officers should wear body cams to curb police abuses

An 18-month study conducted by The Lab – a research group created by the Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser – looked at over 2,000 officers comparing citizen complaints and use of force by officers. Half of the officers wore body cameras, the other half didn’t. When comparisons were made between the two groups, researcher Anita Ravishankar concluded, "We found essentially that we could not detect any statistically significant effect of the body-worn cameras." In other words, body cameras did not seem to create any change in how officers do their jobs.

It is also worthy to note that organizations that were calling for all officers to have body cams are now calling for a stop to camera use due to privacy concerns.

Counter negative opinions with facts

I was easily able to locate statistics and research to counter some of the commonly heard criticisms of police. The information is available to anyone who wants to look it up, whether they are a police officer or not. For those people who are on the fence regarding their beliefs about the police, this information could change their mind.

No one knows your job better than you. No one understands your job better than you. But if you don’t take the time to gain the knowledge to counter negative opinions about the police with factually based arguments, we will continue to lose ground.


SC police release video of K-9 capturing suspect hiding in dishwasher

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Duane Wolfe

By PoliceOne Staff

GREENVILLE COUNTY, SC — An investigation is underway after a K-9 attacked a suspect being apprehended in April.

According to Fox News, the department’s K-9 found suspect Kevin Leroy Scott White, 47, attempting to evade arrest by hiding in a dishwasher outside in a yard.

When White was found, the K-9 pulled him out and bit his side when the dog’s handler briefly lost his footing, police say. The K-9 attacked White a second time on top of his head.

Footage shows the K-9 officer command the dog several times to release White, who can be heard screaming on the ground. The officer had to repeat the command several times before the K-9 released White.

An investigation into whether excessive force was used during the arrest is being conducted by the sheriff’s department and the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division.

White was taken to a local hospital and treated for his injuries after the arrest. He’s been charged with possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, failure to stop for blue lights, resisting arrest and other charges.


Federal Report Sheds Light on Deaths of PA Firefighters

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An investigation found that five factors led to the death of the two York firefighters who were killed last year by a building collapse the day after a three-alarm fire.

Group to Look at MD County FFs’ Work Conditions

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The committee created by the Frederick County Council will conduct research on firefighters' issues, such as collective bargaining, mediation and other areas.

Bill named after Conn. LEO forced into retirement heads to governor’s desk

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pat Tomlinson The Hour, Norwalk, Conn.

NORWALK, Conn. — Former Norwalk police officer Phil Roselle has dealt with a host of issues, both mental and physical, since he was shot by a fellow officer during a training session at a gun range in September 2017.

He’s experienced blood clots and night terrors, depression and permanent nerve damage in his right hand. His kidneys are failing him. Worst of all, he said, is the overwhelming feeling of helplessness.

“I wouldn’t wish this upon any other officer, to go through what I’ve been through. It’s just really hard,” he said.

In April, he was forced to retire from the police force — a profession he dreamed of since he was a teen. But on Wednesday, he and his family heard the first bit of good news they’ve gotten in a while.

A bill allowing municipalities to pay public safety employees forced into retirement by injury the difference between their retirement pay and the regular rate of pay prior to retirement is heading to Gov. Ned Lamont’s desk after it was approved by the state House of Representatives on the last day of the legislative session. The bill is expected to be signed into law next week.

Under the current collective bargaining agreement, public safety employees in Connecticut can only receive up to 75 percent of their pay from worker’s compensation when forced into retirement by an injury.

Phil Roselle’s wife, Debbie, first began pushing for a means to close that pay gap in October 2018, when she learned of a law in Massachusetts that allowed municipalities to step in where worker’s compensation might fall short.

And after six months of impassioned pleas before the state legislature, her hard work has paid off.

“I feel like I’ve been able to give Phil justice, hope and dignity that he needed after everything he went through,” said Debbie Roselle, who initiated the push for the bill back in October. “This is something those in the line of duty should be entitled to, and I’m happy to have been able to do this for Phil and other officers like him.”

