August 19, 2019

3 ways agencies can effectively implement new technologies

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Content provided by CentralSquare Technologies via GovThink.com

By Steve Seoane for PoliceOne BrandFocus

Law enforcement personnel are exposed to high and frequent stressors every day. They undergo constant exposure to violence, traumatic situations, other people’s distress, threats to their own safety, excessive overtime, fatigue from working irregular hours and a rapid escalation of work duties – just to name a few.

Adapting to new technology should be the very last thing that adds stress to officers’ lives. Innovation in technology has been extremely beneficial to law enforcement, for example, through reduced response times, data sharing, interoperability and efficiency of administrative tasks.

However, there’s another side to the story that often gets overshadowed by the promise of shiny new tech. Technology advancements for the public safety sector all contribute to the ultimate goal of keeping both citizens and officers safe. In order for new technology to be as effective as it is designed to be, it’s instrumental that one key piece of the equation is not overlooked: the officer’s ability to use it.

Adapting to new technology can be an added strain in the already-hectic daily lives of law enforcement officials. When the use of new technology is mandated without any training or guidance, officers may feel as if too many new tools are being pushed onto them, creating an overwhelming burden just to keep up with a variety of devices. It’s important for management to remain aware of how their officers are adjusting to this new technology and do what they can to alleviate the burden of the learning process. If not properly trained and new tech is cumbersome, officers are likely to abandon the tech. This causes losses in both increased functionality and investments.

Here are three ways law enforcement agencies can help reduce the pressure officers feel from adopting new technology:

THOROUGH TRAINING

Technology meant to be helpful to law enforcement officers works only as well as the people who are using it. When properly and thoroughly trained, officers feel more confident and capable with their technological tools and are less likely to be distracted or overwhelmed during their shifts. Today, convenient on-demand training courses are often available via online and mobile applications, and can be helpful in keeping officers updated with the latest features and functionality.

REDUCED DISTRACTIONS

Being distracted is hazardous for police officers, who need to be alert and vigilant throughout their shift. If they don’t understand the technology they are using and become distracted trying to figure it out while in the field, their situational awareness is compromised. Ensure that prior to using new tech in the field, officers have the opportunity to learn about it and familiarize themselves.

STREAMLINED SYSTEMS

Communities and agencies cannot afford to have officers inhibited by outdated technology in their toolkit. Inefficiencies in their devices, especially when out in the field, increases officer frustration and stress. Software that works smarter and more intuitively can help officers focus on the matter at hand while helping them accomplish tasks faster.

Police officers have an inherently dangerous and stressful job. It’s important to make sure new technologies empower officers and first responders – and doesn’t hinder them in their day-to-day responsibilities.


New CA Law Will Require Deadly Force to be “Necessary”

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Under the new standard, prosecutors can also consider the actions both of officers and of the victim leading up to a deadly encounter, to determine whether the officer acted within the scope of law, policy and training.

Phoenix PD Implements New Gun Pointing Policy, Announces More Mental Health Training and Full Rollout of Body Cameras

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Williams said she expects the new "Pointed Gun at Person" (PGP) reports will help the department track how many times officers can de-escalate potentially deadly situations.

Memorial to victims of Boston Marathon bombing completed

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Philip Marcelo Associated Press

BOSTON — The memorial to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing is complete.

Three stone pillars representing the three people who died at the race's Boylston Street finish line were installed early Monday, marking the final step of the $2 million project, which took four years to plan and develop.

The monument was supposed to be ready least year for the fifth anniversary of the April 15, 2013, bombing but underwent significant redesigns and other delays.

Bolivian-born sculptor Pablo Eduardo said before this year's race that it was important that the final work reflect the hopes and expectations of families who lost loved ones.

The monument marks the spots where two pressure cooker bombs detonated, killing three people and wounding more than 260 others. It includes four bronze and glass spires ranging in height from about 17 feet (5 meters) to 21 feet (6 meters) that were installed last month and are meant to illuminate the site.

Cherry trees to bloom each April have also been planted, and two bronze bricks have been set in the sidewalk to honor the police officers killed in the bombing's aftermath, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Officer Sean Collier and Boston police Officer Dennis Simmonds.

The pillars installed Monday range in height from about 4 to 6 feet (1.2 to 1.8 meters) and were gathered from places around Boston significant to the bombing victims.

One representing 8-year-old Boston resident Martin Richard was taken from Franklin Park in his family's Dorchester neighborhood. Another that is fused to it honors 23-year-old Boston University graduate student Lingzi Lu and was donated by her school.

Around the base of the two pillars is an inscription etched in bronze: "Let us climb, now, the road to hope."

And the third pillar for 29-year-old Medford, Massachusetts, native Krystle Campbell comes from Spectacle Island in Boston Harbor. Its inscription reads: "All we have lost is brightly lost."

Boston is also planning a larger monument elsewhere in the city to commemorate the attack.


Off-Duty California Sheriff’s Deputy Wounded in Shooting

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A gunman opened fire into a crowd of people early Sunday morning in Turlock, wounding an off-duty sheriff’s deputy from Merced County, Sheriff Vern Warnke confirmed Monday.

Video shows Calif. LEO shoot knife-wielding man

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Nate Gartrell and John Glidden Times-Herald, Vallejo, Calif.

VALLEJO, Calif. — The city of Vallejo has released body camera footage showing an officer shooting a man who began walking toward the officer, knife in hand.

The officer, Christopher Hendrix, can be seen on the video yelling commands at the suspect, identified as 49-year-old Edward Gonzales, and even warning Gonzales he is about to be shot. Gonzales either ignores the commands or responds with profanity.

Gonzales survived the shooting, and was charged with several felonies in connection with the incident. Hendrix fired four shots, but it is unknown how many times Gonzales was struck.

It all started the afternoon of January 6, when officers Hendrix and Rashad Hollis responded to a report of Gonzales trespassing on church property. The video shows them approaching Gonzales on the 400 block of Nebraska Street. He ignores the officers commands and hops a fence, as they attempt to use a Taser on him.

From there, the officers split up. Hollis gets in his car and drives around the block, hoping to cut off Gonzales’ route, while Hendrix follows Gonzales on foot. On the video, Hendrix can be heard telling Gonzales several times “show me your hands.”

“F— you,” Gonzales responds at one point.

Later, Gonzales approaches a large gate with metal spikes, and seems to realize he is cornered. Hendrix continues to yell commands, at one point telling Gonzales, “You’re about to get shot, dude.”

A few moments later, Gonzales takes a couple steps towards Hendrix, and the officer fires four shots. Gonzales falls to the ground and throws the knife. Then Hollis shows up in his squad car, on the other side of the gate.

Vallejo interim police Chief Joe Allio said the department was releasing the video in the interests of transparency. Under a recently-passed law, SB 1421, police agencies are required to release videos of officer-involved shootings and other use of force incidents.

After being treated for his injuries, Gonzales was arrested and charged with assault with a deadly weapon on a police officer, brandishing a deadly weapon to resist or prevent arrest and trespassing.

A month after Gonzales was shot, five Vallejo officers shot 20-year-old Willie McCoy roughly 25 times, as he sat in the front seat of his car in a Taco Bell drive-thru. McCoy had apparently passed out in his car, with a stolen gun in his lap, and the officers fired 55 shots at him after he moved forward in his seat. The shooting led to increased scrutiny of the police department’s use of force, and a lawsuit by McCoy’s family asking for federal oversight of the department.

The Gonzales and McCoy shootings have been the only two officer-involved shootings in Vallejo this year. In addition to Gonzales’ shooting, have released video of McCoy being shot, as well as the 2018 fatal shooting of Ronell Foster by a Vallejo officer who was attempting to stop Foster for a minor traffic infraction.

©2019 Times-Herald (Vallejo, Calif.)


Deputies find newborn covered in ants on floorboard of van

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

LONDON, Ky. — Police in Kentucky say a mother and grandmother were arrested when deputies discovered a 16-day-old newborn covered in ants on the floorboard of their van.

News outlets report 32-year-old Rebecca Jean Fultz and 69-year-old Charolette J. Simpson were charged Thursday with criminal abuse of a child and failure to use a child restraint device.

A news release from Laurel County sheriff's office says the baby was found during a traffic stop.

The statement says deputies found the baby on the floorboard between the front seats, soiled and breathing heavy. The van didn't have a safety seat and there was no air conditioning.

The release says the baby was treated for dehydration and is in better condition.

It's unclear whether Fultz or Simpson has an attorney.


California Governor Signs Use of Force Bill

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday signed Assembly Bill 392, creating one of the toughest standards in the nation for law enforcement use-of-force.

Sister: NYPD cop who killed self had mental evaluation in June after making threats

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Anthony M. Destefano and Michael O'Keeffe Newsday

NEW YORK — The sister of an NYPD officer who shot himself to death said the department cleared her brother for duty after a June mental health evaluation — even though he regularly threatened to harm himself or others.

Eileen Echeverria of West Islip, whose brother, 25-year department veteran Robert Echeverria, 56, took his own life Wednesday night, said she asked NYPD officials at least 10 times in recent years to provide mental health assistance to her brother and take away his weapons.

“They failed him epically. … It is NYPD’s fault,” she said in an interview Thursday. “A hundred percent. I begged them so many times, please take his guns, please get him help.”

NYPD officials briefly did take Robert Echeverria's guns in June, his sister said. After a police therapist interviewed her brother two months ago and cleared him to return to duty June 19, the department gave him back his weapons, she said.

When asked specifically about the allegations, an NYPD spokesman said: “We are conducting an investigation.”

The department's Force Investigation Division is charged with investigating officer-involved shootings, including cop suicides.

Echeverria, a married father of two who lived in Laurelton, Queens, became the ninth NYPD officer to die by suicide this year and the second this week. He grew up in West Islip, his sister said, and attended West Islip High School.

After four department officers killed themselves in June, the NYPD declared a mental health crisis among the ranks and urged cops to seek help for themselves or others in distress.

“I told [the Internal Affairs Bureau] my brother was going to kill himself,” Eileen Echeverria said. “I told them my brother is on edge, and that he is going to kill himself. He’s going to kill me."

Her brother was most recently assigned to the Strategic Response Group, which responds to terrorist attacks and other incidents of civil unrest.

“The psychiatrist saw him once and then she says he’s OK and gives him his guns back,” said Echeverria, 52. “And almost two months to the day, he kills himself. What kind of doctors do they have? What kind of counseling do they have?”

NYPD Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea did not address the allegations but acknowledged the department continues to struggle with officer suicides.

“This is not unique for law enforcement," Shea said. "For us, we are hurting right now. It has been a very tough year, and from the unions to the membership, to the executives in the police department ... we are all trying as best we can to work together, to come up with initiatives to do more.”

Echeverria was off duty and at home when he shot himself Wednesday night, police sources said. He was pronounced dead at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset.

“This is not a mistake you can fix with an eraser,” said John Walsh, 28, Eileen Echevarria’s son. “This is a tremendous tragedy that could have been avoided.”

The veteran cop had an 18-year-old son and an 11-year-old daughter, his sister said. His wife, Sheila Echeverria, did not return calls for comment.

“My brother wanted to be a police officer from the time he could talk,” Eileen Echeverria said. “It was his dream.”

Early on Tuesday, NYPD Officer Johnny Rios became the eighth officer to die by suicide in 2019. Rios shot himself to death at the Yonkers home he shared with his fiancee and her children, the NYPD said.

Eileen Echeverria said her brother had struggled in recent years with severe financial and personal problems.

He had become enraged at times in the past and had threatened to harm others, she said — including her. Echeverria said she went to NYPD headquarters in lower Manhattan about seven years ago after he threatened to hurt his son.

“He was never a happy person,” she said.

Robert Echeverria also threatened to take his own life, his sister said. He once called her from a precinct house and said he was going to “eat a bullet tonight.” but she talked him out of harming himself, Eileen Echeverria said.

“I said ‘Bobby, please don’t do this, please don’t do this to our mother, please don’t do this to us,’ ” she said.

©2019 Newsday


Multi-agency, sex-sting operation targets online predators

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By W. Thomas Smith Jr.

The Richland County Sheriff’s Department (RCSD) led a successful sting operation in South Carolina, August 5-10, targeting online sexual predators – “monsters” as Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott refers to them – and those soliciting prostitution.

The sexual predator-prostitution sting was a five-day, multi-agency operation that led to the issuance of 28 warrants, including 14 arrested for prostitution, five arrested for solicitation of or sexual exploitation of a minor, and nine still at-large.

Dubbed Relentless Guardian, the operation was conducted by law enforcement officers clandestinely posing as preteen and teenage girls in Internet chat rooms and on gaming apps. The child-sex predators, also known as “travelers,” because they travel from one area to the next in search of victims – often crossing state lines – began with the predators communicating online with persons whom they believed were girls between the ages of 11 and 14.

According to RCSD officials, suspects will often share pictures of themselves or request pictures. Suspects then travel to what they believe is a young girl’s home when the child’s parents are supposedly away. The trap is then set.

“The predators won’t meet any young girls,” Lott said. “They’ll meet us. The problem is, these monsters do this as a matter of course. This is not their first time.”

Nor is Relentless Guardian the first operation led by RCSD and conducted by the South Carolina Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force. Last year, RCSD led another such-operation dubbed Full Armor in which 38 were arrested (18 persons suspected of being child predators and another 20 for prostitution).

ICAC is composed of RCSD – under the operational direction of RCSD Senior Investigator Melissa Perry – the U.S. Marshal’s Service, the U.S. Secret Service, the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security, the S.C. Attorney General’s office, the U.S. Attorney for South Carolina and other involved police departments or sheriff’s offices within the state.

During the latest operation, local agencies in addition to RCSD included the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office, the Horry County Sheriff’s Office, the York County Sheriff’s Office, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, the Bishopville Police Deptartment, the Orangeburg County Sheriff’s Office, the Aiken County Sheriff’s Office and the Mount Pleasant Police Dept.

“The FBI is involved only if suspects cross state lines,” Captain Maria Yturria said, director of RCSD’s public information office.

According to Yturria, though the FBI was not directly involved in the operation, the cases of those suspects who travelled from other states like Georgia and Florida will be turned over to federal prosecutors.

“Relentless Guardian, like operation Full Armor in July 2018, was very successful,” Lott said. “And it is still an ongoing effort.”

“Since our operation last year, ICAC has also conducted operations in Greenville, Myrtle Beach, down in the Lowcountry and elsewhere,” Yturria said.

Among those nabbed in Relentless Guardian so far are former South Carolina DOT commissioner John Hardee, who was attempting to solicit a prostitute, and former Deputy Derek Vandenham, who was immediately fired after his arrest.

“That was something that made me sick to my stomach to know that one of my deputies that I trusted and we put out here in this community was one of these monsters. This was one of the most disgusting things that I’ve had to deal with was to have a deputy do something like this,” Lott said in a press conference last week.


About the author

W. Thomas Smith Jr. is a special deputy with the Richland County Sheriff’s Dept.


NYPD Fires Officer Accused in Eric Garner’s Death

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Commissioner James O'Neill said that it was "an extremely difficult decision" to fire Officer Daniel Pantaleo.

‘Bored’ PA Volunteer Firefighter Pleads Guilty to Arsons

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A security camera caught Munhall volunteer firefighter Ryan Laubham setting two fires late last year, and he admitted to police that he did it because he was bored.

Gunman Who Ambushed LAPD Officers at Traffic Light Shot and Killed

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A gunman who ambushed officers with the Los Angeles Police Department was shot and killed by on Sunday night.

Relief Fund Set Up for Injured MO Volunteer Firefighters

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Six Vienna firefighters are recovering from second- and third-degree burns they suffered following a fire and subsequent explosion at a home last week.

Calif. governor signs law changing standard for use of deadly force

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Don Thompson Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California is changing its standards for when police can kill under a law signed Monday by Gov. Gavin Newsom, as it tries to deter police shootings of young minority men that have roiled the nation.

"We are doing something today that stretches the boundary of possibility and sends a message to people all across this country that they can do more and they can do better to meet this moment," Newsom said as he stood alongside family members of people killed by police.

The law by Democratic Assemblywoman Shirley Weber of San Diego will allow police to use lethal force only when necessary to defend against an imminent threat of death or serious injury to officers or bystanders. But lawmakers dropped an explicit definition of "necessary" that previously had said officers could use deadly force only when there is "no reasonable alternative."

One catalyst was last year's fatal shooting of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man suspected of vandalism whose death sparked major protests in the state capital and reverberated nationwide. Despite the public anger, law enforcement objections stalled the bill last year and even some supporters had reservations until it was amended in May.

The measure passed with bipartisan support after major police organizations won concessions and ended their vehement opposition.

Lawmakers also removed an explicit requirement that officers try to de-escalate confrontations. Law enforcement officials said that would have opened officers to endless second-guessing of what often are split-second life-and-death decisions.

The measure still contains the strongest language of any state, according to the American Civil Liberties Union, which proposed the bill and negotiated the changes.

Weber said the law "changes the culture of policing in California." She was joined on stage by fellow lawmakers and family members of people who have been shot by police, including Clark's family and the mother of Oscar Grant, a man killed by police officers on an Oakland train platform in 2009.

It is linked to a pending Senate bill requiring that officers be trained in ways to de-escalate confrontations, alternatives to opening fire and how to interact with people with mental illness or other issues.


3 New York Police Officers Injured by Subjects Throwing Objects from Buildings

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Three officers with the New York Police Department suffered non-life-threatening over the weekend as anti-police mobs threw objects such as glass bottles and debris at them in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of the city.

AG Barr: “We Must Have Zero Tolerance for Resisting Police”

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Attorney General William Barr said in a speech before the assembly at the Fraternal Order of Police Conference in New Orleans, "We must have zero tolerance for resisting police. This will save lives."

Sister of NYPD Officer Who Died By Suicide Says She Repeatedly Asked Department for Help

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The sister of an officer with the New York Police Department who died by suicide last week told CBS News that she repeatedly contacted the agency to warn of her brother's failing mental health.

North Carolina K-9 Struck, Killed by Car While Chasing Suspect

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A K-9 with the Greensboro (NC) Police Department was struck and killed by a car while chasing a suspect on Friday night.

Missouri Youth Football Team Choose “Thin Blue Line” Uniforms

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Harrisonville (MO) Police Department is celebrating the decision made by its local little league football team to wear uniforms representing their respect for law enforcement.

Nebraska Police Helicopter Crashes, Crewmembers Suffer Minor Injuries

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two pilots with the Omaha (NE) Police Department suffered minor injuries when the helicopter they were flying had a power loss as it was about to land.

California Sheriff’s Office to Issue Patrol Rifles to Deputies at Large-Scale Events

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office announced on Friday that some of its deputies will be armed with patrol rifles while staffing large scale events.

2 Missouri Officers Lauded for Saving Man Stabbed in New Orleans

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two officers with the Kansas City Police Department attending the National Fraternal Order of Police Convention in New Orleans rushed to the aid of a man who had been stabbed in the chest by a panhandler late last week.

Houston Motor Officer Struck, Suffers Non-Life-Threatening Injuries

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A motor officer with the Houston Police Department was struck and injured by a pickup truck on Saturday night, leaving the officer with non-life-threatening injuries.

Kansas Officer Seen Helping Woman in Wheelchair Across Busy Intersection

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Wichita Police Department was seen helping a woman in a wheelchair across a busy intersection over the weekend. Photos of the act of kindness posted to social media quickly went viral.

Police Impersonator Pulls Over Van Full of New York Detectives

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A driver used an air horn and emergency lights to pull over a van Friday in Hicksville — but it happened to be occupied by Nassau County detectives so he tried to escape by speeding off.

Texas Troopers Fatally Shoot Driver Who Pulled Gun

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Department of Public Safety troopers fatally shot a driver they said pulled a gun on them late Saturday in South Dallas, according to authorities.

Using virtual training to enhance situational awareness

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Author: Heather R. Cotter

Virtual training systems are highly customizable and are designed to provide officers dynamic, real-world training exercises that improve situational awareness and safety.

The virtual training environment can mimic an active shooter event, a use-of-force scenario and even an average daily encounter (e.g., traffic stop). Officers who participate in virtual training will gain improved situational awareness and more training experiences, so they are more prepared to respond to any type of threat regardless of its severity.

Virtual training systems allow officers to exercise in any type of threat environment. Using virtual training systems, instructors can run officers through multiple virtual training exercises and provide immediate feedback about how the officer responded during the scenario. Officers can apply the instructor feedback immediately.

Below are examples of five types of virtual training exercises instructors can use to improve an officer’s situational awareness.

1. Emerging threats

Instructors can design any type of exercise using a virtual training system. Agencies and instructors can review recent incidents and develop an exercise that mimics these real-world events. The advantage to this type of customization is that any emerging threat that is occurring can be created in the virtual training system and exercised so officers have increased situational awareness to identify the threat and are prepared to respond. This type of training gives officers an opportunity to train under simulated conditions that their fellow officers in another jurisdiction just encountered. It is an incredible way to bring relevant training to an agency that will improve situational awareness and prepare all officers to respond effectively and safely.

2. Jurisdiction specific

In addition to training officers on emerging threats that are occurring, virtual training systems also give instructors the opportunity to customize exercises based on their unique environment, jurisdictional setting and known threats. For example, a rural jurisdiction can create exercises that a single deputy or officer might have to manage before backup arrives. This jurisdiction-specific virtual training will prepare officers and improve their situational awareness for when a real-world event occurs and they’re the only resource available for a significant period of time. Similarly, mid-and-large sized agencies can also create jurisdiction-specific exercises using virtual training systems to improve officers’ situational awareness when an emergency occurs.

3. Use of force (UOF)

At any given moment, an officer is required to make critical, life-saving decisions in a matter of seconds. This level of decision-making and situational awareness is a critical function of law enforcement, and continuous training is vital. Instructors can use training systems to simulate various scenarios in which an officer will be subjected to immediate UOF decision-making. The UOF scenarios can be prescriptive or customized based on the officer’s response and de-escalation techniques. Like real-world encounters, the officer does not know how the subject will act; it will be unpredictable. Instructors can modify the virtual training exercise based on the officer’s response.

4. Emergency medical care

Officers (whether they are EMT trained or not) are often put in a position to practice emergency medicine before EMS arrives. Officers perform life-saving medical care such as CPR, bleeding control and naloxone administration. Instructors can create exercises in which an officer needs to stop the bleed, administer treatment or perform CPR. Practicing life-saving medical care requires focus on the patient, but officers will also need to maintain situational awareness to assess scene safety. Practicing these medical exercises in a simulated environment will benefit officers and the communities they serve.

Further, beyond emergency medical care, instructors can also create unique virtual training exercises for tactical medical teams to exercise in simulated high-stress environments (e.g., active shooter, mass casualty). Tactical medical teams enter hostile environments and they need impeccable situational awareness to triage and treat as many patients as possible. Virtual training systems provide the opportunity for tactical medical teams to exercise in simulated high-stress environments. The systems can be programmed to challenge the calmest emergency medical professionals.

5. Complex threats

Virtual training systems are highly customizable and allow instructors the opportunity to create complex exercise scenarios that will challenge every officer to maintain his or her situational awareness to protect the innocent and stay safe. Instructors can simulate gunfire, loud sounds, gunshot wounds, hostile subjects, active shooters and more. The duration of the exercise can also vary depending on the intensity of the scenario. An officer may only have a few seconds to respond and neutralize the threat or have several minutes to attempt to de-escalate and neutralize a dynamic threat. After running complex threat exercises, officers can receive immediate feedback for applied correction. This immediate opportunity to run the exercise again will demonstrate improved situational awareness, which will increase officer safety and survivability.

Conclusion

Whether an agency is in the process of selecting new recruits, evaluating officers for potential promotion, or establishing fit-for-duty baselines, virtual training systems give agencies the opportunity to simulate low, medium and high-stress scenarios. Virtual training systems provide efficient and realistic training coupled with the chance for immediate behavioral correction. Continually exercising scenarios in a virtual environment will help improve officers’ situational awareness and manage their stress levels as dynamics change. Officers who participate in virtual training improve their situational awareness, their training and their preparedness for real-world events. Even the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is examining virtual training systems for public safety. Agencies and companies will benefit from this research.


NYPD Commissioner Announces Decision to Fire Officer Over Chokehold Death

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill announced Monday that he is firing Officer Daniel Pantaleo.

NYPD fires officer for 2014 death of Eric Garner

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Author: Heather R. Cotter

Associated Press

NEW YORK — After five years of investigations and protests, a New York City police officer has been fired for the chokehold death of an unarmed black man.

Police commissioner James O'Neill announced Monday that he has fired Officer Daniel Pantaleo based on a recent recommendation of a department disciplinary judge.

Pantaleo is the officer who was recorded on video wrestling Eric Garner to the ground in 2014, with his arm wrapped tightly around Garner's neck.

Garner's dying words of "I can't breathe" became a flash point in a national debate over race and police use of force.

Pantaleo's lawyer has said the officer used a reasonable amount of force and didn't mean to hurt Garner.

A state grand jury declined to indict Pantaleo. Federal authorities announced last month that they wouldn't bring civil rights charges.


Police: Man accused of threat to Jewish center arrested

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Author: Heather R. Cotter

Associated Press

NEW MIDDLETOWN, Ohio — Police say a man accused of making what they believe was a threat to a Jewish center in Ohio on Instagram has been arrested on telecommunications harassment and aggravated menacing charges.

New Middletown police say they arrested 20-year-old James Reardon, Jr., at his home Saturday in the Mahoning County village. WKBN-TV reports Police Chief Vincent D'Egidio said Reardon allegedly posted a video last month of a man shooting a semi-automatic rifle with the caption: "Police identified the Youngstown Jewish Family Community shooter as local white nationalist Seamus O'Rearedon."

Reardon is scheduled to be arraigned Monday by video in Struthers Municipal Court.

The post tagged the Jewish Community Center of Youngstown. Authorities say the Instagram account was Reardon's.

Police said rounds of ammunition, semi-automatic weapons and anti-Semitic information were found at his house.

It couldn't be determined whether Reardon has an attorney.

Andy Lipkin, Youngstown Area Jewish Federation's executive vice president, said they were aware of the incident and were working with police.

"I want to stress that we know of no other threat to the Jewish Community or to any of our agencies at this point it time," he said in a statement posted on the organization's website. "Nonetheless, I have directed that we maintain the additional level of security for the near future."


Injured NY Firefighter Trapped in Attic Fire Sues FD

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In his lawsuit against the Buffalo Fire Department, Eric Whitehead claims he was left behind in a burning attic when a fellow firefighter evacuated the house.

FL Search Continues for Missing FFs Who Went Boating

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Agencies and volunteers have searched nearly 25,000 square miles off Port Canaveral for Jacksonville firefighter Brian McCluney and Virginia firefighter Justin Walker

CO Firefighters Tackle Arson Suspect Allegedly in the Act

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Longmont crews were responding to a blaze at a home supply store when they discovered the man allegedly setting more fires while inside the burning building.

Why Make the Switch to SURE-GRIP?

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Zico SURE-GRIP Tool Mounts utilize time-tested, all-weather hook & loop straps for a greater surface area and a stronger, tighter, and more “true” grip on all of your tools, no matter the handle shape. Operation is simple—just loose the strap...

Firefighters Suffer Minor Injuries in 3-Alarm NH Blaze

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A resident was treated at the scene for minor burns, and Nashau crews rescued a cat during a large house fire Sunday.

Photos: NTOA 36th Annual Law Enforcement Operations Conference and Trade Show

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Photos: NTOA 36th Annual Law Enforcement Operations Conference and Trade ShowThe National Tactical Officers Association’s 36th Annual Law Enforcement Operations Conference and Trade Show is being held in Orlando this week.

NY Volunteer Firefighter in Two-Vehicle Crash

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Seneca Falls police said a Junius volunteer firefighter hit another vehicle while responding to a call, but his apparatus wasn't properly equipped at the time.

New 70-Foot Quint Delivered to Rome, GA, Fire Dept.

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rome, GA, Fire Department has taken delivery of a 70-foot quint built by Sutphen Fire.

Firefighters Face New Health Risks Battling CA Wildfires

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

As development hits California’s mountains and forests, wildfire crews not equipped with bulky protective gear are dealing with carcinogens common in urban blazes.

Eight PA Firefighters Hurt in 3-Alarm House Fire

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two people who were trapped inside the burning Washington Township home Sunday night also were injured and taken to the hospital.

NYPD Officers Rescue Woman In Hudson River

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two NYPD officers jumped into action Sunday after a woman ended up in the Hudson River off Pier 62.

NYPD Officers Rescue Woman In Hudson River

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two NYPD officers jumped into action Sunday after a woman ended up in the Hudson River off Pier 62.

Florida Police Make Arrest In 36-Year-Old Rape Case

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man accused of raping a Coral Springs woman has been charged 36 years after the crime occurred.

Florida Police Make Arrest In 36-Year-Old Rape Case

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man accused of raping a Coral Springs woman has been charged 36 years after the crime occurred.

New Park Dedicated to Fallen Colorado Sheriff’s Deputy Opens

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Saturday in Castle Rock was a great day to spend some time outdoors. Even better if spent at a brand new park dedicated to a Douglas County deputy who lost his life in the line of duty.

Report: NYPD Denied All ICE Requests Over 1-Year Period

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The NYPD rejected all requests from the feds to detain immigrants in custody over a one-year period, new data shows.

Officers Arrest At Least 13 People During Portland Protests

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police in riot gear largely managed to keep the right-wing Proud Boys and their supporters apart from the counter-protesters, although sporadic clashes continued across the city late in the day.

Woman Credited With Leading Deputies to Potential Mass Shooter

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Florida woman whose ex-boyfriend texted saying he wanted to "break a world record for longest confirmed kill ever," and, "a good 100 kills would be nice" is being hailed as a hero for reporting the missives, leading to his arrest.

Brothers Accused of Firebombing Atlanta Police Officer’s Home

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police have arrested two suspected crack dealers accused of ordering the firebombing of an Atlanta police officer’s home in June.

Man in Custody in Suspicious Device Scare at NYC Subway Station

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 26-year-old homeless man is facing charges after allegedly leaving suspicious packages on a Manhattan street and at a subway station Friday morning, sparking an evacuation and snarling service for hours.

Suspect Charged in Shooting of Missouri Trooper and Deputy

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

James D. Cummings has been charged with the shooting of a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper and a Carter County Sheriff's deputy on Friday.

Suspect in Shooting of Six Philadelphia Police Officers Charged With Attempted Murder

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Attempted murder charges were filed on Saturday against Maurice Hill for allegedly shooting six Philadelphia police officers during a dramatic 7 1/2-hour standoff last Wednesday.

Tenn. firefighter-paramedic dies while off-duty

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Grant Langer, 23, served with the Memphis Fire Department for two years

Tenn. firefighter-paramedic dies while off-duty

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Grant Langer, 23, served with the Memphis Fire Department for two years

Tenn. firefighter-paramedic dies while off-duty

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Grant Langer, 23, served with the Memphis Fire Department for two years

Firefighter sues Buffalo Fire Department, saying he was left behind in burning attic

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Eric Whitehead sued the fire department for "negligence, carelessness and recklessness" and violating its procedures and practices when fighting the fire

9 people injured in Pa. when lightning strikes tree causing it to fall on tent

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nine people, including children, were transported to the hospital with back and head injuries, as well as cuts and bruises

9 injured in Pa. after tree falls on tent due to lightning strike

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nine people, including children, were transported to the hospital with back and head injuries, as well as cuts and bruises

9 injured in Pa. after tree falls on tent due to lightning strike

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nine people, including children, were transported to the hospital with back and head injuries, as well as cuts and bruises

9 injured in Pa. after tree falls on tent due to lightning strike

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Nine people, including children, were transported to the hospital with back and head injuries, as well as cuts and bruises

Missing Calif. EMT found deceased

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A preliminary investigation suggests that he "may have fallen in the steep and rocky terrain" during his five-day solo hiking trip in the mountains

Search continues off the Fla. coast for 2 missing firefighters

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies searched about 24,000 square miles looking for the missing boaters

Search continues off Fla. coast for 2 missing firefighters

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies searched about 24,000 square miles looking for the missing boaters

Search continues off Fla. coast for 2 missing firefighters

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies searched about 24,000 square miles looking for the missing boaters

Vehicle fire dangers: Burning pickup rolls into fire apparatus

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Video underscores the importance of proper apparatus positioning and wheel chocking

Excessive 911 calls to Tenn. fire department shows gap in resources

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jeffery Henson, 57, lives with a genetic neurodegenerative disease and called the fire department more than 90 times in one month

Excessive 911 calls to Tenn. fire department shows gap in resources

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jeffery Henson, 57, lives with a genetic neurodegenerative disease and called the fire department more than 90 times in one month

Excessive 911 calls to Tenn. fire department shows gap in resources

Posted on August 19, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jeffery Henson, 57, lives with a genetic neurodegenerative disease and called the fire department more than 90 times in one month

3 Texas firefighters injured in fire apparatus rollover crash

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two firefighters were rescued by civilians but a third suffered critical injuries from being stuck under the apparatus

Judge orders Heather Locklear to residential treatment for 2018 assault of first responders

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Heather Locklear faced five counts of battery on an officer, one count of battery on emergency personnel and two counts of resisting, obstructing or delaying an officer

Heather Locklear ordered to residential treatment for 2018 first responder assault

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Heather Locklear faced five counts of battery on an officer, one count of battery on emergency personnel and two counts of resisting, obstructing or delaying an officer

Small plane crashes into NY home, causing massive fire

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Authorities said two people are dead, three are injured and one is still missing following the Cessna’s crash into the home

Grant applications struggles: How to describe our department and area coverage

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When struggling to find the words, think about how you talk to fellow firefighters and focus on the basics

Austin paramedic leads efforts in homeless outreach program

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Amber Price said seeing the same people make the same mistakes made her want to find ways to help people beyond rushing to them in an ambulance

8 firefighters, 2 residents hospitalized after garage fire spreads into Pa. home

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighters entered the home “with virtually no firefighting equipment available at the time” to save a resident trapped inside the home

TX Firefighter Critically Injured in Apparatus Rollover

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Huntsville firefighter's head and hand were stuck under the apparatus following a rear-end crash that also trapped two other firefighters.

KS Blast in 1959 Killing MO Firefighters Spurred Changes

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Kansas City gasoline tank explosion that killed six people, including five Missouri firefighters, led to safety improvements to better protect the public and future crews.

IL Fire Station May Close over FFs Union’s Objections

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Edwardsville officials are considering closing the fire department's Montclair station, as well as eliminating two firefighter/paramedic positions.

Watch DC Crews Make Kennedy Center Elevator Rescue

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two adults and a child were pulled up to safety by the District of Columbia's technical rescue team after the elevator they were in stalled 30 feet below the entrance.

Philadelphia standoff suspect charged with attempted murder

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — A man suspected of shooting six police officers during an hourslong standoff that ended when tear gas caused the man to surrender was charged with attempted murder.

Authorities have said that the criminal background of suspect Maurice Hill should have prevented him from legally owning the firepower used during the standoff that lasted deep into the night.

Court documents indicate that Maurice Hill, 36, faces multiple counts of attempted murder, aggravated assault, assault on a law enforcement officer, and reckless endangering. He was denied bail. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Sept. 5.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that at Saturday's video arraignment, Hill sat with arms crossed and head down, responding "I guess" when asked whether he understood the charges.

"I am not an immediate danger," he said after a prosecutor argued for denial of bail. A message was left with Hill's attorney seeking comment.

Hill had at least a semi-automatic rifle and a handgun when he opened fire Wednesday afternoon on officers serving a drug warrant, authorities said.

His record includes multiple arrests in Philadelphia and adjacent Delaware County between 2001 and 2012, according to online records.

Hill's criminal convictions include assault, perjury, fleeing and eluding, escape and weapons offenses.

He served two stints in state prisons — three, counting a return for a probation violation. He was sentenced to 55 months in federal prison term over a pair of convictions for being a felon in possession of firearms.

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross has expressed amazement that the standoff ended with no one dead and no life-threatening injuries, despite the gunman firing over 100 rounds.

The six officers who were struck by gunfire were released after being treated at hospitals Wednesday night.

Four other men were charged with drug offenses in connection with the standoff; two were trapped in the house along with the gunman and two Philadelphia police officers, the Inquirer reported.

Hill's lawyer, Shaka Johnson, said Hill called him during the standoff asking for help surrendering. Johnson then called Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner, and they patched in both Hill and the police commissioner, according to Krasner.

Hill told Johnson he wanted to make it out alive to see his newborn daughter and teenage son again.


NYC subway scare suspect taken into custody

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Michael R. Sisak and Jennifer Peltz Associated Press

NEW YORK — Bail has been set at $200,000 for a homeless man from West Virginia who was charged with placing two devices that looked like pressure cookers in a New York City subway station.

The bail was set Sunday when Larry Kenton Griffin II of Bruno, West Virginia, appeared in Manhattan Criminal Court.

A message seeking comment was left with a lawyer for Griffin.

Griffin was scheduled to return to court Friday.

His bail was set by Criminal Court Judge Keisha Espinal two days after Friday morning's commute was disrupted by a police investigation that began after two large cooking pots were spotted at Manhattan's Fulton subway station.

The 26-year-old Griffin was charged with two counts of placing a false bomb. He was arrested Saturday in the Bronx.


13 people arrested at Portland protest

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Gillian Flaccus Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — Hundreds of far-right protesters and anti-fascist counter-demonstrators swarmed downtown Portland, Oregon, on Saturday for a long-hyped rally that attracted President Donald Trump's attention and resulted in at least 13 arrests.

Police seized metal poles, bear spray and other weapons and closed bridges and streets to try to keep the rival groups apart. They were largely successful. Six minor injuries were reported.

"This was a dynamic event with demonstrators frequently moving from one part of the city to another," Mayor Ted Wheeler said at an evening news conference.

Leaders of the right-wing groups vowed to return to Portland, saying they would keep coming back to the liberal West Coast city so long as the left-wing antifascists, known as antifa, groups remained active.

President Donald Trump weighed in early Saturday, writing on Twitter that "Portland is being watched very closely... Hopefully the Mayor will be able to properly do his job."

He also wrote that "major consideration is being given to naming ANTIFA an 'ORGANIZATION of TERROR.'" It wasn't immediately clear what he meant by that because there's no mechanism for the United States government to declare a domestic organization a terror group.

Joe Biggs, the organizer of the right-wing gathering, said it was a success.

"Go look at President Trump's Twitter," he told The Oregonian/OregonLive. "He talked about Portland, said he's watching antifa. That's all we wanted,"

At the evening news conference Portland's mayor said Biggs was not welcome. "We do not want him here in my city. Period," Wheeler said.

Wheeler tied the demonstrations to "a rising white nationalist movement" and a growing sense of fear in the country.

"We're certainly seeing that play out," he said. "Portland being a very progressive community is always going to be at or near ground zero of this battle."

The events began late Saturday morning. Flag-waving members of the Proud Boys, Three Percenters militia group and others gathered downtown, some wearing body armor and helmets like the antifa protesters. Police said they had seized the weapons, including shields, from multiple groups as they assembled along the Willamette River, which runs through the city.

More than two dozen local, state and federal law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, were in the city for the right-wing rally. Portland Police said all of the city's 1,000 officers would be on duty for the gathering that was hyped on social media and elsewhere for weeks.

As of early afternoon, most of the right-wing groups had left the area via a downtown bridge. Police used officers on bikes and in riot gear to keep black-clad, mask-wearing anti-fascist protesters from following them.

But hundreds of people remained downtown and on nearby streets, and there were skirmishes throughout the day. Police declared a gathering of mostly left-wing protesters near Pioneer Courthouse Square a "civil disturbance" and told people to leave.

Police spokeswoman Lt. Tina Jones at one point said there were about 1,200 on the streets, but that number fell throughout the day.

The self-described anti-fascists had vowed to confront the right-wing rally, while leaders from the far right urged their followers to turn out in large numbers to protest the arrests of six members of right-wing groups in the run-up to the event.