Now, the ball is in the city’s court.

When the bill was first proposed in January, Mayor Harry Rilling said he would consider enacting the measure in the event it passed.

But now, with the bill’s passage appearing imminent, Rilling’s tone grown a little more noncommittal.

“I will take a look at the bill and see who is eligible for these expanded benefits,” Rilling said in a statement Friday. “The city has worked hard to negotiate a fair retirement settlement for Officer Roselle and his family, the terms of which are confidential. I want to be clear that the City of Norwalk has been and continues to be committed to protecting those who keep us safe in our community. We must do what’s right to ensure our first responders are taken care of and protected.”

Roselle currently receives a monthly payment of $5,097.20 (75 percent of his previous wage), and will consider to do so for the rest of his life under his pension.

Under the proposed law, Norwalk’s Common Council could vote to supplement his pay with a two-thirds vote of its legislative body until he reaches age of 65. He is now 52.

Common Council chairman Tom Livingston said he wasn’t familiar with the bill, so he could not yet comment on it.

Despite no assurances from the city, Debbie Roselle remains confident that they will “do the right thing.” She said once the bill is officially signed into law, she plans on reaching out to the mayor to discuss a possible agreement.

“I followed through and did what I had to do, I just hope the city will do the same,” Debbie Roselle said.

———

©2019 The Hour (Norwalk, Conn.)


Firefighters Cancer Registry to Get $900K Boost

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The funding to the Centers for Disease Control that was approved by federal lawmakers will put the financial backing for the voluntary database at $2.5 million.

Memphis Officers Injured After Riots Break Out Following Fatal Police-Involved Shooting

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers were injured after a riot broke out following a police-involved shooting Wednesday.

Calif. LEOs sue city, claim bias against race, sex in promotions

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Twelve white male San Francisco police officers are suing the city, arguing they were passed over for promotions because of their race and gender.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports Wednesday that the lawsuit, which was filed Tuesday in federal court, is the latest round in a conflict that dates back decades. A 13th plaintiff who is now retired says she also was denied promotion, because she is a white lesbian.

The lawsuit challenges a test-scoring method that the city adopted in 1979 in response to a lawsuit from a group representing black and female officers, who alleged discrimination in hiring and promotions.

San Francisco "bands" promotional test scores so that people who score within a certain range are treated the same, which means the department can consider other factors such as language skills and experience in awarding promotions. The latest lawsuit challenges that method.

"The city — to this day — has a long-standing practice and custom of discriminating against white males in SFPD promotions to the rank of sergeant, lieutenant and captain," said M. Greg Mullanax, the officers' attorney, in the lawsuit.

Mullanax said that in 2016, the department promoted three black sergeants, even though their scores were lower than those of 11 white candidates who were denied promotions.

San Francisco settled a similar 2003 lawsuit for $1.6 million, but did not acknowledge wrongdoing.

Mullanax said the Police Officers Association contacted Chief William Scott but none of the officers who met with Scott received any "substantive response."

John Coté, a spokesman for City Attorney Dennis Herrera, said the department "uses lawful, merit-based civil service examinations in making promotions."


San Francisco LEOs sue city, claim bias against race, sex in promotions

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Duane Wolfe

Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Twelve white male San Francisco police officers are suing the city, arguing they were passed over for promotions because of their race and gender.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports Wednesday that the lawsuit, which was filed Tuesday in federal court, is the latest round in a conflict that dates back decades. A 13th plaintiff who is now retired says she also was denied promotion, because she is a white lesbian.

The lawsuit challenges a test-scoring method that the city adopted in 1979 in response to a lawsuit from a group representing black and female officers, who alleged discrimination in hiring and promotions.

San Francisco "bands" promotional test scores so that people who score within a certain range are treated the same, which means the department can consider other factors such as language skills and experience in awarding promotions. The latest lawsuit challenges that method.

"The city — to this day — has a long-standing practice and custom of discriminating against white males in SFPD promotions to the rank of sergeant, lieutenant and captain," said M. Greg Mullanax, the officers' attorney, in the lawsuit.

Mullanax said that in 2016, the department promoted three black sergeants, even though their scores were lower than those of 11 white candidates who were denied promotions.

San Francisco settled a similar 2003 lawsuit for $1.6 million, but did not acknowledge wrongdoing.

Mullanax said the Police Officers Association contacted Chief William Scott but none of the officers who met with Scott received any "substantive response."

John Coté, a spokesman for City Attorney Dennis Herrera, said the department "uses lawful, merit-based civil service examinations in making promotions."


Eight-foot gator takes bite out of La. deputy’s cruiser

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rebecca Hennes Houston Chronicle

SHREVEPORT, La. — Deputies with the Caddo Parish Sheriff's Office in Shreveport said they were unable to apprehend a dangerous "suspect" Monday.

The suspect - an eight-foot alligator - was spotted in the middle of Hwy. 1 in the hills of north Caddo Parish, deputies said in a Facebook post. While waiting for wildlife experts, deputies attempted to contain the gator themselves, but the animal proved too quick for them.

Before escaping, the gator took a huge bite out of a patrol deputy's car, removing part of the front fender.

The toothy suspect is still on the run.

Alligators spotted around the Houston area are not uncommon during this time of year, according to officials with the Texas Parks & Wildlife. Earlier this month a large gator was found on the front porch of a home in Cinco Ranch, while a five-foot alligator was found swimming in floodwaters at U.S. Highway 90 near the Katy Veterinary Clinic last month.

Residents who come across the animals should not approach them, officials said.

The one that got away... This 8-footer was spotted tonight in the middle of Hwy. 1 in the hills of north Caddo Parish....

Posted by Caddo Parish Sheriff's Office on Monday, June 10, 2019

———

©2019 the Houston Chronicle


Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue, The Dalles, Or, Gets Custom Pumper

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue, The Dalles, OR, have taken delivery of a custom pumper built by Rosenbauer.

VFD Sues IN Fire District over Breach of Contract

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Sellersburg Volunteer Fire Department is suing the Tri-Township Fire District after the district's board voted to end its decades-long relationship with the department.

Ark. PD to overhaul no-knock drug raid policies

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — The Little Rock Police Department announced Wednesday it is overhauling policies for obtaining no-knock warrants in drug raids, eight months after a man alleged officers blasted down his door and raided his apartment without probable cause.

Police Chief Keith Humphrey said at a news conference that the department will now use more detailed information when determining whether a no-knock warrant is reasonable. Officers are not required to announce themselves when serving a no-knock warrant.

Humphrey also said the department will implement other policies, such as thoroughly vetting cooperating individuals and more carefully defining how narcotics and SWAT teams interact, all of which are aimed at improving community policing and repairing a damaged image.

In October, Roderick Talley said he was suing the department and the city, alleging the police lied to obtain a no-knock warrant and used similar boiler-plate language on dozens of other warrants. Talley showed video footage from outside of his home which he said proved police lied when they claimed on an affidavit that they witnessed a confidential informant buying cocaine from Talley. Footage showed the informant ringing Talley's doorbell and leaving minutes later — after no one answered the door. Talley said he was at work when the informant approached.

After police obtained the warrant, indoor footage provided by Talley showed officers blew open his door and raided his apartment. The search warrant inventory shows police found a "green leafy substance," scales, baggies and "paperwork," but no cocaine.

Talley's lawyer, Mike Laux, said the suit has been withdrawn and will be filed again later, possibly with more complainants.

Humphrey said the new policies were enacted from a desire to improve best practices.

"I don't want the community to think that it was because we were forced to do this," Humphrey said. "It was because we felt it was the best way to increase the community's trust in us and we know that there's always a better way of doing things."