Patriot Prayer's Joey Gibson, who organized similar rallies in 2017 and 2018 that erupted in clashes, surrendered Friday on an arrest warrant for felony rioting. He was at a confrontation that broke out on May 1 outside a bar where antifa members had gathered after a May Day demonstration.

In a video he livestreamed on Facebook, Gibson accused the police of playing politics by arresting him but not the masked demonstrators who beat up conservative blogger Andy Ngo at a June 29 rally that drew national attention.

A video of that attack went viral and led the Proud Boys, who have been designated a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, to organize Saturday's event.

Police continue to investigate several incidents from clashes on May 1 and June 29 and are politically neutral, Jones said.

Authorities had asked residents not to call 911 Saturday unless it's a life-threatening emergency and to stay away from the heart of downtown.

Portland Police Chief Danielle Outlaw said authorities tried to keep everyone safe and allow people to exercise their free speech rights during the rallies.

"Today was a long and arduous day," Outlaw said at the news conference. "The disruptions were held to a very small area of downtown Portland."


NY Twin-Engine Plane Crash Kills Two

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The aircraft, which was headed to Republic Airport in East Farmingdale, crashed into a LaGrangeville house, killing the pilot and an occupant in the home.

Watch OH Firefighter Rescue Cat from House Fire

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Three cats were pulled from a burning home by Lancaster crews, and one firefighter's helmet camera captured the smoke-filled scene inside the residence.

Fire & EMS Chief

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Almira Township Fire & EMS in Lake Ann, MI, is accepting applications for a department chief.

FL Firefighters Learn Basics of Driverless Shuttles

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Members of the Jacksonville Fire Department were shown the ins and outs of the autonomous vehicles, as well as finding out how to deal with them in emergencies.

Labor Board Sides with IL Firefighters Against City

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Peoria's firefighters union accused the city of unfair labor practices stemming from "brownouts" in 2017 that were conducted to make up for budgetary shortfall.

FL Agencies Searching for Firefighters Who Went Fishing

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jacksonville firefighter Brian McCluney and Virginia firefighter Justin Walker set off in a boat Friday afternoon in Port Canaveral and did not return.

Pittsburgh Firefighters Injured Battling 5-Alarm Blaze

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A massive apartment complex fire in Pittsburgh's West Oakland neighborhood displaced nearly 75 residents, and it took crews close to three hours to get under control.

Paramedic pinned by car at NC Walmart parking lot airlifted to hospital

Posted on August 18, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A paramedic got out of an ambulance and a Mustang accelerated forward and pinned the paramedic against the ambulance

Ill. state labor board sides with firefighters in lawsuit

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Illinois Labor Relations Board upheld a decision that found City Hall didn't respond in time to the union's unfair labor practice accusations

Ill. state labor board sides with firefighters in lawsuit

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Illinois Labor Relations Board upheld a decision that found City Hall didn't respond in time to the union's unfair labor practice accusations

Ala. city council to vote on ambulance service ordinance

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The new ordinance features financial penalties of up to $20,000 for failure to meet response time requirements and a $2 million insurance bond requirement

Search and rescue efforts underway for missing Fla. FFs who went fishing

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

JFRD's Brian McCluney and Norfolk's Justin Walker were last seen leaving the boat ramp Friday in a 24-foot center console boat

Search and rescue efforts underway for missing Fla. FFs who went fishing

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

JFRD's Brian McCluney and Norfolk's Justin Walker were last seen leaving the boat ramp Friday in a 24-foot center console boat

EMT missing after 5-day solo hiking trip in Northern California

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Twelve search and rescue teams were deployed to continue the search for Daniel Komins, who has not been heard from since August 11

2 Pittsburgh firefighters injured in 5-alarm apartment fire

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two firefighters were transported to the hospital after sustaining injuries battling a five-alarm apartment fire in Pittsburgh

Possible Health Benefits Cuts Alarm CA Firefighters

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sacramento's fire union is worried a new contract with the city, set for binding arbitration in November, could reduce or eliminate health benefits for current and retired firefighters.

CA Fire District to Add Two-Member Rescue Squads

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The squads would help the stretched-thin East Contra Costa Fire Protection District address Brentwood's growth and assist firefighters on calls as needed.

FDNY Crews Rescue Resident from Bronx Fire

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two people were taken to the hospital with severe burns from a blaze that spread through a three-story house early Saturday.

Six OH Firefighters Put on Administrative Leave

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Sullivan firefighters are accused of offenses such as "derogatory" online comments and "insubordination." But a city official said the move "crippled" the department.

FL Firefighter Suing over Denied Cancer Benefits

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

St. Petersburg Fire Lt. Jason Francis says his benefits claim was wrongly rejected by the city after he was diagnosed with thyroid cancer earlier this year.

Special Act Lets MA Fire Chief Stay Past Retirement Age

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The state legislative measure allows Plymouth Fire Chief Ed Bradley to keep running the department until he turns 67 in April 2022.

No Charges Expected Against Ex-OH Firefighter

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The former Mad River Township fire lieutenant faced two sexual misconduct complaints while working at the Bethel Township Fire Department.

OH Firefighters Battle Multi-Alarm Cabinet Company Fire

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The blaze at the Mil Tech building in Columbus and quickly burned through the roof of the structure Friday night, but no injuries were reported.

LA Firefighter Killed in Crash on Way to Work

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Zachary firefighter Douglas Glass suffered fatal injuries after hitting a tree limb hanging across the road. "It's a terrible loss for the Zachary Fire Department," his chief said.

Police: Man paid in cash, cocaine to firebomb officer’s home

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

ATLANTA — Police in Georgia have arrested a pair of brothers accused of paying another man in cash and cocaine to throw a firebomb through the window of an Atlanta police officer's home.

News outlets report the arrests of 35-year-old Wesley Wise and 30-year-old Quinton Wise were announced Thursday.

Atlanta police Maj. Michael O'Connor says the brothers paid a man $50 in cash and $100 worth of cocaine to set the fire June 26. The officer wasn't home at the time.

O'Connor says police plan to arrest the man who threw the incendiary device.

O'Connor says the brothers had a sizable drug operation and didn't want a police officer living on their street.

It's unclear whether either man had an attorney who could comment on their behalf.


School leader criticized over campus security after massacre

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Terry Spencer Associated Press

SUNRISE, Fla. — Members of the commission investigating last year's Florida high school massacre ripped into the district's superintendent Thursday, saying he's not doing enough to assure campus security, particularly at charter schools.

Members of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission told Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie it's unacceptable that up to 29 charter schools recently reported they have no long-term plan for having an armed guard on campus as required by law. The schools had temporary guards when the school year opened Wednesday, but some only have short-term contracts with the sheriff's office and deputies are guarding others without a contract.

The commission said some charter schools in Broward County didn't have an armed guard on campus throughout the day during the last school year. Those schools argued that under the state law adopted weeks after the Feb. 14, 2018, shooting that killed 17 that an armed guard had to be "assigned" to the school. They argued that "assigned" meant a guard had to be named for each school, but didn't always have to be on campus. The Legislature changed the wording earlier this year to make it clear that an armed guard must be present throughout the school day.

Charter schools are publicly funded, but mostly operate independent of the district. They have their own boards, set their own policies and hire their own employees, but must make reports to the superintendent. The district board can revoke a school's charter if it doesn't abide by state rules, but the state can overrule that decision. There are almost 100 charter schools in Broward County.

Commissioners told Runcie that a year ago he should have publicly shamed the charter schools that used "semantics" to get around the rule requiring armed guards and threatened them with closure. They said he should be doing the same now with charter schools that don't have a long-term security arrangement with the sheriff or a police department. The 15-member commission is composed of law enforcement, education and mental health professionals, a legislator and the fathers of two students slain in the shooting in Parkland.

"What happened to a sense of urgency?" Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said. "In my world, we would have been repairing whatever went horribly wrong...starting on Feb. 15, 2018. We are here 18 months later, after the kids have already been denied a safe school officer on their campus for an entire year, and people are freaked out because we are going to call them out."

Ryan Petty, whose 14-year-old daughter Alaina died in the shooting, said, parents "expect the leaders in this county to do their jobs and when they don't there is a heavy price to pay."

Runcie told commissioners he is hamstrung because there is no law requiring charter schools have a long-term contract for armed guards, only that they have a guard present when open.

He said 28 of the 29 with no long-term plan met that requirement when they opened Wednesday and that he will ask the county board next week to revoke the charter of the one that didn't. Much to the consternation of Judd and other commissioners, Runcie refused to name that school publicly because he feared a gunman could target it while it remains open.

"I have got to operate on policies and the direction I get from the school board," Runcie said. He said if the state department of education says not having a long-term security plan is grounds for closure, "we will add a bunch to the list."


Minn. paramedic utlizes magic for pediatric emergency calls

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ivan Mazurkiewicz performs magic tricks for his youngest patients as a way to calm them down and make their ride to the hospital less stressful

Woman accused of stabbing Boston EMT not competent for trial

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The EMT was stabbed seven times in the abdomen and legs and a second EMT driving the ambulance was pepper-sprayed

Huge wildfires in the Arctic and far North send a planetary warning

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Researchers are finding that wildfires are too frequent, intense and severe, and are pouring more carbon into the atmosphere

La. firefighter dies in vehicle crash on his way to work

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Zachary Fire Chief Danny Kimble said the firefighter was on his way to work, driving his normal route when his personal vehicle struck a tree limb

Minn. paramedic utilizes magic during pediatric emergency calls

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ivan Mazurkiewicz performs magic tricks for his youngest patients as a way to calm them down and make their ride to the hospital less stressful

Huge wildfires in the Arctic and far North send a planetary warning

Posted on August 17, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Researchers are finding that wildfires are too frequent, intense and severe, and are pouring more carbon into the atmosphere

Md. medic unit involved in crash while transporting patient

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An Anne Arundel County medic unit was transporting a patient with serious injuries sustained in an earlier vehicle crash

Md. medic unit involved in crash while transporting patient

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An Anne Arundel County medic unit was transporting a patient with serious injuries sustained in an earlier vehicle crash

Man suspected of shooting Mo. deputy, trooper surrenders after standoff

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

VAN BUREN, Mo. — Authorities say a man suspected of shooting and wounding two law enforcement officers has surrendered after a seven-hour standoff in southern Missouri.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol announced around 5 p.m. Friday in a Tweet that the standoff had ended.

Patrol Cpl. Dallas Thompson says it began when gunfire erupted as two troopers and a Carter County deputy were approaching a home to serve an eviction notice. The deputy, who was hit in the leg, groin and chest, was pulled to safety by one of the troopers. He was flown to St. Louis for treatment for injuries that aren't considered life-threatening.

The other trooper was shot in the shoulder and his bulletproof vest and was released from a hospital after receiving treatment.

The shooting came two days after six Philadelphia police officers were shot and wounded during a standoff.


Framework for law enforcement responses to people with mental health needs

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Office of Justice Programs' National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Author: The Office of Justice Programs' National Institute of Justice (NIJ)

By Becky Lewis TechBeat Magazine

As law enforcement officers and agencies respond to an increasing number of calls for individuals experiencing mental health and emotional crises, they continue to become more aware of a need for increased and improved training and response protocols.

Agencies that recognize that need, but want a roadmap of where to start, can find help in Police-Mental Health Collaborations: A Framework for Implementing Effective Law Enforcement Responses for People Who Have Mental Health Needs, a new online publication from the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center.

Produced with funding from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the framework is based on six key questions:

    Is our leadership committed? Do we have clear policies and procedures to respond to people who have mental health needs? Do we provide staff with quality mental health and stabilization training? Does the community have a full array of mental health services and supports for people who have mental health needs? Do we collect and analyze data to measure the police-mental health collaborations (PMHCs) against the four key outcomes? Do we have a formal and ongoing process for reviewing and improving performance?

Each question addresses “why it matters and what it looks like,” with an illustrative case study.

According to Terence Lynn, Deputy Division Director, Law Enforcement, at the CSG Justice Center, the framework helps communities build more comprehensive efforts and adapt them to the scale needed for that jurisdiction with a focus on four key outcomes that allow agencies to see if their efforts are succeeding:

Increased connections to resources; Reduced repeat encounters with law enforcement; Minimized arrests; Reduced use of force in encounters with people who have mental health needs.

“It allows agencies to assess what they’ve implemented and look for areas that need improvement. The Framework also helps with developing new training and addressing specific issues,” Lynn says. “Law enforcement and community health agencies tend to act as stand-alone entities, and they’re interacting with the same individuals and issues. The Framework helps agencies that may not even know each other exists begin a conversation about forging partnerships so that everybody benefits.”

He adds that in addition to providing a starting point for agencies, it also allows those who have some efforts in place to assess what they’re doing and where they’re going. Several of those agencies helped with the development of the framework content, contributing feedback to the case studies featured after each section.

Lynn explains that the CSG Justice Center has established a network of law enforcement and mental health learning sites that work on improving responses to individuals experiencing mental and emotional crises. These learning sites come from a variety of geographical and demographical locations, with some of them contributing case studies to the framework. The agencies included in the case studies are in Los Angeles, Houston, Tucson, Arlington (Mass.), Salt Lake City and the University of Florida.

Lynn says now that the Framework has been released, the next steps call for piloting its use with several communities, then generating data to show its usefulness. The CSG Justice Center also wants to promote it to the field through webinars and conferencing.

“We’ll be doing a presentation at the International Association of Chiefs of Police annual conference in October, in partnership with BJA, to discuss the framework and its positive outcomes and benefits. We’ll be doing that at other national conferences and law enforcement behavioral health conferences as well,” Lynn says. “And there’s just being engaged in conversation with learning sites and hearing about what’s going on in the field. Our goal is to help them understand how data can help determine if they’re moving the needle and having a positive impact, and using that information to help inform their decision-making. They’re excited that the framework is in existence, and I think it will be a valuable source of information to help their efforts.”

Download Police-Mental Health Collaborations: A Framework for Implementing Effective Law Enforcement Responses for People Who Have Mental Health Needs here.


Six MO Firefighters Injured after House Blast

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The injured Vienna firefighters suffered second- and third-degree burns while they were responding to a residential fire that resulted in an explosion Friday.

Why police agencies need to share their good deeds

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Policing Matters Podcast
Author: Policing Matters Podcast

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

In mid-July, several acts of police heroism in which an officer saved the life of an infant or a toddler made headlines in the span of just a couple of days. This might lead one to conclude that there was a sudden uptick in such actions, but that conclusion would be inaccurate. The only uptick was in the media's coverage of those events.

In this podcast segment, Jim and Doug discuss the fact that police heroics happen every day, and talk about the increasing need for police agencies to proactively tell those stories to counter the seemingly ongoing anti-police rhetoric in the public discourse.

LEARN MORE

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Why your police department needs a brand


Do police officers have a legal obligation to use de-escalation tactics?

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Mike Ranalli

De-escalation tactics, an essential tool for patrol officers, are often portrayed as the singular answer to reducing police use of force. Many critics have come to expect law enforcement to use de-escalation in nearly every encounter – assigning a simple solution to a complicated problem. But law enforcement encounters are not straightforward and are often particularly challenging when involving people with mental health issues or those who are otherwise emotionally disturbed.

Dr. Bill Lewinski of the Force Science Institute distinguishes between conflict communications and crisis communications. In general, conflict communications are used on criminal suspects, while crisis communications – tactics we associate with de-escalation – are used on noncriminal subjects, including persons in crisis.

As Lewinski notes, it’s not that simple. The proper opportunity (limited risk to innocent people or officers) is necessary for de-escalation to be successful. De-escalation is particularly applicable to persons in crisis situations with limited risk. It should be noted a person who is in a severe emotional crisis or state of “excited delirium” may not be able to comprehend or even hear attempts at de-escalation, which is based on a capacity for communication. Therefore, the situation could exceed the limited risk necessary for effective de-escalation.

So that brings us to the question: Do police officers have a legal obligation (putting aside the moral or practical aspects for now) to use de-escalation tactics in certain circumstances? The answer is, generally, no. But as with most things we do in law enforcement, it’s more complicated. Following are three court cases that may help officers understand when it would be appropriate to attempt de-escalation. These cases are presented for illustrative purposes only. You should check with your legal advisor regarding binding case law in your jurisdiction.

Roell v. Hamilton

Gary Roell suffered from chronic mental illness. Officers were called to his neighbor’s condo when Roell threw a flower pot through a window and threatened the neighbor. When deputies arrived, Roell was half-naked and appeared to be in a state of excited delirium. Holding a hose with a metal nozzle, he turned and charged toward the deputies. After Roell ignored repeated commands to stop, the deputies struggled with Roell, issuing several commands and warnings and firing their TASER devices. Eventually, they were able to get him handcuffed and in leg shackles (which they placed after Roell kicked a deputy in the groin). Roell went limp and began to snore, waking twice to struggle again. When deputies checked him, they found no pulse. He was pronounced dead shortly thereafter.

When Roell’s widow sued, the court found in favor of the officers, delivering a key ruling relating to the legal obligation for de-escalation: Officers are not prohibited from using force on a person in crisis. Specifically, the court noted, “No caselaw prohibits officers from using any physical force against a person first attempting alternative de-escalation techniques … Resistance that was probably used by excited delirium does not preclude officers from using a reasonable amount of force to bring a person under control.”

In fact, the courts have a history, under Graham v. Connor, of not requiring officers to use or even consider the least intrusive means available, if the force used was objectively reasonable. Put another way: Objective reasonableness does not require a culpable mental state from the person causing risk.

Doerle v. Rutherford

Officer Greg Rutherford was a member of a Special Incident Response Team called to Richard Doerle’s house when Doerle began behaving erratically and aggressively and threatening suicide. Doerle was under the influence of alcohol and prescription medications. Officers had established a perimeter and Doerle was remaining within it. He had not threatened anyone or committed any crimes. Some 30 to 40 minutes after arriving on scene, Rutherford entered the perimeter to “reconnoiter closer to Deorle.” Rutherford then shot Doerle with a less-lethal “beanbag round” as Doerle walked toward him, unarmed. Doerle suffered serious injuries and sued for excessive force.

The court agreed the force used was excessive and denied Rutherford qualified immunity. This ruling points to how courts will analyze the reasonableness of force used on a person in crisis. This is a second key legal issue when considering whether de-escalation should be attempted: There is a difference between a criminal suspect and a person in crisis. Courts do not provide a per se rule or formal definition of the two but they do acknowledge a distinction. The Doerle court noted, “Even when an emotionally disturbed person is inviting officers to use deadly force to subdue him, the governmental interest in using such force is diminished by the fact that the officers are confronted with a mentally ill individual, not a person who has committed a serious crime against others.”

It’s important to note this distinction only pertains to analysis of the reasonableness of the force used. When it is (or should be) apparent to the officers the individual involved is emotionally disturbed, this is a factor that must be considered when determining reasonableness. Officers must use this assessment of the individual’s mental state to determine if de-escalation is appropriate. Even if de-escalation is not effective (the person is unable to comprehend or communicate), giving the person some time and space may be appropriate when they are not causing risk to anyone.

Glenn v. Washington County

Lukus Glenn’s mother called 911 when the 18-year-old came home intoxicated and agitated, damaging household property and threatening suicide. She advised the dispatcher Lukus was holding a knife to his neck and threatening to kill himself if the cops came. A staging area was established nearby, but the first two deputies bypassed it, responding directly to the scene. The first deputy positioned himself about 8–12 feet from Lukus with his weapon drawn and pointed at Lukus. While Lukus stood with the knife to his neck, the deputy screamed at him to drop the knife or he would kill him. The second deputy arrived a minute later. He started behaving the same way as the first deputy.

An officer from a local agency arrived with a beanbag shotgun and the first deputy ordered him to “beanbag him.” Lukus was struck by multiple beanbag rounds and attempted to retreat toward the house. The deputies had already determined that if Lukus went toward the house – where the deputies had told the family to remain – they would shoot him. They fired 11 rounds at Lukus and he died on his grandmother’s porch.

The court denied summary judgment to the officers, finding the reasonableness of their actions was questionable. This brings us to our last key point regarding de-escalation and the law: Officers should be careful to avoid inadvertently escalating the situation. Although courts have ruled there is no obligation to protect an individual against private violence, including self-harm (see DeShaney v. Winnebago County DSS), if officers choose to act, they must be aware of the possible liability and risk of harm to the person and/or officers that may result.

In Sum

While the law does allow for the use of force on persons in crisis, and does not explicitly require the use of de-escalation, it does consider an individual’s mental state (as part of the Graham v. Connor factors test) to determine when use of force is objectively reasonable.

Therefore, de-escalation should be used when appropriate and possible. It is critical to identify discretionary time, cause of risk, and who is at risk when determining the proper plan of action.

The primary goal of police response in potentially violent situations is to do the right thing for the right reason – protect the person who needs assistance and protect the responding officers. Although we focused on legal obligation in this article, we must always remember that reduced liability is merely a benefit, not a primary motivator, in these situations.

For more about using de-escalation with persons in crisis, watch this on-demand webinar, De-Escalation: When & How to Make It Work.

About the author

Mike Ranalli, ESQ., is a Program Manager II for Lexipol. He retired in 2016 after 10 years as chief of the Glenville (N.Y.) Police Department. He began his career in 1984 with the Colonie (N.Y.) Police Department and held the ranks of patrol officer, sergeant, detective sergeant and lieutenant. Mike is also an attorney and is a frequent presenter on various legal issues including search and seizure, use of force, legal aspects of interrogations and confessions, wrongful convictions, and civil liability. He is a consultant and instructor on police legal issues to the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, and has taught officers around New York State for the last 11 years in that capacity. Mike is also a past president of the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police, a member of the IACP Professional Standards, Image & Ethics Committee, and the former Chairman of the New York State Police Law Enforcement Accreditation Council. He is a graduate of the 2009 F.B.I.-Mid-Atlantic Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar and is a Certified Force Science Analyst.


Salem Township, MI, Fire Dept. Takes Delivery of an Wildland Urban Interface Engine

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Salem Township, MI, Fire Department has taken delivery of a Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) built by HME Ahrens-Fox.

NJ Union: Cash-Strapped FD Needs More Air Tanks

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Trenton firefighters are down to five spare tanks on their air and lights apparatus. "It affects our overall readiness," a fire union official said.

Strap in: this affordable nylon belt also locks your gear in place

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Sponsored by SENTRY

By Sean Curtis for PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

After wearing the old, heavy leather Sam Browne duty gear for 15 years, I was admittedly anxious to try out SENTRY’s Gunnar Belt and pouch system. When I went through my first basic SWAT course, nylon was getting better, but still had a long way to go. To put the belt and pouch system to the test, I tried it out for a month and a half and even wore it to my statewide, annual, firearms instructor’s training seminar where I used it during courses. The gear is light, strong, and extremely versatile. And as if that wasn’t enough, the gear is also comfortable.

Belted for success

SENTRY has set up a winning belt system with the Gunnar Inner Belt. Made of high-strength nylon webbing, the base is a 1.75-inch inner belt that fastens simply by pulling the tail through a D-ring and folding it back to some strong hook and loop. I was surprised how low profile and supple the inner belt was, especially given how other brands I’ve tried had an extremely rigid and even scratchy feel to them. And even though the inner belt was soft, it gripped the outer belt extremely well. It also did not have any rough or unfinished edges as I have seen with other older nylon products.

The Low Profile Operator Belt by SENTRY is another 1.75-inch outer belt that attaches to the inner belt through a hook and loop system. The connection is extremely strong, so you have to be careful to make sure they’re aligned before donning it on. The benefit of this strong grip is a complete lack of having to use keepers of any kind, whatever your loadout is. The genius of this belt’s mounting system is the sections of double-oval laser cutouts that allow you to affix pouches MOLLE/PALS style. Because of the ovals, you can mount pouches horizontally, vertically, even at angles if you prefer. Optionally, you can use integrated belt loops on the pouches to any standard duty belt. Plus, the belt closes very securely with a Cobra Buckle.

Not just any old pouch

SENTRY also sent along some great accessories for their belt system that showed a mindfulness-bent towards pouches of different sizes. These pouches shared some features in common which I will discuss here, but I will break down each of the individual pouches below. First, each of the pouches was laser cut nylon, strong, yet flexible. In addition, they had external ovals allowing me to potentially stack multiple pouches on top of each other. Depending on your mission, you might be able to stack a couple of M4 magazine holders on top of each other and still get a comfortable ride in your patrol car. The pouches also came with toggle loops or some other type of retention device.

SENTRY seems to understand what happens when heavy gear is only held in your belt with gravity, take a tumble and when your stuff spills out it’s a law enforcement yard sale.

SENTRY engineered methods to lock your gear in place until you need it. Also, the plastic mounting tabs are pretty easy to route and secure in place. Here’s how the belt fared with different pouch sizes:

Single pistol magazine pouch - I mounted a spare mag holder just to the outside of my normal double mag. This pouch was very handy and also had a tensioned pull tab I could place on top of my pistol magazine to keep it secured in place. Despite all the jostling and running around at my training, I did not lose this magazine. When I needed to access it, I simply rocked the tab to the side and withdrew the magazine.

AR-15/M4 magazine pouch – Much like the single pistol pouch, this wider one accommodated an AR-15 magazine. This pouch also had a secure tab and I used it frequently. During rifle/pistol transition drills I was able to use both of these pouches handily. The staggered laser-cut ovals on the exterior of this pouch made the possibility of mounting still yet another mag holder very possible.

Shotgun ammo pouch – This unique design was a slightly deeper pouch than the M4 magazine holder and came with a snap on the top. After clearing the retainer, I was able to draw forth a U-shaped piece of nylon with 10 shotgun shell loops. A convenient tab assured clearing the shell holder from the pouch. This cool piece of kit makes it possible to carry 10 more rounds of shotgun shells, in whatever configuration you like, without a whole lot of bulk on your belt. With built-in belt loops, you can also mount the shell carrier to a belt or sling.

Single handcuff pouch – I mounted the single handcuff pouch strong-side just after the Cobra Buckle. This unit contained a single snap in the middle and a shroud that covered the bottom and sides of the cuffs without taking up much room. A simple tug upward freed the handcuffs but they did not otherwise come out during running around.

Tourniquet pouch – Without a doubt, one of my favorite accessories was the tourniquet pouch. At first blush, this looks like a normal nylon pouch with a hooded flap closure. However, there is a drawstring with some knurled knobs hanging down from the flap. During training, I did not notice this string, but I knew it was there. Pulling up on the draw actually opens the flap and ejects the tourniquet halfway out of the pouch. This is an awesome feature that could be accomplished with gross motor function should it become necessary. In addition, the staging of the tourniquet makes it a whole lot easier to access from various positions, even if an officer is still seat belted in a car.

When nylon beats ancient leather

I remember the days of leather duty belts. I recall having to back up to the dresser and either throw it on or shrug it off with a thud. I would wrestle it into place and snake a few strategically placed keepers on to keep it secured. Whenever I had to add or remove a component, I laid it all out and mapped the route for the belt. Even early nylon products I used were barely better.

Those days are gone.

SENTRY has produced a smart system built on tough nylon that is so much lighter than leather. You can mount accessories, or remove them, one piece at a time. The pouches have an intelligent design with an eye towards both retention and customization. Users can stack or nest pouches how they see fit. The end result is a low-profile belt that is far more capable than any duty gear I’ve ever experienced. Lightweight and flexible, SENTRY has a wide array of pouches and other accessories in colors from black, to coyote brown and multi-cam, enabling you to design your own rig to fit your needs, whatever they may be.


Photo of the Week: Blue Angel

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

PoliceOne Members
Author: PoliceOne Members

This week's photo comes from William Naylor of the King County Sheriff’s Office in Washington. Naylor writes:

"This photograph was taken during Seafair Week in Seattle. The Blue Angels come every summer to fly during halftime of the Hydroplane Boat Races in Lake Washington."

Calling all police photographers! PoliceOne needs pictures of you in action or training. Submit a photo — it could be selected as our Photo of the Week! Be sure to include your name, department information and address (including city, state and ZIP code) where we can reach you — Photo of the Week winners have a chance to win a PoliceOne.com T-shirt!


Md. court rules pot smell not enough to search person

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Maryland's highest court says the smell of marijuana isn't enough for police to search a person, in a ruling that begins by quoting the title of Bob Dylan's song: "The Times They Are A-Changin'."

The Court of Appeals ruled 7-0 this week that in Maryland's post-decriminalization era, the odor of marijuana coupled with possession of what is clearly less than 10 grams doesn't give officers probable cause to make an arrest and search a person.

The ruling says police can still use the smell of marijuana to justify searching a vehicle. But police can't search anyone in the vehicle without evidence of a crime.

Maryland decriminalized possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana in 2014. It's now considered a civil offense that can carry a $100 fine.


Police lawsuit alleges carbon monoxide poisoning from Ford Explorer

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Phoebe Wall Howard Detroit Free Press

Six Washington state troopers have sued Ford, claiming their patrol vehicles made them sick from carbon monoxide poisoning. The officers blame a design flaw in 2014-17 Explorer SUVs modified for police duty.

The troopers allege their department-issued vehicles have a faulty exhaust and/or heating, ventilation and air conditioning system that allow “exhaust odor and gases, including carbon monoxide — an odorless, toxic gas, to enter the passenger compartment of the vehicles while in use.” As a result, the lawsuit filed in Clark County Superior Court said, the vehicles cause headaches, dizziness, nausea and potentially life-threatening situations.

In the lawsuit, troopers allege that the “hazardous defect” has resulted in numerous complaints to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the opening of a federal investigation into the vehicles. The lawsuit also notes that “Ford has recently issued an emission recall notice for all Ford Interceptor SUVs built from 2011-18.”

“The defect is not new to Ford,” the lawsuit says. As early as 2012, Ford had “issued Technical Service Bulletins to its exclusive network of dealers, recognizing the presence of exhaust odors and fumes.”

Nausea, rollover crash

In addition, the lawsuit noted the federal traffic safety investigation summary reports “three crash events and 25 injury incidents citing a total of 41 injuries. The alleged injuries … range from unspecified to loss of consciousness with a majority indicating nausea, headaches or light-headedness. One police incident alleged a crash with related injuries, and a second police incident reported a physiological injury allegedly from carbon monoxide exposure. Another reported police incident resulted in a rollover crash event with injuries.”

Ford spokesman Mike Levine said Monday in a statement to the Free Press: “As we have previously said, carbon monoxide concerns in Police Interceptor Utilities are related to unsealed holes from the installation of police equipment by third parties after the vehicle was purchased.”

Police departments in more than a dozen states raised concerns about possible carbon monoxide leaks, including California.

Newport Beach police officer Brian McDowell was responding to a non-emergency call when he passed out behind the wheel of his 2014 Ford Explorer police cruiser and crashed into a tree, reported CBS News. “I just think, plus or minus one second I maybe wouldn’t be here on this earth for my kids,” he told the network in 2017.

Cops ‘live in these cruisers’

That year, police departments added carbon monoxide detectors in their vehicles. “They live in these cruisers for, you know, eight hours at a time, maybe longer,” said Capt. Shawn Steele of the fire department in Auburn, Massachusetts, where at one point a third of the town’s cruisers were taken out of service, CBS News reported.

The lawsuit filed this month faults Ford for its “pre-production testing, design failure mode analysis and consumer complaints to dealers and NHTSA” and then concealing the defect from the law enforcement officers.

“Current plaintiffs are troopers who were issued the Ford Explorer Interceptors as their regular patrol vehicles,” the lawsuit says. “Plaintiffs were advised that the vehicles were safe to drive and that there were no problems which would cause them any hazard, injury or harm. Plaintiffs detected exhaust fumes within the passenger compartment of their vehicles while driving and plaintiffs have suffered headaches, nausea, foggy thinking and flu-like symptoms. … Trooper (Randall) Cashatt, has suffered permanent neurological damage which has prevented him from continuing his job as a Washington State Patrol trooper.”

During a Florida Better Business Bureau proceeding on Jan. 2, 2015, Ford’s representative said, “We do feel that it’s a design issue, not a defect … It’s simply a vent leading somewhere where it doesn’t need to be; and, you know, it’s just being set in a certain way that’s — that’s allowing it to draw it into the — into the vehicle,” according to a transcript cited in the Washington State lawsuit.

Ford’s Levine said Monday: “That statement was made in error by a contractor of Ford at a Better Business Bureau proceeding involving an alleged exhaust odor. These vehicles are safe. Ford has thoroughly tested vehicles and has not found carbon monoxide levels that exceed what people are exposed to every day.”

The lawsuit claims that Ford has been unable to do more than offer a “Band-Aid fix” that continues to “warp and fail again over time.”

In October 2018, the CBS-affiliate in Seattle KIRO-TV reported Cashatt, then a 20-year veteran trooper, said his 2014 Ford Explorer Police Interceptor made him so ill, “I remember thinking that I was going to die.”

Civilians report sickness, too

NHTSA told the Free Press in January 2018 that Ford’s “customer satisfaction campaign does not bring closure to this issue.”

More than 1,300 Ford Explorer owners have reported issues to the federal safety officials, who began investigating in 2016.

In January 2018, the nonprofit Center for Auto Safety sent a letter to Ford CEO Jim Hackett renewing an October 2017 request for the Dearborn-based company to recall 1.33 million Explorers from model years 2011-17 for suspected carbon monoxide leaks.

In July 2017, federal transportation officials expanded their probe into reports of exhaust odors in vehicle compartments and exposure to carbon monoxide that may be linked to crashes and injuries. The oversight agency said at the time it was aware of the growing complaints and crashes that may have been linked to exposure to carbon monoxide and dozens of injuries among police and civilian vehicles.

Ford on Monday noted that NHTSA’s 2017 report said, by that time, that “no substantive data or actual evidence … has been obtained supporting a claim that any of the alleged injury or crash allegations were the result of carbon monoxide poisoning, the alleged hazard.”

Feds investigating

On Monday, NHTSA released the following statement to the Free Press:

“Safety drives everything we do at NHTSA. The agency’s investigation into model year 2011-2017 Ford Explorer SUVs is ongoing. Steps include: testing multiple civilian and law enforcement vehicles; conducting field inspections of complaint vehicles and crashes involving police units; evaluating consumer complaints; and monitoring the effectiveness of Ford’s customer service repair campaigns. NHTSA will publicly release the agency’s conclusions when the safety defect investigation is completed.”

©2019 Detroit Free Press


New Fire Apparatus, Gear Approved for KY Department

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The London Fire Department will replace a 33-year-old vehicle, as well as 15-year-old air tanks and improved turnout gear.

Deputy, trooper shot in rural southern Mo.

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

VAN BUREN, Mo. — The Missouri State Highway Patrol says a trooper and a deputy sheriff are hospitalized after being shot while serving an eviction notice in a rural area of the state.

The shooting led to a standoff that's still ongoing Friday afternoon.

The shooting happened around 10 a.m. in Carter County in southern Missouri. A patrol spokesman. Sgt. Clark Parrott, told KFVS-TV that the injuries are not believed to be life-threatening. Both officers were wearing protective vests.

The deputy was shot in the leg, groin and chest. The trooper was shot in the shoulder and struck in his bulletproof vest.

Carter County is about 150 miles southwest of St. Louis.


NYPD Asks Officers to Evaluate Its Mental Health Programs

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 22-question survey was sent out Thursday—one day after the ninth NYPD officer committed suicide this year. The survey was also circulated a week ago, police sources said.

‘Shots fired, officers down’ and the barricaded gunman

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lt. Dan Marcou
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

Picture yourself approaching a door with your partner when suddenly you hear, “Bam! Bam! Bam! Bam!” A voice cackles over the radio, “Shots fired, officer down!” You realize it is your voice.

As someone who has been there and done that, I would like to take this opportunity while the Philly shootout is fresh in your mind to mentally prepare you for the moment when you find yourself saying, “Shots fired, officer down!”

Step One?

Step one is to remember that there is no step one. You will need to prepare through training to do many things at once instinctively to ensure the survival of yourself, your partner, the other officers on scene and those responding.

Stop the Threat or Contain the Threat

Returning fire to stop the threat is justified, however, in many barricaded gunmen cases, you may find yourself unable to identify, acquire and isolate the target to stop the threat.

You must decide whether to engage the shooter from your current location, advance on your attacker to engage, move to cover to engage, or disengage. If you dawdle, you die!

Return fire if you can, get off the proverbial X and move to a position of cover and advantage. From here you will be able to continue to return fire, as you orchestrate the safe arrival and placement of responding officers to facilitate the containment of the suspect and start the SWAT callout protocol if they are not already on scene. Breathe.

The Officer Down

If you are the officer down and you can get yourself to a safe place on your own power, do so! Remember to tell yourself, “The fight is not over. I’m still in this fight! I must finish the fight, because this fight will not finish me!!” Breathe.

With that said, many who are shot, including my partner, have, wounds that make it impossible for them to move. I thank God I had been prepared in advance for that moment because I had:

Maintained my strength and physical conditioning through regular workouts; Trained extensively in firearms and tactics; Practiced downed officer rescues and lifts prior to the incident; Trained as an EMT.

My partner had also prepared for the moment by maintaining his mental and physical strength and fitness level (He was not overweight, which may have made him impossible for me to move alone.) He also was wearing his vest.

If an officer goes down next to you, it will undoubtedly be safer for you to relocate to save yourself and plan an organized rescue. However, when it happens, you may discover, as I did, that it is not in your nature to abandon a friend. If you go into the rescue mode instinctively, as I did, it will help you to have:

Pre-shots-fired knowledge of the closest available cover; Prior training in proper rescue drags/carries; A pre-incident knowledge of the fact that you will be pumped up with an adrenaline surge like no other, allowing you to accomplish great deeds.

Therefore, you may discover as I did that you are able to move your wounded partner to the closest available cover almost as quickly as you can move myself.

I am not advising you to do this. I am advising you that you may do this no matter what anyone says you should do, so prepare yourself for this reaction.

Call SWAT, Establish an Inner Perimeter

Once the “shots fired, officer down!” call goes out officers will be rushing to the scene like a stampede in an episode of “Rawhide.”

(Note: For stampeding officers responding to a “shots fired, officer down!” call, remind yourself of something your academy EVOC instructor said as you hit the gas pedal for the first time after this transmission. “You’re no good to anyone unless you arrive alive.” Drive with due care! Breathe.)

Back at the scene, as you tend to your wounded partner, picture in your mind a safe route to the scene and a spot for officers to stage. Choose the route and staging area quickly and radio it in along with your partner’s condition, the shooter’s identification, his/her position, weapons and any other pertinent information. Breathe.

Your next visualization should be where the first arriving officers need to deploy to ensure they will have cover and mobility while containing the suspect. Facilitate the immediate securing of the inner perimeter as the officers arrive. (The inner perimeter is a sterile area established by you to contain the problem, which is the barricaded gunman and the solution, the police.) Officers on the inner perimeter should all be armed with long guns. Breathe.

The staging area will also be the place to direct the ambulance for your partner, and other ambulances to stand by for any other casualties. Non-law enforcement rescue personnel in most jurisdictions will not enter an area they call “a hot zone,” so attend to your fellow officer’s bleeding and get him to an ambulance quickly. Seconds matter.

Establish an Outer Perimeter and Command Post

The outer perimeter surrounds the inner perimeter and locks down the area around the inner perimeter to prevent people from wandering into the kill zone. It also allows for safe movement of officers who are evacuating innocents and deploying as assigned. It protects not only the staging area, but also the command post. (Oh yeah, identify and establish a command post.)

Remember that the big difference between a lone barricaded gunman and an active shooter is that time is on your side with the lone barricaded gunman so, breathe.

Communication

The incident should have its own radio channel(s) to operate on.

It behooves you to begin communications as soon as possible. If you have a trained negotiator great, but If you don’t, it still behooves you to begin communication as soon as possible. When you are talking, you are not shooting and talking gives your tactical team time to get into position and plan.

Establish phone contact as soon as possible, because yelling back and forth does not have a calming effect.