A graph provided by the department showed all narcotic warrants have dropped precipitously since last year, a decline Humphrey attributed to both federal agents conducting investigations and city investigations being more targeted and focused.

In 2018, the department served 95 narcotics warrants, 57 of which were no-knock. This year, through Tuesday, only 29 warrants were served, six of which were no-knock.

Beginning Wednesday, an officer who files an affidavit must now fill out a "threat assessment" matrix, which asks questions like "Is the suspect on parole?" or "Is the suspect currently/historically associated with an organization which is known or suspected of violent criminal activity?"

Mayor Frank Scott, who attended the news conference, called the threat assessment "an extra step of accountability."

Answers to those questions, as well as other intelligence such as whether children are present, will guide officers in determining if a no-knock warrant is appropriate. Supervisors must now also sign off on no-knock requests, and Humphrey said he will review all affidavits and threat assessments after the warrants are served.

The department's use of cooperating individuals was also reformed, changes which were implemented late last year. Previously, informants were not regularly investigated. Now, they'll be investigated annually, at a minimum, and individuals who are inactive for a year will be purged from the department's approved list. The department said 59 individuals have been purged so far this year.

Laux, Talley's attorney, said he was pleased with the department's reforms, calling them "gratifying." But he also said they don't solve past issues, including instances in which officers lied on affidavits.

"Going forward, I think it's going to save lives, I think it's going to save property, I think it's going to result in less litigation," he said. "But what about the stuff in the rearview mirror?"


How to Select A Public Safety Electric Bicycle

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Properly selecting an electric bicycle for patrol uses isn't as easy as it sounds. There are multiple considerations that must be taken into account.

Clint Sandusky

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Cpl. Clint Sandusky (ret.) had a 24-year career in law enforcement with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s and Riverside Community College District Police Departments.  He has been an active California POST-certified Bike Patrol Instructor for...

Four NY Firefighters Hurt in Barbecue Grill Blaze

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

It took seven fire departments, including West Islip, an hour to control Wednesday's house fire, which started from a barbecue grill on the back deck.

Off-Duty Holster Survey – Responses Requested

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Media Group would appreciate about one minute of your time to answer these seven questions.

25 LEOs injured, 3 people arrested at scene of fatal Tenn. shooting

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Armed officers and an angry crowd faced off after a Tennessee man was fatally shot by U.S. Marshals in a working-class Memphis neighborhood.

People in the crowd threw rocks and bricks, with 25 officers suffering mostly minor injuries during the tense clash Wednesday night in the Frayser community in north Memphis. Officers cordoned off several blocks near the scene. By 11 p.m., officers had used tear gas and most of the crowd dispersed, police director Michael Rallings said at a Thursday morning at a news conference. Three people were arrested.

Officers on horseback patrolled the area, and lines of police cars with flashing blue lights were parked along the street. An ambulance could be seen at the outer edge of the scene. A helicopter flew overhead as police cars trickled away. Residential streets were blocked, and a heavy police presence remained in the area Thursday.

Tennessee Bureau of Investigation spokeswoman Keli McAlister said the Gulf Coast Regional Fugitive Task Force went to a Frayser home to look for a suspect with felony warrants. Marshals saw the man get into a vehicle and then proceed to ram task force vehicles several times before exiting with a weapon, McAlister said. Marshals then opened fire, killing the man who died at the scene. McAlister did not say how many marshals fired or how many times the man was shot.

One local official identified the victim as Brandon Webber and said he was shot several times in his family's front yard. Family members confirmed to the Daily Memphian that the 21-year-old Webber died.

In identifying Webber on Twitter early Thursday, Shelby County Commissioner and mayoral candidate Tami Sawyer said "Every life lost should matter...every single one. How many times will this be ok? It cannot continue to be."

Memphis police officers were called in to help with crowd control as word of the shooting spread on social media. As more protesters showed up, more Memphis officers and Shelby County sheriff's deputies arrived at the scene. The situation then escalated, and officers donned protective riot gear as people threw rocks and bricks. Police cars and a nearby fire station were damaged, Rallings said.

The TBI is called in to investigate police-involved shootings by district attorneys in Shelby and other counties in the state. TBI investigators then give their report to the district attorney, who will decide whether to pursue charges against officers involved.

The police director implored residents to wait until the TBI finishes its investigation before spreading possible misinformation about the shooting. "I need everyone to stay calm," Rallings said.

While police support the right of people to demonstrate, Rallings said "we will not allow any acts of violence."

Passion Anderson, a 34-year-old student, drove her 13-year-old son to the scene early Thursday, after protesters had gone and the scene had calmed down. She grew up in Memphis, but left to Ohio before moving in November to the Frayser neighborhood, a mostly low- to middle-income area north of downtown.

Anderson said she worries about her son's safety every day in Memphis which like other large cities, struggles with violent crime.

"I just want him to see this, know what's going on, to be conscious," she said from the driver's seat of her car, with her son in the passenger seat. "I fear for him all the time."


25 LEOs injured at scene of fatal Tenn. shooting

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null
Author: Duane Wolfe

Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Armed officers and an angry crowd faced off after a Tennessee man was fatally shot by U.S. Marshals in a working-class Memphis neighborhood.

People in the crowd threw rocks and bricks, with 25 officers suffering mostly minor injuries during the tense clash Wednesday night in the Frayser community in north Memphis. Officers cordoned off several blocks near the scene. By 11 p.m., officers had used tear gas and most of the crowd dispersed, police director Michael Rallings said at a Thursday morning at a news conference. Three people were arrested.

Officers on horseback patrolled the area, and lines of police cars with flashing blue lights were parked along the street. An ambulance could be seen at the outer edge of the scene. A helicopter flew overhead as police cars trickled away. Residential streets were blocked, and a heavy police presence remained in the area Thursday.

Tennessee Bureau of Investigation spokeswoman Keli McAlister said the Gulf Coast Regional Fugitive Task Force went to a Frayser home to look for a suspect with felony warrants. Marshals saw the man get into a vehicle and then proceed to ram task force vehicles several times before exiting with a weapon, McAlister said. Marshals then opened fire, killing the man who died at the scene. McAlister did not say how many marshals fired or how many times the man was shot.

One local official identified the victim as Brandon Webber and said he was shot several times in his family's front yard. Family members confirmed to the Daily Memphian that the 21-year-old Webber died.

In identifying Webber on Twitter early Thursday, Shelby County Commissioner and mayoral candidate Tami Sawyer said "Every life lost should matter...every single one. How many times will this be ok? It cannot continue to be."

Memphis police officers were called in to help with crowd control as word of the shooting spread on social media. As more protesters showed up, more Memphis officers and Shelby County sheriff's deputies arrived at the scene. The situation then escalated, and officers donned protective riot gear as people threw rocks and bricks. Police cars and a nearby fire station were damaged, Rallings said.

The TBI is called in to investigate police-involved shootings by district attorneys in Shelby and other counties in the state. TBI investigators then give their report to the district attorney, who will decide whether to pursue charges against officers involved.

The police director implored residents to wait until the TBI finishes its investigation before spreading possible misinformation about the shooting. "I need everyone to stay calm," Rallings said.

While police support the right of people to demonstrate, Rallings said "we will not allow any acts of violence."

Passion Anderson, a 34-year-old student, drove her 13-year-old son to the scene early Thursday, after protesters had gone and the scene had calmed down. She grew up in Memphis, but left to Ohio before moving in November to the Frayser neighborhood, a mostly low- to middle-income area north of downtown.

Anderson said she worries about her son's safety every day in Memphis which like other large cities, struggles with violent crime.

"I just want him to see this, know what's going on, to be conscious," she said from the driver's seat of her car, with her son in the passenger seat. "I fear for him all the time."