Never conduct any negotiation with an armed suspect face to face!

SWAT

Every department should have SWAT capabilities available in-house or through mutual aid.

Here are some things that the Philadelphia Police Department’s first responding officers and SWAT pulled off during this event:

    First responding officers survived the initial violent assault. The suspect was contained by officers within an inner and outer perimeter quickly. The wounded were evacuated quickly. SWAT was called. Communication was sought after with the suspect, who resisted these efforts, until they were eventually established. Rescue plans were made and carried out for cut-off officers and civilians. Technology was used to keep the community aware of the dangers, while advising some to shelter in place. Great efforts were made during communications, including getting someone the suspect trusted to aid with negotiations. Officers weathered taunts of some community members while the event was in progress. Professional press briefings were given. When the time was right, chemical munitions were effectively introduced. Safe arrest tactics were employed to take the suspect into custody. Medical care was provided to the suspect before turning him over to jail personnel. All Philadelphia cops went home after this long shift. Bravo!

SWAT teams train for these situations constantly and have available some or all of these resources that street officers may not have or train with:

Trained tactical operators; Trained tactical commanders; Trained breaching officers and breaching tools; Trained negotiators; Trained grenadiers; Trained snipers and observers; Explosives experts; Investigators gathering information and working on necessary warrants; Tactical EMTs; Protective equipment; Armored vehicles; Snipers with optics; Drones; Robots; Thermal imagers. A Deserved Critique of Politicians

This is not a political commentary, but a critique of politicians is in order. It has been hard to watch political “leaders” show compassion for lawbreakers, while continually voicing a disdain for American law enforcement. Their words at best have inspired open disrespect toward police officers and, at worst, have given tacit permission for attacks on police.

A Deserved Critique of the National Media

The national media has not done their job in identifying this unjustified and relentless war of words against police officers by elected officials, which has had deadly consequences across the nation. It has also led to open disrespect of officers, which showed itself in the taunting of officers in Philadelphia during this deadly event.

Additionally, the media has been asked repeatedly to not reveal police tactics, movements and positions, while these incidents are in progress. During the Philadelphia shootout, they not only showed positions and movements of officers during what was an in-progress incident, but they also had “experts” speculate on what tactics might be deployed next. It was as if they were saying, “Hey, cop killer, heads up! Here they come!”

Shout Out to The Philadelphia Police Department

During this incident, members of the Philadelphia Police Department attempted to conduct a drug investigation/arrest. They were suddenly attacked by a heavily armed career criminal. They reacted, returned fire, rallied, rescued and prevailed. Philly officers took to the world stage during this event and shined like the stars in the sky.

This dynamic sudden assault was brought to a successful conclusion without a single loss of life by a magnificent combination of tactics, equipment and courage. To all members of the Philadelphia Police Department who survived this withering fire, thank you for your example. You are our heroes.

For the rest of you out there, prepare!


United States Attorney Slams DA for “Culture of Disrespect” Against Police

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania on Thursday slammed Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner for creating a "culture of disrespect" that he believes led to the shooting of six Philadelphia police officers on Wednesday.

2 Missouri LEOs Shot, Hospitalized with Non-Life-Threatening Injuries

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Carter County (MO) Sheriff's deputy and a Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper were shot Friday morning, leaving both with non-life-threatening injuries.

New York PBA President on Suicide: “Don’t F—king Do It!”

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Following two police officer suicides in the span of just over 24 hours this week—the eighth and ninth of the year for the department—the president of the Patrolman's Benevolent Association delivered a blunt message to officers who might be approaching crisis leading to self-harm: "Don't f—king do it!"

Florida Deputies Stop Active Shooter at Grocery Store

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Deputies with the Escambia County (FL) Sheriff's Office responded to a disturbance at a grocery store on Thursday afternoon, finding upon arrival an armed suspect shooting at customers inside the store.

Parents of Ohio Gunman Apologize for “Insensitive” Obituary

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The parents of the gunman who shot and killed his 22-year-old sister and eight others on August 4 have apologized for posting an obituary of the 24-year-old assailant calling him a "funny, articulate and intelligent man with striking blue eyes and a kind smile."

Philadelphia Athletes, Sports Teams Send Police Messages of Support

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A number of Philadelphia-based athletes and sports teams sent messages of support on social media to the Philadelphia Police Department after six officers were shot during a gun battle and standoff Wednesday in the Nicetown-Tioga section of the City of Brotherly Love.

Arkansas Department Seeks to Build New Headquarters Building

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Harrison Police Department say that the agency has long outgrown its current headquarters building and are seeking to build a new facility with the aid of a half-cent sales tax passed in 2014.

Ohio Officer Assists in Couple’s Wedding Proposal

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Cincinnati Police Department is being lauded for his assistance in a young couple's wedding proposal over the weekend.

Atlanta Police Arrest 2 Suspected of Firebombing an Officer’s Home

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Atlanta Police Department has arrested two brothers in the arson attack on an Atlanta police officer's home in June.

3 Major Agencies to Deploy Axon’s Officer Safety Plan 7+

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Axon announced that the Atlanta and Baltimore City Police Departments, both Major Cities Chiefs Association members, will deploy Axon's new TASER 7 weapons and Axon Body 3 cameras as part of Axon's new Officer Safety Plan 7+ (OSP 7+). Orange County (FL) Sheriff's Office will also deploy TASER 7 weapons on OSP 7+.

Officer Uses Stand-Up Comedy to Relieve Stress, Raise Money for Charity

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Commander Vinnie Montez of the Boulder County Sheriff's Office in Colorado has taken his penchant for making people laugh from a hobby to what may be his full-time career upon retirement.

Vuzix Blade Smart Glasses Now Provide a Visual Hands-Free Assistant for DJI Drones

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Vuzix Blade Smart Glasses enabling enterprise, first responders, security officials and consumers to fly DJI drones without the aid of a spotter, smartphone or tablet.

FirstNet Authority Board Approves FY20 Budget

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The $82 million FY20 budget focuses on public safety engagement, network deployment and investments.

Florida Deputies Stop Active Shooter at Grocery Store

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Escambia County Sheriff's deputies thwarted a man who was shooting up a grocery store Thursday afternoon near Pensacola.

Georgia Sheriff’s Deputy Dies Suddenly While On Duty

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

K-9 Gus, who has been with the Hall County Sheriff's Office since he was a pup, died Tuesday.

Georgia Sheriff’s K-9 Dies Suddenly While On Duty

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

K-9 Gus, who has been with the Hall County Sheriff's Office since he was a pup, died Tuesday.

MD Medic Unit Carrying Injured Man Crashes

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Anne Arundel County unit was taking a man who was seriously injured in an earlier accident to a shock trauma center in Baltimore when the crash happened.

Super Bright Fenix TK72R Rechargeable LED Flashlight – 9000 Lumens

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

If you’re looking for a super bright Fenix flashlight, look no further than the Fenix TK72R searchlight. At 9,000 lumens, this is one of the brightest flashlights out there, with a draw range of up to 938 feet. It’s perfect for officers on duty, as...

Police seek to question man in NYC rice cooker bomb scare

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Jennifer Peltz Associated Press

NEW YORK — Three abandoned devices that looked like pressure cookers caused an evacuation of a major New York City subway station and closed off an intersection in another part of town Friday morning before police determined the objects were not explosives.

Police were looking to talk to a man seen on surveillance video taking two of the objects — which police identified as rice cookers — out of a shopping cart and placing them in a subway station in lower Manhattan. In a photo released by authorities, the young man is lugging a cooker into an elevator.

But police stressed that so far, it wasn't clear whether he was trying to frighten people or merely throwing the objects away.

"I would stop very short of calling him a suspect," said John Miller, the New York Police Department's top counterterror official. "It is possible that somebody put out a bunch of items in the trash today and this guy picked them up and then discarded them, or it's possible that this was an intentional act."

Earlier, Gov. Andrew Cuomo had said authorities suspected the items were placed in the subway "to suggest that they were electronic devices and possible bombs."

Many rice cookers look like pressure cookers, but the latter use pressure to cook food quickly — a function that has been used to turn them into bombs.

Police swarmed the initial finds around 7 a.m. on the mezzanine and platform of the Fulton Street station, a few blocks from the World Trade Center and New York Stock Exchange. Dozens of suspicious packages are reported daily in New York City, but the proximity to the site of the Sept. 11 attacks served to heighten anxiety before police gave the all-clear.

About two hours later, a third rice cooker — the same make, year and model — was also found about 2 miles away (3 kilometers) on a sidewalk in the Chelsea neighborhood, prompting another police investigation.

"This is a frightening world we live in, and all of these situations have to be taken seriously because God forbid one day ... it's a real device," said Cuomo, a Democrat. "We learned the hard way after 9/11, and we are prepared."

Michael Oji, a New Jersey resident who works in lower Manhattan, said he's lived in the metro area for more than 20 years and saw the additional security that came to the area after the Sept. 11 attacks.

"Going to work in the morning, thinking that everything's OK, and you run into something like this, it's scary," he said just outside an entrance to the station that had been closed off by armed officers.

Multiple subway lines were partially suspended during the police investigation at Fulton Street, and delays continued throughout the morning.

Pressure cookers packed with explosives killed three people and injured hundreds when a pair of Islamic extremists detonated them during the Boston Marathon in 2013.

In September 2016, a pressure-cooker bomb went off in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood, injuring 30 people.

In 2017, a would-be suicide attacker set off a homemade pipe bomb in an underground passageway at the Times Square subway station during rush hour, seriously injuring himself.


Bodycam footage capturing fatal Colo. OIS of armed suspect stokes more controversy

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Olivia Prentzel The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.)

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Colorado Springs police body camera footage released Thursday shows two officers fatally shoot De’Von Bailey in the back after confronting him over a reported armed robbery.

The cameras worn by Sgt. Alan Van’t Land and Officer Blake Evenson show Bailey, 19, and cousin Lawrence Stoker put their hands up, per police order, after the officers say they will check for weapons. The officers knew that one of the suspects they were looking for had a gun.

As Evenson approaches Bailey from behind for a pat-down, Bailey pivots to the right and runs toward Adams Park with his hands near his stomach. Van’t Land screams: “Hands up! Hands up! Hands up!” And Evenson yells, “Let me see your hands!”

But Bailey keeps running without raising his hands. They chase him and fire several shots at his back. Then Bailey collapses in the street.

Three bullets struck Bailey in the back and one in his elbow, said Dr. Leon Kelly, the El Paso County coroner.

In the video, officers call for a med kit before checking for a weapon. They find a gun as they cut off Bailey’s shorts.

Van’t Land is an 11-year veteran of the force, and Evenson has served seven years, police said. Both were assigned to the department’s Sand Creek substation at the time of the shooting.

But police declined to identify a third officer who also wore a body camera, and they wouldn’t say why footage from that camera wasn’t released. Police Lt. Jim Sokolik directed questions to the county Sheriff’s Office, which did not respond to Gazette queries.

The Bailey family’s attorneys said the video did not show the 19-year-old presenting an imminent threat to the officers.

“Instead, it is clear that he was merely trying to get away from the situation,” the lawyers wrote in a statement Thursday. “Even if the officers had legitimate concern that a suspect might escape, the law strictly specifies that it is only when the officers have evidence that a person is in imminent risk of death or serious bodily harm may that officer use deadly force — a gun — to stop a person from fleeing.”

Asked what justice would mean for the Bailey family, one of the lawyers, Danny Kay, suggested criminal charges against the officers could be appropriate.

“We want justice,” he said. “We’re hoping it’s through the criminal courts because there was no reason to shoot him in the back.”

Kay said the video proves that Bailey was trying to hold up his pants and posed no threat to anyone as “he sprinted away.”

“It defies common sense,” he added. “How can he be a threat to anyone? He’s just running away.”

Former Los Angeles police Lt. Adam Bercovici, however, said the video shows that Bailey did pose an immediate threat.

“He was definitely reaching for his waistband while he was running,” Bercovici said. “And while it might not be something that people are happy with based on the totality of the circumstance, the officers were legally justified to use deadly force in this case.”

#SURVEILLANCEVIDEO: This surveillance video from neighbors shows the moment De’Von Bailey collapses on the ground as officers run toward him with guns drawn during Saturday evening’s #officerinvolvedshooting. Neighbors say they heard 7 shots ring out. @KOAA pic.twitter.com/ROH9GCxasA

— Jessica Barreto (@BarretoReports) August 7, 2019

Such split-second decisions are the hardest part of the job, Bercovici said.

“It probably happened in a millisecond. Your brain has to process from a stationary investigation, transition into a foot pursuit and then into confrontation. That’s a very difficult thing to do,” he said.

In the video, at least seven shots are heard before Bailey drops to the ground. Bercovici said that’s how police are trained.

“There was no overkill,” he said. “We’re trained to stop. And the minute (Bailey) went to the ground, (the officers) stopped.”

Had police let Bailey run, that might have led to more harm to the community, he said. And a TASER isn’t accurate on the run, so it might not have been effective.

“It’s a lose-lose in the sense that he runs into the park and harms somebody. Background is extremely important when determining to use deadly force, but it cannot always be the determining factor,” he said.

Children were playing in Adams Park when Bailey was shot about 6:45 p.m., witnesses said.

Bercovici commended the officers’ sensitivity and professionalism throughout the encounter. As they cut Bailey’s pants from his body, Evenson is heard saying: “Stay with me, brother.”

John Burton, a 40-year lawyer and former board president of the National Police Accountability Project, agreed with the family’s lawyers that Bailey was not posing a direct threat to the officers, but he said it was a tough call.

“I think (Bailey) could be criticized for the decision he made. But I think officers could be criticized for pulling the trigger when he wasn’t posing an immediate threat,” Burton said. “But I highly value life, and I don’t think they should have pulled the trigger.”

Burton said he doesn’t think officers expected Bailey to run, but they could have initially ordered Bailey and his cousin to their knees or to lie on the ground. Instead, their approach to the robbery suspects was “very casual,” he said.

“They knew they were contacting these guys because they might have just done an armed robbery. There was a little bit of cowboy arrogance in their approach. I think what they should have done is try to establish a perimeter so they can’t get away, and use a high-risk felony stop,” the lawyer said.

Whether better tactics might have made a difference, Burton couldn’t say.

Sokolik said the Police Department will review its policies and procedures in the shooting after the 4th Judicial District Attorney’s Office rules on whether the shooting was justified. He declined to comment further, citing the investigation by the Sheriff’s Office.

That investigation is complete, however, the Sheriff’s Office reported Thursday afternoon, and the results were being presented to the DA’s Office.

At least two dozen people gathered Thursday evening at a visitation for Bailey at Angelus Chapel Funeral Directors & Crematory, 1104 S. South Circle Drive. Family and friends expressed shock and sadness over the footage but declined to comment on the record.

A private funeral for Bailey will start at 11 a.m. Friday at Relevant Word Ministries, 1040 S. Institute St.

The body-cam footage, released 13 days after the fatal shooting, comes earlier than release of such footage in the past. In five instances in which city police used deadly force over the past 18 months, body cam footage was released with the DA’s ruling but no earlier than 2½ months after the incident.

Nationwide, police have more promptly released video evidence and the names of the officers involved. Such was the case this month when an officer in a Dallas suburb killed a woman lying in the grass while he tried to shoot a dog that was charging at him. Authorities released footage from that shooting less than 24 hours after it happened.

©2019 The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.)


NYPD asks officers to evaluate its mental health programs

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Graham Rayman and John Annese New York Daily News

NEW YORK — The NYPD is surveying officers about the effectiveness of its mental health services.

The 22-question survey was sent out Thursday — one day after the ninth NYPD officer committed suicide this year. The survey was also circulated a week ago, police sources said.

Officers are being asked how familiar they are with the department’s counseling services, and how comfortable they are using those services.

“The department is in the process of developing comprehensive Health and Wellness initiatives to meet the needs of NYPD staff,” an intro to the survey reads. "We want to foster change in how mental and emotional health is perceived and how to obtain health.

“If you believed a coworker needed help, where would you feel most comfortable referring them?” one question asked.

Officers are asked if they agree with this statement: “I would be comfortable informing the Department if I obtained outside mental health and wellness assistance." The possible responses are “strongly disagree,” “disagree," “agree” and “strongly agree.”

The survey — which the department says is voluntary, anonymous and confidential — also seeks to break down its respondents by gender, demographics, experience, education level and prior military service.

©2019 New York Daily News


Churches arm, train congregants in wake of mass shootings

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Jake Bleiberg Associated Press

HASLET, Texas — Acrid gun smoke clouded the sunny entrance of a Texas church on a recent Sunday.

Seven men wearing heavy vests and carrying pistols loaded with blanks ran toward the sound of the shots, stopping at the end of a long hallway. As one peeked into the foyer, the "bad guy" raised the muzzle of an AR-15, took aim and squeezed the trigger.

The simulated gunfight at the church in Haslet was part of a niche industry that trains civilians to protect their churches using the techniques and equipment of law enforcement. Rather than a bullet, the rifle fired a laser that hit Stephen Hatherley's vest — triggering an electric shock the 60-year-old Navy veteran later described as a "tingle."

The shootings this month killed more than 30 people at an El Paso Walmart and Dayton, Ohioentertainment district. But gunmen have also targeted houses of worships in recent years, including a church in rural Sutherland Springs, Texas, where more than two dozen people were shot dead in 2017.

The anxiety of one mass shooting after another has led some churches to start training and arming their worshippers with guns. Not all security experts support this approach, but it has gained momentum as congregations across the country grapple with how to secure spaces where welcoming strangers is a religious practice.

"Ten years ago, this industry was not a thing," said David Riggall, a Texas police officer whose company trains churchgoers to volunteer as security guards. "I mean, sanctuary means a safe place."

In 1993, Doug Walker said security wasn't at the fore of his mind when, as a recent Baptist seminary graduate, he founded Fellowship of the Parks church in Fort Worth. But six years later, after a gunman killed seven people and took his own life at another church in the Texas city, the pastor said his thinking changed.

Today, the interdenominational church has four campuses and 3,000 worshippers on an average Sunday, Walker said. It has increased security as it has grown, asking off-duty police to carry weapons at church events. And it recently hired Riggall's company, Sheepdog Defense Group, to train volunteers in first aid, threat assessment, de-escalation techniques, using a gun and tactical skills, such as clearing rooms during an active shooting.

Walker, 51, said there wasn't a single event that prompted his church to decide its guards needed more training. But Riggall said that after mass shootings congregations reach out.

"Every time the news comes on and there's another shooting in a school or church or something like that, the phone starts ringing," Riggall said.

The 46-year-old police officer said that he and a colleague had the idea for the company after the 2012 mass shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut. They started doing firearms trainings with parents and, after Riggall became certified under Texas law to train security guards, transitioned to churches.

The company incorporates Christian teachings into its courses and more than 90 people at 18 churches have completed the 70 hours of initial training and become state-licensed guards through its program, Riggall said. The so-called sheepdogs are insured and technically employed by the company. But they volunteer doing security at their own churches, which in turn pay Riggall.

On a Sunday in July, Brett Faulkner stood with an AR-15 in hand and his back to the cross in the sanctuary of Fellowship of the Parks campus in Haslet, a community about 15 miles (24 kilometers) north of Fort Worth. He pointed the rifle at a young woman's back and yelled at the armed men advancing into the room, "I'm going to kill this woman. It's going to happen right now."

Faulkner, a 46-year-old information technology worker, already completed a Sheepdog session but came to another church's to play the bad guy and keep his skills sharp.

"It really just comes down to caring about the people in that building," Faulkner said of choosing to guard his small Baptist church.

Faulkner said his congregation re-evaluated its security after recent mass shootings and went with Riggall's company as a cost-effective option. "This is a good balance between the cost of paying professionals and relying on untrained volunteers," he said.

Security professionals differ on what balance is right.

After 11 worshippers were shot dead during Shabbat morning services at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, the city's Jewish community has added layers of defenses.

Since that October attack, congregations that once felt guns were unnecessary or inappropriate have welcomed armed security, said Brad Orsini, security director for The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. But arming worshippers is not an approach the former FBI agent recommends.

"Carrying a firearm is an awesome responsibility," said Orsini, who served in the Marine Corps before his nearly three decades with the FBI. "Because you have the ability to have a carry concealed permit does not make you a security expert. Because you have a firearm doesn't necessarily mean you should be carrying it at the church on the weekend."

Sheepdog Firearms, a Birmingham, Alabama-area gun range, offers police-style training to people looking to protect their churches. Owner David Youngstrom acknowledged the eight-hour course doesn't produce experts.

But, he said, many of the roughly 40 Alabama churches that have sent people to take the class are small, rural congregations with limited means. For them, having armed volunteers can feel like the only option, he said.

And the trainings provide churches with evidence of having a security program in place if a tragedy turns into litigation. "It gives a good record for something that will hold up in court," Youngstrom said.

Laws about carrying firearms in houses of worship vary from state to state. But as a general matter of liability, churches training members for security is not much different from a business hiring guards, according to Eugene Volokh, a professor at the UCLA School of Law.

A church could be sued if people were harmed because its security was badly trained, Volokh said, but also if it generally failed to protect people on its grounds. Both can be insured against and either is unlikely, he said.

Brian Higgins, a former police chief for Bergen County, New Jersey, and instructor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, said he's seen varied approaches to firearms in his work consulting at houses of worship. Attitudes toward guns differ between urban and rural areas, as do the security needs, he said.

And churches comfortable arming members also draw lines to preserve an environment conducive to worship.

Fellowship of the Parks allows congregants to have concealed weapons in church. But Walker, the pastor, said that other than security, people carrying openly are asked to put their guns away or leave.

"If people open carry who are not uniformed that can be very unsettling," Walker said. "You may not know if that person is a possible shooter or criminal, so we try to balance it."


Study: Critical Public Equals Less Proactive FFs, Police

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A University of Texas and University of Pittsburgh study found that first responders who felt misunderstood by the public were less likely to be rated as "proactive" by supervisors.

Pierce Dealer, Reliant Fire Apparatus, Marks 25th Year with New Service Center

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The exclusive Pierce dealer for southern Wisconsin and Iowa, is commemorating the company’s 25th anniversary in business and as a Pierce dealer, with the grand opening of a new 10,000 square foot service center.

CA Man Threatened to Shoot Down Firefighting Choppers

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pilots helping to put out the Delta Fire in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest last year changed flight paths after the Dunsmuir man confronted a U.S. Forest Service employee.

Winchester, VA, Fire and Rescue Dept. Puts 105-foot Aerial in Service

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Winchester, VA, Fire and Rescue Department has taken delivery of a 105-foot rear-mount aerial built by Pierce Mfg.

Canadian FFs, Police Hospitalized after Gas Explosion

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

London, Ontario, crews were responding to a car crash, but after arriving at the scene, they discovered a natural gas line had been cut in the accident.

Video: California Police Officer Helps Choking Boy Breathe Again

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The two officers who saved the boy's life on July 22 were honored by the Culver City City Council this week.

Man Flees Traffic Stop With Chicago Police Officer Inside Vehicle

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A man took a Chicago police officer on a wild ride overnight after fleeing a traffic stop with the officer inside the vehicle.

Maryland Court Rules Marijuana Smell Cannot Prompt Police Search

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Maryland's highest court says the smell of marijuana isn't enough for police to search a person.

California Supreme Court Tightens Standards for Police Search of Homes

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police need a warrant or an emergency to enter someone’s home, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday, discarding a 20-year-old opinion that would allow entry for less-urgent reasons.

Ohio Trooper Shoots Suspect Following Pursuit

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A State Highway Patrol trooper shot a suspect late Thursday night following a pursuit in southwest Ohio.

Dale Earnhardt Jr., Family Escape Fiery TN Plane Crash

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No one was seriously hurt when the plane the retried NASCAR driver was in skidded off a Elizabethton runway. Officials praised the quick response by firefighters and EMS.

Police: KS Firefighter at Fault in Apparatus Crash

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No one was injured in the accident involving a Wichita Fire Department vehicle and a dump truck along Interstate 235 on Thursday.

MA Firefighters Rescue Four in 4-Alarm Blaze

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Around 60 Worcester firefighters were needed to control the fast-moving blaze that broke out in a three-story building Thursday night.

Washington Trooper Finds Driver Playing ‘Pokemon Go’ on 8 Phones at Once

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When Sgt. Kyle Smith of the Washington State Patrol saw a driver parked on the shoulder of eastbound Highway 518 in Burien near Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on Tuesday evening, he thought the driver had a disabled vehicle.

Body Camera Video Shows Fatal Colorado Police-Involved Shooting

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Colorado Springs Police Department on Thursday released body camera footage of the Aug. 3 officer-involved shooting of 19-year-old De’Von Bailey.

NYPD Evaluating Effectiveness of Mental Health Programs

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The 22-question survey was sent out Thursday — one day after the ninth NYPD officer committed suicide this year.

Philadelphia Police Lauded for Handling of Standoff That Left 6 Officers Wounded

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Philadelphia officials on Thursday praised the Police Department for resolving the previous day’s 7 1/2-hour standoff that left six cops wounded by gunfire and trapped two others inside a Tioga house for hours.

Illinois State Police Trooper Shot While Serving Warrant; Suspect in Custody

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An Illinois State Police trooper was wounded while attempting to serve a search warrant.

Training Day: Chest seals, tourniquets and trauma dressings

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Challenge EMS providers’ critical thinking and appropriate skill deployment with these 3 penetrating trauma scenarios, ranging from moderate hemorrhage to exsanguination

CAL FIRE pilots train on Zeus aircraft

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The C-130 Zeus aircraft requires three crew members to operate and can stay in the air for four to five hours depending on the weight and load the aircraft

NIOSH conducts EMS injury risk management study

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

EMS at higher injury risk than all other U.S. professions

2019 winners of National EMS Awards of Excellence announced

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Recipients will receive their award during the opening ceremony at NAEMT’s General Membership Meeting

17 injured in Ky. crash between truck and Greyhound bus

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

First responders have cleared the scene where 17 people were injured in a two-vehicle collision between a commercial truck and a Greyhound bus

17 injured in Ky. crash between truck and Greyhound bus

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

First responders have cleared the scene where 17 people were injured in a two-vehicle collision between a commercial truck and a Greyhound bus

Misconceptions about airway management and the industry gold standard

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Our co-hosts discuss airway management and its important role in EMS, including common misconceptions and the standard all providers should strive for

17 hospitalized in NC multi-passenger van crash

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials say one victim was found trapped inside the van and responders used hydraulic rescue cutters and saws to remove them

17 hospitalized in NC multi-passenger van crash

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials say one victim was found trapped inside the van and responders used hydraulic rescue cutters and saws to remove them

Product of the Day: US Digital Designs — Phoenix G2 Fire Station Alerting

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Phoenix G2 system integrates crystal-clear text-to-speech technology, mobile app, and high-contrast message signs.

An Effective Aerial Platform Operations Program

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

For overwatch, support, surveillance, or search and rescue, one thing a UAV can’t do is have an officer inside

Social Media and Contemporary Law Enforcement

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Creating your brand is more than click, set up, and save

How to Select Off-duty Footwear

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

You might be off-duty, but that doesn't mean you are off your feet, so choose your shoes wisely

Transformational Tech

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

How wearable technology is transforming law enforcement

When Body Armor Saves Officers…When Body Armor Saves Families

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two stories of officers saved by body armor and how the manufacturer gave back

The Uniform and Family

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

I knew it was going to be an emotional experience, but I wasn’t prepared for how touching the stories were going to be. The general media likes using words like “victim” and “survivor” a lot. They’re easy words to convey context and push the...

An Inside Look at the Speer Factory

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

How the Speer LE Gold Dot G2 Duty Handgun round makes its way from formed brass to ready for your pistol

The Vanguard of Leadership

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

If you go back through the August 2019 issue of Law Enforcement Technology you’ll find articles regarding body armor, the latest technology that is connected to you/on your person as you work a shift, precision engagement of targets from an aerial...

How a SWAT Competition Prepares Teams for Crisis

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

We set our sights on an annual Texas-based program that targets tactical skills

How wearable tech can help monitor first responders’ health

Posted on August 16, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Now EMS providers can directly monitor their risk of life-threatening conditions

Police: Kan. firefighter at fault in fire truck crash with dump truck

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The dump truck sustained minor damage in a two-vehicle crash involving a Kansas fire truck

5 tips for managing the PEA cardiac arrest patient

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Since the differential diagnosis for PEA is wide and ACLS offers little guidance, try these tips to improve the chances of patient survival

U.S. Sen. McConnell helps to secure $6.6M grant for Ky. opioid rural program

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The money will be used to establish a Rural Center of Excellence on Substance Use Disorder to oversee and provide treatment in 47 rural counties across the state

McConnell helps secure $6.6M grant for rural Ky. opioid program

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The money will be used to establish a Rural Center of Excellence on Substance Use Disorder to oversee and provide treatment in 47 rural counties across the state

Veinity Fair: Evaluating jugular venous distension

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ever ogle the veins of someone you're being introduced to? You're not alone

Veinity Fair: Evaluating jugular venous distension

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ever ogle the veins of someone you're being introduced to? You're not alone

4 residents rescued from third floor of Mass. house fire

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Sixty Worcester firefighters worked to control the fast-moving blaze; some were treated for heat exhaustion and smoke inhalation

Code 3 Podcast: Are you ready to fight fire in the wildland/urban interface?

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Orange County Fire Authority Chief Brian Fennessy talks about the “new normal” of structural and wildland firefighting crossover

NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., family rescued from fiery plane crash

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials credited the quick response by area EMS and firefighters for helping the passengers and mitigating any potential environmental problems with fuel runoff

NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., family rescued from fiery plane crash

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officials credited the quick response by area EMS and firefighters for helping the passengers and mitigating any potential environmental problems with fuel runoff

EMS protocols all paramedics should follow

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Training paramedics and EMTs on changes to EMS protocols ensures they’re performing to the best of their ability within the parameters of recognized standards

Fighting fire from an ambulance: A difficult but rewarding job

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighter/paramedics assigned to the ambulance face unique challenges but also gain unparalleled experience

Fighting fire from an ambulance: A difficult but rewarding job

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Firefighter/paramedics assigned to the ambulance face unique challenges but also gain unparalleled experience

Training in Active Shooter Response Gear

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Active shooter response gear is heavy and can change the way you perform, so you need to know how to compensate.

St. Louis Crews Save Four Children in Burning Apartment

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Three of the children who were pulled out of the fire were in cardiac arrest, but all four eventually were breathing on their own and in stable condition at the hospital.

Residents purr-turbed over cat’s ouster from police force

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

MOCKSVILLE, N.C. — A North Carolina police department is evicting its pet cat named Sgt. Butters, and some residents are mounting a campaign to bring him back.

The Winston-Salem Journal reports the Mocksville Police Department's resident feline needed a new home after concerns were raised about a pregnant woman who worked in the building and said she couldn't be around cats. Officers had rescued the cat last year after it was seen hanging around the department.

A Save Sarge Butters Facebook page had nearly 600 members by Thursday afternoon.

Sgt. Butters has been credited with helping to restore the department's tarnished image after a jury awarded $4.1 million in damages to three former officers who said two town officials fired them in 2011 for reporting allegations of corruptions to state officials.

Sweet dreams twitter world #sargebutters #mocksvillepd #cats #CatsOfTwitter #catsofinstagram #CatsOnTwitter #kittyzen #sleeping #communitypolicing #therapycat pic.twitter.com/wxeTkWvihW

— Mocksville Police Department (@MocksvilleD) August 14, 2019


Man wearing TV on head leaves old television sets on porches of Va. homes

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Cliff Pinckard Advance Ohio Media, Cleveland

HENRICO COUNTY, Va. — Mysterious figures are channeling the spirit of old technology in Virginia.

Residents woke up Sunday morning to find more than 50 old tube televisions sitting in front of their homes.

How did they get there? People wearing the shell of an old TV on their heads are seen on security videos carrying the sets and gently placing them on the porches.

It’s the second time it’s happened, according to WTVR. It occurred last summer in a different neighborhood in Henrico County.

Residents are speculating on why it’s happening, but they’re taking it in stride.

“It’s sort of funny... He wants to be known as the TV Santa Claus, I don’t know,” Jim Brooksbank tells WTVR after he found a 13-inch TV in front of his house. “I can’t think of any technology or political point that would be valid here. It’s just a senseless prank.”

Henrico police say more than one person is involved in the prank. Police and officials with the solid waste department removed the TVs from the neighborhood.

“It’s summer, and people are getting ready to go back to school,” Brooksbank tells WTVR. “Maybe TV man was just ready to strike and put a little humor in our lives.”

©2019 Advance Ohio Media, Cleveland


Calif. Supreme Court tightens standards for police search of homes

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Bob Egelko San Francisco Chronicle

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Police need a warrant or an emergency to enter someone’s home, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday, discarding a 20-year-old opinion that would allow entry for less-urgent reasons.

One’s home is the place “where privacy expectations are most heightened,” the court said, quoting a 1986 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. Citing their own ruling in a 2005 case, the justices said police who lack a warrant can enter only when “swift action” is needed “to prevent imminent danger to life or serious damage to property, or to forestall the imminent escape of a suspect or destruction of evidence.”

The 7-0 ruling rejected a standard proposed in 1999 by three justices that would allow police to enter a private home for “community caretaking” to meet needs that fell short of an emergency — and using any evidence they noticed after entering.

Officers, for example, could cite “the possibility someone inside required assistance or property needed protection” to justify entering without a warrant, then-Justice Janice Rogers Brown wrote in the 1999 case, upholding a home search in Contra Costa County. Arguing for that standard in the current case, Attorney General Xavier Becerra’s office said “community care-taking” could include such needs as “assisting those who cannot care for themselves” or “returning lost children to anxious parents.”

Although Brown’s opinion lacked the majority support needed for a binding precedent, it has been followed by some lower courts in California, including the appellate court in the current case. That court allowed prosecutors to use evidence of guns and drugs that officers found in the home of a Santa Barbara man who was disarmed, searched and handcuffed outside before they entered the home.

The state’s high court ruled the evidence inadmissible and allowed the homeowner, Willie Ovieda, to withdraw his guilty plea to charges of manufacturing illegal drugs and possessing an assault weapon. He had been sentenced to probation.

The case illustrated the sometimes-elusive boundary between private citizens’ need for protection in unforeseen circumstances and their right to be free of government intrusion. The Constitution’s Fourth Amendment prohibits “unreasonable search and seizure,” a term that is still being defined in a technological age nearly 230 years later.

To search someone’s property, police ordinarily obtain a warrant from a court based on “probable cause” of incriminating evidence at the site. The issue in Monday’s case was what officers must show to justify entry without a warrant.

Police went to Ovieda’s home in June 2015 after getting messages from family members that he was suicidal and had access to a gun. They surrounded the home while Ovieda was inside with two friends, a husband and wife, who took away a gun he was trying to grab, the court said. The woman then led Ovieda outside, where police handcuffed and searched him.

Officers then entered the home, with guns drawn, in what they called a “protective sweep” to look for other weapons and see if anyone needed help, the court said. Inside, they found marijuana and drug production equipment, along with various firearms. Ovieda pleaded guilty after a trial judge ruled that the entry was legal and the evidence was admissible.

In Monday’s ruling, Justice Carol Corrigan said police had safe legal options — they could have taken Ovieda into custody for a mental health evaluation, then obtained a warrant to search his home for guns. But without a warrant or an emergency, she said, they had no justification for entering the home.

“If all that is required is the possibility that someone in some house might require aid, any officer on patrol might urge that people in homes often need help and the officer entered to make sure assistance was not required,” Corrigan said.

American Civil Liberties Union attorney Ian Kysel, who filed arguments supporting Ovieda, said the ruling “ensures that, unless there is a life-threatening emergency, a judge will issue a warrant before police can force their way into a home.”

©2019 the San Francisco Chronicle


AL Woman Who Stole $640K from VFDs Sentenced

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Andrea Payne, treasurer of the Talladega County Association of Volunteer Fire Departments from 2012 to 2018, used the embezzled funds on bills and cruises.

Union: Cleveland Chief Wrongly Had FF Sign Petition

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"How could an employee refuse the request of his chief?" stated a fire union letter about allegations Chief Angelo Calvillo sought a firefighter's support for the mayor's re-election.

Experience junkie or gadget guru: Which are you?

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Sponsored by ZT Knives

By PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

What’s the secret to happiness? Truth is, it’s different for everyone. Take our quick quiz to find out which makes you happier – tinkering with your toys or making new memories.


Video: Commissioner Talked to Suspect to End Philadelphia Standoff

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

To end a lengthy Philadelphia standoff that left six officers shot and wounded, Police Commissioner Richard Ross used some "unorthodox" tactics, including speaking directly with the suspect.

Review: HAIX Black Eagle tactical and athletic boots

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Sponsored by HAIX

By Warren Wilson for PoliceOne BrandFocus

Law enforcement is an equipment-dependent profession. We spend quite a bit of time researching our firearms, holsters, vehicles, flashlights, et al. We invest this time in the pursuit of equipment which will help us stay safe and injury free.

Do we make the same investment of time in researching our duty boots? Probably not. We should probably start paying a little more attention to some of the most health-critical pieces of equipment we use every day.

I recall, a few decades ago, a department in which administration required officers to wear a duty boot with slick outsoles (the part that touches the ground). They wanted to ensure that officers weren’t dragging mud into the building at the end of their shift. Not coincidentally, the department was struggling with how to address an epidemic of fall-related injuries to their officers.

Thankfully, times have changed. A duty-grade set of boots should not only protect us from falls, but also against long-term injuries to our feet, hips and back. Budget boots do neither of those things.

Tradition meets innovation

HAIX (pronounced, “hikes”) started in the shoe business in Bavaria in 1948. Bavarian shoe making is rich in tradition and is also established in the workwear, forestry and outdoor industry, thanks to the quality of its functional shoes and safety shoes. Building on that tradition with cutting-edge research and development, HAIX has expanded its market into the U.S. and its offerings include functional footwear for firefighters and police officers.

HAIX combines the German reputation for engineering with advanced athletic shoe technology. Manufactured entirely in Europe, these boots are reportedly some the sturdiest, most comfortable footwear available for American public safety professionals, so I put that claim to the test.

HAIX challenged us to wear-test a few of their new products which are aimed at the law enforcement market. They sent me one pair of Black Eagle Athletic 2.0 T High Side Zip boots and one pair of Black Eagle Tactical 2.0 GTX High Side Zip boots to abuse. I used them for two weeks – every time I worked the range and quite a bit off duty as well. I was impressed.

Common features

Both of these boots have side zippers, pull-on loops and are oil resistant with anti-slip soles. One of the most remarkable features is what they call the “HAIX Climate System” – the tops of the boots have vent holes which pump hot air out and let outside air in with every step. The soles are also insulated to protect against extreme hot or cold.

Both boots are constructed with anti-static material and are metal free. Their slip-resistant soles have “self-cleaning” tread (to satisfy that 20th century police administrator) which release caked mud and debris when the boot is flexed. They’re also non-marking.

Giving the HAIX Black Eagle Athletic 2.0 T High Side Zip a test run

The HAIX Black Eagle Athletic 2.0 T High Side Zip boots are much lighter than any others I’ve ever worn, except for a few that proved too fragile for duty work. According to my scale, these boots each weigh 24 ounces. For comparison, one of my high-quality running shoes is 14 ounces and my current uniform duty boots from a well-known manufacturer are 31 ounces.

I would not hesitate to run in these. In fact, I did. The word, “athletic,” is right there in the name, so I thought I’d see if that word was properly applied to this product.

Keep in mind, these are the high side zip boots and HAIX offers them in shorter, lighter models. Still, a normal three-mile run really sold me.

The anti-bacterial soles are well cushioned. They’re advertised as moisture-wicking with “airflow” channels and they live up to that claim. The heel clip stabilizes the rear of the foot, making sprints comfortable and sturdy. They put a lot of thought into this product all the way down to the laces and the way the boot transfers traction forces to the lacing elements.