Deputy Uses CPR To Save Man Who Drowned While Learning to Swim

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A deputy saved a man's life by using CPR after the man was found unconscious when he accidentally slid into the deep end of the pool while learning how to swim.

Strange Details Emerge About Suspect In Fatal Shooting of Beloved Deputy

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police believe the alleged killer of Los Angeles Sheriff's Deputy Joseph Gilbert Solano -- might be responsible for another murder and a string of armed robberies.

10-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Gets to be Cincinnati’s Police Chief for a Day

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 10-year-old cancer survivor is serving as Cincinnati's police chief for the day. Blake Hegner was sworn in Tuesday morning as Cincinnati's top cop.

Baltimore Security Guard Accused of Rape Has Impersonated an Officer Before

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

More than 20 years later, Baltimore Police said Richard Barnes again pretended to be a police officer, pulling a woman over in the Charles Village neighborhood before taking her to another location where police said he raped her.

New Task Force Focused on Connecting Guns to Violent Crimes in Denver Area

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The goal of a newly-expanded law enforcement task force is to more quickly get guns off the street in the Denver metro area and arrest those pulling the trigger.

Alligator Takes a Bite Out of Louisiana Deputy’s Cruiser

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An alligator chomped on a Caddo Parish deputy’s patrol car before making an escape, authorities said Monday.

California Sheriff’s Deputy Recovering After Shootout

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Riverside County Sheriff’s deputy who was wounded in a gun battle with a man while responding to a domestic disturbance at a home near Lake Matthews in Riverside County on Tuesday was released from the hospital, authorities said Wednesday.

Body Camera Video Shows South Carolina K-9 Apprehend Suspect

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Greenville County Sheriff's Office has released video of a K-9 tracking down a wanted man.

Can VR Change How Police Respond to Mental Health Crises?

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Axon, the company that made its mark developing and selling TASERS to police departments across the country, is now getting into a new market with untapped potential for law enforcement: virtual reality.

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy Who Was Shot in the Head Dies

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Joseph Solano, who was shot in the head while off duty inside a Jack in the Box restaurant in Alhambra Monday, succumbed to his injuries Wednesday.

Bridgeport Fire Department offers second chances to firefighters with criminal records

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Program seeks to represent the full diversity of the community while giving qualified applicants a good job opportunity

Exploding vehicle struts: A hidden hazard

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five Near-Miss reports highlight unique danger present during vehicle fires

Exploding vehicle struts: A hidden hazard

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five Near-Miss reports highlight unique danger present during vehicle fires

NC county, EMS and driver sued over ambulance crash

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Graham man is suing Alamance County, Alamance County EMS and an ambulance driver for medical expenses over a crash with an ambulance in 2016

NC EMS agency, county and driver sued over ambulance crash

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Graham man is suing Alamance County, Alamance County EMS and an ambulance driver for medical expenses over a crash with an ambulance in 2016

The 7 best EMS movies of all time

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

We will be shocked if you've heard of #1

Mass. firefighter accused of walking naked into store will retire

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighter was charged with disorderly conduct after an employee at the Middletown store reported the nude customer

Pa. VFD upgrades station safety with FEMA federal grant

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The department was selected to receive $48,000 from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to eye air quality improvements at the fire hall

Iowa city EMS communication system on track

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The communication paths needed for the system have been deemed free from obstruction and the frequency coordination is at 85% completion

Ohio fire, EMS agencies rally to support boy with cancer

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Fayette Volunteer Fire Department and the Concerned Citizens of Burlington organized the community event to show support and raise funds

Ohio fire, EMS agencies rally to support boy with cancer

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Fayette Volunteer Fire Department and the Concerned Citizens of Burlington organized the community event to show support and raise funds

Calif. deputy shot in off-duty attack dies

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Stefanie Dazio Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — A Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy who was shot in an off-duty attack at a fast-food restaurant died Wednesday, the sheriff announced.

Joseph Gilbert Solano, who had been on life support, died Wednesday afternoon, Sheriff Alex Villanueva.

Medical staff worked around the clock for two days "trying to do a miracle but unfortunately that didn't come to pass," he said.

A man walked into a Jack in the Box in suburban Alhambra on Monday and shot Solano in the head as he was waiting for his food order at the counter, authorities said.

Solano was out of uniform and there's no indication that the gunman knew he was a deputy, Villanueva said.

"The deputy was alerted in the restaurant that someone was following him and that's when he turned to confront it and that's when the shooting happened," the sheriff said. "But a motive or rationale from the suspect, that's the million-dollar question."

Solano's son, girlfriend, mother and other family members were at the hospital news conference.

"He was a really good dad," said his weeping son, Matthew Solano. "Continue to pray for him and my family, please."

Rhett Nelson, 30, of St. George, Utah, was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of the killing after he called his father in Utah from a Long Beach church to say he had killed someone.

Nelson's family has said he suffers from mental illness and an opiate addiction. It wasn't immediately known if he had a lawyer who could speak on his behalf.

Investigators said Nelson also is suspected of shooting a 30-year-old man standing on a Los Angeles street about an hour before Solano was killed. Both shootings appeared unprovoked and may have been random, authorities said.

Meanwhile, the San Diego Police Department, the San Diego County Sheriff's Department and the Carlsbad Police Department issued a news release Wednesday saying that Nelson is being investigated in connection with a series of five armed robberies of convenience stores that occurred in the area June 7 through Sunday.

In each robbery, the suspect wielded a handgun and demanded cash, the release stated. The crimes occurred in San Diego, Lemon Grove and Carlsbad.

Before the possible string of crimes began, however, Nelson's family contacted St. George police on May 27 and said he'd left their Utah home "without any specific reason" with a gun but they did not think he was suicidal or a danger to anyone else, Capt. Mike Giles said.

"He made a statement to them or somehow communicated he wanted to make it on his own or die," Giles said. They formally reported him missing the next day and said they believed the gun was for self-defense. It was not immediately known who owned the weapon.

Nelson has a history of mental illness and a history of opiate abuse, though he had been clean for about six months, according to statements from his father, Bradley Nelson. The family is "devastated beyond words" by the attacks and is cooperating with authorities.

"We believe we made every effort to help Rhett and bring him home safely without harm to himself or others, but despite our best efforts we were unable to locate him before this horrific act," the statement said.

On June 4, Nelson called his family from Rancho Santa Margarita in Orange County, Giles said. They still believed he was safe and police removed him from a missing persons database the next day.

On Wednesday, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department released Nelson's booking photo as part of an effort to seek any additional victims. Homicide investigators believe he may have been involved in other crimes in California.

Giles said no recent crimes involving Nelson have been reported to St. George police.

The Salt Lake Tribune reported that Nelson didn't have a violent criminal history in Utah but had previously pleaded guilty to driving with a "measurable amount" of a controlled substance in his body and guilty to underage alcohol offenses.

Los Angeles authorities recovered a gun from Nelson's car. It was not immediately clear if it was the firearm from Utah.


Product of the Day: W.S. Darley & Co. — Darley Fire Hydrant Pressure Gauge

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Darley Fire Hydrant Pressure Gauge allows for testing pressure in the main or hydrant.

5 keys to great report writing

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.
Author: Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

No recruiting brochure ever finds room for a picture of a bleary-eyed patrol officer in the station typing police-speak into a report for half her shift.

The cops on television don’t even take notes, much less write reports – unless, of course, the script calls for one of those chaotic stationhouse scenes where pimps and druggies are being jerked around in the background as our hero taps on the old manual typewriter one finger at a time (I’m an old school "Hill Street Blues" fan).

Despite all of our digital technology, there is still no better way to tell the world what happened at three in the morning in the mud and the blood and the beer in that alley than by the written word. We have so many time-saving boxes to check that sometimes we fail to provide a healthy narrative in the press of time.