Water testing the HAIX Black Eagle Tactical 2.0 GTX High Side Zip

The types of weather that made SWAT callouts and training days unbearable were rain, snow or heat. The Black Eagle Tactical 2.0 GTX is advertised to be waterproof and has “Sun Reflect” technology to minimize the effects of extreme heat.

I’ve had a few boots which made that claim but proved otherwise during actual use. GORE-TEX is a great thing but works only when properly integrated into the boot. How better to test this feature than to find a puddle and let them do their thing? I tried putting the boots directly into the aforementioned puddle by hand. I learned one thing about boot testing: waterproof boots float. I had to actually put them on and stand there for 10 minutes.

The test went well and absolutely no water seeped into my socks. These boots breathe very well, and the heel and midsole are tough, but comfortable. They absorb shock better than anything I’ve worn before in spite of their light weight.

The right height for the job

All Black Eagle Tactical Series boots are available in three different heights. I prefer the high side zip for normal law enforcement activities for the protection offered to the ankle and lower leg. Cops who work bicycle patrol or other duties where shorts are necessary will appreciate the abbreviated versions of the boots I tested. The next time you’re looking at duty boots, give these a try. I think you’ll be as impressed as I am.

Do your own wear-test

If you want to give these boots a try yourself, here’s your chance:

HAIX is holding a contest to give 1,000 law enforcement officers the opportunity to get a free pair of the Black Eagle Tactical 2.0 GTX High Side Zip or the Black Eagle Athletic 2.0 T High Side Zip. In exchange for their feedback, wear testers can keep the boots. Click here to find out how to enter.

About the author

Warren Wilson is a lieutenant with the Enid Police Department in Oklahoma. He is a former SWAT team leader, current firearms instructor and writer. He has been a full-time law enforcement officer since 1996.


FF’s Helmet Camera Shows Fatal NC Blast’s Aftermath

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Durham Fire Department released footage showing the destruction caused by an April 11 gas explosion that killed one person and injured 25 others, including nine firefighters.

Phalanx Defense Systems to Focus on Fire/EMS Designs

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Phalanx equips agencies with specialty systems that aren’t police hand-me-downs.

9th NYPD Officer Dies by Suicide This Year

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the New York Police Department died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in Queens on Wednesday evening—the ninth NYPD officer to complete suicide in 2019.

Alabama Officer Receives Thoughtful Note from Lawn Care Service

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Reece Smith with the Moody Police Department found a note from the lawn care service that regularly tends to his neighbor's yard stating that the worker just realized that he might be disrupting the officer's sleep."

Ohio Officer Cleared of Wrongdoing in OIS

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Sharonville (OH) Police Department who shot a man in a hotel earlier this week has been cleared of any wrongdoing by the Hamilton County Prosecutor.

Good Samaritan Helps Canadian Officer Save Drowning Woman

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A young man saw an officer about to jump into an indoor pool to save a woman from drowning and bravely jumped in to assist in the effort.

Officers Transport Flood-Stranded Daycare Kids to Parents in Armored Vehicle

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Summerville (SC) Police Department saw that there was an imminent danger for kids at a local daycare facility attempting to get to their parents through street flooded with rainwater.

Illinois Department Welcomes New K-9, Asks Public for Name Suggestions

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Galesburg (IL) Police Department announced on social media that it has recently welcomed a new K-9 to its ranks.

Chicago Police Department Retires Stars of Three Fallen Officers

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Chicago Police Department on Tuesday retired the stars of three officers killed in the line of duty last year.

Montana Department to Host Back-to-School Event Emphasizing Safety and School Supplies

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officers with the Cut Bank (MT) Police Department will soon host the fifth annual "Kids Day in the Park" event, using the occasion to emphasize school safety and give free backpacks filled with school supplies to students in need.

Are you ready for suicide by cop?

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Senior Contributor
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Senior Contributor

A suicide-by-cop (SBC) incident – where a subject deliberately provokes police into killing him – can happen to any cop, at any time, on any shift. Cops will make every effort to end an SBC situation nonviolently, but sometimes the suicidal subject will not allow that outcome. Like everything else you might encounter on patrol, an SBC is something for which you must prepare.

Interested in getting the opinion of an officer who is also a clinical psychologist, I connected with Dr. John Azar-Dickens, a licensed clinical psychologist and sworn law enforcement officer with the Rome (Ga.) Police Department.

Azar-Dickens told me that in addition to scenario-based tactical training, officers must also do scenario-based visual imagery.

“The first step is to accept and realize that an SBC scenario is possible,” he said. “None of us want it to happen, but we must accept it as part of the job. If we fail to accept it as a likely reality, we then fail to prepare mentally for it.”

Acceptance of the likelihood leads to a process of preparation in which the officer can create scenarios in his mind of an SBC-type scenario, going through the event step-by-step and actively working it through in their mind. Essentially, the officer practices the event in his mind over and over again. The images should be made as vivid as possible and the officer should visualize himself performing successfully and confidently.

“As brilliant as the brain may be, it cannot tell the difference between something being imagined and it actually happening,” Azar-Dickens said. “When we look at research comparing athletes who use visual imagery in addition to active practice versus those who just use active practice alone, we find those who use the imagery are more consistent, more confident in their performance, and better mentally prepared for the stress associated with performance.”

Similarly, if an officer has actively played out multiple SBC scenarios in his or her mind, the brain will not consider it a new experience if it happens in the “real world.” Consequently not only performance, but emotional reactions are likely to be more productive and useful rather than debilitating.

Your Own Well-being

Preparation also involves being healthy and well before the event occurs. Essentially, proper personal wellness prepares the mind and body for stress and the types of traumatic events that officers will experience on duty.

“As we know with all traumatic events, the person who tends to fare better is the one who is healthy and well-balanced before the event occurs. So, taking care of oneself through regular exercise, proper amounts of sleep and appropriate daily management of stress is critical in preparing for this type of event,” Azar-Dickens said.

This begs the question, what are possible steps to take to ensure an officer’s own mental and emotional well-being prior to a suicide-by-cop event?

“I think a lot of this is the officer understanding what is suicide by cop and the role the officer must play. This type of event involves a distraught and emotionally imbalanced individual using the officer to commit suicide. Thus, the officer is thrust into a situation in which he or she is the victim and essentially becomes victimized by the individual.”

In an SBC, the officer essentially has the role of victim. The officer is essentially being used by a suicidal individual to end their life, and this can drive a lot of the emotional conflicts.

“This shift in role and lack of control over the situation can be challenging for the officer to handle. As simple as it may sound, understanding and thinking about these situations for what they are can have a great mental and emotional benefit in moving through this type of situation,” Azar-Dickens said.

It’s Not Your Fault

If someone is determined to commit suicide by cop, there is not a lot that can be done to do to stop them. While verbal skills and de-escalation techniques are useful, those things are not always going to work.

Some people simply can’t be helped, and all of the perfect words and actions in the world still won’t change things. Azar-Dickens told me that this is an important concept for the officer to integrate into their thoughts about the event. It’s one he’s also familiar with as a clinical psychologist.

“This is something that plagues psychologists and psychiatrists in that we do everything possible to stop someone from ending their life, but in reality, we know that those individuals who are determined to kill themselves will often do so regardless of what we do. In other words, we can do everything right and even then it does not make a difference,” Azar-Dickens said. “The officer must understand that while a life was lost and this is tragic, it is not the officer’s fault. Officers will frequently blame themselves in this type of situation and believe there is something they could have done to stop it. They tend to play the scenario over and over again in their mind and may get caught up in second-guessing their decisions.”

Officers involved in an suicide-by-cop incident must understand what happened is not their fault. Keeping this in mind will help in the healing process following such an event.

This article, originally published on 07/26/2013, has been updated.


Massachusetts Teen Creates Sign Language Class for Local Police

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When she was old enough to drive, Catherine Fitzgerald, who has profound hearing loss, was worried about what would happen if she was ever pulled over by a police officer.

Driver Charged in Crash That Killed Florida Sheriff’s Deputy

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The driver hospitalized after last month’s crash that killed Broward Sheriff’s Office Deputy Benjamin Nimtz was arrested Wednesday on 13 charges and citations Wednesday in relation to the crash.

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Recalls Trying to Talk Gunman Intro Surrendering

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross said Thursday that he personally tried to talk the gunman who wounded six police officers into surrendering in North Philadelphia’s Tioga section, but it was “the tear gas that ultimately brought him outside.”

Family of Fallen New Jersey Trooper Cheering on Little League World Series Team Named After Him

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Elmora Troopers – 13 All-Stars from the Elmora Youth League – haven’t forgotten New Jersey State Police Trooper Thomas J. Hanratty, who was killed in 1992 when he was hit by a vehicle while conducting a traffic stop on Route 78.

MI Firefighter Suffers Burns in House Fire

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"The training kicked in, and that’s what helped in this case," Saginaw's fire chief said about how the crews handled the incident early Thursday.

Ohio gunman’s parents apologize for ‘insensitive’ obituary

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By John Seewer and Dan Sewell Associated Press

CINCINNATI — The parents of the Dayton gunman have apologized for the wording in his obituary that didn't mention the mass shooting that left nine dead, including his younger sister.

Stephen and Moira Betts issued a statement that said the obituary for Connor Betts was "insensitive in not acknowledging the terrible tragedy that he created."

They said they wanted to reflect the son they knew and weren't trying to "minimize horror of his last act."

The obituary described the 24-year-old as a "funny, articulate and intelligent man with striking blue eyes and a kind smile" before it was taken down Wednesday by a funeral home in their hometown of Bellbrook, Ohio.

Betts opened fire in a popular entertainment district in Dayton on Aug. 4 that left nine dead and at least 17 wounded by gunfire. Police say officers shot and killed Betts just outside the doors of a crowded bar.

It's not known whether Betts targeted his 22-year-old sister, Megan. They had spent an hour together at a bar in the same area before the shooting.

The family will be holding private memorial services for both of their children.

Ethan Kollie, a longtime friend of Betts who told investigators he bought the body armor, a 100-round magazine and a key part of the gun Betts used in the attack will be in court Thursday after a judge balked at releasing him from jail.

Authorities have said there's no indication Kollie knew Betts was planning the mass shooting. But Kollie is charged with lying on a federal firearms form while buying a pistol not used in the shooting.

Prosecutors said Kollie first spoke with investigators just hours after the shooting.

Kollie's attorney wants him released on house arrest.

A judge has been reviewing where Kollie would stay under house arrest with electronic monitoring and other conditions.


Suspected Philadelphia Cop Shooter Has Extensive and Violent Criminal Record

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

In 2008, he was convicted of escaping, fleeing from police, and resisting arrest. Along the way, he beat criminal charges on everything from kidnapping to attempted murder.

Wis. fugitive survives 3 years in makeshift bunker

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

RINGLE, Wis. — A Wisconsin fugitive wanted on child sexual assault and child pornography charges hid out for more than three years in a makeshift bunker powered by solar panels and a pedal generator before a hunter stumbled onto him last week, police said.

WSAW-TV reports that several months ago Thomas Nelson of Wausau found a bunker with a log door carved into an embankment on state land in the township of Ringle west of Wausau, about 145 miles (233 kilometers) north of Madison, the state Capitol. He became curious and returned to the bunker on Friday morning to see what was inside.

The door was unlatched so he went inside. He discovered 44-year-old Jeremiah Button, who disappeared in February 2016 just weeks before he was scheduled to stand trial on child sexual assault and child pornography charges.

"I pushed the door open, and I look inside and I can see canned foods, there's little storage boxes, and I'm like ... I gotta go in," Nelson told the television station. "I come around the corner a bit and there he is, laying in his bed. I mean, I was shaking when I went in, I was shaking when I went out."

He moved away and called police, guiding them to the bunker's door. A 20-minute stand-off ensued before Button surrendered. Marathon County Sheriff's Deputy Matt Kecker said Button seemed almost glad for human interaction.

Kecker said Button told deputies that he had been building the bunker while his case was moving through court, stockpiling it with items he found in the Marathon County landfill.

Sheriff's Lt. Jeff Stefonek said Button set up solar panels on the bunker's roof to power LED lights, radios, cooling fans and all manner of electronic equipment. He also had a pedal-powered generator for cloudy days. The bunker was small enough that it stayed warm in winter and cool in summer.

"He was not only surviving, but thriving in this structure through all of the different supplies he was able to find," Stefonek said.

Button is back in custody on a $100,000 cash bond and is due back in court for a pre-trial conference on Sept. 16. His attorneys, public defenders Anne Renc and Jessica Phelps, didn't immediately return phone messages Wednesday. Court records show they were assigned to Button's case on Tuesday.

His attorney in 2016, Gary Kryshak, withdrew from the case in February 2017, a year after Button fled. He didn't immediately return a message left at his office Wednesday.


Video shows Calif. deputy shoot suspect who climbed into cop car

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Nate Gartrell The Mercury News

SANTA ROSA, Calif. — The Sonoma County Sheriff’s office released officer body camera footage Wednesday, showing a deputy shooting several times into his own patrol car, after a robbery suspect hopped inside.

The deputy, David Edney, fired six times into the driver’s side of his car, after 42-year-old Brad Baymon, of Minnesota, climbed into the car and closed the door. Moments earlier, Edney tried to stop Baymon by using a Taser on him, and in the process allowed the suspect to get in between Edney and the police vehicle.

“I left (the car) exposed like an idiot, and he jumped right in,” Edney later told a responding Santa Rosa officer, a conversation also caught on the video. He told the officer that when he attempted to force Baymon out of the car, Baymon appeared to reach for a knife.

“So I backed up, closed it, and he was trying to put it in drive and I just shot him, I was like, ‘He’s not taking my fucking car,'” Edney told the officer, later adding, “I’ve got my gun in there, my rifle.”

Edney was attempting to contact Baymon, who’d been identified as the person who’d attempted to stab an employee while stealing a pair of shoes from a store at the Santa Rosa Plaza Mall. In the video, Edney approaches Baymon, who was walking down a sidewalk on Morgan Street. Baymon ignores the deputy’s calls to stop, and continues to walk.

That’s when Edney warns Baymon that he’s going to use a Taser on him. When the Taser fails to have any effect, Edney runs in front of the direction Baymon was walking. Baymon responds by turning around and headed toward the deputy’s car, with the front door wide open.

At that point, there was little Edney could do to stop him from getting inside.

In the ensuing fracas, Edney attempts to pull Baymon from the car, but Baymon shoves him away and closes the door. That’s when Edney steps back, near the sidewalk, and shoots into the driver’s side door. The window is shattered, and Edney calls onto his radio that shots were fired.

After the shooting, Edney yelled “Don’t move” and “Let me see your hands” to Baymon several times. Within seconds, several more patrol cars arrive on the scene and

Baymon was treated for his injuries, and survived, authorities said. He was charged with robbery, carjacking, assault with a deadly weapon, and possessing a concealed knife.

Sonoma officials said Edney has been a deputy for nearly five years, and before that worked for another Bay Area police department for several years. He was placed on administrative leave following the shooting.

©2019 the San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.)


Officer kills himself, 9th NYPD suicide this year

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

NEW YORK — An off-duty veteran New York city police officer killed himself on Wednesday, becoming the ninth police officer to die by suicide this year, authorities said.

The officer with over 25 years of service shot himself in the head at his Laurelton home in Queens just after 6 p.m., officials said. He was rushed to a hospital in Manhasset where he was pronounced dead. His name was not immediately released.

The tragedy comes just one day after another off-duty police officer fatally shot himself at his home in Yonkers.

"To anyone who may be struggling, know that there is support available," the department said in a Twitter post that announced the latest officer suicide.

Police Commissioner James O'Neill has declared a mental health crisis in the department amid the recent spate of officer suicides. He has sent messages reminding officers of available resources and urging them to seek help.

[Read: Officers share their experiences coping with stress]

Police officers have a higher suicide rate than the general public experts say, in part because of their ready access to firearms.

The NYPD suffered another tragedy today with the loss of another officer to suicide. To those who may be facing struggles - Help is always available, you are not alone. pic.twitter.com/Va0v3aNkl5

— NYPD NEWS (@NYPDnews) August 13, 2019


Two IL FFs Compete Together on ‘American Ninja Warrior’

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Known as the Towers of Power, Streamwood firefighter Brandon Mears and Aurora firefighter Dan Polizzi will compete in the NBC show's city finals next week.

Suspect in shooting of 6 Philly LEOs called lawyer during standoff

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Kristen De Groot and Claudia Lauer Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — A gunman barricaded himself inside a Philadelphia rowhouse for 7½ hours, firing on police and wounding six in a standoff that trapped two officers and paralyzed a neighborhood, all while the commissioner and the shooter's attorney tried to negotiate a surrender.

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross expressed amazement that the standoff, which began Wednesday when officers attempted to serve a drug warrant, ended with no one dead and no life-threatening injuries, despite the gunman firing over 100 rounds.

It "could have been far worse," Ross said Thursday outside the Philadelphia Police Department. "This was a very dynamic situation, one that I hope we never see again."

The gunman came out of the home after police used tear gas. He was taken to a hospital for evaluation and then placed in custody.

As officers flooded the scene, the situation grew chaotic at times. Police took to Twitter to ask media helicopters to pull back at the beginning of the standoff, saying they feared the gunman might be able to see police positions in the footage. People who had been blocked or pulled from their homes clamored for information, and at times, some onlookers shouted at or shoved officers. Many ignored orders by police to stay back, ducking under or stepping over police tape.

At one point, two men launched a drone, and when police tracked it down and confiscated it, a crowd of people already on edge shouted for the officers to pay attention to the shooter and not the drone.

A nearby day care center was locked down for hours and later evacuated, with police officers helping carry babies and two city buses set up where shaken children waited for their parents to pick them up.

While standoffs with police are not uncommon, the situation in Philadelphia drew particular attention because of how long gunfire was exchanged and the fact that the commissioner made the unusual decision to speak to the shooter directly and that two police officers were trapped during the standoff.

The suspect was identified by Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner as Maurice Hill, 36. Krasner said Hill had an extensive criminal history, including drug, gun and robbery charges. Krasner said Hill should not have been on the streets but stopped short of saying there was any specific failure by law enforcement.

"I think it's fair to say the criminal justice system, imperfect as it is, did not stop this terrible incident," he told reporters at a news conference Thursday.

Pennsylvania prison officials said a man with the same name and date of birth served about 2½ years on drug charges and was paroled in 2006 and served more than a year for aggravated assault and before being released in 2013.

State court online court records indicate that man had multiple arrests in Philadelphia and adjacent Delaware County between 2001 and 2012, producing convictions that include perjury, fleeing and eluding, escape and weapons offenses.

U.S. Attorney William McSwain told reporters that Hill was prohibited from possessing firearms because of past convictions.

Hill's lawyer, Shaka Johnson, said Hill called him during the standoff asking for help surrendering. Johnson then called Krasner, and the two men patched in both Hill and the police commissioner, according to Krasner.

Hill told Johnson he wanted to make it out alive to see his newborn daughter and teenage son again.

President Donald Trump weighed in on the shootout Thursday morning, saying the gunman "should never have been allowed to be on the streets."

"He had a long and very dangerous criminal record," he wrote in the tweet. "Looked like he was having a good time after his capture, and after wounding so many police. Long sentence — must get much tougher on street crime!"

In the aftermath of the standoff, Philadelphia's top federal prosecutor said it was precipitated by a disrespect for law enforcement that the district attorney is championing.

"This vile rhetoric puts our police in danger," U.S. Attorney William McSwain said Thursday in a news release, saying Krasner "routinely calls police and prosecutors corrupt and racist."

Ross, the commissioner, said the gunman had at least an AR-15 military-style weapon and a handgun. On Thursday, politicians from Pennsylvania called for new gun-control measures. Democratic Mayor Jim Kenney told reporters called on state and federal lawmakers to "step up or step aside" and let cities deal with the problem themselves. He did not give specifics on what he wanted to see done.

The standoff started around 4:30 p.m. as officers went to a home in a north Philadelphia neighborhood of brick and stone rowhomes to serve a narcotics warrant in an operation "that went awry almost immediately," Ross said.

Many officers "had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets," Ross said.

The six officers who were struck by gunfire have been released from hospitals.

Two other officers who were trapped inside the house for about five hours after the shooting broke out were freed by a SWAT team well after dark fell.

Ross said the reason he made the unusual decision to be the person negotiating with Hill was because he was "so worried" about his officers stuck inside.

"I wouldn't be able to live with myself if I was 200 feet away," he said Thursday.

Three people who officers had taken into custody in the house before the shooting started were also safely evacuated, police said.

Police tried to push crowds of onlookers and residents back from the scene. In police radio broadcasts, officers could be heard calling for backup as reports of officers getting shot poured in.

"There was just a lot of screaming and chaos," said Abdul Rahman Muhammad, 21, an off-duty medic.


About 100 FFs Battle 2-Alarm AZ Construction Site Fire

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"As soon as this thing kicked out, we saw it, and I gotta tell you our heart dropped a little bit," a Tempe fire official said about the huge blaze.

HAIX Looking for 1,000 Officers to Wear-Test Boots

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

HAIX will provide all boots to the chosen wear-testers free of charge. Officers who receive the boots must agree to wear them on active duty for four weeks in September/October.

Firefighter Suffers Dehydration Battling WA Wildfire

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighter was taken from the scene of the Wiser Lake Fire south of Lynden and transferred to a medical unit, according to emergency broadcasts.

Firefighter Suffers Dehydration Battling WA Wildfire

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The firefighter was taken from the scene of the Wiser Lake Fire south of Lynden and transferred to a medical unit, according to emergency broadcasts.

Roswell, GA, Fire Dept. Puts Heavy Rescue in Service

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Roswell, GA, Fire Department has put in service a new 22-foot heavy rescue, built by SVI Trucks on a Sutphen cab and chassis.

Ex-FF Files Workers Comp Lawsuit Against OK City

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Former Ardmore firefighter Brian McDaniel, who retired in January after being diagnosed with prostate cancer nearly a year earlier, had two workers compensation claims denied.

Six Philadelphia Cops Wounded in Standoff with Gunman

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"It’s nothing short of a miracle that we don’t have multiple officers killed today," Philadelphia's police chief said of the shootout that ended with the shooter surrendering.

SC Department’s Fully Staffed Apparatus May be Brief

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five Columbia-Richland apparatus are now properly staffed, but the department must convince county officials to restore some of its budget for that to continue.

6 officers shot in Philly; 2 LEOs trapped in active scene

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Other officers are being treated for non-gunshot injuries

6 officers shot in Philly; 2 LEOs trapped in active scene

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Other officers are being treated for non-gunshot injuries

A look back at the most important changes to NFPA 1851 that every firefighter should know

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This crash course has everything you need to know on how the standard has evolved since 2001

Arrest Made in Crash That Killed Florida Sheriff’s Deputy

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An arrest has been made in connection with a crash that killed Broward Sheriff’s Deputy Benjamin Nimtz last month.

Four Juveniles, One Adult Charged With Murder Following Crime Spree

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four juveniles were charged as adults with first degree murder, following a crime spree that ended in the death of a 14-year-old boy.

Four Juveniles, One Adult Charged With Murder Following Crime Spree

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four juveniles were charged as adults with first degree murder, following a crime spree that ended in the death of a 14-year-old boy.

Four Juveniles, One Adult Charged With Murder Following Crime Spree

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four juveniles were charged as adults with first degree murder, following a crime spree that ended in the death of a 14-year-old boy.

Coast Guard Recovers 1,300 Pounds of Marijuana Floating Off Coast of Catalina Island

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The U.S. Coast Guard recovered about 1,300 pounds of baled marijuana off Catalina Island, authorities said Wednesday.

NYPD Officer Becomes Ninth in Department to Commit Suicide This Year

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty NYPD officer shot himself to death Wednesday, becoming the ninth department officer to die by apparent suicide this year.

Authorities Say Kansas Deputy Wanted in Felony Case Has Left the Country

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office said in an email Wednesday that Derick A. Chandler’s “location has been determined to be outside of the United States” but wouldn’t say where exactly he went.

Shots Fired at Sacramento Detective in Unmarked Car

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

West Sacramento police say they are searching for a suspect vehicle after someone fired shots at a detective in an unmarked car Wednesday morning, but the officer was not harmed.

Connecticut Police Release Children’s Stick Figure Sketches of Suspect

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Eager to help with a police search, young witnesses to a motorcycle crash in Berlin provided graphic depictions of the fleeing suspect.

First responders sign Texas flag in the aftermath of El Paso shooting

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Texas first responders are signing and passing a pair of Texas flags around the state to show support for their fellow first responders after the El Paso Shooting

First responders sign Texas flag in the aftermath of El Paso shooting

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Texas first responders are signing and passing a pair of Texas flags around the state to show support for their fellow first responders after the El Paso Shooting

First responders sign Texas flag in the aftermath of El Paso shooting

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Texas first responders are signing and passing a pair of Texas flags around the state to show support for their fellow first responders after the El Paso Shooting

First responders sign Texas flag in the aftermath of El Paso shooting

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Texas first responders are signing and passing a pair of Texas flags around the state to show support for their fellow first responders after the El Paso Shooting

Video Shows California Deputy Shoot Man Who Climbed Into Cruiser

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Sonoma County Sheriff’s office released officer body camera footage Wednesday, showing a deputy shooting several times into his own patrol car, after a robbery suspect hopped inside.

West Virginia Trooper Wounded in Shooting Released From Hospital

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A West Virginia State Police trooper was was wounded in a shooting last week was released from the hospital on Tuesday.

Wives of Two Virginia Troopers Killed in Helicopter Crash File Wrongful Death Suits

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The widows of two Virginia state troopers killed in a helicopter crash the same day thousands of white nationalists and neo-Nazis flooded Charlottesville are seeking $50 million each in separate wrongful death lawsuits.

Suspect in Shooting of 6 Philadelphia Officers Taken Into Custody After Hourslong Standoff

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A gunman who Philadelphia police say shot six city officers late Wednesday afternoon surrendered around midnight, ending a dramatic standoff that had two officers trapped for several hours inside a house with the suspect after a shootout erupted.

Texas firefighter hospitalized after fire truck rolls over

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Volunteer Firefighter Logan Jones suffered several broken bones after the fire truck he was riding in rolled over several times while responding to a call

Video: NC city releases firefighters’ bodycam footage of April explosion

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

City of Durham officials released bodycam footage documenting the aftermath of the April 10 explosion that left one dead and 17 injured

Ga. paramedic to open wrestling academy

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jeff Tucker wants to share his love of wrestling and provide a family-friendly version of wrestling to his community

Ga. paramedic to open wrestling academy

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jeff Tucker wants to share his love of wrestling and provide a family-friendly version of wrestling to his community

Fla. man arrested in Pa. for interfering with paramedics

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Justin H. Ryan refused to follow police orders and recorded paramedics treating a patient with his cellphone

Philadelphia Suspect in Custody After Hours-Long Standoff, 6 Wounded Officers OK

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The suspect in Wednesday's hours-long standoff in Philadelphia in which six officers were shot surrendered to authorities just after midnight Thursday, exiting the residence with his hands in the air.

5 steps to address physical and cognitive issues in an aging EMS workforce

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

If an EMS provider’s diminished capacity prevents them from performing the job’s essential functions or puts anyone’s safety at risk, consider reasonable accommodations

Death and the intimacy of truth: A lesson for EMS leaders

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Even when we as healthcare providers must deliver hard truths, there can be an intimacy and a human connection that comes with honesty in the worst of circumstances

Product of the Day: Ready Rack by Groves Incorporated — Wall Mounted Red Rack

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Wall Mounted Red Rack by Groves Incorporated is a robust locker system that is time tested and designed to withstand the beatings given to storage systems in the fire and safety industry.

6 officers shot in Philly; gunman in custody after hourslong standoff

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Many officers "had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets"

6 officers shot in Philly; gunman in custody after hourslong standoff

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Many officers "had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets"

6 officers shot in Philly; gunman in custody after hourslong standoff

Posted on August 15, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By Christina Paciolla and Claudia Lauer Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — A gunman who opened fire on police Wednesday as they were serving a drug warrant in Philadelphia, wounding six officers and triggering a standoff that extended into the night, is in police custody, authorities said.

Philadelphia police Sgt. Eric Gripp said early Thursday morning that the man was taken into custody after an hourslong standoff with police.

The shooting began around 4:30 p.m. as officers went to a home in a north Philadelphia neighborhood of brick and stone rowhomes to serve a narcotics warrant in an operation "that went awry almost immediately," Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross said.

Many officers "had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets," Ross said.

The six officers who were struck by gunfire have been released from hospitals, Philadelphia police Sgt. Eric Gripp said.

Two other officers were trapped inside the house for about five hours after the shooting broke out but were freed by a SWAT team well after darkness fell on the residential neighborhood. Three people that officers had taken into custody in the house before the shooting started were also safely evacuated.

"It's nothing short of a miracle that we don't have multiple officers killed today," Ross said.

Temple University locked down part of its campus, and several children and staff were trapped for some time in a nearby day care.

Police tried to push crowds of onlookers and residents back from the scene. In police radio broadcasts, officers could be heard calling for backup as reports of officers getting shot poured in.

"I was just coming off the train and I was walking upstairs and there were people running back downstairs who said that there was someone up there shooting cops," said Abdul Rahman Muhammad, 21, an off-duty medic. "There was just a lot of screaming and chaos."

Police implored the gunman to surrender, at one point patching in his lawyer on the phone with him to try to persuade him to give up, Ross said.

"We're doing everything within our power to get him to come out," Ross said during the standoff. "He has the highest assurance he's not going to be harmed when he comes out."

Dozens of officers on foot lined the streets. Others were in cars and some on horses.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said its agents responded to the scene to assist Philadelphia police.

President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr were briefed on the shooting, officials said.

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said he was thankful that officers' injuries weren't life-threatening.

"I'm a little angry about someone having all that weaponry and all that firepower, but we'll get to that another day," Kenney said.

#Philadelphia live #police officer injured during #shooting #cop #us pic.twitter.com/O93Gfs6E6i

— Serbian Team UN SC 1244 ???? (@SerbianTeam) August 14, 2019

NBC25/FOX66 Breaking News - NBC News reports an active shooter situation in Philadelphia where police were shot at in a North Philly neighborhood. According to CBS3, at least four officers have been rushed to the hospital. (CNN, KYW video) pic.twitter.com/v8XC7pi2z7

— Bill Harris (@BillHarrisTV) August 14, 2019

Breaking: Five police officers have now been shot during an active shooting incident in Northern Philadelphia. (Via @CBSPhilly) pic.twitter.com/fr54uiYrZ1

— PM Breaking News (@PMBreakingNews) August 14, 2019


Off-duty Ohio firefighter helps extinguish vehicle fire

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

North Lawrence Fire Department officials said the fire was out by the time they arrived, and another good Samaritan was directing traffic at the scene

6 officers shot in Philly; 2 LEOs in building with gunman freed

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA – At least one gunman opened fire on police Wednesday as they were serving a drug warrant in Philadelphia, wounding six officers and triggering a standoff that extended into the night, authorities said.

Two other officers were trapped inside the house for about five hours after the shooting broke out but were freed by a SWAT team well after darkness fell on the residential neighborhood.

None of the officers sustained life-threatening injuries and they've been released from the hospital, Philadelphia police Sgt. Eric Gripp said.

"It's nothing short of a miracle that we don't have multiple officers killed today," said Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross as officers continued their standoff with the gunman.

The shooting began around 4:30 p.m. as officers went to a home in a north Philadelphia neighborhood of brick and stone rowhomes to serve a narcotics warrant in an operation "that went awry almost immediately," Ross said.

"I was just coming off the train and I was walking upstairs and there were people running back downstairs who said that there was someone up there shooting cops," said Abdul Rahman Muhammad, 21, an off-duty medic. "There was just a lot of screaming and chaos."

Many officers "had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets," Ross said.

Shots were still being fired three hours later, police said, and officers returned fire.

Around 9:30 p.m., police said, a SWAT team freed the two officers who had been trapped inside, along with three people that officers took into custody before the shooting as part of the drug warrant. But the gunman remained barricaded.

Police were imploring him to surrender, at one point patching in his lawyer on the phone with him to try to persuade him to give up, Ross said.

"We're doing everything within our power to get him to come out," Ross said, adding: "He has the highest assurance he's not going to be harmed when he comes out."

Temple University locked down part of its campus, and several children and staff were trapped for some time in a nearby day care.

Police tried to push crowds of onlookers and residents back from the scene. In police radio broadcasts, officers could be heard calling for backup as reports of officers getting shot poured in.

Dozens of officers on foot lined the streets. Others were in cars and some on horses.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said its agents responded to the scene to assist Philadelphia police.

President Donald Trump and Attorney General William Barr were briefed on the shooting, officials said.

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said he was thankful that officers' injuries weren't life-threatening.

"I'm a little angry about someone having all that weaponry and all that firepower, but we'll get to that another day," Kenney said.

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates.

#Philadelphia live #police officer injured during #shooting #cop #us pic.twitter.com/O93Gfs6E6i

— Serbian Team UN SC 1244 ???? (@SerbianTeam) August 14, 2019

NBC25/FOX66 Breaking News - NBC News reports an active shooter situation in Philadelphia where police were shot at in a North Philly neighborhood. According to CBS3, at least four officers have been rushed to the hospital. (CNN, KYW video) pic.twitter.com/v8XC7pi2z7

— Bill Harris (@BillHarrisTV) August 14, 2019

Breaking: Five police officers have now been shot during an active shooting incident in Northern Philadelphia. (Via @CBSPhilly) pic.twitter.com/fr54uiYrZ1

— PM Breaking News (@PMBreakingNews) August 14, 2019


Medics use shopping cart full of ice to immerse patient suffering heat stroke

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

First responders arrived on scene to find an unresponsive man with a core temperature of 108.2 degrees

Former Okla. firefighter files workers’ comp lawsuit against city

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Brian McDaniel retired after being diagnosed with prostate cancer and was previously denied workers compensation twice

6 officers shot in Philly; 2 LEOs in building with gunman freed

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An hourslong standoff with a gunman barricaded inside a northern Philadelphia home is continuing into the night

6 officers shot in Philly; 2 LEOs in building with gunman freed

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An hourslong standoff with a gunman barricaded inside a northern Philadelphia home is continuing into the night

Fla. city to address 911 deficiencies over a year after Parkland shooting

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

911 callers were put on hold and transferred, and the emergency radio system froze due to excessive traffic during the attack at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

Fla. city to address 911 deficiencies over a year after Parkland shooting

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

911 callers were put on hold and transferred, and the emergency radio system froze due to excessive traffic during the attack at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

6 officers shot in Philly; 2 LEOs trapped in active scene

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA – Police say an hourslong standoff with a gunman barricaded inside a northern Philadelphia home is continuing into the night as the shooter ignores officers.

Commissioner Richard Ross said during a Wednesday night news conference the "very volatile" situation is still unfolding.

Six officers were struck. All are in stable condition. Ross said other officers were injured responding to the scene.

Ross said officers were serving a narcotics warrant at the home and had already entered when gunfire erupted. Ross said the gunman fired multiple rounds and officers returned fire. He said many "had to escape through windows and doors to get (away) from a barrage of bullets."

Two officers remained inside the home, but Ross says he believes they are OK.

Ross said officers have been calling the gunman and he has picked up but did not speak to them.

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates.

#Philadelphia live #police officer injured during #shooting #cop #us pic.twitter.com/O93Gfs6E6i

— Serbian Team UN SC 1244 ???? (@SerbianTeam) August 14, 2019

NBC25/FOX66 Breaking News - NBC News reports an active shooter situation in Philadelphia where police were shot at in a North Philly neighborhood. According to CBS3, at least four officers have been rushed to the hospital. (CNN, KYW video) pic.twitter.com/v8XC7pi2z7

— Bill Harris (@BillHarrisTV) August 14, 2019

Breaking: Five police officers have now been shot during an active shooting incident in Northern Philadelphia. (Via @CBSPhilly) pic.twitter.com/fr54uiYrZ1

— PM Breaking News (@PMBreakingNews) August 14, 2019


6 officers shot in Philly during intense gun battle; 2 LEOs trapped in active scene

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

PHILADELPHIA – Six officers have been shot by a gunman in an ongoing standoff.

During a news briefing, Police Commissioner Richard Ross said all the officers are expected to survive. Two officers remain inside the home with the gunman. Police are currently attempting to negotiate the gunman's surrender.

Additional officers were being treated for non-gunshot injuries.

According to NBC Philadelphia, the gunman continued to fire shots at police as dozens of LEOs initially responded to the scene. Police were first called to the scene for narcotics activity, WDBJ reported.

The gunfire started when police were reportedly serving a warrant.

According to multiple reports, the suspect is livestreaming the standoff on Facebook.

BREAKING: Suspect firing at police in Philadelphia

BREAKING: ABC News affiliate WPVI has live coverage as at least one suspect is firing at officers in an ongoing shooting incident in Philadelphia. READ MORE: abcn.ws/31OzDSb

Posted by ABC News on Wednesday, August 14, 2019

#Philadelphia live #police officer injured during #shooting #cop #us pic.twitter.com/O93Gfs6E6i

— Serbian Team UN SC 1244 ???? (@SerbianTeam) August 14, 2019

NBC25/FOX66 Breaking News - NBC News reports an active shooter situation in Philadelphia where police were shot at in a North Philly neighborhood. According to CBS3, at least four officers have been rushed to the hospital. (CNN, KYW video) pic.twitter.com/v8XC7pi2z7

— Bill Harris (@BillHarrisTV) August 14, 2019

Breaking: Five police officers have now been shot during an active shooting incident in Northern Philadelphia. (Via @CBSPhilly) pic.twitter.com/fr54uiYrZ1

— PM Breaking News (@PMBreakingNews) August 14, 2019

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates.


Multiple Officers Wounded, 1 Critical in North Philadelphia Shooting

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

One of the officers was reportedly shot in the head and is in critical condition. The critically wounded officer was reportedly conscious when he was taken from the scene.

At least 6 officers shot in Philly

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

PHILADELPHIA – At least six officers have been shot by a gunman in Philadelphia.

According to NBC Philadelphia, a gunman continued to fire shots at police as dozens of LEOs responded. Police were first called to the scene for narcotics activity, WDBJ reported. Reports say the scene is still active, with the gunman continuing to fire at police.

Multiple reports say six officers were shot, with at least one additional officer being treated for non-gunshot injuries. The shot officers are believed to have injuries that are non-life-threatening.

The gunfire started when police were reportedly serving a warrant. SWAT officers have surrounded the building containing the gunman.

BREAKING: Suspect firing at police in Philadelphia

BREAKING: ABC News affiliate WPVI has live coverage as at least one suspect is firing at officers in an ongoing shooting incident in Philadelphia. READ MORE: abcn.ws/31OzDSb

Posted by ABC News on Wednesday, August 14, 2019

#Philadelphia live #police officer injured during #shooting #cop #us pic.twitter.com/O93Gfs6E6i

— Serbian Team UN SC 1244 ???? (@SerbianTeam) August 14, 2019

NBC25/FOX66 Breaking News - NBC News reports an active shooter situation in Philadelphia where police were shot at in a North Philly neighborhood. According to CBS3, at least four officers have been rushed to the hospital. (CNN, KYW video) pic.twitter.com/v8XC7pi2z7

— Bill Harris (@BillHarrisTV) August 14, 2019

Breaking: Five police officers have now been shot during an active shooting incident in Northern Philadelphia. (Via @CBSPhilly) pic.twitter.com/fr54uiYrZ1

— PM Breaking News (@PMBreakingNews) August 14, 2019

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates.


Watch House Collapse as CA Crews Battle Blaze

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Fresno firefighter's helmet camera captured dramatic video of crews tackling a challenging two-alarm house fire.

Iowa Deputy Dies from Crash Injuries Suffered Friday

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Lyon County, IA, sheriff's deputy died Tuesday from injuries she suffered in a patrol vehicle crash on August 9.

Kan. police fatally shoot rifle-toting man

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Margaret Stafford Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — A missing woman was found dead in Arkansas one day after police fatally shot her estranged, rifle-toting husband near a popular shopping area in Kansas City, Kansas, authorities said Wednesday.

The body of 49-year-old Sylvia Ussery-Pearson was found Tuesday night in northwestern Arkansas' Benton County, police said during a news conference in Overland Park, Kansas, where she was from. The discovery was made hours after Charles Pearson, a 21-year veteran Army Ranger who had completed two combat tours in Iraq, walked into a Country Inn & Suites and told the general manager that he killed his wife.

Pearson, 51, said he was armed and heading to the nearby Legends Outlet shopping district.

Police in Kansas City, Kansas, said that when law enforcement confronted Pearson at an intersection, he fired several shots at officers, who returned fire and killed him.

Ussery-Pearson had been missing since Monday after leaving her home with her husband, who lived in nearby Lenexa, Kansas. Overland Park Police Chief Frank R. Donchez Jr. said her family filed a missing person report later that day after they were unable to contact her. Police then contacted her husband, who allowed police to search his home and car. The Benton County Sheriff's Office said in a news release that he told law enforcement that he didn't know where his wife was.

Donchez said Pearson later called family and friends and said he was suicidal before going to the shopping area, where the shooting happened.

A handwritten note found in Pearson's Lenexa home led law enforcement to search the upscale Whitney Mountain Lodge, located above Beaver Lake, and find her body near a water tank, according to the Benton County Sheriff's Office release. It wasn't clear whether Pearson had a connection to the area.

Donchez said Ussery-Pearson's death is believed to be a homicide but the cause hasn't been released. He said no other suspects are being sought. He said the couple had been estranged since February. Court records and friends paint a picture of a turbulent relationship.

Lenexa police said officers responded to four calls involving the couple, including one in October 2018 in which Pearson was charged with misdemeanor criminal damage to property. Pearson, who allegedly broke a mirror, was booked into the Johnson County jail and released the next day after posting bond. The court records indicate a diversion agreement in the case was signed Nov. 28, 2018.

Police said officers also responded to two disturbances in January and a "civil matter" in February, but no arrests were made in those three incidents.

One of Ussery-Pearson's friends, Denise Skaggs, told The Kansas City Star that Pearson was abusive and refused to see a counselor for what Ussery-Pearson suspected was post-traumatic stress disorder. Skaggs said Ussery-Pearson told her "she was done" with the marriage and moved out.

Skaggs, who described Pearson as a "loose cannon," said Ussery-Pearson didn't want him to know where she was living but found him "lurking around."

Skaggs said Ussery-Pearson lost a son to violence in 2017. He was killed in a shooting, she said.

Donchez said he didn't know whether Pearson had PTSD from his military service.

"We need to do more for our veterans that return from combat," he said. "This may or may not be an unfortunate circumstance of his service."

Before Ussery-Pearson's body was found, officials in Cass County, Missouri, searched a patch of land outside of Harrisonville that belonged to U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler. Police said the reason for the search was that Ussery-Pearson's phone had pinged on Hartzler's land about 40 miles (64.37 kilometers) south of Kansas City.

Hartzler's spokesman, Steve Walsh, said Wednesday that the Hartzlers didn't know Ussery-Pearson or Pearson.


FFs Dedicate CA Memorial for Fallen UT Battalion Chief

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Draper City Battallion Chief Matthew Burchett died last year fighting California’s largest-ever wildfire burning in Lake and Mendocino counties.

FFs Dedicate CA Memorial for Fallen UT Battalion Chief

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Draper City Battallion Chief Matthew Burchett died last year fighting California’s largest-ever wildfire burning in Lake and Mendocino counties.

FDNY: Crews Didn’t Leak Jeffrey Epstein’s Death

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“The FDNY reviewed the alleged information and determined it did not come from the Department,” a spokesman said after details of Epstein's suicide leaked online.

Shots Fired at Texas ICE Offices, Officials Blame Political Rhetoric

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Christopher Combs, special agent in charge of the San Antonio FBI, said in a press conference later Tuesday that “an unknown number of individuals in an unknown number of vehicles” fired shots at the building and came close to hitting federal employees in the building. 

Families of VA Troopers Killed in Helicopter Crash Sue State Police

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On August 12, 2017, State Troopers Berke Morgan Matthew Bates and Henry John Cullen III were hovering in a helicopter above the Unite The Right Rally in Charlottesville. As they hovered, the helicopter began to pitch up and down suddenly and eventually crashed into the ground and burst into flames, the lawsuit details.

Multiple Philadelphia Police Officers Wounded in Shootout

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

At least four officers were wounded in a shootout Wednesday afternoon in North Philadelphia.

Utah Man Fights Officer While Wearing Only “Man Thong”

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police were dispatched after a call came in Monday night about a male in a "man thong walking down the middle of the road with a sign around his neck," the court documents state.

AL Firefighters Start Demolition of Own Station

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mobile firefighters swung hammers to begin bringing down the aging and inadequate Fire Station No. 18, which was built in the 1960s.

Marine Kidnapped as Baby Meets FBI Agent Who Rescued Him

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two days after Rembert was born in 1997, the baby boy was kidnapped by a woman who claimed to be a health care worker. More than 24 hours later, Sowers found Rembert, who had been abandoned in a box behind a dumpster.  

Charlotte Officer Cleared in Controversial Fatal Shooting

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police Chief Kerr Putney said employees at the Burger King called police after Franklin was acting suspicious and gave the employees an "uneasy feeling." He said 911 calls from inside the restaurant indicated Franklin had a gun. 

Biking IA Firefighter Killed in Hit-and-Run Accident

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Grandview firefighter Devin Estabrook was bicycling in Muscatine when an unknown vehicle going the same direction struck him and then fled the scene.

Gunman’s Call to Wife Reveals Possible Motive in Murder of CHP Officer

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Luther was arrested by West Covina police in June 1994 in that Los Angeles County case, and one of the filed charges was assault on a peace officer with use of a semiautomatic weapon.  The CDCR record does not indicate he was sentenced for that.

NC Deputy Shoots Man Ramming Patrol Vehicle with Stolen Tractor

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"The tractor, which has been confirmed as stolen and belonging to Meadow Farms Incorporated, then rammed the patrol car three times almost rolling the car over. Fearing that the nearly 7,000-pound machine could roll over his car and kill him, the deputy fired at the driver."

LAPD Selects Federal Premium Ammunition for Duty Use

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) has recently selected Federal Premium ammunition for multiple firearms platforms, including 45 Auto, 308 Win, and 12-gauge duty requirements.

Wisconsin County Gets New Lake Assault Boats Craft for Patrol, Rescue

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The St. Croix County (WI) Sheriff's Office took delivery of a custom-built Lake Assault Boats rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) in time to serve during this summer's active July 4th holiday weekend for patrol and water-based emergency rescue operations on a 27-mile stretch of the St. Croix River.

Pulsar Night Vision Readies to Attend NTOA 2019!

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pulsar is proud to announce their attendance at this year’s National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) 36th Annual Law Enforcement Operations Conference and Trade Show 2019.

Mobile Laser Scan Data Improves Police Engagement Time in Active Shooter Simulation

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A security technology firm reduced the time needed for public safety personnel to engage a simulated active shooter by providing the team with site floorplans created from 3D laser scan data.

IXP Corporation Reaches Milestone in Managed Services for 911 Dispatch

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After decade of success, ChatComm (GA) renews IXP contract for five additional years; IXP also marks 20th anniversary

‘The Making of the U.S. M17’ Featured This Week on NRA’s American Rifleman TV

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This week the NRA’s American Rifleman TV will feature The Making of the U.S. M17; an in-depth feature about the success of the SIG SAUER Modular Handgun System.

Zetron Joins L3Harris Technologies’ Mission Critical Alliance to Accelerate Advancement of Interoperable Public Safety Technologies

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Zetron announced its membership in the L3Harris Technologies Mission Critical Alliance (MCA), a consortium of public safety technology providers with a common goal of advancing the capabilities, compatibility and security of mission critical solutions.

National Police Foundation and spcaLA Unveil Report on Reducing Dog Shootings in Police Encounters

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

the National Police Foundation and spcaLA have released a report entitled “An Evidence-Based Approach to Reducing Dog Shootings in Routine Police Encounters: Regulations, Policies, Practices, and Training Implications.”

Iowa LEO dies from crash injuries

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By PoliceOne Staff

ROCK RAPIDS, Iowa – A deputy died Tuesday from injuries sustained during an on-duty crash Friday.

According to Sioux City Journal, Lyon County Sheriff's Office Deputy Sheriff Stephanie Schreurs rolled her police SUV at a sharp curve early Friday morning. Schreurs, a 24-year veteran cop, was airlifted to a hospital. No one else was injured in the single-vehicle crash.

According to ODMP, Schreurs was 60. She is survived by her four children.


FirstNet Certified Fleet Complete Apps Bring Fully-Integrated Fleet Management Solution to Public Safety

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

AT&T, Fleet Complete, Cradlepoint Offer FirstNet Ready™ In-Vehicle Network Solution that Will Boost Public Safety for Communities Across the USA

Video Shows Florida Police Officer Smash Window to Rescue Baby From SUV

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Newly released body camera video shows a Stuart police officer officer bust a window of an SUV to save a baby girl trapped inside.

US homeland security chief: Racism is fueling some terrorism

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Emily Wagster Pettus Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. — White supremacist ideology is helping fuel domestic terrorism in the United States, the head of Homeland Security said Tuesday.

Acting Secretary Kevin K. McAleenan appeared in Jackson, Mississippi, for a forum about preventing violence against religious groups. The conversation included references to mass shootings, including the recent one that killed 22 people at a Walmart in El Paso.

Authorities in Texas say the white man charged in the shooting told police he was targeting Mexicans.

"The attack in El Paso and the violent white supremacist ideology that inspired it offends us all," McAleenan said Tuesday. "We must address it with moral clarity, this hate that is domestic terrorism, and it must be resisted together by Americans of all races, ethnicities and faiths."

Others at the forum described the threat in similar terms.

"Racism is a national security threat," said Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas, a member of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Critics of President Donald Trump contend his language has stoked racial and ethnic divisions. Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi did not name names but said "the racist, xenophobic language that we hear coming from high places" empowers people "to do crazy things."

Thompson and Jackson Lee also criticized raids last week in which 680 Hispanic immigrants were arrested at food processing plants in Mississippi, the largest workplace sting in the U.S. in at least a decade.

"Last week's massive ICE raid will have an enormous long-term effect on the state of Mississippi," Thompson said. "I do not understand why ICE picked this time, right after the country was healing from the targeted attack on Mexicans, to perform these raids in this community. ICE turned the first day of school, a special day that is to be filled with smiles and happiness, into a fearful memory for many of the children in Mississippi."

McAleenan told NBC on Sunday that the timing of the raids was "unfortunate," but the action had been planned for more than a year.

Jackson Lee said Tuesday that racists who target Hispanics or other people of color can be bolstered by the workplace raid.

"They see a brown person and they see the government rounding up and they're saying, 'That's what I should be doing, but I won't round up. I will kill,'" Jackson Lee said.

McAleenan said that domestic terrorism, whether at houses of worship or other places, "has a broad and expansive impact on American citizens and our national climate."

"These attacks not only end lives, they also degrade our society and diminish the integrity of our national values," McAleenan said. "They pull at our civic seams and our diverse country and they challenge citizens' faith in their government's ability to protect them. Domestic terrorism jeopardizes both our physical security and our perceptions of security."


Suspicious person calls and third-party racial profiling

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.
Author: Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D.

Police leaders, as well as front-line supervisors and officers, are so sensitive to the volatility of citizen contacts that a practice of simply avoiding contacts in the first place is an appealing strategy. The “no contact, no complaint” philosophy – often referred to as “de-policing” – can have both short- and long-term negative effects.

But what happens when racial profiling is done by the citizen calling in a suspicious person? Can officers avoid contacting the suspected person if they believe the caller was acting out of their own bias toward someone’s appearance?

What citizens know

Police officers are very aware of that so-called “sixth sense” that makes them take a second look at a situation.

We know two things about this seemingly extrasensory perception. The first is that this is a gathering and assessment of facts that happens at an instinctual level. This is a brain process so automatic that it takes an intentional effort to break it down and articulate what is making something or somebody “suspicious.” The second thing we know about the sixth sense, now that we understand it is quite rational and not supernatural, is that merely labeling something as “suspicious” has zero credibility in a court of law.

The citizen who gets the feeling that someone or something is suspicious is not likely to have the ability to articulate why they have that feeling. A police officer will report that a person was walking in shadows rather than the main portion of the sidewalk, that the person was looking constantly over their shoulder, that their arms weren’t swinging naturally but being held close in a manner consistent with concealing something heavy under their shirt, and that the person was wearing a coat on a hot day. The citizen is likely to say, “I don’t know, it just seemed suspicious.”

Must we mistrust that citizen’s vague concern? Do we allow dispatch to screen out those calls for lack of concrete reasons? Should officers ignore potential criminal behavior for fear of being accused of biased policing?

Answer the call

The officer should respond to the concern and make his or her own observations. Deciding whether to make a consensual contact or an investigatory stop must be based on the totality of circumstances, only one of which will be the call from a concerned citizen. Lacking any other articulable facts to justify an investigatory stop, the officer will either make a consent contact or clear from the call.

Keeping it consensual

For the officer, a clear understanding of contacts is essential. The basic rule is that the more articulable facts the officer has, the longer and more restrictive the contact can be. With zero facts, the officer is left only with a consensual contact. The citizen must be allowed to walk away and refuse to answer any questions if the contact lacks a factual basis.

Using consensual language is essential to preserve the non-confrontational context of a contact. Asking permission to chat, asking for help in observing for suspicious activity, thanking the person for their time and a conversational demeanor can preserve a positive contact. Expecting a normal amount of nervousness, hesitation and even hostility, the officer cannot use the subject’s invocation of their rights as a foundation for moving into an investigative stop.

Perceptions

A citizen being contacted by the police will not describe that contact with the legal precision of rulings on the fourth amendment to the Constitution. “The cops stopped me” will likely be the description regardless. Their story can be positive if officers engage lawfully and appropriately.


Missouri Officer With Cancer Leaves Hospital to Walk Autistic Son to First Day of School

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

St. Louis County Police Officer Andy Mattaline, who was recently diagnosed with cancer and underwent a serious surgery two weeks ago, left the hospital and was joined by his colleges to escort his autistic son to the first day of school Monday morning.

Widows sue over troopers killed in Va. helicopter crash

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. — The widows of two Virginia state troopers killed in a helicopter crash the day of a violent white nationalist rally have sued the state and others over their husbands' deaths, alleging the aircraft was not properly maintained or repaired.

Amanda Bates and Karen Cullen filed wrongful death lawsuits Monday. Both are seeking around $50 million in damages for the "unrelenting grief" and financial losses their families have sustained since the crash of the helicopter, which their lawsuits describe as a "maintenance nightmare."

H. Jay Cullen and Berke M.M. Bates were aboard the Bell 407 single-engine helicopter on Aug. 12, 2017, to provide video surveillance of public demonstrations in Charlottesville. The "Unite the Right" white nationalist rally had drawn hundreds of members of far-right groups to the city, and violence erupted between them and anti-racism counterprotesters.

Cullen and Bates captured video of the moment an avowed white supremacist plowed a car into a crowd of peaceful demonstrators, killing a woman and injuring dozens more. The video was used in court proceedings against James Fields, who has since been convicted of murder, hate crime and other charges.

The helicopter then left after being reassigned to help oversee then-Gov. Terry McAuliffe's motorcade. Within minutes, there was a 911 call reporting the fiery crash. Witnesses said the aircraft began to spin as it descended, according to a preliminary report from federal transportation safety investigators that also said the helicopter left a debris field several hundred feet long.

The widows' lawsuits, filed against the state, the Secretariat of Public Safety and Homeland Security, and state police, say the troopers' fear would have been "unspeakable" and that there was nothing either man could have done to save themselves.

The helicopter was a "maintenance nightmare" with a history of malfunctions, the lawsuits say.

Among the issues alleged: operational difficulties with the engine and fuel control; flight control malfunctions requiring "constant inspection, disassembly and maintenance"; and an "inadequately designed" tail boom.

The lawsuits also allege the state failed to follow and implement maintenance manuals and checklists; to evaluate the helicopter for its airworthiness; and to issue adequate instructions for flight crews to cope with emergencies.

Corinne Geller, a state police spokeswoman, and Alena Yarmosky, a spokeswoman for Gov. Ralph Northam, said they couldn't comment on pending litigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board is still investigating the crash. A final report is expected next year. A preliminary report did not cite a likely cause.

The Associated Press has previously reported that the helicopter was heavily damaged in 2010 when it lost engine power and was forced to make a hard landing.

Geller has said the aircraft was fully repaired.

Separately, the widows also filed wrongful death lawsuits in June against Rolls Royce Corp., which made the engine used in the helicopter, according to The Daily Progress.


Police release timeline, video leading up to Ohio mass shooting

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Springfield News-Sun, Ohio

DAYTON, Ohio — Police released more information about the gunman’s actions in the two hours leading up to a mass shooting in Dayton’s Oregon District on Aug. 4.

Various video surveillance cameras in the neighborhood helped police piece the timeline together, showing the gunman as he visited two bars on East Fifth Street before returning into his vehicle and changing into a dark hoodie and grabbing his backpack.

The shooter arrived at Blind Bob’s with his sister and a friend at 11:04 p.m., before leaving alone at 12:14 a.m. and going to Ned Peppers, Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said.

He was seen exiting the bar at 12:42 a.m. before footage showed him back at his car and then behind Newcom’s and Heart Mercantile shortly before the shooting.

In new surveillance video released by police, people on Blind Bob’s patio are seen taking cover as the gunman walks down an alley beside the patio and starts firing.

Other videos showed the moments when officers first engaged the shooter.

Police believe the shooting lasted 32 seconds, with officers engaging the shooter about halfway through.

Biehl said it was clear that the gunman was “very familiar” with the Oregon District and that he was even in the neighborhood the night before the shooting.

While police still aren’t sure if the shooter realized that one of his victims included his sister, Biehl said that the siblings were communicating after he left Blind Bob’s and that he was aware of her location.

The chief added that he thinks the shooter previously planned the incident and that none of the shooter’s interactions at either bar that night contributed to his actions.

There is also no indication that anyone helped the gunman in the shooting or how far in advance the incident was planned.

Biehl also updated the number of survivors who were treated for gunshot wounds. Previously, 14 people were listed as being shot. Three additional people have been treated for gunshot wounds, bringing the total to 17.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said that she is working on forming a committee to create a permanent memorial for the victims.

She asked that everyone keep the victims’ families in their hearts and to continue to support them as they mourn their loved ones.

More than a dozen agencies responded to the shooting, Dayton City Manager Shelley Dickstein said.

In addition to the Dayton Police Department, officials from 14 agencies, including from the federal state and county level, responded to the Oregon District that night.

Hundreds of first responders provided support through medical care, providing CPR and setting up tourniquets, Dickstein said.

©2019 Springfield News-Sun, Ohio


Fallen Calif. LEO had ‘dream job’

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Stefanie Dazio Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Bells tolled Wednesday during a solemn California Highway Patrol ceremony for an officer killed when a motorist he pulled over for a traffic stop grabbed a rifle and opened fire in a shooting rampage that wounded two more officers.

The tribute for Andre Moye, Jr. at the highway patrol's academy in the city of West Sacramento replaced the agency's plan to celebrate its 90th anniversary, the highway patrol said in a statement.

Authorities were still investigating what prompted Aaron Luther, 49, to shoot Moye and the other officers.

Moye had stopped Luther on a freeway in the Southern California city of Riverside on Monday, and officials have said he probably did not know that Luther had a long and violent criminal history.

"It's obvious something triggered him to do this," said Riverside police Officer Ryan Railsback. "We don't know what that is."

One of the wounded officers was still hospitalized Wednesday with what were described as critical injuries to one of his legs, though officials said he was alert and in stable condition. The other wounded officer was released earlier.

Moye, a motorcycle officer, was on a freeway overpass filling out paperwork to impound Luther's pickup truck when Luther, who was outside the vehicle and not restrained, pulled a rifle from the truck and started shooting.

Moye, 34, was fatally wounded but called for help and two responding officers were shot in the legs while frightened motorists ducked for cover from dozens of flying bullets.

Officials have said public records showing peoples' criminal history are not typically something officers have access to during traffic stops.

Highway patrol Inland Division Chief Bill Dance said it was not clear whether Moye asked a dispatcher for additional information about Luther, 49, who was convicted of attempted murder in 1994 and also had convictions for assault, domestic violence, unlawful possession of a firearm and battery.

Railsback said authorities searched Luther's Beaumont home on Tuesday but he did not know anything was seized.

John Aresta, police chief in Malverne, New York, and a past president of the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police, said officers have almost no way of knowing drivers' criminal history during traffic stops.

When officers request information about a vehicle license plate number, a report usually comes back listing the vehicle's registered owner, if it's been reported stolen and if the license has been suspended or revoked. For checks of driver's licenses, Aresta said active arrest warrants may be available but "it's not going to come up with a criminal history and it's not going to come with an asterisk saying 'bad guy,'" Aresta said.

Luther had a warrant dating from 2017 after he failed to appear in court to answer a misdemeanor charge of driving with a suspended or revoked license.

A warrant like that "doesn't necessarily mean you're going to jail in handcuffs," Railsback said.

Luther was paroled from state prison in 2004 after serving about 10 years of a 12-year sentence for attempted second-degree murder with an enhancement for the use of a firearm, first-degree burglary and second-degree burglary, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

Court records show Luther also was arrested in 2007 on felony assault charges and took a no-contest plea deal that sentenced him to 90 days in jail. He also was charged with multiple felonies in San Bernardino County and pleaded no contest in 2010 to assault with a deadly weapon, according to the Southern California News Group.

As a felon, Luther was not supposed to have a gun and his father, Dennis Luther, said he's not sure how his son came to possess one. He said his son had struggled with drugs, was depressed and in pain from knee injuries that left him unable to work his construction job.


CA County’s FDs Face Money Issues, Disbanding

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Templeton Fire and Emergency Services is among the San Luis Obispo County departments struggling financially, forcing officials to consider stopping service.

New OH Dispatcher Standards Target Better Treatment

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"I believe this added service from our 9-1-1 center greatly enhances our fire/EMS response …, " Vandalia's fire chief said about Ohio's new requirements for dispatchers.

FFs Say PA Fire Company’s Closing Blindsided Them

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The chief of the now-shuttered Tilbury Fire Company wants to fight to reinstate it, and he hopes Plymouth Township residents will rally behind that effort.

Texas Police Officers Rescue Two Drivers After Fiery Crash

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Fort Worth officers saved the lives of two drivers involved in a fiery crash Wednesday morning, police said.

Book excerpt: Taming the Serpent: How Neuroscience Can Revolutionize Modern Law Enforcement Training

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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When dealing with law enforcement officers and the idea of introducing new ways of doing things, we must address the question, “What’s in it for me?” Here are just a few of the benefits I believe come from understanding the brain under stress and how to apply that knowledge:

1. Understanding the brain under stress can help you learn to biohack your own brain to achieve peak performance. (Because in law enforcement, performing under stressful conditions is a job requirement.)

2. Understanding your own brain in conflict will help you understand the brain of the person you are dealing with, and aid in forming effective strategies for a safe resolution for all parties involved.

3. Understanding the brain and what happens when the balance between emotional and cognitive control is lost can aid officers and supervisors in awareness of anxiety, poor performance, depression and PTSD issues.

4. Understanding the brain in conflict aids in comprehending how problems can occur, and aid in developing strategies to prevent issues such as lawful but awful incidents (police incidents that are lawful but look horrible to the public and media), mistake-of-fact shootings (a suspect reaching for an object that the officer believes is a weapon, but it turns out not to be), and excessive force.

5. Understanding the brain’s memory systems to develop better training that focuses on the brain and central nervous system for the best possible performance under stressful conditions.

CHAPTER TWO: DE-ESCALATION: STRATEGIES TO STAY LEFT OF BANG The ABCs of Strategy

The A, B and C planning format is used by tactical teams around the world and is sometimes taught as a primary plan, a backup plan and an emergency plan (for when Verbal Judo fails). Unfortunately, we rarely teach these concepts at the basic academy level.

I once had a kickboxing coach named Dale Minor who helped start me down the road to preparing to become a law enforcement officer. Dale used to always say if you run to the center of the ring and just start swinging, you may show you’re tough, but you are going to take way more hits than you need to. His philosophy was to always begin with the end in mind. What does this fight look like when it’s over and how are we going to get there? ABC planning is just that; begin with the end in mind. Have an idea of what the end of the situation in question looks like and have several ideas for how you are going to get there. With that said, let’s look at the plans.

The A Plan

The A plan is the easiest plan to develop because, while there are a wide variety of calls an officer goes to, there are many tactical preparation strategies and concepts that work across this spectrum of calls. The A plan is how I want this call to go if everyone at the scene recognizes my lawful authority and is compliant with my directives. I “ask” and they agree to comply with my request. By some estimates, 98.9 percent of police calls for service go according to plan.

The most important part of the A plan is to establish your lawful presence and authority to show you’re prepared for possible trouble by how you place yourself at the scene, how you manage your emotions, and how you take control of the scene. In the end, that is exactly what police officers are paid to do: take control of whatever situation they are lawfully present for and successfully manage the situation to the most positive conclusion the parties involved will allow.

Part of the A plan are the things you and other officers do to hedge your bets in case the situation gets violent. How you look, how you act and how you communicate are all indicators to a suspect or any other party involved in the call for whether or not you are prepared. This is important because in interviews with suspects who attacked or killed law enforcement officers one of the deciding factors on whether the suspect was going to attack the officer was how prepared the officer looked, how they positioned themselves, and how direct and confident they were with their communications.

The United States Marine Corps uses a concept called left of bang to describe the fact that everything you do, see, comprehend and act on before the shots are fired or the violence begins, matters. If everything you do or don't do before the shooting or violence starts happens left of bang and everything after is right of bang then, in your tactical planning your A and B plans happen left of bang. The C plan occurs right of bang.

There is a list too long to include all the things that can be done left of bang to either prevent violence or place yourself in the most effective position to deal with the violence. But here, at least, are some thoughts to get the ideas flowing.

    If this goes bad, where is my last point of cover (stops a bullet) or concealment (hides you)? The brain under stress does not perform well unless it is effectively trained to do so. By giving yourself an idea of where to go if things go bad, you are pre-loading the brain for peak performance. Keep in mind the axiom, “failure to plan is planning to fail.” The idea of last point of cover works in every law enforcement contact including traffic stops. Parking away from the scene to avoid being ambushed while getting out of the car and give yourself time to evaluate the scene gives time and space to establish your left of bang baselines. Time and distance are your friend. Bullets are less likely to deflect through a medium at a 90-degree angle and more likely to deflect at other angles due to a variety of factors. Don't approach windows and doors head on and don't maintain a perimeter on a location while standing directly in the line of sight of doors and windows. As a quick test, look out the front window of your home while standing about five to ten feet back from the window with all interior lights turned off. What can you see? Now stand outside of your house about ten feet back from the window looking into your house and see what you can see. All advantage goes to the person in the house, so plan accordingly. If you were a criminal standing inside your house with a scoped rifle, how easy would it be to shoot anyone directly in front of and across the street from your home? Why would you, as a police officer, want to place yourself in those positions? Don't answer priority calls by yourself. You cannot track and control multiple people by yourself and every year officers from around the country are killed or seriously hurt trying to do so. If no one is dying, what is the rush and why go in alone? When working with other officers, position yourselves so you can see each other. If you can't see each other, you can't help each other. Constantly evaluate the resources you need as you are constantly evaluating your plans to bring the call to its conclusion. Use light to your advantage and understand when it’s to your disadvantage. The principle of light control is to put more light in front of you and be careful of backlighting. Backlighting is when there is a greater amount of light behind you than in front of you making it easier for someone looking to hurt you to do so. Evaluate what kind of call you are going to and what this call looks like when it’s done. Is this a criminal matter or a civil matter? Practice, practice and practice some more. Train in defensive tactics, tactical shooting and decision-making. Keep up on the laws in your jurisdiction and case law on use of force and dealing with the mentally ill. Constantly assess the surrounding area and make sure you are aware of innocent civilians and work to keep them out of potential harm. Assess your less than lethal options and have them available and positioned tactically. You choose the location of the traffic stop or contact. Always tilt the odds in your favor. Constantly practice building searches and suspect searches so you are learning to tactically cover the angles. It’s all about the angles and who uses them to their advantage. Remember the lawful but awfuls and recognize when your call or contact may be headed down that road. Learn to read people and recognize pre-flight or pre-fight indicators. Always explain your lawful authority and purpose. You would be amazed how many officers forget to establish this baseline from the start of the interaction. If you can’t see the suspect’s hands or are unsure of what is in them, move to assess and identify. Action is faster than reaction so the only way to change the suspect’s focus is to not be where they expect you to be.

Again, this is not an all-inclusive list, just ideas for some of the things you can do left of bang to try and take control of the situation. Each of these examples can and should be ingrained into your cognitive appraisal process and mental models (ABC planning).


Book excerpt: Taming the Serpent: How Neuroscience Can Revolutionize Modern Law Enforcement Training

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

When dealing with law enforcement officers and the idea of introducing new ways of doing things, we must address the question, “What’s in it for me?” Here are just a few of the benefits I believe come from understanding the brain under stress and how to apply that knowledge:

1. Understanding the brain under stress can help you learn to biohack your own brain to achieve peak performance. (Because in law enforcement, performing under stressful conditions is a job requirement.)

2. Understanding your own brain in conflict will help you understand the brain of the person you are dealing with, and aid in forming effective strategies for a safe resolution for all parties involved.

3. Understanding the brain and what happens when the balance between emotional and cognitive control is lost can aid officers and supervisors in awareness of anxiety, poor performance, depression and PTSD issues.

4. Understanding the brain in conflict aids in comprehending how problems can occur, and aid in developing strategies to prevent issues such as lawful but awful incidents (police incidents that are lawful but look horrible to the public and media), mistake-of-fact shootings (a suspect reaching for an object that the officer believes is a weapon, but it turns out not to be), and excessive force.

5. Understanding the brain’s memory systems to develop better training that focuses on the brain and central nervous system for the best possible performance under stressful conditions.

CHAPTER TWO: DE-ESCALATION: STRATEGIES TO STAY LEFT OF BANG The ABCs of Strategy

The A, B and C planning format is used by tactical teams around the world and is sometimes taught as a primary plan, a backup plan and an emergency plan (for when Verbal Judo fails). Unfortunately, we rarely teach these concepts at the basic academy level.

I once had a kickboxing coach named Dale Minor who helped start me down the road to preparing to become a law enforcement officer. Dale used to always say if you run to the center of the ring and just start swinging, you may show you’re tough, but you are going to take way more hits than you need to. His philosophy was to always begin with the end in mind. What does this fight look like when it’s over and how are we going to get there? ABC planning is just that; begin with the end in mind. Have an idea of what the end of the situation in question looks like and have several ideas for how you are going to get there. With that said, let’s look at the plans.

The A Plan

The A plan is the easiest plan to develop because, while there are a wide variety of calls an officer goes to, there are many tactical preparation strategies and concepts that work across this spectrum of calls. The A plan is how I want this call to go if everyone at the scene recognizes my lawful authority and is compliant with my directives. I “ask” and they agree to comply with my request. By some estimates, 98.9 percent of police calls for service go according to plan.

The most important part of the A plan is to establish your lawful presence and authority to show you’re prepared for possible trouble by how you place yourself at the scene, how you manage your emotions, and how you take control of the scene. In the end, that is exactly what police officers are paid to do: take control of whatever situation they are lawfully present for and successfully manage the situation to the most positive conclusion the parties involved will allow.

Part of the A plan are the things you and other officers do to hedge your bets in case the situation gets violent. How you look, how you act and how you communicate are all indicators to a suspect or any other party involved in the call for whether or not you are prepared. This is important because in interviews with suspects who attacked or killed law enforcement officers one of the deciding factors on whether the suspect was going to attack the officer was how prepared the officer looked, how they positioned themselves, and how direct and confident they were with their communications.

The United States Marine Corps uses a concept called left of bang to describe the fact that everything you do, see, comprehend and act on before the shots are fired or the violence begins, matters. If everything you do or don't do before the shooting or violence starts happens left of bang and everything after is right of bang then, in your tactical planning your A and B plans happen left of bang. The C plan occurs right of bang.

There is a list too long to include all the things that can be done left of bang to either prevent violence or place yourself in the most effective position to deal with the violence. But here, at least, are some thoughts to get the ideas flowing.

    If this goes bad, where is my last point of cover (stops a bullet) or concealment (hides you)? The brain under stress does not perform well unless it is effectively trained to do so. By giving yourself an idea of where to go if things go bad, you are pre-loading the brain for peak performance. Keep in mind the axiom, “failure to plan is planning to fail.” The idea of last point of cover works in every law enforcement contact including traffic stops. Parking away from the scene to avoid being ambushed while getting out of the car and give yourself time to evaluate the scene gives time and space to establish your left of bang baselines. Time and distance are your friend. Bullets are less likely to deflect through a medium at a 90-degree angle and more likely to deflect at other angles due to a variety of factors. Don't approach windows and doors head on and don't maintain a perimeter on a location while standing directly in the line of sight of doors and windows. As a quick test, look out the front window of your home while standing about five to ten feet back from the window with all interior lights turned off. What can you see? Now stand outside of your house about ten feet back from the window looking into your house and see what you can see. All advantage goes to the person in the house, so plan accordingly. If you were a criminal standing inside your house with a scoped rifle, how easy would it be to shoot anyone directly in front of and across the street from your home? Why would you, as a police officer, want to place yourself in those positions? Don't answer priority calls by yourself. You cannot track and control multiple people by yourself and every year officers from around the country are killed or seriously hurt trying to do so. If no one is dying, what is the rush and why go in alone? When working with other officers, position yourselves so you can see each other. If you can't see each other, you can't help each other. Constantly evaluate the resources you need as you are constantly evaluating your plans to bring the call to its conclusion. Use light to your advantage and understand when it’s to your disadvantage. The principle of light control is to put more light in front of you and be careful of backlighting. Backlighting is when there is a greater amount of light behind you than in front of you making it easier for someone looking to hurt you to do so. Evaluate what kind of call you are going to and what this call looks like when it’s done. Is this a criminal matter or a civil matter? Practice, practice and practice some more. Train in defensive tactics, tactical shooting and decision-making. Keep up on the laws in your jurisdiction and case law on use of force and dealing with the mentally ill. Constantly assess the surrounding area and make sure you are aware of innocent civilians and work to keep them out of potential harm. Assess your less than lethal options and have them available and positioned tactically. You choose the location of the traffic stop or contact. Always tilt the odds in your favor. Constantly practice building searches and suspect searches so you are learning to tactically cover the angles. It’s all about the angles and who uses them to their advantage. Remember the lawful but awfuls and recognize when your call or contact may be headed down that road. Learn to read people and recognize pre-flight or pre-fight indicators. Always explain your lawful authority and purpose. You would be amazed how many officers forget to establish this baseline from the start of the interaction. If you can’t see the suspect’s hands or are unsure of what is in them, move to assess and identify. Action is faster than reaction so the only way to change the suspect’s focus is to not be where they expect you to be.

Again, this is not an all-inclusive list, just ideas for some of the things you can do left of bang to try and take control of the situation. Each of these examples can and should be ingrained into your cognitive appraisal process and mental models (ABC planning).


Slain California Highway Patrol Officer Died Doing His ‘Dream Job’

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Whether he was gliding through a zip line course with his wife in Mexico or hopping onto his motorcycle at the CHP’s Riverside station, Andre Moye was often wearing an infectious smile.

A must-read: “Blue Lives in Jeopardy”

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Reprinted with permission from CityWatch.

By Phyllis M. Daugherty

"Blue Lives in Jeopardy - When the Badge Becomes the Target," recently released by co-authors former LA District Attorney Steve Cooley and Los Angeles County career prosecutor and office historian Robert (Bob) Schirn, is the second in a trilogy of books examining actual line-of-duty events that have ended the lives of law enforcement officers in Los Angeles County.

Their first book, "Blue Lives Matter," was released in 2017 to national and international acclaim. Its theme is, “When it comes to killing a peace officer, we do not forgive, we do not forget, and we do not give up,” meaning that law enforcement agencies are especially diligent in investigating, solving and prosecuting cases involving the deaths of officers.

Their goal was to write – with the input and expertise of many individuals who actually investigated and prosecuted the cases examined – a series of books to serve as reminders and “training manuals” for law enforcement officers and to prevent line-of-duty deaths from occurring.

A major theme of Book Two, “Blue Lives in Jeopardy – When the Badge Becomes the Target,” is the disturbing trend of more and more officers being targeted for assassination merely because they are wearing a police uniform and/or performing a police function.

This book, besides being riveting, could not be more timely!

On May 6, 2019, the FBI released its annual statistical report showing that 106 officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents in 2018. Of these, 55 officers died as a result of felonious acts in 28 states and Puerto Rico. This was nine more than the 46 killed in 2017.

The average age of the officers feloniously killed was 37 years old. The two most frequent circumstance surrounding the deaths were, 23 that occurred during investigative/enforcement activities, and 11 who were ambushed.

Offenders used firearms to kill 51 of the 55 victim officers. Vehicles were used to kill the other four. An additional 51 officers died in accidents.

About the authors

Widely known as the three-term elected District Attorney of Los Angeles County, it is not common knowledge that Steve Cooley also served as a reserve LAPD police officer for over five years.

Combining the experience of these two career prosecutors, Steve Cooley and Bob Schirn are uniquely qualified to recognize the 25 cases that are appropriate to examine and identify simple steps and protocols that are so basic and essential that they are often taken for granted, but the absence of which may cost the life of an officer or officers at the scene.

At the end of each chapter the authors include a segment on “Lessons Learned,” as they did in Book One, "Blue Lives Matter."

This book stresses the importance of a strong working relationship between investigators and prosecutors in solving crimes and planning and putting together the best possible cases for criminal prosecution.

Gang Violence

The book includes a stern reminder that there are over 400 known street gangs in Los Angeles County that use violence to maintain control over their turf and the lucrative narcotics trade in their territories.

Chapters 5-8 involve a background of gang violence or gang influence: "Four of the shooters were gang members and the fifth shot an officer to impress the street gang he wished to join. None of the officers was even able to unholster his weapon before being taken by surprise or ambushed."

This Bomb is a Booby Trap

This chapter describes the deaths of two LAPD officers. One, Arleigh McCree, was considered a leading expert on explosives and international terrorism who had helped investigate the bombing of a U.S. Marine Corps Barracks in Lebanon. His partner, Ronald Ball, had worked out of the Van Nuys Division as a patrol officer. He joined the Firearms and Explosives Unit and was considered an expert bomb technician. He planned to retire in three years. They were called to disarm a pipe bomb in a North Hollywood garage. McCree and Ball each left behind a wife and children.

This book must be taken seriously

You cannot remain unmoved by the raw courage and intense dedication of the officers who lost their lives in these incidents. You can’t help but wish someone had reminded them to take more precautions confronting the dangers that ended their watch.

That is exactly what Steve Cooley and Bob Schirn have done in this book, which opens with this quotation by a survivor, "It's not how these officers died that made them heroes, it's how they lived."

If there was ever a poignant reminder of how fragile and interconnected life is and how closely we are bound to the men and women who choose a career in law enforcement to protect us, “Blue Lives in Jeopardy – When the Badge Becomes the Target” is it.


About the author

Phyllis M. Daugherty is a former City of Los Angeles employee and a contributor to CityWatch.


A must-read: “Blue Lives in Jeopardy”

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Reprinted with permission from CityWatch.

By Phyllis M. Daugherty

"Blue Lives in Jeopardy - When the Badge Becomes the Target," recently released by co-authors former LA District Attorney Steve Cooley and Los Angeles County career prosecutor and office historian Robert (Bob) Schirn, is the second in a trilogy of books examining actual line-of-duty events that have ended the lives of law enforcement officers in Los Angeles County.

Their first book, "Blue Lives Matter," was released in 2017 to national and international acclaim. Its theme is, “When it comes to killing a peace officer, we do not forgive, we do not forget, and we do not give up,” meaning that law enforcement agencies are especially diligent in investigating, solving and prosecuting cases involving the deaths of officers.

Their goal was to write – with the input and expertise of many individuals who actually investigated and prosecuted the cases examined – a series of books to serve as reminders and “training manuals” for law enforcement officers and to prevent line-of-duty deaths from occurring.

A major theme of Book Two, “Blue Lives in Jeopardy – When the Badge Becomes the Target,” is the disturbing trend of more and more officers being targeted for assassination merely because they are wearing a police uniform and/or performing a police function.

This book, besides being riveting, could not be more timely!

On May 6, 2019, the FBI released its annual statistical report showing that 106 officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents in 2018. Of these, 55 officers died as a result of felonious acts in 28 states and Puerto Rico. This was nine more than the 46 killed in 2017.

The average age of the officers feloniously killed was 37 years old. The two most frequent circumstance surrounding the deaths were, 23 that occurred during investigative/enforcement activities, and 11 who were ambushed.

Offenders used firearms to kill 51 of the 55 victim officers. Vehicles were used to kill the other four. An additional 51 officers died in accidents.

About the authors

Widely known as the three-term elected District Attorney of Los Angeles County, it is not common knowledge that Steve Cooley also served as a reserve LAPD police officer for over five years.

Combining the experience of these two career prosecutors, Steve Cooley and Bob Schirn are uniquely qualified to recognize the 25 cases that are appropriate to examine and identify simple steps and protocols that are so basic and essential that they are often taken for granted, but the absence of which may cost the life of an officer or officers at the scene.

At the end of each chapter the authors include a segment on “Lessons Learned,” as they did in Book One, "Blue Lives Matter."

This book stresses the importance of a strong working relationship between investigators and prosecutors in solving crimes and planning and putting together the best possible cases for criminal prosecution.

Gang Violence

The book includes a stern reminder that there are over 400 known street gangs in Los Angeles County that use violence to maintain control over their turf and the lucrative narcotics trade in their territories.

Chapters 5-8 involve a background of gang violence or gang influence: "Four of the shooters were gang members and the fifth shot an officer to impress the street gang he wished to join. None of the officers was even able to unholster his weapon before being taken by surprise or ambushed."

This Bomb is a Booby Trap

This chapter describes the deaths of two LAPD officers. One, Arleigh McCree, was considered a leading expert on explosives and international terrorism who had helped investigate the bombing of a U.S. Marine Corps Barracks in Lebanon. His partner, Ronald Ball, had worked out of the Van Nuys Division as a patrol officer. He joined the Firearms and Explosives Unit and was considered an expert bomb technician. He planned to retire in three years. They were called to disarm a pipe bomb in a North Hollywood garage. McCree and Ball each left behind a wife and children.

This book must be taken seriously

You cannot remain unmoved by the raw courage and intense dedication of the officers who lost their lives in these incidents. You can’t help but wish someone had reminded them to take more precautions confronting the dangers that ended their watch.

That is exactly what Steve Cooley and Bob Schirn have done in this book, which opens with this quotation by a survivor, "It's not how these officers died that made them heroes, it's how they lived."

If there was ever a poignant reminder of how fragile and interconnected life is and how closely we are bound to the men and women who choose a career in law enforcement to protect us, “Blue Lives in Jeopardy – When the Badge Becomes the Target” is it.


About the author

Phyllis M. Daugherty is a former City of Los Angeles employee and a contributor to CityWatch.


Failure to train, supervise and discipline LEOs: The Third Circuit speaks

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Mike Callahan
Author: Mike Callahan

On July 1, 2008, Camden, New Jersey, police officers Kevin Parry and Jason Stetser kicked down several doors at a residence in Camden, looking for drugs.

Alanda Forrest, a visitor to the home, was standing near an upstairs bedroom door when an officer kicked it in. Forrest was hit in the face by the door and knocked unconscious. When he regained consciousness, Officer Parry was on top of him and repeatedly punched him in the face.

Forrest was handcuffed and dragged downstairs by Parry and Stetser. Another occupant of the home later testified that she saw an officer hit Forrest in the head with a flashlight and hit him so many times that he urinated all over himself; his face was swollen and full of blood.

Forrest was taken to a hospital and asked by a nurse about the cause of his injuries. He told her he tripped and fell, as the arresting officers had threatened him with additional charges if he told the truth.

After the incident, Officer Parry wrote a report in which he claimed he saw Forrest engaged in a hand-to-hand drug transaction on the porch of the residence and that Forrest initiated the fight that ensued during the arrest attempt. Parry later told a grand jury that Forrest was in possession of 49 bags of illicit drugs. Forrest plead guilty and was sentenced to over four years in state prison.

Forrest served only 18 months and was released because Officer Parry later admitted he fabricated the police report pertaining to the arrest of Forrest by stating that he saw a hand-to-hand drug transaction involving Forrest. After Forrest’s arrest, Parry, Stetser, their former supervisor Sergeant Morris and two other officers became the targets of a civil rights investigation that resulted in guilty pleas from all for conspiracy to violate civil rights.

During the investigation, Parry and Stetser admitted filing false police reports, planting drugs and lying under oath. Over 200 criminal cases were dismissed, vacated or otherwise adversely affected by their nefarious conduct.

Shortly after his arrest, Forrest filed an internal affairs complaint with the Camden Police Department (CPD), alleging he was badly beaten by officer Parry and his partner. After the complaint received no action, he followed up with a letter in which he reiterated his complaint. While still incarcerated, Forrest sued Parry, Stetser, the City of Camden and the Camden Department of Public Safety pursuant to the federal civil rights statute, i.e. 42 U.S.C. § 1983. [1]

With respect to the suit against the City and its Public Safety Department, the Federal District Court divided Forrest’s allegations into three categories:

The first was designated “failure to supervise through the Internal Affairs process”; The second involved a general failure to supervise category; The third involved failure to train allegations. Evidence of Failure to Supervise, Discipline and Train

Forrest offered several subcategories of evidence to support all three categories of his complaint:

The New Jersey Attorney General (NJAG) conducted a review of Camden’s police operations five different times prior to Forrest’s arrest, most recently in 2006. During two of those occasions, the NJAG ordered the Camden County Prosecutor to oversee the Camden Police Department (CPD). One NJAG report warned that Camden’s failure to “proactively [manage] police misconduct would place it ‘in the position of failing to adequately protect the civil rights of its citizens and sets the stage for significant civil liability.’” In 2002, the NJAG found that the CPD had a backlog of over 350 officer misconduct internal affairs complaints that had not been investigated. The NJAG recommended this backlog be immediately addressed and warned that the City and the CPD could be found “deliberately indifferent to the conduct of its police officers and the civil rights of its citizens.” The CPD failed to heed the warning of the NJAG and maintained an extensive, recurring misconduct complaint backlog in the years leading up to Forrest’s arrest. The backlog reached a high of 487 uninvestigated complaints in 2004 and 461 in 2005. Some progress was made because the number of uninvestigated complaints dropped to 175 in 2007. The CPD sustained only about 1% of the complaints of serious misconduct between 2004 and 2008 (7 of 622). These included excessive force, improper search and improper arrest. The misconduct investigations that the CPD did conduct were seriously deficient. For example, a CPD internal affairs (IA) investigation involving Officers Parry and Stetser conducted a year before the Forrest incident involved allegations of “planted drugs.” [2] The IA investigator interviewed no witnesses and based his “unfounded” conclusion solely on the incident reports of Parry and Stetser. Several former CPD high officials, including the Chief and Deputy Chief, testified that in the years leading up to and including the year of Forrest’s arrest there were several deficiencies in CPD management protocols, including how the CPD tracked officer locations during their shifts; [3] no officer performance evaluations in spite of a 2006 NJAG recommendation that they be implemented; and a sergeant to officer supervision ratio that was two to three times too high. [4] Officers Parry and Stetser were aware of CPD supervision deficiencies. Parry testified that “nobody seemed to care.” He explained “the more sergeants had to do … the more paperwork that had to be completed for our squad, the less they were on the street and there was no supervision for them.” Officer Stetser testified that his lieutenant most likely knew he was filing false reports and accepted them anyway. Officer Stetser engaged in questionable conduct in front of his supervisors on two occasions without reprimand. First, he put drugs in his lieutenant’s bag in front of the entire squad as a prank. The lieutenant discovered this and did nothing. Secondly, a sergeant conducted an integrity test on Stetser in which he gave him 45 bags of drugs to turn in but only 30 were filed. Nothing was done. Result of Litigation

As previously mentioned, the Federal District Court judge divided Forrest’s lawsuit into three categories: Failure to supervise through the IA process; a general failure to supervise; and failure to train.

The judge dismissed the general failure to supervise and failure to train allegations in response to a motion for summary judgement filed by the City. In doing so, the judge refused to permit the evidence pertaining to the IA failure to supervise category to be considered in support of the general failure to supervise and failure to train categories of Forrest’s complaint. [5] The Third Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the lower court ruling regarding the dismissal of two categories of the lawsuit.

The Third Circuit ruled that the lower court erred in refusing to consider parts of the evidence put forth by Forrest for the second and third categories of his lawsuit. The court ruled that, “We conclude that aspects of all three theories should survive when the evidence … is considered in its entirety.” On the dismissal of the general failure to supervise category, the court stated, “The evidence presented by Forrest may convince a reasonable jury that Camden’s failure to supervise and discipline its officers amounted to deliberate indifference to the rights of individuals with whom those officers would come into contact.” The court observed that, “The record would support a finding that Camden’s policymakers knew that their officers would require supervision, that there was a history of officer supervision being mishandled, and that, in the absence of such supervision, constitutional violations were likely to result.”

With respect to failure to train, the court focused on a failure of the CPD to train its supervisory officers. The court observed that Camden policymakers knew or should have known that its supervisory officers would be confronted with officer misconduct and that a failure to discipline would lead to the unconstitutional behavior reflected here, i.e., a deprivation of constitutional rights. The court observed further that the evidence presented by Forrest raised significant questions “as to whether Camden’s supervisor-level officers were adequately trained on how to discipline and combat officer misconduct when it was brought to their attention, including the kinds of misconduct-false arrest and excessive force-that led to Forrest’s injuries.”

Conclusion

This case represents another glaring example of what can happen to a police department when its supervisory officials display indifference to their management responsibility to properly train, supervise and discipline subordinate officers.

In this case, a group of officers, including a sergeant, knew that the CPD internal affairs division and its supervisory staff were in no position to monitor their rogue actions and they acted accordingly. It took an independent civil rights investigation to uncover and stop this deplorable conduct.

A proper, efficient and effective disciplinary system would have stopped this situation long before it reached the depths that it did. Moreover, the failure of the CPD to hold its officers accountable through periodic performance evaluations sent street officers the distinctly wrong message of institutional indifference.

Proper training of sergeants and an appropriate ratio of sergeants to line officers would also likely have been a significant factor in bringing about a different outcome. It should also be noted that high officials of the CPD ignored several warnings from the NJAG that predictably came true. This case will likely be settled before trial with a huge payout from the City of Camden.

References

1. Forrest v. Parry, (No. 16-4351) (3d Cir. 2019).

2. Between 2004 and 2008, seven complaints were lodged against Stetser, including the planting of drugs complaint plus one for excessive force, one for improper arrest and one for harassment and improper detention. Parry was the subject of three complaints, one involving planting drugs. The other two were not listed in the opinion.

3. The CPD relied solely on officer prepared logs to determine where an officer was on a given shift.

4. This ratio was supposed to be 5-7 officers per sergeant but instead was 12-15 per sergeant.

5. In order to simplify this case for the readers, I have chosen to eliminate certain portions of the case history and the court’s opinion from the discussion. One of the matters eliminated from discussion was a jury verdict in favor of the City on the first category of the suit involving failure to supervise in the IA process. The jury verdict was vacated by the Third Circuit along with its reversal of the lower court’s dismissal of the second and third categories of Forrest’s lawsuit.


OH Fire Department Want Firm for Diversity Push

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Toledo Fire & Rescue officials have proposed hiring a minority-owned creative firm to produce a recruitment campaign to increase diversity in the department.

TX Firefighter Seriously Injured in Apparatus Rollover

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Motley County firefighter Logan Jones was riding in an apparatus that was responding to lightning fires in the area when the vehicle rolled over several times.

Dave Smith: But Will They Change?

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A new study's findings refute social activists' assumptions about police shootings and race.

PA Assistant Chief Who Fell from Apparatus Dies

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Walter Wagman, a 32-year veteran of the Buchanan Valley Fire Department, was severely injured when he fell from an apparatus while responding to a call earlier this month.

Chicago Police Department Retires Badges of Three Officers Killed In The Line Of Duty

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

On Tuesday morning the Chicago Police Department retired the badges of three officers killed in the line of duty last year.

Colorado Deputy Gets Relief From Stand Up Comedy

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When Boulder County Sheriff's Commander Vinnie Montez isn’t biting the bullet on the stage a Saturday night, he might be loading one at the shooting range.

Colorado Deputy Awarded for Heroic Effort to Save Driver From Rushing Creek

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The deputy received a medal of honor for his actions in helping rescue an elderly man after the man flipped his SUV into a creek.

Kansas Sheriff’s Deputy Accused of Misconduct Goes Missing

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Deputy Derick Ambrose Chandler disappeared after Wellington police and the Sumner County Sheriff’s Office identified him as a suspect in a felony case.

Ohio Police Shoot Man Holding His Daughter Hostage

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police shot a 53-year-old man early Tuesday morning as he held his adult daughter hostage in a hotel room

Officials Vow to Arrest Gunman Who Shot Connecticut Police Captain

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

While SWAT teams in an armored vehicle searched the city for the gunman who fatally shot a man and wounded well-respected police Capt. Anthony Duff, the department’s top brass sent a sharp message Tuesday to the shooter: We will find you and arrest you.

Baltimore Police Officer Taken to Shock Trauma After Crash

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Baltimore police officer was taken to Shock Trauma on Tuesday afternoon after a woman crashed into his vehicle while it was parked in the Central Park Heights neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore.

Police Release Videos, Timeline in Dayton Mass Shooting

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Various video surveillance cameras in the neighborhood helped police piece the timeline together, showing the gunman as he visited two bars on East Fifth Street before returning into his vehicle and changing into a dark hoodie and grabbing his backpack.

Slain LAPD Officer Honored: ‘Brother, Your Watch Has Just Begun’

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The young officer was shot and killed while off duty last month near a taco stand in Lincoln Heights, not far from the neighborhood where he grew up.

Iowa Sheriff’s Deputy Dies Following Crash

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lyon County Sheriff's Deputy Stephanie Schreurs died on Tuesday after she sustained incapacitating injuries after she was involved in a single-vehicle crash early Friday morning.

Photo of the Week: Firefighter takes in patient’s dog

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This week’s photo comes from Mark Heller, the EMS coordinator with Chatham Fire Rescue in Massachusetts. Pictured is Michael Lopriore and his new foster dog. A local resident was in need of rehabilitation for a severe medical condition but would not agree to the admission due to concerns for her dog. The dog is the only family she has and provides the resident emotional support. Healthcare...

Photo of the Week: AMR Georgia empowers citizens

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

This week's photo features Brian Noll, Shandeana Price, Jake Wall and Antoine Meadows at the NAACP Health & Safety Fair at the South DeKalb Mall, which AMR Georgia participated in. AMR’s Stop The Bleed and CPR trainings are intended to empower and equip bystanders to take simple steps that may help save a life before help arrives. [Read: Resilient communities train citizens to be...

6 Mont. EMS departments receive $300K to start pilot program

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Six Montana EMS departments received $50,000 each to purchase equipment and begin training for an integrated healthcare pilot program

Cleveland medic writes scathing resignation letter

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Megan Mull cites a "toxic and dangerous environments" as reasons for her departure

Study reveals Houston FD issues with resource allocation

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rice University conducted an in-depth analysis of 911 calls, determining fire trucks were responding to 25% of calls where an ambulance was required

Study reveals Houston FD issues with resource allocation

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rice University conducted an in-depth analysis of 911 calls, determining fire trucks were responding to 25% of calls where an ambulance was required

Study reveals Houston FD issues with resource allocation

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Rice University conducted an in-depth analysis of 911 calls, determining fire trucks were responding to 25% of calls where an ambulance was required

Detecting a fire with a compact thermal drone solution

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Joshua Fire Department deploys the Mavic 2 Enterprise Dual for firefighting missions

Rapid Response: Lack of smoke alarms contributes to multiple fatality structure

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

How firefighters can work with childcare facilities to help underscore fire safety

Rapid Response: Lack of smoke alarms contributes to multiple fatality structure fire

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

How firefighters can work with childcare facilities to help underscore fire safety

NASA scientists fly through Wash. wildfire-triggered thunderstorm for research

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The research could improve climate models and help determine what happens to the chemistry of smoke in the stratosphere

NASA scientists fly through Wash. wildfire-triggered thunderstorm for research

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The research could improve climate models and help determine what happens to the chemistry of smoke in the stratosphere

Crookston, MN, Firefighters Association Has Taken Delivery of a Custom Pumper

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Crookston, MN, Firefighters Association has taken delivery of a 2019 custom pumper built by Rosenbauer.

Product of the Day: Ram Air Gear Dryer — Ram Air TG-Series Turnout Gear Dryers – 4, 6 or 8-Unit Models

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Ram Air’s new TG-Series Gear Dryers have the same great quality you expect from Ram Air but feature a smaller footprint than their predecessors.

11 Life-saving benefits of CAD-to-CAD interoperability

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Don't make the mistake of slowing your first responders down by overlooking CAD interoperability

Social media training: Getting firefighters to take it seriously

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Combat hurdles to social media training by focusing on the right topics

Ore. wildfire caused by butane hash oil lab blast

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Investigators determined that the East Evans Fire started in a shack where Michael Cashmareck was running an illegal butane hash oil lab

Mich. paramedic accused of swiping morphine, fentanyl for personal use

Posted on August 14, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Eric Stanke, 34, was arraigned for charges that include possession of a controlled substance and two counts of obtaining a controlled substance by fraud

Feel the heat: Managing exertional heat stroke

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

NAEMSP and NATA recommend a cool first, transport second approach to exertional heat stroke treatment with cold water immersion therapy

Ky. judge orders 911 dispatch center study

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Daviess County Judge-Executive Al Mattingly requested a study be conducted on the feasibility of consolidating regional 911 dispatch centers into one center

Ky. judge orders 911 dispatch center study

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Daviess County Judge-Executive Al Mattingly requested a study be conducted on the feasibility of consolidating regional 911 dispatch centers into one center

Have you forgotten? A call to chiefs to remember who they serve

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Show your firefighters that you haven’t forgotten them, their sacrifices or the love of the job

When the guns go silent: how to manage the aftermath of a mass shooting

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Emergency management concerns for the hours and days following an active shooter event

Chief: Smoke detectors lacking at Pa. childcare center where 5 died

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

One state senator said he plans to introduce a bill that would require DHS to inspect all smoke detectors during their annual inspection of childcare facilities

3 keys to enhancing PowerPoint programs for fire service professionals

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Focusing on preparation, delivery and troubleshooting will help ensure a smooth and effective presentation

Pa. assistant chief dies 2 weeks after being thrown from truck

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Assistant Chief Walter Wagaman succumbed to injuries sustained after being ejected from the firetruck when responding to a call

FDNY first responders entangled in Epstein scandal after information leak

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FDNY officials reviewed the leaked reports on the message board and are confident that the information was not posted by a first responder

What’s new in fire department apparatus bay design and technology

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

Several new technologies are being integrated into apparatus bays to optimize firefighter safety and department efficiency

What’s new in fire department apparatus bay design and technology

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Several new technologies are being integrated into apparatus bays to optimize firefighter safety and department efficiency

Fla. driver arrested after boasting of ‘live’ grenade

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By David Boroff New York Daily News

DESOTO COUNTY, Fla. — A motorist in Florida was arrested Saturday after claiming to have a "live" hand grenade in his vehicle.

Donald Reid Jr., of Bradenton, was found with multiple weapons, which were displayed in a Facebook post by the DeSoto County Sheriff’s Office.

Reid told detectives during the traffic stop that he had a grenade "with the pin in place" in his possession.

He “informed detectives that to his knowledge, the grenade was ‘live,’” the sheriff’s office said.

The Sarasota County Sheriff’s bomb squad made sure the grenade was safe for removal and destruction, according to authorities.

Reid was charged with multiple counts of possession of firearms and ammunition by a convicted felon.

©2019 New York Daily News


LA Audit: Ex-Fire Department Head Skimmed $56K

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The former Vacherie Volunteer Fire Department president allegedly used $56,600 of department funds to on phone bills, loans and other personal expenses.

LA Audit: Ex-Fire Department Head Skimmed $56K

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The former Vacherie Volunteer Fire Department president allegedly used $56,600 of department funds to on phone bills, loans and other personal expenses.

No A/C in Houston Fire Apparatus Amid Triple-Digit Heat

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Houston's firefighters union is calling for the city to repair an aging fleet of about two dozen fire apparatus without air conditioning.

Video Shows Police Take Down Gunman at VA Medial Center

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

No one was injured when a man fired an assault rifle at a Veterans Affairs hospital on the Near West Side Monday afternoon, then ran inside where he was arrested near a pharmacy as staff and patients yelled and scattered for cover, according to Chicago po

Off-Duty FF Uses Water Truck to Douse OH Pickup Fire

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

The firefighter used the water he was carrying to an asphalt company to extinguish a burning pickup truck in Tuscarawas Township.

Connecticut Police Captain Wounded in Shootout

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New Haven Police Capt. Anthony Duff was wounded in a shootout while off-duty Monday night.

NYPD in Mourning Again After Police Officer Becomes Eighth to Commit Suicide This Year

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Another NYPD cop took his own life early Tuesday, shooting himself inside his Yonkers home.

California Highway Patrol Officer Killed in Gunfight with Suspect on Freeway

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Officer Andre Moye had served with the California Highway Patrol for three and a half years. He is survived by his wife, mother, father, and siblings.

NYPD Officer Dies by Suicide—8th this Year

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 35-year-old police officer with the New York Police Department was found dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound in his Yonkers home on Tuesday morning—the eighth death by suicide on the department in 2019.

Former Missouri Lawmaker Blasts Warren for Tweet Claiming Michael Brown was “Murdered”

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A former Missouri lawmaker—who is also a retired police officer—blasted presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren for a Tweet claiming that Michael Brown was "murdered" in Ferguson five years ago.

California Officers Targeted for Termination Fight Back, Sue City

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Five officers with the Oakland Police Department who have been targeted for termination are suing the city and the police commission, claiming that both bodies do not have the legal authority to fire them.

Woman’s Wrong Number Text to Officer Leads to Viral Police Department Social Media Post

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A woman errantly sent a text message to an officer with the Winfield (MO) Police Department in which she claimed that they "got high" together.

Colorado Officer Finds Stress Relief in Stand-Up Comedy

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 20-year veteran with the Boulder County Sheriff's Office has a second career in his off-duty time as a stand-up comedian.

Hospitalized Baltimore Officer Shot While Off Duty Says on YouTube “I’m 10-8”

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Isaac "Ike" Carrington, who has been confined to a hospital bed since being shot multiple times while off duty last week, took to social media to declare that he'd be back on the streets and on duty soon.

Nevada Officer Fires on Truck Accelerating Toward Him

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the North Las Vegas Police Department discharged his service weapon at a pickup truck on Sunday afternoon as the vehicle was accelerating toward him.

3 Pennsylvania Kids Raise Money for Officer to Obtain Ballistic Vest

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Three nine-year-old friends in Pennsylvania have taken it upon themselves to raise money for their local police department to be able to acquire ballistic vests for their officers.

Connecticut K-9 Dies in Retirement

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A K-9 with the West Hartford Police Department has died from complications from lymphoma that forced him into retirement in January of 2018.

FDNY Firefighter Suffers Fatal Heart Attack after Call

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lt. Brian J. Sullivan, a 27-year veteran FDNY firefighter who was in Squad 41 in the Bronx, was feeling pain and discomfort on his shift, but kept responding to calls.

California Highway Patrol Mourns Death of Officer Killed During ‘Horrific’ Shootout

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A driver California Highway Patrol Officer Andre Moye stopped pulled out a rifle and opened fire, mortally wounding him while he was filling out paperwork to impound the man’s truck.

Chief: Killing of young LA officer ‘leaves a lasting scar’

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — A young Los Angeles police officer gunned down while off duty at a taco stand was memorialized by his chief for his big smile, bright mind and devotion to public service.

Hundreds of fellow officers packed the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels on Monday to honor Officer Juan Jose Diaz.

"Juan's death leaves a lasting wound, his murder a lasting scar," police Chief Michel Moore told mourners.

The 24-year-old officer was shot July 27 after confronting a man spray-painting gang graffiti on a wall. Diaz had been hanging out and eating tacos with his girlfriend and her two brothers in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood.

Diaz will be remembered as someone with humility and sharp sense of humor who "continually strove to help others," Moore said.

The officer's family and friends wore white and were seated in the front pews of the downtown cathedral, where Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez presided over a bilingual Mass.

His sister, Anahi Diaz, said her brother had wanted to be a police officer since he was 5 years old. She laughed as she remembered him eating cereal out of a Los Angeles Dodgers batting helmet and singing country music — "and not very well."

A hearse arrived at the cathedral with a police motorcycle escort. After the service, the casket was escorted for interment at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills cemetery.

Diaz had been on the force for two years and was assigned to the police department's Professional Standards Bureau, which conducts investigations into department personnel.

He was shot as he and his group tried to drive away to avoid a violent confrontation, investigators said. One of his girlfriend's brothers was seriously wounded but is expected to recover.

Two men and a woman were arrested Aug. 2 in connection with the killing. They were identified as Francisco Talamantes, 23; Cristian Facundo, 20; and Ashlynn Smith, 18, police said. They're due in court next month on multiple charges including murder with a gang allegation, prosecutors said.

It wasn't immediately clear whether the defendants had obtained lawyers.

Detectives said the shooting occurred during a two-hour series of crimes by gang members that included another attempted shooting nearby where the targets were unhurt.

Diaz is the second off-duty officer killed in the Los Angeles area in recent months. In June, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Joseph Gilbert Solano was shot at a Jack in the Box restaurant in the suburb of Alhambra.

The suspect, Rhett Nelson of Utah, is also charged in the killing of professional Russian snowboarder Dmitry Koltsov. Authorities have said that the killings of Solano and Koltsov are believed to be random. Nelson has pleaded not guilty in both cases.


Portland braces for far-right rally, counterprotest

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Gillian Flaccus Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — Portland police are mobilizing to prevent clashes between out-of-state far-right groups planning a rally here and the homegrown anti-fascists who oppose them as America's culture wars seep into this progressive haven.

Saturday's rally — and the violence it may bring — are a relatively new reality here, as an informal coalition of white nationalists, white supremacists and extreme-right militias hones its focus on Oregon's largest city as a stand-in for everything it feels is wrong with the U.S. At the top of that list are the masked and black-clad anti-fascists who turn out to violently oppose right-wing demonstrators as soon as they set foot in town.

"It's Portlandia, and in the public mind it represents everything these (far-right) groups are against," said Heidi Beirich, director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups. "It's progressive, and even more offensive to them, it's progressive white people who should be on these guys' side."

The groups know they will get a headline-grabbing reaction from Portland's so-called "antifa," whose members have issued an online call to their followers to turn out to "defend Portland from a far-Right attack." Portland's Rose City Antifa, the nation's oldest active anti-fascist group, says violence against right-wing demonstrators is "exactly what should happen when the far-right attempts to invade our town."

Portland leaders are planning a major law enforcement presence on the heels of similar rallies in June and last summer that turned violent, and the recent hate-driven shooting in El Paso, Texas. None of the city's nearly 1,000 police officers will have the day off, and Portland will get help from the Oregon State Police and the FBI. Mayor Ted Wheeler has said he may ask Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, to call up the Oregon National Guard.

"There's no winning for the cops in a situation like this. There just isn't," Beirich said. "This is hard-core stuff, and I don't think you can be too cautious."

Experts who track right-wing militias and hate groups warn that the mix of people heading to Portland also came together for a Unite the Right rally in 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia, which ended when a participant rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing one person and injuring 19.

The rally is being organized by a member of the Proud Boys, who have been designated by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group. Others expected include members of the American Guard, the Three Percenters, the Oathkeepers and the Daily Stormers. American Guard is a white nationalist group, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, while the Three Percenters and the Oathkeepers are extremist anti-government militias. The Daily Stormers are neo-Nazis, according to the center.

[Read: How police can work more effectively with protest groups]

Portland's fraught history with hate groups adds to the complex dynamic.

Many of today's anti-fascists trace their activist heritage to a group that battled with neo-Nazis in Portland's streets decades ago, and they feel this is the same struggle in a new era, said Randy Blazak, the leading expert on the history of hate groups in Oregon.

White supremacists murdered an Ethiopian man, Mulugeta Seraw, in Portland in 1988. And by the 1990s, Portland was known as Skinhead City because it was the home base of Volksfront, at the time one of the most active neo-Nazi groups in the U.S. As recently as 2007, neo-Nazis attempted to gather in Portland for a three-day skinhead festival.

"When I'm looking at what's happening right now, for me it's a direct line back to the 1980s: the battles between the racist skinheads and the anti-racist skinheads," Blazak said. "It's the latest version of this thing that's been going on for 30 years in this city."

Police, meanwhile, have seemed overwhelmed by the cultural forces at war in their streets.

At the June rally, masked antifa members beat up a conservative blogger named Andy Ngo. Video of the 30-second attack grabbed national attention and further turned the focus on Portland as a new battleground in a divisive America.

Republican Sens. Ted Cruz, of Texas, and Bill Cassidy, of Louisiana, introduced a congressional resolution calling for anti-fascists to be declared domestic terrorists, and President Donald Trump echoed that theme in a tweet last month. Portland's City Hall has been evacuated twice due to bomb threats after the June 29 skirmishes, and Wheeler, the mayor, has been pilloried by critics who incorrectly said he told police to stand down while anti-fascists went after right-wing demonstrators.

"I don't want for one minute anyone to think that because we're being thrust into this political show, that I or the public have lost confidence in (police officers') ability to do what we do," said Police Chief Danielle Outlaw, who is regularly heckled as she leaves City Hall by those who feel the police target counterprotesters for arrest over far-right demonstrators.

Police have noted the violence in June was limited to a small area of downtown Portland despite three different demonstrations that lasted more than five hours, with hundreds of people constantly on the move. They also made two arrests last week in a May Day assault on an antifa member that became a rallying cry for the city's far-left.

"We'll be ready for the 17th here in little Portland, Oregon," Wheeler, the mayor, told The Associated Press. "But at the end of the day, the bigger question is about our nation's moral compass and which direction it's pointing."

Blazak, the Oregon hate groups expert, said he worries the extreme response from a small group of counterprotesters is starting to backfire. Many in the city oppose the right-wing rallies but also dislike the violent response of antifa, which provides social media fodder for the far-right.

"The opposition is playing right into the alt-right's hands by engaging with them this way," he said.

Joe Biggs, organizer of Saturday's rally, said the attack on Ngo made him decide to hold the event with the goal of getting antifa declared a domestic terrorist organization. Biggs said those coming to Portland have been told not to bring weapons or start fights, but they will defend themselves if attacked.

Biggs toned down his online rhetoric after the El Paso shootings and urged followers coming to Portland to keep a cool head. He says he is not racist — he has a toddler daughter with his Guyanese wife — but wants to show the world antifa's violent tactics.

"That group of antifa there in Portland needs to be exposed for who they are," Biggs said in a phone interview with The Associated Press. "And guess what? They should be scared."

Everyday Portlanders, however, are feeling more frustrated than scared by the protests that bring their city to a standstill. A 5K race scheduled for Saturday along the waterfront was moved at the last minute to avoid any violence, and an Irish bar that's a city institution canceled an amateur boxing event that draws 500 spectators. Other businesses plan to close on one of the last weekends of the city's peak tourist season.

"People are nervous, people are hesitant to go anywhere near that area, and I don't blame them," said Aaron Montaglione, owner of Terrapin Events, which is putting on the 5K race. "It's affecting everyone."


NYPD officer fatally shoots himself at home

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Thomas Tracy New York Daily News

NEW YORK — Another NYPD cop took his own life early Tuesday, shooting himself inside his Yonkers home, sources said.

The off-duty seven-year veteran of the department left a note when he shot himself in the head about 3:30 a.m., sources said.

His fiancee was in the home when he shot himself. He died at the scene.

He is the eighth NYPD cop to take his own life this year. Four officers killed themselves just last month.

[Read: Steps leaders can take to prevent officer suicide]

NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan last month encouraged officers to seek mental health counseling if they were having suicidal thoughts and said they would not risk losing their jobs if they did so.

©2019 New York Daily News


FirstNet Authority Releases Public Safety-Driven Roadmap for Future of Network

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet Authority) marked a significant milestone with release of a new Roadmap for the future of FirstNet, the nationwide public safety broadband network.

Georgia Deputy Uses PIT Maneuver to End Pursuit

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Newly released dashboard camera video shows a Forsyth County Sheriff's deputy position his patrol car to disable the vehicle and two people were taken into custody in Alpharetta Friday.

DRONERESPONDERS Unveils Technical Experts Program, Adds Advisors

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Speaking at the North Carolina Drone Summit, DRONERESPONDERS director Charles Werner announced the creation of the Technical Experts Program to a crowd of public safety and drone industry professionals.

Why LE needs to prepare for the disinformation era

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Society of Police Futurists International
Author: Society of Police Futurists International

By Glen Mills

dis·?in·?for·?ma·?tion | false information deliberately and often covertly spread (as by the planting of rumors) in order to influence public opinion or obscure the truth — Merriam Webster

An article published by Forbes Magazine on July 9, 2019, asked: How Were Social Media Platforms So Unprepared For 'Fake News' And Foreign Influence?

The topics of disinformation, fake news and foreign actors using social media against multiple democratic governments, including the United States, has been the subject of headlines since the run up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Questions of how the federal government and large technology corporations allowed attacks to be carried out on our democracy have been asked and the analysis of where things went wrong will continue for many years.

A good argument can be made that if the major social media companies and the federal government had been paying attention to developing patterns and had thought more about the future, we may have been able to better anticipate what was coming and could have prevented some of the harm that came from these attacks.

Can we apply futures research to anticipate if and how this might affect policing? With a better understanding of what might happen and then anticipating what will probably happen, can we be better prepared to steer things toward a better outcome?

The evolution of the tech landscape

We can probably assess the future social media landscape through looking at the history of online social networks and how they developed from CompuServe to Friendster to Myspace to Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat.

We have seen an evolution in technologies, accessibility and popularity. Technology allowed these networks to go from simple text posted in forums, to pictures and text, to uploaded video to live video.

More people are able to access these technologies as the price of computers and smartphones have decreased. We have also seen the popularity of social networks rise as more people use these tools to communicate and spread ideas.

Finally, we have seen how malicious actors have found new ways to exploit these tools to spread disinformation.

Applying current trends to future predictions

If we imagine these trends continuing, we can see that more people will likely gain access to the technologies and tools that only large businesses and governments can afford today.

Think of the cost of a mainframe computer of the past to your smartphone today or of the amount of information you can now download freely with a cheap internet connection vs. the slower and more expensive connections of the past.

We have also seen a trend of governments and technology companies struggling to figure out ways to battle misinformation, a situation exacerbated as governments are unable to keep up with technological advancements and regulate harmful acts carried out with newer technologies.

Russian intelligence agencies spent “only” a few million dollars to employ hundreds of workers at “troll farms,” purchase online advertisements and deploy “bot armies” in their attempt to sway the 2016 election. (A bot is basically a computer program that can behave like a person online.) We don’t know if, or exactly how much, these efforts affected the election, but any observer can see that their efforts did cause a great deal of mayhem and confusion.

the Impact of disinformation on policing

Why should we care about this in policing? Because the social media tools and techniques of Russian “non-linear hybrid warfare” are coming to your backyard.

Your smartphone’s technology is equal in power to computers that cost millions of dollars decades ago. Not only that, but the multiple user-friendly apps you have loaded onto your device would have taken teams of developers thousands of hours to create and have required very sophisticated knowledge to even operate in the past. These trends mean that the “troll factory” filled with human employees today will be replaced by sophisticated artificial intelligence programs or bots that will act more convincingly like humans tomorrow.

The bot armies of today (that only cost hundreds of dollars) will cost pennies, be much easier to find and far easier to use by those who have little technical skill.

What will happen when anyone with any type of grievance against any person can easily use all of these tools and techniques? When you add “deep fake” technologies (as discussed in a previous Police Futurists column) and make them attainable and usable by anyone, then social media will become a powerful weapon for domestic abuse, stalking, harassment and blackmail.

By standing up an army of fake but convincing accounts and amplifying messages on social media, individuals could cause civil unrest, disorder and outright panic. What was once a threat by a single person to divulge embarrassing information to a victim's friends, family and coworkers becomes a highly convincing campaign to have multiple sources permanently discredit someone in all aspects of their lives.

The phoned-in bomb threat of the past becomes hundreds of very convincing real-time reports from students of an active shooter at their school, and the controversial police encounter in another jurisdiction from a few years ago is recycled and spread as something that just happened in your jurisdiction last night.

Police leaders in agencies of all sizes need to plan to detect and respond to these events immediately. If any of these events rises to the level of criminal activity they will obviously be investigated, and they may eventually be prosecuted, but what about the damage done in real time?

We need to recognize the trends and signals because they are clearly telling us what is probably going to happen in the future. We need to be better equipped to handle disinformation from many sources, in real time, all of the time. If your agency is not prepared for this then the headline years from now may read, How Was (Insert Your Agency Here) So Unprepared For (Insert Fake News Story and Resulting Real World Harm)?


About the author

Glen Mills is a lieutenant with the Burlington Massachusetts Police Department currently assigned to the Administrative Division and oversees community services, training, emergency management, information technology and dispatch. He is involved in a number of community outreach programs and manages his department’s social media, website, Citizens Police Academy, workplace safety and crime prevention efforts. Glen is also the current president of the Massachusetts Association of Crime Analysts, the first vice president of Police Futurists International and an IACA-certified law enforcement analyst.


L3Harris Technologies’ XL Radios Now Compatible with MSA’s SCBAs

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

With a simple software update, the L3Harris XL-200P and XL-185P radios can use Bluetooth technology to route audio to and from SCBA units.

About 100 San Antonio FFs Battle Shopping Center Fire

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

San Antonio crews took heat precautions as they tackled the blaze, which broke out at a nail salon in the plaza Monday night before spreading to other nearby businesses.

VFIS Introduces ResponderHelp.com, an Emergency Responders One-Stop Free Resource

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The website was developed to serve as a gift to the emergency service community in celebration of VFIS’ 50th anniversary – and, as is customary of a true gift, using ResponderHelp.com is free.

MI Volunteer Firefighter Dies of Heart Attack after Call

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

East Tawas firefighter Norman Edward Klenow, who had served in the fire service for more than 50 years, felt sick on a call and suffered cardiac arrest at his home hours later.

No motive after shootout kills Calif. officer, gunman

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Author: Society of Police Futurists International

Associated Press

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — Two California Highway Patrol officers who were wounded after a man whose truck was being impounded suddenly grabbed a rifle and opened fire, killing another officer, are expected to survive, authorities said Tuesday.

Officer Andrew Moye, Jr., was killed in the gunfight as dozens of bullets flew shortly after 5:30 p.m. Monday just off a freeway in Riverside, east of Los Angeles. Other drivers ran for cover and two people suffered minor injuries.

The two surviving officers are in critical and serious condition, respectively, Riverside Police Officer Ryan Railsback said. He would not identify them.

KABC-TV reported that a man identified the shooter as his son, Aaron Luther, 49, of neighboring Beaumont.

"We don't know his motive for this crime," Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said. Investigators were still gathering evidence from the scene of the "long and horrific gun battle" Tuesday morning.

A CHP officer was doing paperwork to impound the pickup truck when the man reached in, grabbed a rifle and fatally wounded the officer, authorities said. Railsback said he didn't know what prompted CHP officers to initially stop the truck.

"I am devastated by the tragedy," CHP Commissioner Warren Stanley said in a tweet.

Relatives said Moye was 33 and had been with the CHP for about four years.

"He was so kind," his stepmother, Debbie Howard, told KTVU-TV. "You're not going to hear one bad word about him. He loved this job."

Dennis Luther, the father of the suspected shooter, said he watched the events unfold on television. "It's hard. I love him. And I'm sorry for the policeman," he told KABC-TV. "I'm devastated. I just can't believe it."

Luther said his son served prison time for attempted murder but was released more than a decade ago. He says he doesn't know what his son was doing with a gun as a felon, which is illegal.

Railsback said authorities have not yet determined how he had a rifle.

After his truck was impounded, Aaron Luther called his wife to pick him up, his father said.

When she arrived, the tow truck was there.

"She said she heard 'pop, pop, pop' ... gunfire, and then a bullet went through the windshield of her car," Luther said.

He said his son recently seemed depressed, was having knee pain and marital problems but was devoted to his two children and a stepchild.

"He lived for his kids. That's what motivated him," Luther said. "So I don't know what overcame him. I mean, I wish I did know."

Jennifer Moctezuma, 31, of Moreno Valley told the Los Angeles Times that she was driving home with her 6-year-old twins when a bullet flew through her front windshield.

Charles Childress, 56, a retired Marine from Moreno Valley, was in the car behind her.

He led the family as they crawled to the bottom of a bridge to hide and none were harmed, the Times reported.

"He's my hero," Moctezuma said.

Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered flags at half-staff Tuesday in the state Capitol.

Dozens saluted as the officer's flag-draped body was removed from a hospital and placed in a hearse. Motorcycle officers then led a procession as the hearse was driven to the county coroner's office.


Lake Shore, MD, Vol. Fire Dept. Gets Custom Pumper

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Lake Shore, MD, Volunteer Fire Department, in Anne Arundel County, has taken delivery of a 2019 KME Predator pumper.

New Pumper Approved for TX Firefighters

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

"I don’t have a dependable engine in the city," Windcrest's fire chief told the city council about the department's need for a new apparatus.

3 CHP Officers Shot, One Killed in Riverside Shootout

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Police are investigating why the man was stopped in the first place, but the officer determined he needed to impound the truck. The officer had called for a tow truck and was filling out paperwork when the man went back into his pickup and pulled out a rifle.

Florida Motorcycle Officer Critically Injured in Crash

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Pembroke Pines Police Sgt. John Baker, a 25-year-veteran of the force who oversees the Traffic Unit and is one of the agency’s public information officers, was critically injured in a crash while on his police motorcycle Saturday morning.

Court Backs Cleveland FFs’ Demand to Oust Chief

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two legal decisions support the Cleveland fire union's claim that Chief Angelo Calvillo violated the city's charter involving civil service employees and elections.

Skyfire, Darley and DroneSense Team Up to Give Away Drone Program to Oklahoma City FD

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The donation was the result of the companies’ Spring 2019 contest giveaway, which includes two days of on-site training, a DJI Mavic 2 Enterprise Dual aircraft, FAA consulting, and a year-long subscription to DroneSense.

NICE and RapidSOS Transform Investigations by Integrating Incident Intelligence and Emergency Data Clearinghouse Solutions

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

ntegration extends RapidSOS’ enhanced emergency information beyond real-time incident handling to empower post-incident reconstruction

FirstNet Apps Bring Fleet Management Solutions to Public Safety

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

AT&T, Fleet Complete, Cradlepoint Offer FirstNet Ready™ In-Vehicle Network Solution that Will Boost Public Safety for Communities Across the USA

Slain LAPD Officer Juan Diaz Honored In Memorial Service

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A young LAPD officer who was only on the force for two years when he was shot and killed last month while off duty was honored Monday with a memorial service in downtown Los Angeles.

NYPD Deputy Commissioner Opposes Reform to Eliminate Cash Bail

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The NYPD deputy commissioner of intelligence and counter-terrorism says New York is bound for trouble if new criminal justice reforms go into effect next year.

Cops for Kids With Cancer Hosts Boat Ride for Patients, Families

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Cops for Kids with Cancer and Boston Police hosted their annual boat ride for young patients and their families.

Animal-Loving Massachusetts Police Officer Rescues Baby Squirrels

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Quincy Police Officer Tim Kaes rescued two baby squirrels recently after their mother and other siblings died.

Chicago Police Officer Under Investigation for Chauffeuring Hulk Hogan

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Chicago police officer is under investigation after video footage surfaced of him giving ex-pro wrestling legend Hulk Hogan a ride in a squad car along the tarmac of O’Hare International Airport.

Falling Bear Lands on California Deputy’s Cruiser; Causing Crash, Wildfire

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A hit-and-run bear dropped out of the sky, landing on top of a Humboldt County sheriff deputy's cruiser that was responding to a call on Highway 96 near Weitchpec last weekend.

Convicted Felon Told Florida Deputies He Had Live Grenade in Car

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A convicted felon was arrested Saturday after he told DeSoto County Sheriff's deputies he had a live grenade.

NYPD Officers Help Deliver Baby in Back Seat of Car

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A pregnant mom who went into labor in the back seat of her car in Manhattan got an assist from the NYPD — and the first cop on the scene was a former EMT who had already delivered four babies in his last job.

Body Camera Video Released in Fatal Georgia Deputy-Involved Shooting

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Burke County Sheriff's Deputy Eric Madison killed Fredrick Hadden after the man fired at the officer and his former wife who was trying to escape him.

Wild Shootout Near Freeway Leaves California Highway Patrol Officer and Gunman Dead

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

California Highway Patrol Officer Andre Moye was killed and two other officers were wounded in a wild shootout Monday evening off the 215 Freeway in Riverside that also left the gunman dead and motorists dodging bullets.

The Notre-Dame fire: Battling “something bigger than life”

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Key takeaways from the in-depth New York Times article detailing the risky firefighting efforts at the beloved monument

FRI 2019 Quick Take: Updates on federal legislation that impacts the fire service

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

LaSala offers update on funding being considered by the 116th Congress and the impact on local fire departments

Mass. ambulance service trains youth cadets in lifesaving techniques

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Armstrong Ambulance Service taught cadets hands-only CPR and Stop the Bleed techniques to ready them for the field

FirstNet Authority releases roadmap for future network

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FirstNet officials attended individual engagements, workshops and summits with first responders to ensure the roadmap meets responders’ communication needs

FirstNet Authority releases roadmap for future network

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FirstNet officials attended individual engagements, workshops and summits with first responders to ensure the roadmap meets responders’ communication needs

Iowa paramedics assist 79-year-old quadriplegic resident in celebrating his birthday

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Paramedics helped a local man see his garden grow after eight years of not being able to go outside

Ohio city upgrades ambulance equipment and implements notification system

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The newest ambulance cot will increase patient handling safety, and the EMS-to-hospital notification system aims to improve patient care

Ohio city upgrades ambulance equipment and implements notification system

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The newest ambulance cot will increase patient handling safety, and the EMS-to-hospital notification system aims to improve patient care

LODD: Mich. firefighter dies after responding to call

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Norman Edward Klenow, 78, suffered from cardiac arrest after providing traffic control at the scene of a crash

Spotlight: Heat Straps’ glove strap allows firefighters to operate safely, quickly in hazardous environments

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New Jersey-based firefighter Jordan Lang recognized the need for a glove strap after his own gloves fell between a stairwell during a fire academy drill

FRI 2019: Chief Bashoor highlights FireRescue1.com special coverage

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

FireRescue1.com executive editor talks hot topics, editorial board expansion and merger news

Calif. LEO killed, 2 LEOs wounded in shootout

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

UPDATE 10:35 p.m. (PST):

The California Highway Patrol says one officer is dead, another in critical condition and a third has minor injuries after a shootout that also killed the gunman.

Dozens of gunshots were fired Monday near Interstate 215 in Riverside, east of Los Angeles.

CHP Assistant Chief Scott Parker says an officer who pulled over a white pickup was filling out impound paperwork when the driver pulled a rifle from the truck and began shooting.

The officer was fatally wounded but managed to call for help. Authorities say CHP officers, Riverside police and sheriff's deputies arrived and continued trading gunfire. Two other CHP officers were hit before the gunman was killed.

Police withheld the shooter's name and say they don't have a motive for the attack.

Original story below.

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — A shootout near a freeway killed a California Highway Patrol officer and wounded two others Monday before the gunman was fatally shot, authorities said.

A CHP officer had pulled over a white pickup truck at about 5:30 p.m. on a road just off Interstate 215 east of Los Angeles, Riverside police spokesman Ryan Railsback said. He didn't immediately know why the car was stopped.

The CHP decided to impound the truck and a tow had been called when the driver reached into the back of his pickup — apparently to retrieve personal items — but instead grabbed a rifle and opened fire, authorities said.

Three CHP officers were shot. Video showed one officer being taken away in a police car. Another was taken to the hospital by helicopter.

The CHP later tweeted that one officer had died. There was no immediate word on the conditions of the other officers.

Family members identified the officer as 33-year-old Andre Moye, Jr., who was married and had been with the CHP about four years, KABC-TV reported.

Riverside police and Riverside County sheriff's deputies were called and more gunfire erupted as the gunman took cover in front of his car. He was wounded and pronounced dead at a hospital, authorities said.

Someone in another car was hit by flying glass that caused minor injuries, Railsback said.

TV video showed a woman being examined by firefighters.

Video from the scene shows bullet holes in the front windows of two patrol cars and large holes blown in their back windows. What appeared to be an assault-style rifle was on the ground.

Riverside law enforcement call gunbattle that killed a #CHP officer at 5:30pm “long and horrific”. Identities not released of deceased or 2 other officers wounded. Suspect fatally shot & died at the scene on freeway overpass above 215. No motive given. @fox5sandiego 4 updates

— Kathleen Bade (@KathleenFOX5) August 13, 2019

This just happens today near Riverside CA multiple victims as far as I know unfortunately 2 California CHP officers injured one of them air lifted to a near by hospital and the other one transported by an ambulance, but according to the president no gun laws are need ?????? pic.twitter.com/NXn3QWK8lH

— Adrian Zavala (@adrian052989) August 13, 2019

UPDATE: One of the three CHP officers injured during a shootout with a suspect in Riverside has been pronounced dead. Continuing coverage: https://t.co/MN6LrOE6UX pic.twitter.com/2nHDFna4ko

— KESQ News Channel 3 (@KESQ) August 13, 2019 Gun Battle on Riverside Freeway

BREAKING: 2 CHP officers injured in gun battle on Riverside freeway http://via.kswbtv.com/KDdE4

Posted by FOX 5 San Diego on Monday, August 12, 2019

LIVE: Authorities are giving and update after a CHP officer was killed during a shootout in Riverside. https://t.co/YVecyQeP0W https://t.co/rUmAGvpSyt

— FOX26 News (@KMPHFOX26) August 13, 2019


FDNY Lt. Brian Sullivan suffered a fatal heart attack after shift

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lieutenant Sullivan was a veteran fire officer and a member of FDNY's Special Operations Command who served the department for nearly three decades

Product of the Day: PURVIS Systems — The PURVIS Fire Station Alerting System (PURVIS FSAS)

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The PURVIS FSAS is used by agencies throughout the U.S., including the fire departments of NYC, Washington DC, and Boston.

Mass. firefighter admits to OUI in crash with police cruiser

Posted on August 13, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Jay Frisbee, 37, was sentenced to a driver alcohol education program and his license will be suspended for 45 days

New Ohio requirement mandates dispatchers be certified

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Ohio Department of Administrative Services gave all dispatch centers a deadline to either be EMD certified or to submit a timeline for compliance

New Ohio requirement mandates dispatchers be certified

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Ohio Department of Administrative Services gave all dispatch centers a deadline to either be EMD certified or to submit a timeline for compliance

2-alarm fire breaks out at Google’s planned NY campus

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Four firefighters suffered minor injuries; standpipe problem required firefighters to stretch a line up some of the building’s stairs

Former Ga. firefighter and ‘Walking Dead’ actor dies of cancer

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dango Nguyen was a member of the Athens-Clarke County Fire and Emergency Services for almost 20 years

Cincinnati family sues city for wrongful death after failed 911 responses

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The lawsuit states that "defendants acted recklessly and with deliberate indifference in failing to protect Kyle Plush, causing him to suffer greatly before his death"

AG William Barr Voices Support for LE, Derides “Social Justice” DAs at FOP Conference

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Attorney General William P. Barr delivered opening remarks Monday at the Grand Lodge Fraternal Order of Police's 64th National Biennial Conference. He took the opportunity to voice his and the Trump Administration's support for law enforcement, and plans for how to support their mission.

10 non-verbal signs all officers should be able to recognize and interpret

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Calibre Press
Author: Calibre Press

Provided by Calibre Press

When it comes to securing and maintaining your tactical advantage, the ability to recognize and interpret non-verbal communication when dealing with potentially troublesome subjects is one of the most powerful officer safety tools you have.

In their recently released book, "Street Survival II" from Calibre Press, authors Jim Glennon, Dan Marcou and Chuck Remsberg list 10 non-verbal, pre-attack indicators all officers should be aware of, understand and watch for.

It’s important to remember that these are not necessarily guarantees of an attack or singularly cause for immediate, intense defensive actions, but in combination with or in the context of a risky encounter, they should not be overlooked.

1. Behavior in vehicles

Stay alert for out-of-the-ordinary activity in and around a vehicle you’ve stopped.

Watch for things like a driver, or worse yet a driver and one or more passengers, immediately exiting the vehicle and rapidly heading back to your squad; lots of “scrambling” inside the vehicle as you’re stopping it; a driver who quickly exits the vehicle, heads in your direction, then abruptly changes his mind and quickly heads back to the vehicle; and lots of turning heads and attention to you coming from passengers in the vehicle.

If things seem abnormally tense and “fidgety” don’t overlook the possible message that activity sends.

2. Micro-expressions

While overt expressions like smiling or frowning may seem to reflect the true emotion of the person you’re dealing with, “micro-expressions” – quick, fleeting reflections of emotions that may or may not sync with the more overt demonstration of emotion you see – can tip you off to the real intent, thoughts, motivation and mood of the individual you’re dealing with.

Stay intently alert for signs of clenched teeth, furrowed brow, pursed lips, bared teeth and wide, non-blinking eyes. If you see these, even for a fleeting moment, don’t disregard them.

3. Grooming

Watch for things like wiping off imaginary lint, hair straightening and clothing adjustments that come at inappropriate times. These could be unconscious signs of an attempt to distract you or an outlet for nervous energy.

4. Stretching

The timing of a stretch can be revealing and a tactically valuable message. While it may not be a big deal if a person you pulled over starts stretching after getting out of the car, take note if they stretch after you start asking some key questions such as, “Do you mind if I search your vehicle?”

5. The Target Glance

This is a term used to describe a subject’s obvious preoccupation with a particular area of an officer’s body or with a particular weapon the officer is carrying. This can be represented by staring directly at or repeatedly glancing at the intended target.

One of the most obvious signs of potential trouble is paying repeated visual attention to an officer’s gun, which could flag a gun grab, but other targets of focus, like the chin, nose, throat or eyes, can be early warning signs of an attack.

6. Clenching

Pre-fight tension can cause jaw muscles to bulge, fists to close and facial muscles to contract. If you pay close attention, you may also see the trapezius muscles that cover the back of the neck and shoulders rise as large muscles of the body constrict in prep for an assault.

7. The “Fighting Stance”

This bladed, quite obviously combative stance almost always signals that a fight is likely brewing. When you see this – clenched fists, tightened face, flaring nostrils and dropping one side (usually the strong side) behind the other – take serious note. Also note lots of body position shifting that can be indicative of nervous energy and fight positioning.

8. Rapid Eye Blinking

Under significant stress, eye blink rates can noticeably alter in one of two ways. The rate can either increase dramatically (e.g., an increase from the “typical” rate 6-20 blinks per minute to 40-60 blinks p/m) or decrease (e.g., 2-4 blinks p/m), which is often referred to as the “thousand-yard stare.”

9. Flanking

This strategic positioning to the side or sliding behind an officer generally occurs when there are multiple suspects. Stay alert for this surrounding-type positioning and be prepared to tactically reposition quickly and definitively if you spot such behavior.

10. The Miscellaneous Others

There are myriad additional non-verbal signs that can indicate a pending attack – dilated pupils, hidden hands, dipping to the strong side as though grabbing something, mouth breathing/panting, hands defiantly on hips, contemptuous spitting, pacing, etc. Learn them, remember them and watch for them!


‘It Could Have Been Tragic’: Georgia Deputy Recovering After Exchange of Gunfire

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Witnesses to Sunday night's shooting in Rossville that injured a Walker County deputy and a 47-year-old man said that anywhere from 30-40 shots were fired during the incident.

3 ways data sharing helps law enforcement be more effective

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Content provided by CentralSquare Technologies via GovThink.com

By Steve Seoane for PoliceOne BrandFocus

The challenges that law enforcement agencies face are unique to each department, but the one that binds them all is the need to share data and information across agencies.

Imagine one county with multiple municipalities all working on similar types of crimes – but they may not know it if data is not being shared. When systems are connected, there is more shared access to relevant information. With that additional insight into data and trending issues, agencies have the potential to more effectively apprehend perpetrators, proactively deter crime and address issues in the community.

Increasing the interoperability between databases and the agencies that use them should be a priority for public safety software leaders for many reasons. Top among them include:

1. Increasing apprehension rate

Law enforcement is limited by jurisdictional boundaries. Perpetrators don’t care about county or city lines when they commit crimes. Law enforcement agencies operating on software that doesn’t allow them to compare cases with other agencies could be duplicating efforts or wasting time chasing dead ends. When resources and data can be shared and utilized efficiently, apprehension cases are robust, and prosecution is more successful.

2. Proactivity reduces victimization

Proactively sharing data gives public safety agencies a new, unique opportunity for insight to help reduce victimization. Just like weather forecasting, agencies can take detailed patterns and trends to help better understand and anticipate future crimes in a jurisdiction. For example, if data showed that burglaries most frequently occur on Wednesday afternoons within a city, resources can be distributed to these specific areas so that an increased police presence can deter the crime from happening, ultimately enabling them to cut down on victimization.

3. Responding to changing officer demographics

The public safety sector is experiencing an influx of younger officers rising rapidly through the ranks as older generations retire. These younger officers expect to have access to information at any time on any mobile device. They expect to have that access immediately because that’s how they function off-duty in their day-to-day lives. They have not lived in a world where the internet did not exist or where cell phones didn’t fit inside their pocket. It’s become necessary for public safety software providers to provide this new generation with the tools they need and have come to expect.

Law enforcement officials have a unique challenge before them. Fostering an environment of data sharing requires open communication, trust between agencies and an all-hands-on-deck attitude because the benefits data sharing brings to both law enforcement and citizens are invaluable. There is an opportunity now to innovate and adopt new technologies on the front line to help keep communities safe.


3 ways data sharing helps law enforcement be more effective

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Content provided by CentralSquare Technologies via GovThink.com

By Steve Seoane for PoliceOne BrandFocus

The challenges that law enforcement agencies face are unique to each department, but the one that binds them all is the need to share data and information across agencies.

Imagine one county with multiple municipalities all working on similar types of crimes – but they may not know it if data is not being shared. When systems are connected, there is more shared access to relevant information. With that additional insight into data and trending issues, agencies have the potential to more effectively apprehend perpetrators, proactively deter crime and address issues in the community.

Increasing the interoperability between databases and the agencies that use them should be a priority for public safety software leaders for many reasons. Top among them include:

1. Increasing apprehension rate

Law enforcement is limited by jurisdictional boundaries. Perpetrators don’t care about county or city lines when they commit crimes. Law enforcement agencies operating on software that doesn’t allow them to compare cases with other agencies could be duplicating efforts or wasting time chasing dead ends. When resources and data can be shared and utilized efficiently, apprehension cases are robust, and prosecution is more successful.

2. Proactivity reduces victimization

Proactively sharing data gives public safety agencies a new, unique opportunity for insight to help reduce victimization. Just like weather forecasting, agencies can take detailed patterns and trends to help better understand and anticipate future crimes in a jurisdiction. For example, if data showed that burglaries most frequently occur on Wednesday afternoons within a city, resources can be distributed to these specific areas so that an increased police presence can deter the crime from happening, ultimately enabling them to cut down on victimization.

3. Responding to changing officer demographics

The public safety sector is experiencing an influx of younger officers rising rapidly through the ranks as older generations retire. These younger officers expect to have access to information at any time on any mobile device. They expect to have that access immediately because that’s how they function off-duty in their day-to-day lives. They have not lived in a world where the internet did not exist or where cell phones didn’t fit inside their pocket. It’s become necessary for public safety software providers to provide this new generation with the tools they need and have come to expect.

Law enforcement officials have a unique challenge before them. Fostering an environment of data sharing requires open communication, trust between agencies and an all-hands-on-deck attitude because the benefits data sharing brings to both law enforcement and citizens are invaluable. There is an opportunity now to innovate and adopt new technologies on the front line to help keep communities safe.


OH Firefighter Suffers Back Injury in House Fire

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A resident of the Columbus home was taken to a local hospital in critical condition with burns following the Monday afternoon blaze.

TN Prison Escapee, Accused Murderer Captured

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Around 4 a.m. Sunday he was spotted on a doorbell camera about 10 miles from the prison rifling through a refrigerator kept in a residential carport.

NYPD closes investigation into LEO’s ‘shoot on sight’ comment about rapper 50 Cent

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Thomas Tracy New York Daily News

NEW YORK — The NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau closed its investigation into a Brooklyn precinct commander’s orders to shoot rapper 50 Cent on sight, claiming the directive made in a squad room full of cops was a just a bad joke, and not an actual threat, the Daily News has learned.

Investigators determined that 72nd Precinct Deputy Inspector Emmanuel Gonzalez made the comment, but didn’t mean it to be a threat against the “In Da Club” rapper, sources with knowledge of the case said.

Since IAB couldn’t prove any malice or intent behind the statement, detectives closed the case without filing any departmental or criminal charges, sources said.

Gonzalez allegedly told his cops to shoot the “Power” actor on sight if they saw him at a department-sanctioned boxing match called a smoker.

He quickly passed the comment off as a joke, but it rattled his officers so much that one sent a text message about it that got other Sunset Park cops buzzing.

“The inspector just said at roll call if u see Kurtis Jackson (aka 50cent) shoot on site … I’m like wtf,” the officer wrote on June 8, 2018, according to a copy of the text obtained by The News.

Gonzalez’s gaffe finally made its way to police headquarters, where IAB launched an internal review.

At least eight cops and a supervisor confirmed that Gonzalez made the remark during a roll call, sources said.

An NYPD spokeswoman confirmed that the case is closed.

“This allegation was unsubstantiated and closed,” the spokeswoman said.

An email to a spokeswoman for the rapper — whose real name is Curtis Jackson — was not immediately returned.

After the Daily News first reported the investigation, the rapper and actor took to Twitter and Instagram blasting Gonzalez, calling him a “Gangsta with a badge.”

A month before the roll call, Gonzalez filed an aggravated harassment complaint, claiming 50 Cent threatened him on Instagram. The rapper was commenting on a lawsuit accusing Gonzalez of shaking down the owner of the now-shuttered Sunset Park club Love and Lust, one of his favorite night spots, and wrote, “Get the strap,” a slang term for “get a gun.”

©2019 New York Daily News


CT Firefighters in Band Pen Tribute to Fallen Colleagues

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two Bridgeport firefighters in the band Indestructible Noise Command wrote the song in memory of Lt. Steven Velasquez and firefighter Michel Baik, who died in a 2010 fire.

Chicago cop under investigation for chauffeuring Hulk Hogan on O’Hare tarmac

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Jeremy Gorner Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — A Chicago police officer is under investigation after video footage surfaced of him giving ex-pro wrestling legend Hulk Hogan a ride in a squad car along the tarmac of O’Hare International Airport.

The approximately three-minute video was posted on Hogan’s Facebook page on Aug. 2 under a post that says, “Thank you Chicago PD much love!!!!!!” In the footage, Hogan was sitting in the front-passenger seat of the squad car while Jimmy Hart, a longtime wrestling manager, sat behind him.

Meanwhile, the on-duty officer, who is assigned to the airport, was seen driving with the siren blaring.

“My Uber’s got a siren,” Hogan joked.

“We love Chicago PD,” said the cameraman, who was seated in the back beside Hart.

“Yes, sir. Chicago PD for life,” Hogan replied.

A spokesman for police Superintendent Eddie Johnson could not say if the officer has been relieved of his police powers, but the department’s Bureau of Internal Affairs has launched an investigation.

The officer, however, will lose a special certification that allows cops to drive vehicles on the tarmac, spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said.

“The activity and behavior demonstrated in that video poses a significant risk to the officers and overall aviation safety on the airfield,” he said. “The superintendent was furious about what he saw.”

But the footage appeared to suggest the officer might not be the only one under scrutiny in the investigation. He claimed in the video to have received permission from a supervisor to chauffeur around Hogan and Hart.

“Don’t get in trouble doing this,” Hart said to the officer.

"... My sergeant. He’s all for it,” the officer replied.

At one point in the video, Hogan outstretched his arms and yelled, “Watch the truck!”

Also in the video, the cameraman focused on Hart.

“We’re going to Rosemont Horizon, baby,” said Hart, using the former name for what is currently known as Allstate Arena in suburban Rosemont. “It’s where all the memories are made by Hulkamania! Years and years ago.”

A search of the arena’s website doesn’t show any wrestling-related events scheduled for Aug. 2 or in the following days. But a post on Hogan’s Twitter page on Aug. 2 said he and Hart were in town for the National Sports Collectors Convention, which was held from July 31 to Aug. 4 in the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont.

Hogan, meanwhile, said at one point in a flippant tone, "It's just not normal driving around without a siren on.”

"We need to get one of those," the cameraman then quipped.

Hogan and the cameraman also talked about a large crowd at the baggage claim area.

“That’s why I don’t have a problem doing this,” the officer said, referring to an apparent effort to keep Hogan and Hart away from the baggage claim area.

Hogan, who once told entertainment news site TMZ that he wanted to be Donald Trump’s running mate before the 2016 presidential election, appeared to take a subtle swipe at Chicago’s Democratic political leadership, though it’s unclear if he was referring to Mayor Lori Lightfoot or her predecessor, Rahm Emanuel.

"Question for you," Hogan said to officer. "Are you guys gonna elect that same mayor this year?"

Hogan’s comment appeared to make the cameraman a little nervous before he ended the video.

“Let me get off this live here ... we don’t... we love Chicago,” he said.

Representatives for Hogan and Hart could not be reached for comment.

©2019 the Chicago Tribune


Fla. man’s gun stolen during masked orgy

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Tony Holt The News-Journal, Daytona Beach, Fla.

DELTONA, Fla. — A handgun was swiped from a Deltona home during a weekend sex party and the gun owner couldn't give detectives any names of possible suspects because the culprit — like the 20 or so other guests at the party — was wearing a mask, deputies said.

"We're probably not going to solve this one," Volusia County Sheriff's Sgt. Todd Smith said during a public meeting Thursday. "And DNA (identification) is not going to be an option."

The 9mm Glock was holstered and lying on top of a nightstand in the master bedroom when it was stolen, the homeowner told deputies. It was taken during an orgy, in which the theme was anonymous sex, according to a report.

Guests who were invited to the party near Saxon Boulevard were encouraged to "come and go as they pleased" throughout the weekend and were told to bring friends and acquaintances if they so desired, the report stated.

Additionally, guests were told to use fictitious names or no name at all, the homeowner told the Sheriff's Office.

The orgy took place July 19-21 and deputies were contacted a few days later. On July 26, the detective assigned to the case called the homeowner for more information, but he seemed "apprehensive" about giving further details.

The homeowner eventually told the detective that 20 or so people were in his house that weekend and he guessed that he only knew five or six of them, the report stated.

The party was advertised on a social media site, deputies said.

Gun thefts, according to the Sheriff's Office, is a worsening plague in Volusia County. So far in 2019, a total of 81 firearms have been stolen out of 72 unlocked vehicles throughout Volusia, Sheriff Mike Chitwood said. In all of 2018, there were 140 such thefts, according to the Sheriff's Office.

©2019 The News-Journal, Daytona Beach, Fla.


Fla. man’s gun stolen during masked orgy

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Tony Holt The News-Journal, Daytona Beach, Fla.

DELTONA, Fla. — A handgun was swiped from a Deltona home during a weekend sex party and the gun owner couldn't give detectives any names of possible suspects because the culprit — like the 20 or so other guests at the party — was wearing a mask, deputies said.

"We're probably not going to solve this one," Volusia County Sheriff's Sgt. Todd Smith said during a public meeting Thursday. "And DNA (identification) is not going to be an option."

The 9mm Glock was holstered and lying on top of a nightstand in the master bedroom when it was stolen, the homeowner told deputies. It was taken during an orgy, in which the theme was anonymous sex, according to a report.

Guests who were invited to the party near Saxon Boulevard were encouraged to "come and go as they pleased" throughout the weekend and were told to bring friends and acquaintances if they so desired, the report stated.

Additionally, guests were told to use fictitious names or no name at all, the homeowner told the Sheriff's Office.

The orgy took place July 19-21 and deputies were contacted a few days later. On July 26, the detective assigned to the case called the homeowner for more information, but he seemed "apprehensive" about giving further details.

The homeowner eventually told the detective that 20 or so people were in his house that weekend and he guessed that he only knew five or six of them, the report stated.

The party was advertised on a social media site, deputies said.

Gun thefts, according to the Sheriff's Office, is a worsening plague in Volusia County. So far in 2019, a total of 81 firearms have been stolen out of 72 unlocked vehicles throughout Volusia, Sheriff Mike Chitwood said. In all of 2018, there were 140 such thefts, according to the Sheriff's Office.

©2019 The News-Journal, Daytona Beach, Fla.


MO Congressman Proposes Bill Requiring Federal Officers to Only Use Force as “Last Resort”

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The measure also would require state and local governments to pass similar standards for their police agencies or face a cutoff of federal law enforcement aid.

NJ Fire Chief in Crash That Killed Couple

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The East Brunswick chief was responding to a call—his SUV's emergency lights and siren on—when the fatal accident happened Sunday night.

NM cop receives Burger King order with pig drawn on wrapper

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Blake Alsup New York Daily News

CLOVIS, N.M. — A New Mexico police officer received his Burger King order with an unexpected message — a pig’s face drawn on the wrapper.

Clovis Police Officer Timo Rosenthal was in uniform when he went to the local Burger King on his dinner break on Thursday.

In addition to the derogatory drawing, he also said the “patties were burned and the burger was of very poor quality,” local news station KRQE reported.

Burger King said it has fired five employees who were involved, but Rosenthal still has no plans to go back.

The vice president of the local Burger King in Clovis told KRQE the franchise doesn’t support that kind of treatment against anyone, but especially law enforcement.

Well, while on lunch break (and in uniform) I ordered food at Burger King and received this. The patties were burnt and...

Posted by Timo Rosenthal on Thursday, August 8, 2019

©2019 New York Daily News


Democratic Presidential Candidates Accuse Former Ferguson Officer of Murdering Michael Brown

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Two candidates running for the Democratic Party's 2020 presidential nomination have accused former Ferguson, MO, police officer Darren Wilson of "murdering" Michael Brown in a controversial 2014 police shooting. The shooting was ruled justified by both the St. Louis County prosecuting attorney and the U.S. Department of Justice.

Introduction to Mobile Forensics and Mobile Forensic Data Analysis Courses

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Felician University – a non-profit, Franciscan institution – and Cellebrite have joined forces to offer two courses that provide veterans with critical skills that can lead to in-demand cybersecurity and digital intelligence jobs.The courses –...

New York Officer Dies from 9/11-Related Illness

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A former New York State Police Trooper has succumbed to incurable cancer that developed as a result of the time he spent in the rubble of the World Trade Center following the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Off-Duty New York Officer Dies in Manhattan Crash

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An off-duty NYPD officer was among two people killed when a Mercedes sedan existed the Henry Hudson Parkway, struck a tree, and burst into flames early Sunday morning.

California Officer Hospitalized for Fentanyl Exposure

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Los Altos Police Department was hospitalized after having possibly been exposed to Fentanyl at the agency's headquarters building Monday morning.

Idaho Officer, Dispatcher Credited with Saving Heart Attack Victim

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer and a dispatcher with the Pocatello Police Department are saving the life of a man who suffered a massive heart attack early Saturday morning.

Arizona Motor Officer Injured in Traffic Collision

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A motor officer with the Glendale Police Department was injured when his motorcycle was in a collision with another vehicle on Friday night.

Police: Fla. man accused of Walmart shooting threat posted on Facebook about ‘ethnostate’

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Jeff Weiner Orlando Sentinel

WINTER PARK. Fla. — A Florida man accused of posting a mass shooting threat on Facebook had a history of posts about racist and white supremacist ideology, according to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

Richard Dean Clayton, 26, of Winter Park was arrested Friday on a charge of written threats to kill or do bodily harm. He remains in the Orange County Jail, with bail set at $15,000.

The post that led to Clayton’s arrest took place one day after the mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, in which 22 people have died: “3 more days of probation left then I get my AR-15 back,” Clayton wrote in the Aug. 4 post, agents said. “Don’t go to walmart next week.”

According to an affidavit prepared by an FDLE special agent, Clayton had a history of racist postings on Facebook prior to the threat, including an image of a swastika and references to a white “ethnostate."

“Imagine for a moment what we’ve established [our] ethnostate physically removed all the commies and degenerates, and white birthrates are back in the positives,” a July 24, 2018, post said, according to the FDLE. “[Who] would there be left to make fun of?”

The posts also included racial slurs referencing African Americans and Jews, the affidavit said.

“[A]pparently I have a warrant out too, but my lawyer goes to a hearing for it next week so I might be free soon,” he wrote Oct. 19, 2018, authorities said. “Just packin pistols and beating monkeys.”

A photo posted July 5, 2018, showed a shirtless white man wearing a stars and stripes bandanna around his face, an AR-15 style rifle in one hand and a bottle of whiskey in the other, posing in front of a Trump banner, according to the affidavit.

The posts were made under a false name, according to investigators. In rants on the page, Clayton complained that his main account had been banned by Facebook, the affidavit states.

“Based on the recent events that occurred in El Pas[o], Texas and the arrest of Patrick Crusius, your affiant has serious concerns that the suspect has threatened on Facebook to commit an act of terrorism or conduct a mass-shooting in a similar manner,” Special Agent Brett Hougland wrote.

Crusius, the accused gunman in the El Paso shooting, confessed to officers while he was surrendering that he had been targeting Mexicans, according to reports.

During his arrest, Clayton was “very uncooperative and belligerent,” the arresting officer wrote.

“Officer I hope that the next call you go to you get blown away and killed... God I pray that happens,” he said, according to the officer’s report.

He also asked if the officer was Hispanic, the report said.

“They are what is wrong with this country... they come in and are ruining everything,” Clayton said, according to the officer, who said Clayton also called him a Nazi. Clayton threatened to urinate in the officer’s car but decided not to after being told that the officer was not Hispanic, the report states.

“Ok well then I guess I won’t pee in your car then,” he said, according to the report.

According to FDLE records, Clayton has a history of arrests on charges including driving while under the influence, disorderly intoxication, carrying a concealed weapon and marijuana possession.

©2019 The Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, Fla.)


New Mexico Officer’s Fast Food Meal Delivered with Derogatory Drawing

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Clovis Police Department took his shift meal break at a local Burger King restaurant on Thursday and was disappointed to discover that on the wrapper of his order was a drawing of a pig.

Florida Motor Officer in Critical Condition Following Collision

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A veteran motor officer with the Pembroke Pines Police Department was badly injured when his motorcycle was struck by another vehicle.

Florida Motor Officer in Critical Condition Following Collision

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE, Uncategorized

A veteran motor officer with the Pembroke Pines Police Department was badly injured when his motorcycle was struck by another vehicle.

Report: White supremacist arrested in Las Vegas tells agents of attack plans

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Ricardo Torres-Cortez Las Vegas Sun

LAS VEGAS — The alleged would-be attacker considers his white race to be superior. Admittedly and unapologetically, the Las Vegas resident harbored hatred toward African Americans, Jews and members of the LGBTQ community.

But simply embracing the extremist views would no longer suffice, as Conor Climo, 23, was ready to spring into action, he told an undercover FBI investigator this summer.

“I’m more interested in action than online (expletive),” the suspect said, according to a federal complaint.

The 11-page document outlines how the FBI-led task force built its case against Climo using intelligence, undercover communications and an informant.

The Las Vegas arrest on Thursday comes at a time when mass shootings in America are too frequent, and attributed by many to extremism of white supremacy, domestic terrorism and inadequate gun ownership regulations.

Just last week a self-described white supremacist allegedly fired rounds from an assault rifle into a packed Walmart in El Paso, Texas, slaying 22 victims and injuring a couple dozen more. And last October, a gunman killed 11 at Pittsburgh synagogue.

By the time Climo was arrested last week — when authorities found a cache of materials that could have been used to manufacture explosives at his home — he had imagined, discussed and or diagrammed possible attack plots. In one, he would firebomb a Las Vegas synagogue followed by a “light infantry weapon attack.”

In another plan, which was discovered by FBI agents in a notebook while serving a search warrant, Climo allegedly drew out how a possible attack would go down at a downtown Las Vegas bar he deemed to be friendly to LGBTQ clientele. Gunmen in two squads would rush the business, shooting outside, then inside, according to the complaint.

Climo waived his right to remain silent, telling agents about a potential plan that would have included an eight-man sniper squad that would kill scores of Jews at a synagogue or another “area of opportunity,” the complaint said.

For more than two years, Climo said he considered the different ways in which he would kill Jewish people, the complaint said. He told authorities he hadn’t decided on a way.

Climo was jailed on a charge of possession of an unregistered firearm, in the form of the component parts of a destructive device, according to the office of the U.S. attorney for the district of Nevada. U.S. A federal judge on Friday ordered Climo to remain in custody pending an Aug. 23 court appearance.

It wasn’t clear when Climo became radicalized, but he fell in the FBI’s radar in April when agents learned he’d been communicating with members associated with the Attomwaffen Division, an extremist white supremacist group that uses the ideology of the National Socialist Movement. Members of the movement, founded in Detroit in 1994, used full Nazi uniforms until 2007, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups.

The Attomwaffen Division is mostly made up of white males between the ages of 16 and 30. It calls for violence against the government and minorities, according to the compliant. Its ultimate goal is a “race war,” and the “leaderless resistance” recruits “like-minded” members, and trains them in “military tactics, hand to hand combat and bomb making,” the complaint said.

Climo was apparently like-minded.

After his arrest, he told the agents that in late 2017, he began to communicate with members from a Neo-Nazi group that had splintered from the Attomwaffen Division and shares identical ideology. Members of such hate groups converge online and communicate undetected using encrypted messaging.

For years, Climo said, he’d studied and experimented with explosives, and members from the hate group were interested and his knowledge, as he was interested in their ideology of hate, according to the complaint.

By that time, he said, he wanted to do something “different” with his hatred, and the group, for his bomb-making knowledge, offered him the ability and the “glory” for a “greater cause,” he told agents.

But the group wasn’t interesting, or violent, enough for Climo, and he got bored and frustrated, he said, noting that he “wanted to do more” against the groups he hated, according to the complaint.

When he left the group, he revisited his plan against the synagogue, the complaint said. He would torch it while worshippers gathered inside.

Earlier this year, around the time the FBI had set eyes on Climo, a confidential informant came forward with information about a man the informant had met online. Climo had discussed with that person, in detail, how to manufacture a Molotov cocktail, and how he wanted to spark a blaze at an occupied synagogue, the complaint said.

The informant linked Climo with an undercover agent, who pretended to be like minded. In a series of conversations, Climo opened up about his alleged plans, sharing his disdain for minorities.

Climo spoke about weapons and his military service, and how he’d surveilled the downtown bar, the complaint said. He described the area “in great detail.”

He allegedly kept talking about possible targets against the Jewish community, sending the undercover agent online maps on where several synagogues were located. One of them, along with a mosque, were near his house, according to the complaint.

The undercover agent told Climo that he had some solid plans, asking if he had an escape strategy. “Still thinking on that,” the suspect said, allegedly.

At least one of his plans contained an escape plan, the complaint said.

Law enforcement serving a search warrant found chemicals and electronic components typically used to manufacture improvised explosive devices at Climo’s residence. They included: potassium permanganate, thermite, sulfuric acid, lithium aluminum hydride, as well as soldering iron, wires, circuit boards. A notebook had sketches that were “consistent with the items and circuitry needed to function a timed explosive device,” the complaint said.

There were also empty commercial fireworks tubes and fuse.

According to an FBI bomb technician, the items “could be used to readily assemble a destructive device,” the complaint said.

If convicted, Climo faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

©2019 the Las Vegas Sun (Las Vegas, Nev.)


Rhode Island Teen Arrested for Shooting Officer in Ballistic Vest

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer with the Providence Police Department was struck in the ballistic vest when a gunman opened fire on him on Friday afternoon.

Cordico

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Cordico designs customized mobile wellness apps for fire organizations of all types and sizes. As the world leader in wellness technology for high-stress professions, Cordico apps provide firefighters with confidential, in-hand, on-demand 24/7 ...

2 Massachusetts Officers Injured, Civilian Driver Killed in Vehicle Collision

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Massachusetts man was killed and two Rutland (MA) Police Department officers were injured in a head-on collision on Friday evening.

Teens allegedly steal AR-15 from school officer’s safe

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Associated Press

BOILING SPRINGS, Tenn. — News outlets report two former students are accused of breaking into their Tennessee high school and stealing an assault weapon and bulletproof vests from the resource officer's gun safe.

Clay and Macon County authorities say Lee Clark and Adam Cisneros were spotted on video inside Red Boiling Springs School last week. Deputies say the items were found buried behind Clark's home.

WTVF reports Macon schools director Tony Boles says a sheriff's department policy allows officers to bring personal guns to campus along with their service weapons.

Groups advocating against gun violence are questioning how the kids got into the safe.

Beth Joslin Roth of the Safe Tennessee Project said she also wonders why an officer would have an AR-15 at school, given how imprecisely they are designed to fire.


British Officer Run Over by Car Theft Suspect

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

An officer in Moseley, England was run over by a man who reportedly stole a Range Rover Sport vehicle on Saturday.

Prosecutors say Ohio shooter’s friend bought him armor

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Associated Press

DAYTON, Ohio — A friend of the Dayton gunman who killed nine people told federal agents he bought him body armor, a gun accessory and a 100-round magazine earlier this year, according to a court document unsealed Monday.

The charging document says Ethan Kollie bought the items for Connor Betts and kept them at his apartment so his friend's parents would not find them.

Prosecutors on Monday unsealed a charge against Kollie that accused him of lying about not using marijuana on federal firearms forms in the purchase of a pistol that was not used in the shooting.

A message seeking comment was left at a phone number for Kollie.

The charge comes just over a week after the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, where 24-year-old Connor Betts opened fire in a popular entertainment district, killing his sister and eight others. Officers shot Betts within 30 seconds, killing him just steps outside a crowded bar.

Authorities have said hundreds more people may have died had Betts gotten inside.

Police have said there was nothing in his background that would have prevented him from buying the AR-15 style gun used in the shooting.

The weapon was bought online from a dealer in Texas and shipped to another firearms dealer in the Dayton area, police said on the day of the shooting.

Investigators have not released a motive for the shooting .

Eight of the victims who died were shot multiple times, according to the Montgomery County coroner's office. More than 30 others were left injured, including at least 14 with gunshot wounds, hospital officials and investigators said.

Just days after the shooting, Ohio Republican Gov. Mike DeWine announced a package of gun control measures , including requiring background checks for nearly all gun sales in Ohio and allowing courts to restrict firearms access for people perceived as threats.


Acela Truck Company

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

When it comes to the toughest jobs in the harshest environments, nothing is more capable than the Monterra extreme-duty line of trucks. Originally designed for Army combat conditions anywhere in the world, Acela Truck Company's severe-duty Monterra...

VirTra and Force Science Institute Partner to Advance Officer Training

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

“By partnering with Force Science Institute, we’re able to leverage their research, training, and complex scientific principles to add extensive depth and expertise to our leading simulation product line,” said Jason Mulcahy, VirTra GM.

Barr calls for swift death penalty for mass shooters, cop killers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Michael Balsamo Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William Barr staunchly defended the work of law enforcement Monday — promising to push for new legislation to swiftly carry out the death penalty for suspects who commit mass shootings or kill police officers, while also taking aim at prosecutors who "style themselves as 'social justice' reformers."

Barr, who had a tough-on-crime approach in his previous stint as the nation's chief law enforcement officer in the early 1990s, lauded efforts to keep chronic offenders behind bars with long sentences. In his speech to the Fraternal Order of Police conference in New Orleans, he said that helped seriously cut down violent crime. He also said the government must have "zero tolerance" for suspects who resist the police and denounced protesters who threw water on New York City police a few weeks ago as "prancing punks."

That hardline stance, however, puts Barr at odds with today's criminal justice reformers. While the tough-on-crime thinking was common among law enforcement officials in the early 1990s — as the national violent crime rate peaked —many in the criminal justice field now favor rehabilitation instead of incarceration.

President Donald Trump has pushed efforts to overhaul the criminal justice system, often touting bipartisan legislation he signed last year that gives judges more discretion in sentencing and eases mandatory minimum sentences. At the same time, the president has been an ardent defender of police — once telling officers in a speech they shouldn't "be too nice" to suspects they arrest — and has a long history of advocating for the death penalty. Those positions tend to popular with the president's conservative political base.

In his speech, Barr praised federal prosecutors who have brought more cases against violent criminals and drug dealers in an effort to curb the opioid epidemic. But he added that more needs to be done, saying that most of the illegal drugs being trafficked into the U.S. are being brought in by Mexican drug organizations and other transnational gangs.

"Obviously, the head of the snake is outside the United States," he said. "We must destroy these cartels."

Barr took a hard swing at prosecutors who don't embrace the same tough-on-crime stance. He said appointing such progressive district attorneys is "demoralizing to law enforcement and dangerous to public safety" because they "spend their time undercutting the police, letting criminals off the hook, and refusing to enforce the law."

Across the U.S., some longtime prosecutors have been met by more reform-minded challengers, some of whom have vowed not to prosecute lower-level offenses, like drug possession and other misdemeanors.

"So these cities are headed back to the days of revolving door justice," Barr said. "The results will be predictable. More crime; more victims."

Barr promised that the Justice Department would propose legislation to expedite criminal cases against suspects charged in mass shootings and the killings of law enforcement officers, so they could face quick punishment, including the death penalty.

"Punishment must be swift and certain," Barr said.

He also said there should be more of an appreciation for the work of law enforcement officers.

"The 'thin blue line' is getting thinner," he added.


New CA Memorial Honors Fallen 2002 Air Tanker Crew

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The dedication for the three-man crew was unveiled near the crash site of Air Tanker 130, which was fighting the Cannon Fire in Walker, Mono County.

Firefighter’s Kids Among Those Dead in PA Day Care Fire

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Lawrence volunteer firefighter did not know his children were at the Erie day care when he responded to another blaze a few blocks away over the weekend.

Firefighter’s Kids among Dead in PA Day Care Fire

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Lawrence Park volunteer firefighter did not know his three children were at the Erie day care when he responded to another blaze a few blocks away over the weekend.

Quarterback Cleared After S.C. Officers Mistake Bird Poop for Cocaine

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Charges of cocaine possession were dropped against Georgia Southern University’s starting quarterback Shai Werts this week after lab results show what police thought was drugs more than likely was bird poop.

New York Police Chief Recommends Easing Education Requirements for Officers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

LOCKPORT, New York -- The Police Board may consider recommending the city ease its qualifications for new police officers by allowing candidates who have years of relevant experience but no college degree to join the force.The Lockport Police Department...

New York Police Chief Recommends Easing Education Requirements for Officers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

LOCKPORT, New York -- The Police Board may consider recommending the city ease its qualifications for new police officers by allowing candidates who have years of relevant experience but no college degree to join the force.The Lockport Police Department...

Iowa Sheriff’s Deputy Flown to Hospital After Rollover Crash

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Lyon County Sheriff's deputy was flown to a Sioux Falls, South Dakota hospital after sustaining serious injuries in a crash Friday.

FFs Worry Promotions Change to Help NY Mayor’s Friends

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Cohoes firefighters union is protesting the proposed lowering of the promotional requirements for captains, a change the union claims will help those close to the mayor.

Attorney General Calls for Quick Death Penalty for Mass Shooters and Cop-Killers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Justice Department is seeking legislation to allow for quick death sentences for people who committ mass murder or kill a law enforcement officer, U.S. Attorney General William Barr said.

‘I’ll be back’: Off-duty sergeant shot in Baltimore speaks in new video

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Phil Davis The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — The off-duty sergeant who was shot multiple times near his home in Northeast Baltimore on Thursday is awake and speaking, saying in a new video, “I’ll be back.”

Appearing in a YouTube video, Sgt. Isaac Carrington, 43, speaks only briefly from his hospital bed, telling the audience “I love you all” before saying the police code signal “10-8,” meaning he is an in-service officer.

“I’ll be back,” Carrington says, before waving at the camera.

It marks his first public appearance since being shot multiple times outside his home in the 5600 block of Summerfield Ave. in Frankford.

Baltimore police said Carrington was shot around 3:30 p.m. Thursday while he was off-duty and hanging out in front of his home with a neighbor.

The department said a car pulled up in front of the two and at least one masked man carrying a gun tried to rob them. Police said Harrington and his neighbor ran in opposite directions and the masked man chased after Carrington, shooting him multiple times.

The sergeant was taken to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center in critical condition as police scoured the city in search of the suspects.

The Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3 tweeted just after noon Saturday that his condition had been upgraded to “stable” and that he was able to squeeze the hands of hospital staff.

Police took two people into custody Saturday after the department said a vehicle similar to the one used by the suspects was located in southwest Baltimore County.

However, in the video, Police Commissioner Michael Harrison says the department is still looking for the shooter.

“He still has a long way to go, but our prayers have been answered," Harrison said. “And now we all have to rally around getting him healed and making sure we find who did this to hold them accountable.”

©2019 The Baltimore Sun


Two Belgian Firefighters Die in Building Blaze

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Crews from the south-west Limburg zone in Beringen found the firefighters' bodies in the wreckage of the building after part of it collapsed early Sunday.

FDNY Ambulances Collide, Injuring Four EMTs

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dramatic security camera video shows the Bronx crash, which overturned one ambulance and sent it skidding into a parked vehicle.

What’s the best bug out bag for a police officer?

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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Reprinted with permission from Lyons Tactical

By Ron Lyons

A bug out bag is a mobile bag equipped with supplies, tools and gear to help a person survive for a short time after a natural or man-made disaster, terrorist attack, or other event. Most bug out bag choices range between some variation of a standard or everyday backpack and military-style, MOLLE-webbed sling packs. But what’s the best bug out bag for a police officer?

Only you can determine the correct answer. There probably isn't one single bug out bag that is perfect for you, but here are a few good rules of thumb:

    Choose the bag that will hold the amount of gear you intend to load out. Choose a bag made of materials that will withstand the environment where you will likely use the bag. Choose a bag that works within your skill and experience level. Always be willing to modify and perfect your bug out bag.

If your bug out bag contents list is relatively long, you will need a larger bag to accommodate all of your gear. Keep in mind that the more gear, the more weight and the more weight, the less mobile the bag.

Build your gear list then narrow it down to the essential items. Keep what will be the most critical to you in whatever kind of situation you are likely to face.

The material your bag is made out of directly affects its durability and comfort level when it comes time to wear the bag for hours at a time. A higher denier nylon will stand up against the worst of conditions, but will also be stiffer and less forgiving against your body. Lower denier nylon is more supple and flexible, but less durable.

If you lack experience and skill in rigging up the best bug out bag or, more important, in using one, then choose a more basic bag to begin with. In time you can move up to a more complicated bag. On the other hand, if you are good at rigging carabiners, securing gear using MOLLE and such, then a more complicated bag may be an option for you.

In the end, the worst bag with a mixture of gear and supplies is still better than no bag with no gear and supplies.

Different bags for different uses

There is something to be said for having one bug out bag that can fit most of your needs, but the reality is that there probably isn't one bag, even built out correctly, that will work for all of your situations. For example, if you have the best bug out bag at home, ready to go, but the crap hits the fan while you are driving to work, then what? But are you supposed to carry your bag with you like you would a briefcase? Maybe, maybe not.

A better solution is to have a vehicle bug out bag and a home bug out bag. That's right, build one bug out bag kit for the house and another for the car. Since the bag in the car is much more susceptible to theft than a home bag, try to find items that are either used or a less expensive version of what you need. I'm not advocating for using cheap things, just asking you to consider that the bag is vulnerable to theft and you may lose everything.

I am also a fan of having another bag in the vehicle that is larger than a standard bug out bag. Many manufacturers make larger gear bags or duffle bags that can hold less mobile equipment such as rope, rifles, larger water purifiers, more food rations, etc. This kind of bag is also susceptible to theft so purchasing one that locks or can be locked into the vehicle interior may be a good idea. There are cable locksets that can secure these bags to the back seat child seat anchor points or other anchor points in the cabin of your vehicle.

Invest a little money and at least make it more difficult for people to steal your stuff. Tinted windows, vehicle alarms and being careful where you park can all help deter theft as well.

Consider that when you have items in your vehicle, they are not only subject to a higher likelihood of theft, but they are also subject to higher and lower temperatures that may shorten the life or usefulness of contents. In this case, you may need to inspect your vehicle bag and gear more frequently. Medications, food and even water can be affected by temperature extremes or direct sunlight. Think through these possibilities and conduct your inspections.

EDC bug out bags

An Everyday Carry (EDC) bag is a hybrid. Typically, an EDC bag is made to handle all of your daily needs and gear such as money, checkbook, keys and such, but also any lightweight gear you may need in an emergency. The idea is to have things with you that you may need in the exact moment, perhaps when getting to your dedicated bug out bag is not possible for a while.

An EDC bag lends itself well to CCW situations. Many EDC bags are CCW compatible by having a special compartment that holds a handgun as well as having compartments for keys, a wallet and even a computer or tablet. These bags can look very tactical or can be purchased for more of a gray man appearance, blending into the normal world.

Pack an EDC bag as an interim to your bug out bag with CCW, extra ammo, and a smaller portion of food such as a meal replacement bar. You may want an extra phone charger and cable. Keep any medication you require in the bag, for example, if you have some significant allergy to certain foods or stings, throw that medication in the bag. Ultimately, the EDC list you create is just as much dependent on your situation, potential situation, and needs as your normal bug out bag.

Read Ron Lyon’s complete guide to Bug Out Bags: Everything you need to know

About the author

Aa a police officer, Ron Lyons had a sixth sense about drugs and illegal weapons that led him to their discovery in cars during traffic stops. Over time, Lyons received formal training in Drug Interdiction from the U.S. Justice Department Drug Enforcement Administration and the El Paso Intelligence Center as well as further training in Advanced Highway Drug Interdiction and certifications as a Master Street Narc, a Drug Recognition Expert and numerous others. Some of Lyons drug seizures still stand today including the largest single seizure of cocaine in the eastern district. Today Lyons spends his time researching, writing and providing quality products to the tactical and survival world.


FAMA Awards 2019 Turner Scholarship to University of MD Student

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

William Calcagno was selected to receive the $5,000 scholarship in recognition of his commitment to research and steadfast focus towards the improvement of fire safety.

Ex-GA Firefighter, ‘Walking Dead’ Actor Dies of Cancer

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Dango Nguyen had been a firefighter with the Athens-Clarke County Fire Department for nearly 20 years. "He was an aggressive and tenacious firefighter," the department said.

Swanton, VT, Fire Dept. Puts 80-Foot Rear-Mount Aerial in Service

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Swanton, VT, Fire Department has taken delivery of an 80-foot, rear-mount aerial ladder built by HME Ahrens-Fox. It's built on a HME 1871-Spectr MFDxl-12 cab and chassis with a roof notch for the aerial. It is powered by a Cummins X12 engine and an...

TX Firefighter Hurt Battling 3-Alarm House Blaze

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Crews from multiple departments—including Westlake, Austin, Oak Hill and CE-Bar—responded to the fire early Sunday.

Georgia Sheriff’s Deputy Shot, Suspect Wounded in Shooting

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Walker County Sheriff's deputy and a suspect are stable condition after a shooting Sunday.

Two EMTs Killed in WV Ambulance Crash

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Jan-Care Ambulance Service EMTs had just finished a hospital-to-hospital transfer and were headed back to their station when the accident happened in Nicholas County.

Product News: 12 New Products for Investigations

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

New products for evidence management and forensics

MT Fire Lab Gives Firefighters Tools to Battle Wildfires

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The scientists and engineers at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory research ways to make it safer for crews in the state fighting wildfires.

What is the right way to observe Memorial Day?

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

People have the right to do whatever it is that makes them happy, provided it does not infringe upon another's right to do the same

What is the right way to observe Memorial Day?

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

People have the right to do whatever it is that makes them happy, provided it does not infringe upon another's right to do the same

Alleged White Supremacist Charged With Plotting Terror Attacks

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Southern Nevada man, who is employed as a security guard, was charged and arraigned in federal court today in connection to bomb making materials found at his Las Vegas home following an FBI-led Joint Terrorism Task Force investigation.

Off-Duty NYPD Officer Killed In Fiery Crash

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A 24-year-old NYPD officer and her 32-year-old passenger were killed in a fiery wreck on the Henry Hudson Parkway early Sunday morning.

Maryland Police Officer Rescues Baby Deer Caught In Soccer Net

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

One Howard County officer helped out a little fawn who got tangled up with a soccer net earlier this week, setting it free.

New Mexico Police Officer Receives Burger King Order With Pig Drawn on Wrapper

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A New Mexico police officer received his Burger King order with an unexpected message — a pig’s face drawn on the wrapper.

Doors Stolen Off of Massachusetts Police Humvee Recovered

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The doors stolen from the Warren Police Department’s Humvee in July were recovered and charges will be filed against the person who took them.

Orlando Officer Shot in Helmet During Pulse Shooting Faces Looming Disability Deadline

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Orlando Police Officer Michael Napolitano, who was shot in the helmet while responding to the 2016 massacre at Pulse nightclub, faces an uncertain future with the Police Department as a deadline for his disability benefits looms in less than two months.

Escaped Inmate Suspected in Tennessee Jail Official’s Death Captured

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Escaped jail inmate Curtis Ray Watson, who allegedly killed a Tennessee Department of Correction employee. was captured Sunday.

California Police Fear ‘Suicide by Cop’ Cases; So Some Stopped Responding to Calls

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Some fear that, as police stand down, civilians will be left to handle difficult and potentially dangerous situations alone.

Retired New York Trooper Dies of 9/11-Related Illness

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Former Sergeant and Station Commander Jeffrey Cicora, who assisted in search and recovery efforts at Ground Zero following the September 11 terror attacks.

Critically Wounded Baltimore Officer Speaks From Hospital Bed in New Video: ‘I’ll Be Back’

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Baltimore Sgt. Isaac Carrington spoke briefly from his hospital bed, telling the audience that “I love you all” before saying the police code signal “10-8,” meaning he is an in-service officer.

Double LODD and violent attacks on EMS

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Understanding the risks inherent in EMS is critical to taking action to prevent death and injury in the line of duty

Calif. wins $11.3M grant to upgrade its 911 call centers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

California received the largest award in the country, totaling $11,399,076 to improve its 911 centers

Calif. awarded $11.3M grant to upgrade 911 centers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

California received the largest award in the country, totaling $11,399,076 to improve its 911 centers

Calif. awarded $11.3M grant to upgrade 911 centers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

California received the largest award in the country, totaling $11,399,076 to improve its 911 centers

Calif. awarded $11.3M grant to upgrade 911 centers

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

California received the largest award in the country, totaling $11,399,076 to improve its 911 centers

Mo. TCAD Paramedics purchase ballistic body armor

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

TCAD Paramedics purchased this equipment to provide an additional layer of protection for personnel safety and in the event of an emergency

34 Idaho fire programs receive new equipment, supplies

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

BLM's Rural Fire Readiness program aims to provide local fire programs surplus fire equipment to help fight rural wildland fires

Phoenix firefighters escort daughter of fallen FF to first day of school

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Phoenix Fire Department members gathered to see Emery Beck off to her first day of kindergarten

Survey: 90% of American adults consider air ambulances a critical service

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

YouGov conducted a poll revealing that a majority of people consider air ambulance services are critical and should be covered by insurance companies

FAA launches probe into helicopter pilot that fell asleep at controls

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

A Boston MedFlight pilot allegedly fell asleep while transporting a patient from Martha's Vineyard to a Boston hospital

How to project integrity as an EMS leader

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Being true to your core values is always the better road to choose

The evolution of a regional system of care in large vessel occlusion stroke

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The Montgomery County Hospital District EMS experience paired a novel stroke assessment endovascular pathway with specialized training

Survey: How do you train to move, assess and treat bariatric patients?

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Please take a couple moments to answer these multiple-choice questions, which will help us capture how your agency is staying up to date on training for EMS treatment of bariatric patients

5 ways to incorporate CRR into your volunteer fire department

Posted on August 12, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Key steps for volunteer and combination departments to implement a community risk reduction program

Bruised but not broken: Intentionally facing PTSD

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

After trauma images trigger nightmares, a paramedic decides to face his PTSD head on by resisting isolation

Firefighter dad to 3 of 5 kids killed in Pa. daycare fire

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Lawrence Park Township Volunteer Fire Chief Joe Crotty said Luther Jones' two daughters and a son were killed in the fire

7 ways to prepare your fire department for the next recession

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Now is the time to take action, before reduced revenues and budget cuts tighten their grip on the balance sheet

Mont. lab provides firefighters with insights and tools to battle wildfires

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory researchers are studying the properties of fire to make fighting wildfires safer

FRI 2019 Quick Take: Initial incident command for special operations

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

10 response considerations for high-risk/low-frequency events

2 W. Va. paramedics die in ambulance crash

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Paramedics Brittany Young and Ronald Dick II were killed in an ambulance crash after hitting the back of a tractor-trailer

NYPD investigating BB gunshots fired at window of FDNY ambulance

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The FDNY ambulance was passing an appartment complex when its crew heard loud cracks and spotted two spiderweb holes in the passenger-side window

5 children killed in fire at Pa. daycare center

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The victims of the fire, ranging in ages from 8 months to 7 years, were staying overnight in a residential house converted into a daycare center

Joint position statement released on paramedic degree requirements

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

The NAEMSE, NAEMSA and the International Association of Flight and Critical Care Paramedics said it’s time for paramedics to obtain an associate degree

NY Firefighter Honored 25 Years after LODD

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Hundreds gathered in Hudson Falls on Saturday to honor fallen firefighter Paul MacMurray, who died battling a hotel fire 25 years ago this month.

Five Children Dead in PA House Fire

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Erie firefighters were able to remove the five children from the burning home Sunday morning, but they all died from their injuries.

10 ways police officers can get better sleep

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

Olivia Johnson
Author: Olivia Johnson

Sleep is important because it is the body’s way of recharging and rejuvenating. Once sleep is lost, it cannot be made up.

Many first responders suffer from sleep-related issues due in-part to odd shifts and long hours without adequate rest between shifts. [1] How safe would you feel knowing your backup officer hasn’t had a restful night’s sleep in weeks and is struggling to stay awake?

Sleep deprivation can increase your risk for numerous health issues such as increased blood pressure, weight gain, depression and increased cancer risks. Sleep – or the lack thereof – is everyone’s concern. The following may improve the quantity and quality of your sleep.

1. Reduce or eliminate use of chemicals like caffeine, nicotine and alcohol

Caffeine and nicotine over stimulate the brain, keeping sleep at bay. [2-4] A 2013 study from the University of Rochester Medical Center showed “smoking leads to changes of the lung’s circadian clock – suggesting smoking can negatively affect sleep.” [4]

Other forms of nicotine (chewing and vaping) also contribute to sleep issues, as nicotine is a stimulant and does not allow the brain to shut off naturally.

Alcohol, on the other hand, is a depressant and can help one fall asleep when small doses are consumed. However, once the alcohol wears off, the ability to stay asleep is more difficult as alcohol inhibits the brain’s ability to progress into REM or rapid eye movement sleep.

REM sleep is the restful sleep that helps the body recharge. Even a few nights without adequate REM sleep can be detrimental.

2. Reduce activity and mental stimulation prior to bedtime

Any type of activity or stimulation to the body or brain has the opposite effect of helping the body to relax. Neurons begin to fire, revving up the brain’s electrical activity. This activity causes the release of chemicals associated with the “fight or flight” response, resulting in sleep issues. [5]

3. Eat smaller meals and consume fewer liquids toward bedtime

This will prevent frequent nighttime bathroom trips. Certain foods bring on drowsiness, and other foods (spicy, greasy, etc.) can cause indigestion issues and digestive issues. [6]

4. Keep the bedroom for sex and sleep only

The National Sleep Foundation refers to good sleep habits as “sleep hygiene.” [6] By keeping the bedroom strictly for sleep and sex, a correlation is made between the bedroom and appropriate activities. This prepares the mind and body to wind down within the bedroom environment, thus eliminating the anxiety often associated with trying to fall and stay asleep.

5. Keep bedroom temps cool and reduce or eliminate all forms of light

A study regarding insomnia and body temperature found, “Sleepiness and sleep propensity are strongly influenced by our circadian clock as indicated by many circadian rhythms, most commonly by that of core body temperature.” [5]

Many studies show that light, especially blue wavelength light found in many electronics “suppresses the secretion of melatonin, a hormone that influences circadian rhythms.” [3] Cover up lights or move them out of the room.

6. Learn to let go

Research indicates women suffer from more sleep-related issues than men, but men claim to get less than the recommended seven hours of sleep per night. This is in part because women tend to worry and may go to bed thinking about things they need to get done.

Try making a to-do list and categorize the items by importance. Then learn to let go of the racing thoughts and know that getting a good night’s sleep will help you accomplish what you need to tomorrow.

7. Set a specific bedtime

Being able to set a specific bedtime will allow your body to get into a routine of shutting down, relaxing, and ultimately falling asleep. The idea of going to sleep about the same time each day is to get circadian rhythms back in check.

8. Body alignment and comfort are important

Joint, neck, and back pain can lead to sleep issues because of the inability to get comfortable and waking up in pain. Choose a mattress and pillows that provide comfort and support to all areas of the body.

9. Replace the mattress every five to seven years

Mattresses lose support and should be replaced every five years for those over 40 and every seven years for those under 40. As we age, the body experiences more pressure and a less than supportive mattress may do more harm than good. [7]

Mattresses that have visible signs of damage should also be replaced. In addition, mattresses collect dead skin cells, dust mites, and other allergens, which can lead to sneezing, wheezing and asthma-related issues, all of which disrupt sleep.

10. Wash and replace pillows

Dr. Robert Oexman, director of the Sleep to Live Institute, suggests washing pillow covers every few weeks and washing the actual pillow every few months. Oexman says pillows should be replaced at least every three years. Just like mattresses, pillows collect allergens that can disrupt sleep and the lose firmness over time. [8]

Conclusion

Many things can be done to get a better night’s sleep. However, if sleep problems persist, see your physician. Make sure to advise your physician before you use any type of sleep medication or sleep aids, as some have addictive properties. Sleep is vital to every aspect of our lives and should not be underestimated in our overall health.

References

1. Johnson O. Sleep deprivation in first responders. ILEETA Journal, 19-21, Spring 2013.

2. Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Twelve simple tips to improve your sleep.

3. Harvard Medical School. Harvard Health Publications. Blue light has a dark side.

4. Huffington Post. Smoking affects circadian rhythm, study finds.

5. Lack LC, Gradisar M, Van Someren EJ, Wright HR, Lushington K. The relationship between insomnia and body temperature. Sleep Medical Review, 12(4), 307-17.

6. National Sleep Foundation. Taste: What you eat and drink can affect your sleep.

7. The Better Sleep Council. Replacing a mattress.

8. Klein S, Strutner S. The gross truth about how often you should clean (and replace) your pillow.

This article, originally published 2/12/2016, has been updated.


UK govt boosts prisons, police powers in crime clampdown

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

null

Associated Press

LONDON — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is promising more prisons and stronger police powers in an effort to fight violent crime.

The government announced plans Sunday to create 10,000 more prison places to ease overcrowding and said it would allow police to stop and search people without reasonable suspicion "if serious violence is anticipated."

Such powers are contentious because young ethnic-minority men are disproportionately likely to be stopped and searched.

Opposition Labour Party law-and-order spokeswoman Diane Abbott said it was "a tried-and-tested recipe for unrest, not violence reduction."

Official statistics show that violent crime has begun to rise after declining for two decades.

The crime clampdown is the latest in a series of policy promises that Johnson, a Conservative, has made since taking office last month, sparking speculation that an early election is looming.


Orlando LEO shot in the helmet at Pulse faces looming disability deadline, possible termination

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

By Tess Sheets Orlando Sentinel

ORLANDO — Orlando police officer Michael Napolitano, who was shot in the helmet while responding to the 2016 massacre at Pulse nightclub, faces an uncertain future with the Police Department as a deadline for his disability benefits looms in less than two months.

At a police pension board meeting Thursday, members of the union that represents Orlando cops said Napolitano received a phone call from the agency that morning, notifying him he would be terminated Sept. 30 if he cannot appear before the pension board by that date.

But the union said Napolitano has not yet been scheduled by the city for an Individual Medical Exam, or IME, which is required before an injured employee can appear before the board to seek disability retirement.

Napolitano, who suffered injuries including post-traumatic stress disorder after he was shot in his Kevlar helmet during the Pulse shooting, had previously worked in a light duty position for the Police Department following the shooting until a doctor recommended more duty restrictions, according to Shawn Dunlap, president of the union that represents Orlando cops.

Dunlap said OPD could no longer accommodate his disability, so Napolitano is seeking a disability retirement with pension.

Randy Thames, labor chair for the Fraternal Order of Police, which is representing Napolitano, said at the meeting Thursday the officer has been waiting 15 weeks for the medical exam to be scheduled.

“That’s why we were kind of surprised there wasn’t some sort extension,” Dunlap said.

In an email, OPD said the agency is required to terminate an employee when their pension application has been pending more than 180 days.

Termination does not make an employee ineligible to seek a disability pension, as that decision is made by the board, which is “an independent legal entity,” according to OPD.

Pension board chairman Jay Smith at the meeting cited difficulty finding a doctor through Advent Health — the hospital contracted to provide physicians for medical exams — who specializes in Napolitano’s ailments. Smith said the board would work to seek other doctors who would be able to conduct Napolitano’s exam if Advent Health is unable to provide one by Monday.

“If they can’t manage it, then we’re going to have to take the case ourselves," Smith said."... We’ll find a doctor that’s suitable to handle this particular condition and render an IME and the board will take responsibility for the cost that’s related to that."

In a statement, OPD spokesman Cory Burkath hailed Napolitano for “bravely [carrying] out his duties to help us take down a terrorist who committed a horrific act of violence against the Orlando community.”

“Michael Napolitano will always be part of our OPD family and we are committed to his personal health and well-being,” Burkath said. “... Officer Napolitano has served the City of Orlando and its residents with the pride, courage, and commitment that our officers are known for, and this community will forever be grateful to him for his service. ... The Orlando Police Department will continue to work with and support Officer Napolitano.”

©2019 The Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, Fla.)


Calif. PDs fear ‘suicide by cop’ cases. So they’ve stopped responding to some calls

Posted on August 11, 2019 by in EMS, FIRE, POLICE

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By Anita Chabria Los Angeles Times

GRAEAGLE, CALIF. — Before George Quinn wrapped a chain around the rafters of his wood shop and hanged himself in June, he texted his big sister goodbye.

“This is the hardest part,” wrote the reclusive 63-year-old master carpenter, who lived alone with his elderly cat, Sam, in this Northern California mountain town. “Sorry for everything. You should call the Plumas Co sheriff and have them go to the garage.”

Carol Quinn dialed law enforcement from her home near Reno, more than an hour away, desperate for them to save her brother’s life.

The answer she received was startling: Deputies were no longer responding to calls like hers, because the situation could end as a “suicide by cop.”

“Go to the garage” could be a hint at an ambush, a deputy told her. She would have to try to reach her brother on her own.

“We were flabbergasted,” Carol said. “I think almost anyone assumes when you call the sheriff’s office for help that you’re going to get some help. And they refused to go.”

Plumas County is not the only jurisdiction in California that is rethinking how it responds to suicide calls. Some small and midsize law enforcement agencies across the state have stopped responding to certain calls because of the potential dangers to both officers and the person attempting to end his or her life. They also present a financial liability from lawsuits — especially if the situation turns violent.

Other departments, including the Los Angeles police and sheriff’s and San Francisco police, use “disengagement” strategies that allow them to leave calls without confronting someone in crisis. These tactics are used most often when the person is alone and does not present a threat to anyone else, and no crime is being committed.

“In too many instances, we show up and further aggravate a crisis situation,” Plumas County Sheriff-Coroner Greg Hagwood said. “And then, in the end, bad things happen.”

Some fear that, as police stand down, civilians will be left to handle difficult and potentially dangerous situations alone. But Hagwood and others in law enforcement say the profession must examine its legal and moral obligations in an era when use of force is under intense scrutiny and there is increased pressure to curtail deadly police incidents.

A bill currently on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk would toughen the state’s rules for when officers can use lethal force. It mimics civil case law, which, for years, has allowed examinations of officers’ behavior leading up to fatal encounters. For many law enforcement officers, evolving expectations combined with rising numbers of mental health calls mean changing, and potentially limiting, what they do.

“We can’t always be everything to everyone all the time,” Hagwood said.

The fear of encountering a suicide by cop event — when a person takes actions, such as brandishing a weapon, that prompt officers to use deadly force — is especially worrying. In a 2009 study of more than 700 officer-involved shootings nationwide, 36% of incidents were determined to be attempts at provoking officers to use deadly force.

Other studies have found that 10% to 46% of police shootings involved suicide by cop attempts — though the definition of what constitutes a suicide by cop is controversial. Critics say too often it is used to justify police violence. In the 2009 study, researchers found police killed the suicidal person more than half of the time and injured the person in 40% of encounters. The suicidal person was unharmed in only 3% of police encounters.

“Police are right in assessing these [calls] are significantly dangerous,” said John Reid Meloy, a professor of psychiatry at UC San Diego and author of the nationwide study. “This is not a rare event.”

Ron Lawrence, president of the California Police Chiefs Assn., said stepping back from some suicide calls is “definitely a source of conversation in the police profession” and happens as a practice rather than a formal policy at many departments.

It is a protocol he uses as chief of Citrus Heights, a suburb of Sacramento. Departments including those in Mono and Lake counties and the city of Hemet also are selective in answering calls, said Ed Obayashi, a Plumas deputy and statewide police trainer who championed the policy in his county. There is no statewide data on how agencies handle suicide calls, but Obayashi says the hands-off approach is increasingly common.

“Walking away, that is really counterintuitive for police to do,” said Lawrence, the statewide police chiefs’ leader. “But we have just learned through evolution that sometimes police presence is not the answer.”

But the idea of not responding sits hard with some. When staffers brought the suggestion to Hagwood, the Plumas sheriff, he thought it was “the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard,” he said.

“It initially ran against every sensibility in my body because I’ve always subscribed to when people call needing help, we will go,” Hagwood said. He calls George Quinn’s death “sobering.”

Quinn was a relative newcomer to Plumas, a county of about 19,000 residents spread across more than 2,600 square miles of the Sierra Nevada.

Hagwood, who was raised in Plumas and has been in law enforcement for three decades, thinks about how he would have reacted if police had declined to respond to a call about someone he knew, or his parents knew. But he says he believes the protocol is necessary for changing how his county, and California as a whole, handles mental health.

“It is creating a vacuum,” Hagwood said. “That’s where the behavioral health, mental health practitioners need to, in my opinion, recognize that the climate for them is changing as well. It’s changing for us. It needs to change for them.”

Some cities with more money and community pressure are bridging the chasm between police and mental health. Over the last few years, departments in cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco have developed more sophisticated responses, deploying crisis intervention teams with sworn officers and behavioral health professionals.

In San Francisco, they are trained at creating time and distance to allow mental health calls to play out slowly, said Lt. Mario Molina, crisis intervention coordinator for the department. In coming months, he hopes to put teams on patrol that have one officer and one clinician. Other cities already do.

“I tell you, it’s magic,” Molina said of the joint response. “It takes more than just cops.”

Though disengagement may seem counterintuitive, Molina said he had seen it work with the collaborative model. Earlier this year, he said, officers responded to a suicide call from an elderly father who said his adult son, who suffers from mental illness, was threatening to cut his wrists. Arriving officers saw through a window that the son was holding a knife and heard him arguing with his father not to let police enter. Police got the father out. But during an hours-long standoff, the son barricaded himself in his room.

Police entered the house but didn’t force their way into the bedroom. Instead, they looked for blood, a possible sign the son was hurt, Molina said. Finding none, and in consultation with a mental health clinician on scene, Molina’s team “decided it was best for us to walk away at that time,” he said. They advised the father not to return to the house and left.

The son didn’t kill himself, and the next day, though the man was still barricaded in the room, Molina’s staff was able to make contact and persuade him to accept help.

The son told Molina, “If you guys would have come in, I was ready to die. ... I was ready to charge one of you to shoot me,” Molina said.

But few rural and smaller departments have the resources of San Francisco, giving non-response a different feel. Ingrid Braun, sheriff of Mono County, near Yosemite, says the nearest emergency mental health bed in her county is five hours south in Bakersfield, and the county currently has no behavioral health practitioners who can respond to urgent calls.

Like Plumas, her department is selective in responding to suicide calls. “We kind of leave the person in the lurch, and that’s not ideal either,” Braun said.

She is in discussions with county medics to have them answer those calls, which she says are infrequent but happen about once every other month, with police as backup. But like Hagwood, she thinks the death of George Quinn should be a call for a broader discussion.

“There is a larger problem, not just the suicide problem,” Braun said. “If you call because you are bottoming out and you need help, we send men with guns. ... Maybe this needs to shift the conversation.”

Dan Reidenberg, executive director of Suicide Awareness Voices of Education, a national prevention nonprofit, says he understands the challenges but that, with no alternative available, law enforcement officers must remain first responders to all suicide calls. Without some intervention, he said, rising suicide rates could increase further.

“I don’t think it’s the right precedent or the right policy,” Reidenberg said. “We need law enforcement to be that stable, protective, strong force that shows up.”

For Carol Quinn, who spoke with her brother every day, the debate is irrelevant. She said