Here are a few reminders to keep motivated to make good reports.

Good Field Notes

Having a good, consistent shorthand is essential to fast note-taking. Jotting down questions (notes to self...) that come to mind during interviews and observations can keep follow-ups fresh and focused.

Clearly identifying who did and said what at a scene – officers as well as witness and suspects – should be a priority. Quick clothing descriptions (supplemented by cell phone pictures) of persons involved can be helpful.

Notes on sequence, time, and environmental conditions should be part of your written record.

Establish Elements of the Crime

Looking at the statute is the best way to establish an outline for your report. Remember that every element of the offense must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

It’s not about the big picture – it’s about the tiny details. Defense attorneys will attack the element that is least supported or the one that gives rise to the likeliest defense. Anticipating defenses is the opposite side of proving the elements.

Any of us who have watched a defense attorney take a pick axe to our case knows that crazy theories can come from left field. Contemplating their game can help us nail down loose ends in our report.

Include Exculpatory Evidence

Recent cases have crucified police officers who fail to identify and follow-up on suspects (no matter how unlikely) or who fail to include names of all officers at the scene, witnesses, and digital audio or video material.

Just as the CSI effect (jury expectations of fancy science applied to every crime scene) makes us document what we did as well as what we didn’t do in terms of evidence collection and processing, leads unchecked and persons not interviewed will be leveraged to attack the credibility of reporting officers.

Good Reports Will CYA

Covering your assets NEVER means falsifying or fudging on a report. Better to lose a case than your reputation, job, or ability to testify.

However, expect that your report will be used against you in a civil suit or on the stand to discredit you. Defense attorneys seldom have an innocent client, so they have to fabricate a guilty officer. Therefore, be diligent about describing your professional behavior as well as the behavior of others at the scene.

We all know that dash-cam video, for example, can fail to show to an uninformed viewer what is going on outside the camera lens. It can also fail to show the micro signs of pre-aggression, and it can certainly not show the reputation of the suspect or the information you know about him or her that dictated your conduct during the contact.

The same is true of a report. The reporting officer must give the reader a close-up view of the event from as many angles as possible. Don’t ever assume that readers of your report are going to give you the benefit of the doubt, ascribe good or heroic qualities to you, or even think independently in assessing your conduct.

Tell them what you need for them to know, and be as detailed as you truthfully can.

The Long Haul

It is eye-opening to chart the progress of your report as it winds through the system. You know your supervisor sees it, the prosecutor sees it, and the defense attorney sees it.

Do you think about the victim who sees it? The insurance company? The victim advocate? The defense investigator? The probation/parole officer reviewing for the pre-sentence investigation? The parole board in considering parole?

Researchers seeking data for planning, budgeting, grant funding, crime prevention, and a host of other academic pursuits may also see your report. Their conclusions then eventually become policy and legislation (academic research does affect you!).

Juries, reporters, treatment practitioners, attorneys on both sides of a civil suit, internal affairs investigators and the list could go on. This is the equivalent of your English paper being read in front of the whole class in high school...and again next year, and the year after that, and every year following for the foreseeable future.

In other words, it had better be good.

No doubt you’ll be pressured to “get back on patrol” or “let the detectives deal with it” but the long-term effects of a poor report are too substantial to ignore.

This article, originally published 11/29/2012, has been updated with current information.


Top tips for law enforcement career development

Posted on June 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

LEO Round Table host Chip DeBlock asked his guests to share their top tips on career development in law enforcement.


Texas firefighters reunite with victim after life-saving actions

Posted on June 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighters deployed two tourniquets to stop the bleeding, while at the same time working to free the victim from his vehicle

Calif. mandate requires EMTs to receive advanced training

Posted on June 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The training will enable California EMTs to administer and use naloxone, epinephrine and a glucometer, according to the California Emergency Medical Services Authority

Neb. firefighter-paramedic dies unexpectedly

Posted on June 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE,