Civilians help Mo. trooper under attack

Posted on February 9, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

LAFAYETTE COUNTY, Mo. — Missouri State Trooper Beau Ryun was aided by two Good Samaritans after he was attacked during a traffic stop Tuesday.

Ryun told KSHB he pulled over Jonathan Timmons, 22, for a lane violation and smelled marijuana in the vehicle.

Ryun found a pair of scissors in Timmons’ waistband and asked him to sit in the patrol car while he searched the suspect’s vehicle for drugs and weapons.

Ryun said Timmons lunged at him after he pulled his handcuffs out to arrest him.

"We were rolling around on the ground and it was a fight for control,” Ryun said. "The reception in that area was very poor for my radio, and I was unable to call for help."

Charles Barney was driving to funeral when his fiance told him there was an officer involved in a struggle on the side of the road. A 74-year-old woman, Sandra, pulled over to help as well.

Barney told the news station that he found the trooper’s handcuffs on the ground and put one of Timmons’ wrists in the cuffs. But Timmons struggled more and injured Barney in the process.

"So I locked his legs in with my legs and I grabbed his other arm and bent it up all the way over his head and told him, 'You need to stop or I'm gonna break it,’” Barney said.

Ryun said seeing bystanders stop to help him “one of the best moments of his life.”

“I couldn't call for help because my radio was disabled, so to see Charles and Sandra step up like that, I’ll remember that for the rest of my life.”

Timmons is facing six charges, including felony assault and possession of marijuana.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Minn. cop snaps picture of owl resting on his patrol car

Posted on February 9, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

DULUTH, Minn. — From saving bald eagles to roping steer, animals help break up what can sometimes be a monotonous life on the beat.

Duluth Officer Richard LeDoux was on patrol when a citizen flagged him down to report an injured owl, the Duluth News Tribune reported.

The person originally thought the bird had been hit by a car, but when LeDoux approached, the owl jumped up onto the hood of the patrol car.

As the owl stared at the officer through the windshield, LeDoux snapped a picture that a colleague then posted on Twitter.

“It was there maybe a minute or so. It didn’t seem to be in any hurry,” LeDoux said.

This owl flew onto the hood of a squad car, after the officer was flagged down to check on it in the road. Happy to report it flew away! pic.twitter.com/Brmjnpyxmx

— K-9 Officer Hurst (@DuluthPD_S18) February 8, 2017


Sperm bank cited after Ga. deputy’s death

Posted on February 9, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Raisa Habersham The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

AUGUSTA, Ga. — A sperm bank was cited two days after a Georgia deputy died inhaling liquid nitrogen while trying to save an employee, according to documents from the Georgia Department of Insurance.

Xytex sperm bank in Augusta was issued a cease and desist order for the tanks containing the liquid Tuesday following the death of Richmond County sheriff’s Sgt. Greg Meagher. According to authorities Meagher died Sunday trying to save sperm bank employee Anita Wiles after the tanks leaked.

According to Channel 2 Action News, Xytex had permits to install the tanks, but the state fire marshal needed to do an inspection before they could be used.

"We have actually issued a cease and desist order for the tanks and the equipment not to be in operation, until which time they can be corrected and a final investigation be conducted,” Deputy State Fire Marshal Chris Stephens told Channel 2.

Investigators believe the spill set off the burglar alarm inside the sperm bank, the news station reported. Wiles went to shut off the valve off as Meagher and three other deputies went to save her.

Xytex said they are cooperating with authorities in the investigation.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family and the friends of Sgt. Greg Meagher, his fellow deputies and our injured employee,” the company said in a statement.

Services for Meagher will be held noon Friday at the Church of the Most Holy Trinity on 720 Telfair Street in Augusta, according to a release from the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office. Visitation will be held Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at King Funeral Home on 124 Davis Road.

The Police Benevolent Foundation started a memorial fund for Meagher’s family.

Copyright 2017 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution


Several NM officers targeted in revenge plot

Posted on February 9, 2017 by in POLICE

By Maddy Hayden Carlsbad Current-Argus

CARLSBAD, N.M. — Area law enforcement discovered a plot to harm eight officers and their families while serving routine search warrants last month, officials said.

Several people arrested were in possession of specific information about the targeted officers, including home addresses and vehicle types, police said.

The plot targeted specific personnel within the Carlsbad Police Department, Artesia Police Department and the Eddy County Sheriff's Office, according to a news release from the Pecos Valley Drug Task Force.

Information about the plot was uncovered during a joint investigation conducted by CPD and ECSO detectives and the task force on Jan. 31.

Commander James McCormick with the PVDTF said the suspects planned to use firearms and explosives to carry out their plans on the targeted officers.

An "intensive, multi-agency investigation" began once the plot was discovered, police said, and led law enforcement to believe suspects had already taken steps to further the plan.

McCormick said it appears the suspects intended to hire assailants to target the officers.

"As professional law enforcement officers, unfortunately, we all know that violence can visit us at any time," said Eddy County Sheriff Mark Cage in a news release. "However, we take plots such as the one we have been dealing with for the past week very seriously."

On Feb. 1 and 2, officers and agents traveled to dozens of residences in Carlsbad, Artesia and the county as part of the investigation.

Several arrests were made for a variety of offenses, including for involvement in the plot and drug possession.

More than a dozen fugitives were also arrested. McCormick would not provide the names of those arrested in the plot to protect the ongoing investigation.

Two men are being sought as persons of interest in the investigation: Robert T. Matta, 43, of Carlsbad and Michael W. Grantham, 35, of Artesia.

Additional arrests are likely, he said.

McCormick said he believes the suspects targeted officers for revenge.

"I guess they wanted to send us a message," McCormick said.

McCormick said additional patrols have been assigned to the targeted officers' homes and they have been advised to remain extra vigilant.

Since McCormick started working with the task force in 1990, he said this is the fourth time they have thwarted planned attacks on law enforcement.

"The plot identified in Eddy County that specifically targeted Eddy County law enforcement officers is of grave concern and the highest priority for investigation and prosecution," read a statement from the Fifth Judicial Attorney's Office.

Anyone with information is encouraged to call 575-887-5194.

©2017 the Carlsbad Current-Argus (Carlsbad, N.M.)


Man gets life for fatally shooting Ind. police officer

Posted on February 9, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

CROWN POINT, Ind. — A judge sentenced a man to life in prison without parole Wednesday for fatally shooting an Indiana police officer sitting in his patrol car.

Carl Le'Ellis Blount, 28, pleaded guilty to murder last month for killing Gary Patrolman Jeffrey Westerfield on July 6, 2014, the officer's 47th birthday. In court, Blount offered condolences to Westerfield's family, which includes four daughters and a son.

"Remember how he lived, and honor him, by continuing that life of service," said the officer's ex-wife, Dawn Westerfield, a lieutenant with the department.

Before the shooting, Westerfield, who had served 19 years with the department, had been dispatched to investigate reports Blount had been involved in an altercation with an ex-girlfriend. Blount was on probation at the time.

Blount feared he would be arrested on an outstanding warrant from nearby Porter County, Indiana, and "intentionally shot" Westerfield, according to the plea agreement.

Prosecutors in Lake County agreed under the plea deal to not seek the death penalty and to drop other charges against Blount, including theft and battery. The state also agreed not to prosecute Blount in connection with the shooting deaths of 17-year-old Daven James and 23-year-old Derrion Estes on June 26, 2014.

The plea deal said the circumstances of those killings "are a contested issue between parties," but provided no details about them.

Police found Estes and James dead in an alley. Lake County Prosecutor Bernard Carter said family members of those victims were told about the plea deal.

After the sentencing, James' father, Ricky James, shouted, "He killed my son, too!" Several law enforcement officers who had lined the walls of the courtroom for the packed hearing hugged the father and offered condolences as he cried near a courthouse exit.


Miss. House passes ‘Back the Badge’ bill

Posted on February 9, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Emily Wagster Pettus Associated Press JACKSON, Miss. — The Mississippi House voted Wednesday to triple the penalties for committing violence against law enforcement officers, firefighters and emergency responders.

House Bill 645 is called the "Back the Badge Act of 2017." Judiciary B Committee Chairman Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, said it was written in response to attacks on law enforcement officers across the nation.

The 85-31 vote to pass the bill came only after several black representatives talked about how they or their loved ones have been racially profiled or treated harshly by the police.

Rep. Adrienne Wooten, D-Jackson, said that when she was a teenager growing up in Meridian, she and some of her friends were standing around, minding their own business, when officers stopped and beat the African-American young men in their group for no reason.

Rep. John Hines, D-Greenville, said when he was serving in the military in 1989, he was driving from Fort Hood, Texas, back to Mississippi and was stopped by officers on a highway in Louisiana. Hines said he wasn't speeding and after he showed his driver's license and military identification, an officer told him, "'Boy, you're out here mighty late.'" Hines said his sister and a friend were also in the car, and the officer asked why he had so much luggage, then made him unpack everything on the side of the highway as mosquitoes bit him.

"A bunch of other officers were sitting on the side of the road, waiting for me to react," Hines said.

Rep. Christopher Bell, D-Jackson, told about being stopped on a busy road in a Jackson suburb years ago. He said an officer asked him what he was doing there, what he does for a living, why he was driving the vehicle he was driving and whether he had never been arrested.

"I'm 25 years old and I'm out on Lakeland Drive at night and this man is standing there with his hand on gun telling me, 'Do not move,'" said Bell, who had never been arrested. "That was one of the most frightening experiences in my life."

Rep. Jeff Hale, R-Nesbit, who is white, urged the House to support the bill. Hale has worked as a firefighter, and he said emergency responders and law enforcement officers put their lives at risk to help others.

"We don't see race," Hale said. "We see a human being that is in distress and needs help."

Hale also said there is tension in society about some relationships involving law enforcement officers, but the officers are not at fault.

"I think a lot of this stems from the news media putting the twist on it the way they do," Hale said.

Bell tried unsuccessfully to amend the bill to require 10 percent pay raises for law enforcement officers and firefighters.

The Senate has passed a similar measure, Senate Bill 2469, which is called the "Blue, Red and Med Lives Matter Act." It says any crime committed against emergency personnel because of their status as police officers, firefighters or emergency medical technicians would be a hate crime. State law currently doubles penalties for targeting people because of race, ethnicity, religion or gender.

The House and Senate will exchange bills for more work.

____

Online: House Bill 645, http://bit.ly/2kppet1 ; and Senate Bill 2469, http://bit.ly/2kpy7QB .


Why FBI’s N-DEx is the best free investigations tool you’re not using

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

P1 Leaders Staff
Author: P1 Leaders Staff

By Tim Dees

Every police officer has his or her own information back channels, his way of getting details outside of the usual sources. What you may not know is that you can expand that collection to include police agencies all across the country.

The system is called N-DEx (for National Data Exchange), it’s run by the FBI, was designed with input from subject matter experts, and it’s free. If the first two characteristics didn’t interest you, the third one will.

“The N-DEx program has been requirements-driven since the beginning,” said Scott Edson, chief of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Special Operations Division. “The FBI sought input from local, state and federal agencies, and this has resulted in an excellent system.”

N-DEx is a collection of incident data local police departments routinely record and track: names, dates of birth, addresses, phone numbers, license plates, offenses, arrests, convictions and so on. Much of this is sent and tracked by the FBI already, but a good portion of it never makes it out of the agency that recorded it. N-DEx makes it available to all subscriber agencies.

“To better protect people from crime and terrorism, we have learned that we must share the kind of information that N-DEx contains, the incident reports that list the people, places and types of things that can be valuable to the cop on the street, crime analysts and investigators,” said Edson.

Trivial information can close cases

One example of information that usually doesn’t go any further than a local agency is the basic details of a call for service. If officers respond to a noise complaint that turns out to be a family fight that doesn’t reach the level of domestic violence, it may not even generate an incident report. However, the information recorded by the call taker, and any wants checks or other inquiries made by officers at the scene, are held in the agency’s CAD system.

This sort of information was pivotal in resolving a problem in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Investigators received information that an address in their city was the site of narcotics sales. Their informant told them about the sales, that the dealer had firearms on the premises and that he was a member of a street gang in California. His gang name was “Beagle.”

Searches of the usual databases, including California’s CalGang system, turned up empty for Beagle, as did searches for the names of the people listed on the utility bill for the address. However, a search for one of the names from the bill in N-DEx matched a name in a call for service record taken by a California agency. One of the people associated with that call also matched the description of the man living at the North Las Vegas address, and that name was indexed in CalGang with Beagle.

Starting again with what the NLVPD now knew as Beagle’s true name, they found a felony warrant for possession of a stolen vehicle, plus an extensive criminal history that included attempted murder, resisting arrest and sexual assault of a child.

When officers served the warrant at the target address, Beagle tried to stick with his alias but eventually gave his true name, saying he lied because he knew he would be going to prison. Besides Beagle, the warrant service yielded a quantity of cocaine, marijuana, handguns and ammunition, as well as $950 in cash.

Without that tidbit of information from N-DEx, Beagle might still be enjoying his career as a distributor of recreational pharmaceuticals.

Mapping and nodes

N-DEx uses a system called the National Information Exchange Model to translate information contained in your agency’s incident reporting system and convert it to something everyone can use. Data fields like last name, first name and date of birth are mapped from whatever your system calls that field to its equivalent in NDE-x. Some records systems have already been mapped, so if your agency uses a system that another NDE-x user has already recoded, that work is done for you.

While it’s possible for individual agencies to upload their data directly to N-DEx, the preferred method is to use an intermediate data node. Mostly rural states, such as Alabama, use a statewide node to communicate to N-DEx. Major metropolitan areas frequently have data sharing nodes set up already. For example, agencies south of San Mateo County, California, share data through the South Bay Information Sharing System. Thirty agencies in Santa Clara, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties all communicate information through SBISS, and ultimately to N-DEx.

Other interfaces used by N-DEx include the Law Enforcement Enterprise Portal, Regional Information Sharing Systems COPLINK and the Law Enforcement Information Exchange.

Owning your data

A common objection to data sharing is the fear of losing control of the information. If faulty or stale information is shared with another agency, it can be difficult to get that information redacted or updated once it’s out from under your roof.

Although data sent to N-DEx is stored on FBI servers, ownership still resides with the agency that sent it. Each agency can set an expiration date on any record, so it is automatically purged once the authorization expires. Data can be called back and deleted on command.

Agencies also have the capability to set security levels on sensitive information. Records are available to any N-DEx user by default, but they can also be flagged to say something like “Call Anytown PD” if that particular record comes up in a search. Once the bona fides of the requesting officer are established, the agency can decide how much information they want to release about that item.

Data analysis features

More than just a search-and-retrieve system, N-DEx analyzes information and determines if there are relationships between people, places, vehicles and incidents that would not be apparent otherwise. Joe Schmoe may deny any knowledge or association with Benny Burglar, but N-DEx could show that Joe was recorded riding in a car registered to Benny’s address, or that Joe and Benny have both been found in the company of Bob Dealer, who is their suspected meth connection. If these citations or field interviews had been recorded by separate agencies, the association between them might never have been made without data analysis by a system with access to all of the records.

Users see these associations in different ways, depending on the need. One geo-visualization feature displays a graphic with multiple search items submitted in a batch, with links drawn between them whenever there is some association with another search item. These searches are limitable by date or geographic area to keep the diagram from becoming too complex. Analysis like this was previously available only through expensive intelligence analysis software packages.

Access and acquisition

Users typically get access N-DEx through a web portal or browser. There are security measures to ensure against unauthorized access, but most agencies that meet CJIS security standards for data access have no difficulty meeting the requirements. There are periodic audits to guard against misuse of the system.

Agencies that want to become N-DEx users should visit LEEP and complete the online application. Agencies with an existing LEEP account should go to their state’s sub-SIG on the Services section of LEEP and choose Request Access. There is also a help desk email account accessible at ndex@leo.gov.


About the author Tim Dees is a retired police officer and the former editor of two major law enforcement websites. He writes and consults on technology applications in criminal justice. Tim can be reached at tim@timdees.com.


Sex offender who thinks he’s a witch caught after dodging Texas halfway house

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Liz Farmer The Dallas Morning News

WASHINGTON — A sex offender with tattoos scrawled all over his face failed to show up at Texas halfway house has been captured, the Austin American-Statesman reported.

Matthew Ezekiel Stager was released Thursday from the Federal Correctional Complex in Petersburg, Va., and was supposed to check into a transitional facility in Texas that day but never did, the U.S. Marshals Service said.

He was captured in Washington D.C. on Wednesday after two Metropolitan police officers spotted him, the Statesman reported.

He was supposed to be housed in the Austin Transitional Center in Del Valle, but went missing after federal authorities lost track of him at the airport.

Stager is "an admitted witch from North Carolina," according to court documents.

In 1999, Stager was convicted of indecent liberties with a minor after sexually assaulting a girl beginning when she was 12 years old. He ultimately got her pregnant when she was 16, records show.

He was later convicted in Texas on a federal charge of failing to register as a sex offender after crossing state lines, The Progress-Index reports.

In 2004, he registered as a sex offender with the Killeen Police Department, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Stager has known connections to multiple states, The Progress-Index reports.

He turned 45 on Wednesday.

The Associated Press and staff writer Claire Cardona contributed to this report.

———

©2017 The Dallas Morning News


Duke students invent robot cop for traffic stops

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

DURHAM, N.C. — Two Duke University students invented a “robot cop” designed to change the way police officers conduct traffic stops.

Vaibhav Tadepalli and Chris Reyes told WRAL that the “Sentinel” deploys from the officer’s cruiser and drives itself to the window of the civilian's car. Police interact with the driver through a television screen.

The students said the robot records video and will populate data as the driver and officer are interacting, such as the make and model of the vehicle and its license plate number.

The data is then transferred to the officer’s laptop.

Vaibhav and Reyes told the news station they hope to make Sentinel more cost-efficient than other law enforcement robots.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Duke students invent robot cop for traffic stops

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

DURHAM, N.C. — Two Duke University students invented a “robot cop” designed to change the way police officers conduct traffic stops.

Vaibhav Tadepalli and Chris Reyes told WRAL that the “Sentinel” deploys from the officer’s cruiser and drives itself to the window of the civilian's car. Police interact with the driver through a television screen.

The students said the robot records video and will populate data as the driver and officer are interacting, such as the make and model of the vehicle and its license plate number.

The data is then transferred to the officer’s laptop.

Vaibhav and Reyes told the news station they hope to make Sentinel more cost-efficient than other law enforcement robots.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Scotland Yard adopts new fleet of hybrid patrol cars, motorcycles

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

LONDON — In order to combat the toxic air in the city, the London Metropolitan Police Service plans to roll out 250 hybrid patrol cars and motorcycles as the first stage of their “green revolution.”

According to the Evening Standard, the rollout is the first stage in a $26 million program to replace 700 of the total 4,000 cars in 2017 and 2018.

The department is testing hydrogen scooters for officers on street patrol as well.

“Our aim is to make the fleet as clean as we can whilst maintaining operational capability and we are working with the Mayor on his new low emission zones and the fleet deployment will complement the low emission neighborhoods,” head of police fleet services Jiggs Bharij said.

Officials have been comparing the costs with different car makers including Ford, Mercedes, Nissan, Renault, and VW.

For front line operations, Police Chief Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe has been speaking to Tesla to test their cars for the fleet.

According to the Standard, the force stopped buying diesel cars in response to toxic “black” air quality alerts in the city.

The use of hydrogen fuel cell cars as emergency response vehicles is a first for the U.K.

“These first vehicles are a stepping stone that will allow us to build the volume over time once we have the right technology and infrastructure in place,” Bharij said.


Report: Fla. restaurant owner admits employees spit in cops’ food

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

JACKSONVILLE BEACH, Fla. — A restaurant owner, reportedly upset over a traffic citation, admitted that his employees tamper with the food they serve to cops.

A Feb. 6 letter sent out by Police Chief Patrick Dooley warned officers to be cautious when they eat at Cruisers Grill, Action News Jax reported.

The letter said owner Robert Handmaker approached officers after they responded to a false fire alarm at his business.

According to the report, Handmaker recounted a recent experience he had during a traffic stop to the officers who responded to the alarm. He told them he received a citation for expired registration and that the officer who issued the ticket “didn’t seem to care” who he was. Handmaker said he had been offering discounts to first responders who came into the restaurant for years.

According to the news station, Handmaker then cursed at the officers and called them “bullies” after they said they couldn’t resolve his citation.

He indicated employees had spit in officers’ food in the past and may do so again in the future, the report said.

"While I will not issue an order prohibiting patronization of Cruisers, please use caution for health and safety reasons if you choose to eat at this establishment," Dooley wrote.

Chief sent letter to entire Jax Beach police department Feb. 6 saying he became aware of claims that workers may spit in personnel's food pic.twitter.com/Kiirlu5aJf

— Brittney Donovan (@brittneydonovan) February 7, 2017

General Manager John Addis wrote on Facebook that the statements are false and the staff would not mess with anyone’s food.

“We take great pride in our ability to serve our customers every day and have a deep appreciation for those in our community that serve us daily – our men and women in blue,” a Cruisers Grill representative said in a statement. “We are deeply disappointed and saddened to hear that false rumors regarding Cruisers Grill are being circulated… We are confident that after further review, those parties affiliated with this matter will realize that Cruisers Grill has faithfully and diligently served our community for over 20 years.”

Cruisers owner says it's a rumor after being quoted in a police report saying employees spit in officers food pic.twitter.com/YMlGZC3zwn

— Danielle Avitable (@DanielleANjax) February 7, 2017


Legislation would repeal SAFE Act in NY, excluding NYC

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NEW YORK — New proposed legislation would repeal the Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act in New York State, with the exception of New York City.

The SAFE Act requires universal background checks for gun purchases, increases the penalties for the use of illegal guns, mandates a life sentence for the murder of a first responder, and bans assault weapons.

But gun advocates believe that when the act was passed, some Constitutional rights were taken away.

"It infringed upon Constitutional rights, made criminals out of law-abiding sportsmen, and did nothing to protect our children, families, or communities," Sen. Rob Ortt told RochesterFirst.com.

According to WKBW, the new legislation aims to remove the obstacles for people in rural areas who want to purchase guns for protection.

The news station reported that the majority of people (by a small margin) outside the city oppose the SAFE act. It has wider appeal in NYC.

Supporters of the repeal told RochesterFirst.com the act was passed without public input.

"It was really a taking, if you will, of your legally owned firearms and accessories and telling you, you had to get rid of them," lawmaker Ernst Flager-Mitchell said.

If the repeal passes, the governor would need to sign the legislation for it to be approved.


Colo. cops, firefighters surprise autistic boy, 5, at birthday party

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By Chhun Sun The Gazette

FOUNTAIN, Colo. — One of the hardest things Brandi Lake had to do took place a week ago when she had to tell her son — who has autism — that no one was coming to his 5th birthday party.

"Bud," she told him, "people are busy sometimes."

They invited a few of his friends and his classmates from Conrad Early Learning Center in Fountain, but no one accepted, Lake said. After seeing the sad look on Phoenix's face, the mom felt like she should try to do more.

So she contacted the Fountain Police Department on Wednesday.

In an email, she said, "I just had a question, it's odd and I can totally understand if no, but Sat. is my son's b-day, he has autism and can have a hard time in school and friends are hard to make. Everyone he invited has said no. Would any officers come by for cake and sandwiches?"

A couple hours later, the department sent a reply: "Count us in."

On Saturday, Phoenix got the surprise of his life. A handful of Fountain officers showed up at the family's Fountain home with toys and a birthday card signed by the entire department, joining the boy's parents, grandparents and aunts and uncles. While they were partying, Phoenix got another surprise: Fountain firefighters arrived in a fire truck, also bearing gifts.

It was a day to remember.

But of all the gifts he received, what the boy treasured most was a junior police badge from the officers. It was fitting, since Phoenix wants to become a police officer, his mom said.

Why a career in law enforcement?

"Because they help people," he said.

The party was an emotional experience for Brandi Lake, 26, who was crushed thinking about how to tell her son that no one was coming to his birthday party. "I tried to explain it to him," she said. "It was hard for me to say in words."

Brandi didn't expect Fountain police to get back to her. And she didn't expect such a large crowd to show up, considering that many of the officers were on duty at the time. Her heart melted at seeing the outcome, she said.

"It was very emotional and exciting," she said. "As a mom, you know, you want to keep the world warm and fuzzy but that's not possible. So for them to do that, it was amazing and humbling."

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Last week, the Fountain Police Department received a message from Brandi, the mother of a local autistic boy, Phoenix....

Posted by Fountain Police Department on 6hb Februari 2017


Police: Armed robbery suspect shot himself while resisting arrest

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Frank Juliano Connecticut Post

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. — Police say the suspect in an armed robbery Monday night accidentally shot himself in the leg when he struggled with a police sergeant taking him into custody.

Steven Nieves, 31, entered the business at 375 Capitol Avenue shortly before 9 p.m., displayed a firearm and ordered the clerk to hand over money, Capt. Brian Fitzgerald said. The clerk complied and Nieves fled on foot with the cash, he said.

City land records indicate that Mike’s Grocery is the store at 375 Capitol Avenue.

Officers dispatched to the scene began canvassing the area and Sergeant James Geremia located the suspect on Main Street near Charles Street, Fitzgerald said.

“A physical altercation occurred and the perpetrator... resisted arrest and assaulted the sergeant,’’ the police spokesman said. “During the struggle, Nieves reached for a small handgun that was in his pants pocket and the weapon discharged. Nieves was struck by a single bullet and sustained a gunshot wound to his leg.’’

Geremia was able to call for backup and Nieves was taken into custody. Both Nieves and Geremia were transported to St. Vincent's Medical Center for treatment, Fitzgerald said.

Geremia was treated for minor injuries and released, and Nieves was also treated and released to police custody.

The suspect is being held on a $250,000 bond on charges of first-degree robbery, criminal possession of a firearm, unlawful discharge of a firearm, assault on a police officer, reckless endangerment, threatening and carrying a pistol without a permit.

———

©2017 the Connecticut Post (Bridgeport, Conn.)


Trump meets with law enforcement leaders in Washington

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By Emily Ngo Newsday

WASHINGTON — Even a “bad high school student” would understand the law permitting the president to restrict the entry into the country of people he deems a threat, President Donald Trump said Wednesday morning in Washington, D.C., condemning legal challenges to his travel ban.

“You can be a lawyer or you don’t have to be a lawyer, if you were a good student in high school or a bad student in high school, you can understand this,” Trump said in remarks to a meeting of the Major Cities Chiefs Association. “And it’s really incredible to me that we have a court case that’s going on so long. Again, a bad high school student would understand this. Anybody would understand this.”

The president has signaled earlier that he expected to find allies among police chiefs and other law enforcement officials against the “horrible, dangerous and wrong” legal testing of his controversial executive order.

At the chiefs’ conference, he read a section of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 to a receptive audience while criticizing a panel of federal appeals court judges who are currently challenging the legal basis of his travel ban.

“They are interpreting things differently than probably 100 percent of people in this room,” Trump said.

Earlier in the morning he had tweeted: “If the U.S. does not win this case as it so obviously should, we can never have the security and safety to which we are entitled. Politics!”

He continued that he will be addressing “police chiefs and sheriffs and will be discussing the horrible, dangerous and wrong decision.”

The president has expressed increasing frustration with the mounting legal challenges against his executive order barring the entry of nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries and refugees from all over the world. The broadest of the court rulings has halted the travel ban nationwide.

Among the questions facing the administration is whether Trump has the authority to enact such restrictions and whether the ban is discrimination against Muslims.

Trump maintains the executive order is in the interest of national security.

Thank you to our great Police Chiefs & Sheriffs for your leadership & service. You have a true friend in the @WhiteHouse. We support you! pic.twitter.com/niwuK5rgXR

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 8, 2017

The president had found sympathetic voices among the county sheriffs he gathered at the White House on Tuesday.

An honor having the National Sheriffs' Assoc. join me at the @WhiteHouse. Incredible men & women who protect & serve 24/7/365. THANK YOU!! pic.twitter.com/9EMTnH0OrF

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 7, 2017

The group discussed immigrants arriving illegally to the United States, but there were no specific mentions of a terror threat linked to the Islamic State — which Trump has cited as justification for the ban.

“You have a big problem with the refugees pouring in, don’t you?” Trump had asked Hennepin County, Minnesota, Sheriff Richard W. Stanek.

The sheriff replied: “Yes, we do, sir. ... Rule of law is strong and the proper vetting of individuals is really important to us.”

Copyright 2017 Newsday


Spotlight: Getac’s rugged mobile computers are built to withstand all types of weather conditions

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Sponsors

Company Name: Getac Rugged Mobile Computers Headquarters: Irvine, CA Website: http://us.getac.com/index.html

1. Where did your company name originate from?

Getac was formed in 1989 as a joint venture between GE Aerospace and MiTAC Technology Corp. to build computers for the US military. Less than a year after Getac's inception, we unveiled our first fully rugged computers with four expansion slots and a nearly indestructible, all-alloy chassis. Getac has come a long way since its beginnings but we have always maintained that same high level of durability in our products.

2. Why do you believe your products are essential to the police community?

These professionals are working to protect and serve our communities whether it's -20°F in the cold winter months or 120°F in the summer desert heat. They need a product that can withstand these conditions so they have access to immediate information and can document incidents as needed. Our computers are built to withstand those conditions so it's one less thing they have to worry about protecting. Picture and video evidence is becoming an even more essential tool to officers on duty. Our video systems help to collect evidence to assist with criminal prosecution and protect them from unjust scrutiny while also providing a robust software system to manage the data and a secure solution for data storage.

3. What makes your company unique?

One of the items that make us unique in our market is the ability to customize solutions for our customers. For instance, we had a customer that wanted the computer chassis to be in their own specific company green color to make it very identifiable and thus less susceptible to theft. Because we’re a core manufacturer and own the entire process, we were able to accommodate their request. We also can do customizations of the port configurations and, on certain occasions, at the component level. We’ve even designed custom accessories for customers who are using their product in a unique location or manner that is not consistent with the standard user scenario.

4. What do your customers like best about you and your products?

We ask for a lot of feedback from our customers. One of the items we hear consistently is how happy they are with the service and support they've received from our company. Although we are a manufacturer, we realize that the responsibility to our customer goes far beyond the products we sell.

We pride ourselves on the customer experience we provide. It's about making things easy and painless for our customers. That means providing them with the guidance and support they need throughout the entire process, from evaluation to installation to ongoing support.

It also means making sure that we work with solid complimentary technology partners so that if a combined solution (i.e. computer, vehicle dock, software, etc.) isn’t working, we don’t waste time pointing fingers at each other and just focus on getting the issue corrected for the customers.


Wash. deputy extricated from cruiser after crash

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Kenny Ocker The News Tribune

PARKLAND, Wash. — A Pierce County sheriff’s deputy was seriously injured in a head-on collision Tuesday in Parkland.

The crash happened about 3:30 p.m. in the 1600 block of Tule Lake Road South, just south of Washington High School.

A pickup driving around the corner from Spanaway Loop Road South passed a van and crossed the double yellow lines in an icy area, sheriff’s spokesman Ed Troyer said.

“Not very smart,” Troyer said.

The truck hit the deputy’s patrol car head-on, going up and over the hood of the car and crushing some of its supports, Troyer said.

The pickup driver, who identified himself only as Albert N., said he was going around the van because it cut in front of him and then stopped.

When he saw the deputy’s car, he said, he closed his eyes and braced for the crash.

The driver said he tried to get the deputy’s car door open after the wreck but couldn’t.

“I’m just worried about him,” the driver said.

The driver of the truck will be cited with negligent or reckless driving, Troyer said, and the driver of the van was cited for failure to yield.

It took Central Pierce Fire & Rescue firefighters 30 minutes to extricate the deputy from the patrol car after cutting off its roof.

The deputy was awake and talking to emergency responders before being taken to an area hospital on a backboard with a neck brace.

Troyer said his injuries were severe, but said he was coherent and communicative with hospital staff as he underwent tests.

The 34-year-old deputy has been a patrol deputy since August and works as a school resource officer with the Bethel School District. He started working for the Sheriff’s Department in 2008 as a corrections deputy.

___ (c)2017 The News Tribune (Tacoma, Wash.)


Wash. deputy extricated from cruiser after crash

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Kenny Ocker The News Tribune

PARKLAND, Wash. — A Pierce County sheriff’s deputy was seriously injured in a head-on collision Tuesday in Parkland.

The crash happened about 3:30 p.m. in the 1600 block of Tule Lake Road South, just south of Washington High School.

A pickup driving around the corner from Spanaway Loop Road South passed a van and crossed the double yellow lines in an icy area, sheriff’s spokesman Ed Troyer said.

“Not very smart,” Troyer said.

The truck hit the deputy’s patrol car head-on, going up and over the hood of the car and crushing some of its supports, Troyer said.

The pickup driver, who identified himself only as Albert N., said he was going around the van because it cut in front of him and then stopped.

When he saw the deputy’s car, he said, he closed his eyes and braced for the crash.

The driver said he tried to get the deputy’s car door open after the wreck but couldn’t.

“I’m just worried about him,” the driver said.

The driver of the truck will be cited with negligent or reckless driving, Troyer said, and the driver of the van was cited for failure to yield.

It took Central Pierce Fire & Rescue firefighters 30 minutes to extricate the deputy from the patrol car after cutting off its roof.

The deputy was awake and talking to emergency responders before being taken to an area hospital on a backboard with a neck brace.

Troyer said his injuries were severe, but said he was coherent and communicative with hospital staff as he underwent tests.

The 34-year-old deputy has been a patrol deputy since August and works as a school resource officer with the Bethel School District. He started working for the Sheriff’s Department in 2008 as a corrections deputy.

___ (c)2017 The News Tribune (Tacoma, Wash.)


2 NC officers, deputy hurt in motorcycle crash

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By Colin Warren-Hicks The Herald-Sun

BAHAMA, N.C. — Two Durham police officers and one Durham County Sheriff’s Office deputy, each riding a motorcycle, were involved in a crash at 3:15 p.m. Tuesday in on South Lowell Road near Terry Road.

The State Highway Patrol said its preliminary investigation revealed a 2013 Harley Davidson operated by Durham County Sheriff’s Deputy Paul Aiken was traveling north on South Lowell Road when Aiken lost control, traveled onto the northbound shoulder and struck a ditch.

As a result of that, two Durham police officers traveling with Aiken also lost control of their motorcycles. Officer Larry Cox, who was operating a 2013 Harley Davidson, traveled off onto the northbound shoulder, struck a ditch, and overturned. Officer Miguel De Vera Rodriguez, who was operating a 2015 Harley Davidson, traveled off onto the northbound shoulder, struck a utility pole support wire, and overturned.

Aiken and Cox sustained minor injuries. Rodriguez sustained serious but non-life threatening injuries.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

All three drivers were transported to Duke Medical Center.

Durham Sheriff Mike Andrews said the three officers had ridden together for years and had just left an assignment as a funeral procession escort when they crashed.

His office said the three were practicing motorcycle formations when the accident occurred.

“Years of experience has taught me not to speculate about why a collision happened too soon,” Andrews said. “Specialists come in and reconstruct what happened, the years have taught me. Scuff marks, yawl marks — I leave it to those guys.”

Andrews said, “The call came in. I know those guys. I’ve know those guys for a long time. The first thing you think is about is them and then their families. Are they OK?”

The Highway Patrol took over the investigation and around 5 p.m. Tuesday its helicopter swept the fields surrounding the crash site and over the wreckage snapping photographs of the crash site.

No cause has been given for the accident.

———

©2017 The Herald-Sun (Durham, N.C.)


2 NC officers, deputy hurt in motorcycle crash

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By Colin Warren-Hicks The Herald-Sun

BAHAMA, N.C. — Two Durham police officers and one Durham County Sheriff’s Office deputy, each riding a motorcycle, were involved in a crash at 3:15 p.m. Tuesday in on South Lowell Road near Terry Road.

The State Highway Patrol said its preliminary investigation revealed a 2013 Harley Davidson operated by Durham County Sheriff’s Deputy Paul Aiken was traveling north on South Lowell Road when Aiken lost control, traveled onto the northbound shoulder and struck a ditch.

As a result of that, two Durham police officers traveling with Aiken also lost control of their motorcycles. Officer Larry Cox, who was operating a 2013 Harley Davidson, traveled off onto the northbound shoulder, struck a ditch, and overturned. Officer Miguel De Vera Rodriguez, who was operating a 2015 Harley Davidson, traveled off onto the northbound shoulder, struck a utility pole support wire, and overturned.

Aiken and Cox sustained minor injuries. Rodriguez sustained serious but non-life threatening injuries.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

All three drivers were transported to Duke Medical Center.

Durham Sheriff Mike Andrews said the three officers had ridden together for years and had just left an assignment as a funeral procession escort when they crashed.

His office said the three were practicing motorcycle formations when the accident occurred.

“Years of experience has taught me not to speculate about why a collision happened too soon,” Andrews said. “Specialists come in and reconstruct what happened, the years have taught me. Scuff marks, yawl marks — I leave it to those guys.”

Andrews said, “The call came in. I know those guys. I’ve know those guys for a long time. The first thing you think is about is them and then their families. Are they OK?”

The Highway Patrol took over the investigation and around 5 p.m. Tuesday its helicopter swept the fields surrounding the crash site and over the wreckage snapping photographs of the crash site.

No cause has been given for the accident.

———

©2017 The Herald-Sun (Durham, N.C.)


Wash. police receive federal grant to coordinate response to gang activity

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

By Eli Francovich The Spokesman-Review

SPOKANE, Wash. — The City of Spokane and Spokane Public Schools will receive more than $260,000 in Department of Justice grant money to “enhance gang prevention.”

The money will allow the school district, the city, and police to work more closely with other community organizations involved in gang suppression. That collaboration will be known as the Gang Free Spokane Project.

A portion of that money has already gone toward hiring a project manager – Alise Mnati.

Full story: Spokane schools, city receive federal grant to coordinate response to gang activity


Minn. community fights to save police department

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Mary Divine Pioneer Press

FOREST LAKE, Minn. — When Forest Lake resident Erin Turner heard about a plan to possibly shut down the city’s police department and contract with the Washington County Sheriff’s Office for investigative and patrol services, she turned to social media.

Turner, a lifelong resident of the city, posted a petition to save the department on change.org on Jan. 29. Within hours, more than 1,000 people had pledged their support. More than 2,000 people had signed as of Friday. There’s a “We Love Our Cops” page on Facebook. And in a show of support before a Friday night hockey game at the Forest Lake Sports Center, the city’s police officers were introduced by name.

“People are shocked to hear that this conversation is even on the table,” said Turner, 42, a local attorney.

“What is crystal clear from the comments is how valued the Forest Lake Police Department is to our community,” she said. “People have expressed concerns about the ongoing safety and security of our community, decreased response times and about losing our community policing presence — to name just a few.”

She said a close-knit community like Forest Lake needs a police department to hold it together.

City officials last month asked Sheriff Bill Hutton to prepare a proposal for police services, saying they felt confident in his department because of its track record for serving other communities and that “the potential exists for synergy, efficiency and cost savings.”

Forest Lake police already partners with the sheriff’s office and other agencies for dispatch, radios, records management, a drug task force and a SWAT team.

Asking for a proposal does not mean there are any issues related to the department or its officers, city officials said in a written statement to the Pioneer Press. Forest Lake “has a great police department with amazing officers who are dedicated to serving our community.”

Hutton said in January that it would take several months to put together the proposal.

WHAT IT COSTS

Forest Lake, population 19,000, has 25 full-time police officers — a chief, a captain, four sergeants, four detectives, 12 patrol officers, three school resource officers — and two administrative assistants. The department patrols 36 square miles.

The police department’s annual budget is a little more than $4 million, or about 44 percent of the city’s $9.2 million general fund, said City Administrator Aaron Parrish. Most of that, $3.4 million, goes to salaries and benefits.

Parrish, who has worked for the city for six years, said he was aware of residents’ disapproval.

“How we keep people safe is an important and emotional issue that certainly brings out a lot of energy and emotion,” Parrish said. “At the end of the day, this is going to be a very important community conversation for us to have — one of the most important certainly that’s taken place in my tenure with the city of Forest Lake.

In addition to providing police services to six townships in the county, the sheriff’s office provides police coverage to 15 cities. One of them is nearby Hugo, population 14,000, where the sheriff’s office provides a sergeant, investigator and six deputies at the cost of about $950,000 a year. The deputies work out of an office at Hugo City Hall and at the city’s public works department.

NEW COUNCIL MEMBER OBJECTS

Forest Lake council member Mara Bain, who was elected in November, has been a vocal opponent of the plan.

“There is an element that a police department provides to a community that is high-touch, high-service that I value for the community where I raise my own family,” Bain said.

Bain, who is married to a St. Paul police officer, said she likes the concept of local control.

“I think: for Forest Lake, by Forest Lake,” Bain said. “We control budget, we control staffing, we control service levels. Why would we give that up?”

In a letter to Hutton and the Washington County commissioners published in the Forest Lake Times, Bain asked that they make sure the process is “thorough, detailed and fact-based, transparent to all impacted parties and reflects the input from and desires of the residents we are under oath to serve.”

Bain wrote that the vote to request the proposal came from the city’s personnel committee, which includes two city council members, the city administrator and the assistant city administrator.

“The (request for proposal) has caught Forest Lake residents by surprise (contract law enforcement services were not a topic of our recent boisterous election), however initial reactions have been passionate and supportive of the Forest Lake Police Department,” she wrote.

CHIEF SPEAKS OUT

In Police Chief Rich Peterson’s statement on the city’s website, he said he welcomes the opportunity for his department to showcase its talents, accomplishments and initiatives that have been developed and implemented over the years.

“It will give us the chance to display our many community partnerships and our efficiencies of adapting to an ever changing law enforcement environment,” he wrote. “Not just responding as a reactive department from call to call, but being part of the community, educating and partnering with them.”

City administrator Parrish said the community needs to ask some tough questions, including if there are better ways to keep the community safe while being cost-effective.

“I can say that we definitely love our police officers and our department, but there’s that public policy and governance element to these conversations as well,” he said.

Although any plan would need to be approved by the city council, Turner said she thinks citizen approval in a referendum should be required to make the switch.

“This effort to eliminate our police is very clearly not an effort that is coming from our community,” she said. “It is coming from a few members of our city council.”

———

©2017 the Pioneer Press (St. Paul, Minn.)


Donations pour in after SC K-9 dies

Posted on February 8, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Jane Moon Dail The State

KERSHAW COUNTY, S.C. — Kershaw County Sheriff’s Office is now a little more complete after the death of a beloved K9, but one little part is still missing.

Mali the K9, who worked with Deputy Justin Spivey, died from a rare disease in the fall of 2016.

After hearing the sad announcement and Sheriff Jim Matthews’ request for donations, donors gave more than $8,000 – the amount needed to order a new K9 – to the nonprofit Kershaw County Sheriff’s Foundation in less than a month.

Spivey was able to pick up his new “partner,” a female black Labrador retriever, in January.

Matthews said because the community helped the department acquire the “highly trained officer,” the community should also take part naming the female dog.

All Kershaw County elementary-aged students are encouraged to suggest a creative name for the new K9.

A winner for the “Name our New Kershaw County K9” will be announced during a surprise visit from the K9 to his or her school or home school classroom.

“Our schools enjoy a great partnership with local law enforcement,” said Frank Morgan, Kershaw County School District superintendent. “This contest is an exciting opportunity for our students to use their creative skills in a meaningful way.”

A special community committee will select the winning entry, and the winner will be notified the week of Feb. 20.

©2017 The State (Columbia, S.C.)


Boston police troll NFL commish after Patriots win Super Bowl

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

BOSTON — The entire city of Boston was ecstatic after the New England Patriots came back to beat the Atlanta Falcons in the Super Bowl 34-28 on Sunday. But it seems the Boston Police Department were the biggest fans of the night.

The department tweeted out photos of Quarterback Tom Brady and said when the NFL suspended Brady for four games due to underinflated balls, they “didn’t just disrespect the greatest QB of all time, they insulted a region.”

They appeared to troll NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell again after the overtime win.

They tweeted a photo of Brady celebrating with the message, “#JusticePrevails: Greatest comeback in #SuperBowl history!!! God bless the @Patriots. God bless karma. See you in New England Mr. Goodell.”

On the eve of #SuperBowl, the men & women of the #BPD send our best wishes to Tom Brady and company as they prepare for tomorrow's big game. pic.twitter.com/EVF2IzMcFA

— Boston Police Dept. (@bostonpolice) February 4, 2017

Per @marty_walsh: "Congrats to the greatest team, coach & QB of all time on winning #SB51. Parade starts at 11am on Tuesday!!!" pic.twitter.com/ap6vGE2pGh

— Boston Police Dept. (@bostonpolice) February 6, 2017

#JusticePrevails: Greatest comeback in #SuperBowl history!!! God bless the @Patriots. God bless karma. See you in New England Mr. Goodell. pic.twitter.com/cc5jNcGFh0

— Boston Police Dept. (@bostonpolice) February 6, 2017


Are you prepared for an off-duty encounter?

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

Dale Stockton
Author: Dale Stockton

Several active shooter situations have been brought to an end by a single person – often an off-duty officer who was armed and had the wherewithal to engage. What about you? Have you thought it through? Carrying a firearm while off-duty brings big responsibility and, if you engage, much greater risk than on-duty actions. Those risks go beyond the obvious ones related to potential injury from a bad guy. They involve exposure to criminal prosecution, civil liability and, if you’re accompanied by a family member, potential injury to a loved one.

To carry or not to carry

No one knows with any degree of certainty how many officers carry a firearm while off-duty. There is no reliable source for this data and, even if there was, it would vary dramatically among jurisdictions. Suffice to say that many officers choose to carry a weapon and their motivation for doing so ranges from a base level of self-protection (only for me or my family) to an outright commitment to take action in the event of a serious crime. Regardless of where you are on that scale, there are some important considerations.

What to carry

There have been entire books written on off-duty weaponry, so it obviously goes beyond the scope of this article. Bottom line: The weapon must be capable of stopping a threat and you must be sufficiently skilled in using it. A compact version of your service weapon can be a solid choice because of operational similarity. Example: Those who carry a Glock 19 or 23 might consider the Glock 26 or 27, respectively. Many officers who carry a backup gun when on-duty like to carry that same weapon when off-duty. Again, weapon familiarity is a benefit. The last thing you want during a crisis is a weapon that you can’t put into operation or quickly clear if a malfunction occurs.

When to carry

Off-duty carry is such an important responsibility that it should either be done regularly or not at all. Carrying on an intermittent basis can lead to problems due to unfamiliarity with your equipment and uncertainty by those who are often with you (e.g. family). Perhaps just as concerning, if you don’t regularly carry, there is a much greater chance that you will inadvertently misplace or leave the gun behind (I know of two instances where this has happened). Just as important is when not to carry. Far too many officers have ended up in trouble (fired or prosecuted) because they used a firearm while off-duty and intoxicated. If you’re armed, don’t drink.

How to carry

Where you carry your gun on your body is a matter of personal choice. Some officers swear by an ankle holster, especially if that’s where they carry their backup weapon. Other officers don’t like the ankle holster approach because they feel the weapon isn’t readily accessible. This is a matter of practice and an ankle holster can also fit into something of a ploy in the event that you are the victim of a robbery. I know of an officer who purposely dropped his wallet during a robbery, then feigned reaching down to pick it up. He came up firing. This same type of subterfuge can be done with other methods of off-duty carry, but you should absolutely practice and think through what you would do.

Have a plan

As mentioned in the preceding paragraph, you need to think through how you will react in an off-duty situation. This includes your level of engagement. Some officers feel the best approach is to simply be the best witness possible and only act if they or a family member is in immediate danger. Many other officers extend that to the immediate danger of another person, regardless of the relationship. It is important for you to evaluate your probable situations and determine what your threshold of engagement will be. You’re much more likely to be successful in your action if you take this approach.

Share the plan

Sit down and have a conversation with your family and/or close friends who are regularly with you. Tell them what to expect in the event of an off-duty engagement. Give them specific instructions as to what they should do. At a minimum, move away from the situation, take cover, call for help and stress that an off-duty officer is involved and needs help. It is absolutely essential that you have this conversation and that you should do so more than once. If you have kids, it is helpful to have age-appropriate talks based on a hypothetical like a robbery-in-progress. If done properly, your kids will have a clear expectation of what you will do and what you need them to do. It literally could save their life.

Other considerations

An off-duty engagement with a suspect is exponentially more dangerous than when you’re on duty. You’re very unlikely to have needed equipment like body armor, radio, handcuffs or extra ammunition. It’s also likely that any uniformed assistance is going to be both delayed and potentially dangerous. The danger comes from the risk of being mistaken for an armed suspect.

Several off-duty officers have been killed by responding officers who perceived the off-duty officer as an armed suspect rather than a fellow officer. Always assume that responding officers do not know who you are, even if you’re in your own jurisdiction. I have a friend who sustained a serious facial injury during an ATM robbery. He fought back, shot one suspect and held the other at gunpoint. Officers (from his own department) responded to a report of shots fired and a man with a gun. On arrival, my friend’s coworkers didn’t recognize him due to his appearance. Only after some tense moments, and my friend repeatedly yelling his name, did the officers realize they were pointing guns (and a K-9) at a fellow officer. Bottom line: Never, never assume that you’ll be recognized.

At a minimum, make sure to take these steps: Identify yourself and keep doing so. Instruct anyone calling 911 to clearly convey that an off-duty officer is on scene and needs assistance. Don’t rely on a badge clipped on your belt. Instead, hold your badge and identification high so that they can be clearly seen. Also helpful is a badge clearly displayed at chest level. Verbalize your status. Comply with the instructions of responding officers. Keep in mind that they do not know your status and they’re looking at an unknown person who is armed. This is especially important if shots have been fired or if you have taken down a suspect.

Force yourself out of tunnel vision and try to take in the whole scene. There may be other suspects, especially in a robbery, that could pose a deadly threat. If you engage, issue clear and concise commands. Use available cover. If you are forced to shoot, do so purposefully, just like you would on duty. After shots are fired, stop and evaluate your situation. Think “WIN – What’s Important Now?” There may be other suspects that you’re not aware of – a lookout or getaway driver.

What if you’re unarmed?

Even if you regularly carry a weapon while off-duty, you should still think through what you would do in an unarmed situation. You may find yourself in a place or jurisdiction where firearms are prohibited or you’re in a flying status and have chosen to go unarmed. It really can happen anywhere and to anyone. Think through what you would do, what actions you would take and again, your expectations for your family.

Off-duty encounters seldom go as planned and can be deadly for a well-intentioned officer. Think through your purpose in carrying a firearm while off-duty and have a plan that you clearly communicate with your loved ones. Think tactically and continually reassess the situation as it unfolds. Sometimes discretion truly is the better part of valor and it may be appropriate to simply be the best witness possible.


Kan. officer in critical condition after struck by fleeing car

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Dale Stockton

By PoliceOne Staff

WICHITA, Kan. — An officer is in critical condition after a fleeing suspect struck him with a stolen car.

Sgt. Nikki Woodrow told KWCH the officer, a 25-year veteran of the department, was monitoring a home where a stolen vehicle was located.

The suspect had multiple felony warrants and fled, striking the officer with the vehicle.

The news station reported a second officer fired at the suspect, but the suspect was not hit.

The suspect was taken into custody after a pursuit.

Police said the officer is out of surgery, but remains in critical condition.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Live near Pawnee and Meade where police have apprehended a person suspected of running over a police officer.

Posted by Trevor Macy on 7hb Februari 2017


Rapid Response: 3 key lessons from the cop, paramedic confrontation video

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Heather R. Cotter, PoliceOne Senior Editor

What happened

Video captured a confrontation between Portsmouth (Ohio) Police Sgt. Joel Robinson and a paramedic during the treatment of a patient. The Jan. 28 incident occurred when the officer used a TASER on the paramedic’s aggressive patient. The other first responders on scene were able to successfully restrain and treat the patient despite the distractions between the officer, paramedic and crowd of bystanders.

The viral video has garnered a tremendous response from first responders. Here’s the big question: Was the confrontation between the officer and paramedic appropriately handled? It’s important to point out that neither party was cited for wrongdoing, but there are some important takeaways from this incident.

Why it's significant

Every call for service that results in a response by multiple agencies from multiple disciplines is bound to have some complications. Law enforcement officers, firefighters and EMS professionals often do not have the opportunity to train together. This shortcoming can cause confusion on scenes, communication barriers and sometimes conflict, as seen from this incident.

3 key takeaways

1. Everyone is recording Everyone is recording. This is a paradigm shift in our culture, and officers need to be constantly reminded of this reality. The public, businesses, local government and officers are recording. Officers are recorded by official (dash cams, CCTV, body-worn cameras) and unofficial (cell phones) means. Police officers need to understand that videos only show a fraction of a scenario, but when they go viral they can become damaging. With this in mind, it is important for officers to be reminded during roll call about working in an environment in which they are being constantly recorded.

2. De-escalation training Decision making under stress is a requirement of the job. How well officers perform under stressful conditions will vary by individual and incident. However, the fundamentals of de-escalation are the same no matter the scenario: diffuse a tense situation, communicate and do not compromise officer safety. Officers are trained early in their careers how to de-escalate a tense situation and regular refresh training is important.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

In this incident and based on the video footage, Sgt. Jenkins diffused the situation by removing the paramedic from the scene. What’s unique about this case is that Sgt. Jenkins was in a position to apply de-escalation tactics on a fellow first responder. This incident, not one that is commonly encountered during a call for service, opens up the opportunity to have a discussion with allied emergency responders and educate them about de-escalation tactics the agency employs.

3. Establishing command Unified command can make or break a multi-agency response to any incident. In this particular case, who was in charge? Was it the officer who was controlling the crowd and safety of the patient? Was it the paramedic who was initially treating the patient? Was it the firefighters once they arrived to treat the patient? The answers will vary based on who you ask. The main point is that it is absolutely critical to establish a unified command for an effective joint response to any call for service. This is a conversation that must be had in each jurisdiction in order to keep all first responders safe.

What's next

Officers can expect to see more videos surfacing from other incidents. The next time this occurs, it is important for you to remember that it could be you on the recording. Given this, it is critical not to pass judgment on a fellow officer or first responder without knowing the totality of the circumstances. While having an opinion is certainly reasonable, how you choose to vocalize it is a reflection of character.

When officers find themselves in a position to remove an allied first responder from a scene, it is important to do so by the necessary means, but then to make sure the incident commander or supervisor on scene is aware of the situation.

Learn more

While the officer and paramedic were not charged with any wrongdoing, the video from this incident opens up the discussion that all agencies need to have about the emergence of video recordings, applying de-escalation tactics on allied first responders and establishing a unified command during a multi-agency response. Here are some articles to learn more about de-escalation tactics and multi-agency response.

7 easy steps to successful de-escalation

What the public needs to know about police de-escalation tactics

Ferguson lessons: A model of police, fire, and EMS teamwork


Minn. police threaten drunk drivers with Justin Bieber

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Heather R. Cotter, PoliceOne Senior Editor

By Policeone Staff

WYOMING, Minn. — From Nickelback songs to tweeting about a Tostitos chip bag “breathalyzers,” departments have found creative ways to try to prevent drunk drivers from getting behind the wheel.

On Super Bowl Sunday, a department in Minnesota warned potential drunk drivers via a tweet that they’d face Justin Bieber if they broke the law.

“If you drive drunk tonight we’re going to subject you to the Justin Bieber @TMobile Super Bowl Commercial the entire way to jail. #SB51.”

If you drive drunk tonight we're going to subject you to that Justin Bieber @TMobile Super Bowl Commercial the entire way to jail. #SB51

— Wyoming, MN Police (@wyomingpd) February 6, 2017

The tweet went viral and has been retweeted over 10,000 times.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Legislation proposed to retain experienced DC officers

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WASHINGTON — Emergency legislation is being considered to combat the problem DC police are having in filling in the ranks.

According to city officials, officers are retiring in their 40s and 50s and the department is having trouble recruiting and training cops as quickly as they’re losing them.

In an effort combat violence and retain experienced officers, D.C. Council member Vincent Gray introduced emergency legislation to reward officers who stay on, WTOP reported.

If the officers signed on for another five years past their retirement eligibility, they would receive a bonus and one year’s salary.

“We’re not talking about people who are way past the point where they’d be a part of a patrol effort,” Gray told the news station. “These are people who are really at the prime of their career, who are choosing to go on to other jobs or onto another police force just to do something different.”

Former Police Chief Cathy Lanier said if the department fell below 3,800, the city would be in trouble. According to the department, the force currently has 3,762 sworn officers.

The legislation, which Mayor Muriel Bowser said she will not implement, needs nine votes to pass. Gray has also introduced it as a permanent bill. It will be voted on this week.


La. man burglarizes home while wearing GPS ankle monitor

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

SLIDELL, La. — A suspect broke into a home and stole jewelry, electronics and firearms - all while wearing a GPS ankle monitor.

Slidell police received a tip that John Davis, 56, was involved in a Jan. 26 burglary and began looking into him as a suspect, the department wrote on Facebook.

Investigators discovered that Davis was recently arrested in New Orleans and was required to wear an ankle monitor as part of his bail agreement.

Data from the device confirmed that he was at the residence. The GPS sent out his location nine times while he was inside the house, police said.

Davis was booked on possession of stolen property in New Orleans. Police told NOLA.com he will later be booked with a burglary chage in Slidell.


‘Walking Dead’ star thanks Ark. cop for helping mom

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

BENTON, Ark. — An Arkansas officer stopped to help a woman whose car was broken down. Little did he know he was helping a celebrity’s mother and would receive a big thank you from the star.

Officer Stovall was working the Benton Interstate Criminal Enforcement Patrol (BICEP) program Feb. 3 when he spotted a woman who needed a jumpstart to her car, the department wrote on Facebook.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Are you a fan of Daryl Dixon from The Walking Dead? Or maybe Murphy MacManus from The Boondock Saints? The actor's name...

Posted by Benton Police Department on Monday, February 6, 2017

Stovall insisted on helping her find a mechanic to fix her car and get her safely back on the road.

Later, he discovered Norman Reedus, who plays Daryl Dixon on “The Walking Dead,” tweeted a photo and a thank you to the officer for helping his mom.

Thank you officer Stovall from the Benton police dept for rescuing my mom when her car broke down Thank u sir!!! pic.twitter.com/w80bkzHbyB

— norman reedus (@wwwbigbaldhead) February 3, 2017

“I didn't know at the time that she was the mom of a big Hollywood movie and TV star,” Stovall said. “But I definitely know now!”

The department said helping stranded drivers is nothing new for officers working the BICEP program. Although their main responsibility is catching criminals, they are always willing to assist anyone in need.


Texas Rangers join search for Tom Brady’s stolen jersey

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Roberto Villalpando Austin American-Statesman

HOUSTON — Don't worry Tom, the Texas Rangers are on the case.

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick announced Monday that he has asked the Texas Rangers to investigate the theft of the game jersey worn by New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady during the Super Bowl in Houston on Sunday night.

"In Texas we place a very high value on hospitality and football," Patrick said in a statement. "Tom Brady's jersey has great historical value and is already being called 'the most valuable NFL collectable ever.' It will likely go into the Hall of Fame one day."

The Texas Rangers will be assisting the Houston Police Department in seeking the purloined piece of sports history from the Patriots' locker room at NRG Stadium.

Brady, who wore the jersey during the Patriots' 34-28 comeback victory against the Atlanta Falcons in overtime, first notified authorities about his missing jersey late Sunday night.

Patrick said "it is important that history does not record that it was stolen in Texas."

"I'm a Texans and Cowboys fan first, but the unquestionable success of the Super Bowl in Houston last night was a big win for our entire state and I don't want anything to mar that victory," the lieutenant governor said. "Whoever took this jersey should turn it in. The Texas Rangers are on the trail."

___ (c)2017 Austin American-Statesman


Dallas officer refused service at fast-food restaurant

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

By Susan McFarland Fort Worth Star-Telegram

DALLAS — A restaurant chain that gives back to the community, including raising money for local police, is under fire for an employee who refused service to an officer.

The incident occurred last week at a central Oak Cliff store in Kiest Boulevard, according to CBSDFW.com.

After the incident, in which an employee told the officer “we don’t serve your kind here,” social media protests began including promises of a boycott from the law enforcement community.

As complaints about the incident were put on Golden Chick’s Facebook page, the restaurant responded.

“We are extremely disappointed with the exchange that occurred with a Golden Chick employee and a Dallas police officer, and immediately terminated the employee. This does not reflect our restaurants’ pride in serving the Dallas Police Department and all police departments throughout the communities our restaurants are located.”

Golden Chick Store Director Ike Ugokwe said his restaurant has donated hundreds of school supplies to students, given box dinners to the homeless and offers discounts to police officers on duty, according to CBS.

“All those things that we had worked over the years to build see you can see it crashing down because of one simple comment,” Ugokwe told CBS.

A Facebook post by Michael Mata, president of Dallas Police Association, said this was an “unfortunate isolated incident,” and said “Golden Chick has been an amazing community partner with DPD and the Dallas Police Association. The tremendous company and its employees raised money to support the families of the fallen from the July 7th tragedy. I and all officers appreciate their continued support.”

Last month, a Fort Worth police officer was refused service at Wendy’s. Last year, a McDonald’s employee was fired for refusing service to a Brenham police officer.


Golden Chick fires employee who refused to serve cop

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Heather R. Cotter, PoliceOne Senior Editor

By Susan McFarland Fort Worth Star-Telegram

DALLAS — A restaurant chain that gives back to the community, including raising money for local police, is under fire for an employee who refused service to an officer.

The incident occurred last week at a central Oak Cliff store in Kiest Boulevard, according to CBSDFW.com.

After the incident, in which an employee told the officer “we don’t serve your kind here,” social media protests began including promises of a boycott from the law enforcement community.

As complaints about the incident were put on Golden Chick’s Facebook page, the restaurant responded.

“We are extremely disappointed with the exchange that occurred with a Golden Chick employee and a Dallas police officer, and immediately terminated the employee. This does not reflect our restaurants’ pride in serving the Dallas Police Department and all police departments throughout the communities our restaurants are located.”

Golden Chick Store Director Ike Ugokwe said his restaurant has donated hundreds of school supplies to students, given box dinners to the homeless and offers discounts to police officers on duty, according to CBS.

“All those things that we had worked over the years to build see you can see it crashing down because of one simple comment,” Ugokwe told CBS.

A Facebook post by Michael Mata, president of Dallas Police Association, said this was an “unfortunate isolated incident,” and said “Golden Chick has been an amazing community partner with DPD and the Dallas Police Association. The tremendous company and its employees raised money to support the families of the fallen from the July 7th tragedy. I and all officers appreciate their continued support.”

Last month, a Fort Worth police officer was refused service at Wendy’s. Last year, a McDonald’s employee was fired for refusing service to a Brenham police officer.

©2017 the Fort Worth Star-Telegram


Gun rights advocates arrested after carrying rifle into Mich. police HQ

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

By John Wisely Detroit Free Press

DEARBORN, Mich. — Dearborn police arrested two gun rights advocates who walked into police headquarters Sunday afternoon wearing body armor and one of them carrying a rifle slung across his chest while wearing a black ski mask.

James Baker, 25, of Leonard carried a short-barrel rifle in a sling across his chest and a Glock handgun holstered on his hip. Brandon Vreeland, 40, of Jackson was unarmed but both men also had several cameras with them, including cell phones to livestream their interaction with police.

"We audit police to see how well they honor the Constitution and people's rights," said Vreeland, who was free after posting $1,500 bond late Sunday night. "We showcase police abuse and abuse of police power in the totalitarian police state that we live in."

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Baker couldn't be reached for comment today. Vreeland said both men are legal gun owners and Michigan law allows them to carry their weapons openly. They went to the police station to complain about officers stopping them earlier in the day.

Dearborn police said this morning that they were working on a statement about the incident but wouldn't comment before the statement is released.

Vreeland said he left his own rifle in his car.

"No laws were broken," he said. "If we had to defend ourselves in a gun battle, I'd rather be armed."

The video, which was live-streamed on the internet, shows a tense stand-off between officers and the two men inside the lobby of the Dearborn police headquarters on Michigan Avenue. It begins with the two men in the parking lot of the police department. Baker is wearing a ski mask that covers his mouth.

"We're going to file a complaint because we were illegally pulled over," Baker says on the video. "We felt a little afraid we were pulled over so we figured we better protect ourselves."

Vreeland told the Free Press that he and Baker planned to audit Dearborn police to guage how well they respect the rights of gun owners to openly carry weapons. They stopped in a store parking lot near police headquarters to put on their body armor.

"Someone saw us putting on the body armor and called the police," Vreeland said. "Because of the reaction we saw yesterday, we always wear body armor."

In the video, police can be seen with their guns drawn as they order Baker to place his weapon on the ground. He initially refuses and argues with officers before the video goes dark. Audio recording continued after the video goes blank and the confrontation ends without gunshots.

Vreeland said he and Baker were arrested by multiple police officers and later held for about eight hours in the police department lockup.

The lobby confrontation followed an earlier encounter on the street, which was recorded in a separate video. Dearborn police stopped the men in their car and asked to search it after the reports of them suiting up in body armor.

In that the pair refuse permission to search and Vreeland is heard saying "go **ck youself" as he pulls away from the officer.

Baker is charged with breaching the peace, failure to cooperate with police and masking his identity by obscuring his face when he walked into the station. He has not been arraigned on the charges, which are misdemeanors.

Vreeland is charged with breaching the peace, obstructing police and failure to cooperate. Both men are free on $1,500 bond while they await arraignment on the charges.

Vreeland said police confiscated his car and its contents, including his rifle. Police also confiscated his cameras and phone.

Copyright 2017 The Detroit Free Press


3 ways to maximize your fleet budget

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Heather R. Cotter, PoliceOne Senior Editor

The following is paid content sponsored by Derive Systems.

By Barry A. Reynolds for PoliceOne BrandFocus

As law enforcement agencies continue to do more with less, agency heads and budget directors are looking for new ways to stretch their budgets. This new financial way of life requires creativity in order to maintain service levels.

After personnel costs, vehicle and vehicle maintenance costs are likely the second-highest expenses in any annual budget request. These costs generally fall within either the capital budget or the annual operating budget. Capital budget items are usually more expensive items that have an expected lifespan exceeding the fiscal year, while operating budget items are those that will be expended before the end of the year.

No matter how expenses are categorized, most finance committees and decision-makers have one primary concern: How much are we spending, and when are we spending it?

Here are three tips on how to make the most of your vehicle purchasing and equipment budget, including how to find some cost savings where you might not otherwise look:

1. Plan ahead

Plan your vehicle purchasing requests three to five years in advance. Generally this will coincide with your expected increases (or decreases) in personnel. You should also consider changes in outside funding, potential mandates on new services and anticipated growth of your service area.

Once you have this plan finalized, share it with your finance director and/or budget committee and give them a look into the future of your budget requests. Setting the stage ahead of time helps to defray the argument that you can just get by on what you had last year, and a requested increase in funds for vehicle purchasing is much easier to swallow when it was forecasted and anticipated years in advance.

2. Be ready to bargain

For many jurisdictions, the requested funds to be spent on increases in vehicles or equipment often are pooled together during the budgeting process into what are called decision items. These are usually a compilation of requested expenditures from each of the different departments funded by the overall budget. Decision-makers then designate the maximum amount that can be spent in total on these items, as well as the specific items from each department that should get priority.

This is often where a good bargainer can make some deals. For example, to get those three extra squad cars this year, you could offer to transfer three older cars to the municipality’s general vehicle pool instead of selling them at auction. The loss of revenue from sale of those three vehicles likely would not be significant and could be offset by savings in other areas.

3. Look for small investments that result in cost savings

We often tend to think of fleet costs as fixed, as though we can’t really do much to impact the cost of vehicle purchases and operations. While that might be true on the purchasing side, it is definitely not true on the operational side.

Consider fuel consumption, for example. Police vehicles spend a lot of time idling. Derive Efficiency offers a product specifically for law enforcement that reduces idle RPM by 10, 20 or 30 percent by making precise changes to engine calibration settings. These changes maximize fuel efficiency to reduce total fuel consumption and costs by 6 to 12 percent.

These improvements have been independently tested and verified, and the company guarantees at least 6 percent in savings. This frees up money for other needs in the budget. (You can estimate your potential fleet savings with Derive’s online calculator.)

In a 90-day trial of the Derive Efficiency solution, the Port St. Lucie (Florida) Police Department found a 12 percent reduction in idle fuel consumption and an 11 percent decrease in overall fuel expenses. Department administrators were so pleased with the results that they made plans to install the Derive software in the entire fleet and expect it to pay for itself in fuel savings in less than a year.

To make the most of available funds, fleet managers need to look for resourceful ways to stretch their budgets. Planning ahead to anticipate future needs is one key strategy, and it’s important to negotiate deals and find opportunities for operational cost savings.

By employing a combination of these three strategies you could enhance your chances of acquiring funding for those badly needed squad cars, even in tough budget times. The key is to plan ahead, and be proactive by looking for new and innovative ways to offset fleet costs.

About the author

Barry Reynolds has over 35 years of experience in the police profession, including 31 years in municipal law enforcement. He is a leadership author and instructor, and owner of Police Leadership Resources LLC, which provides leadership training and consulting to law enforcement agencies. Barry previously served as a senior training officer and the coordinator for career development programs for the Wisconsin Department of Justice, Training and Standards Bureau. Barry holds a master of science degree in management and is a certified leadership instructor.


Pittsburgh man wearing lingerie drives drunk, fights cops

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh police have charged a man with drunken driving and fighting with officers who allegedly found him semi-conscious behind the wheel of a car while wearing pink lingerie.

Police say 51-year-Daniel Marchese was also exposing himself when they arrived to find him in the running car, going in and out of consciousness in the middle of an intersection Monday afternoon.

Police say they found an open bottle of whiskey and two guns in the car, and that Marchese kicked at officers and threatened them.

Online court records show Marchese was still in custody awaiting arraignment Tuesday on charges including drunken driving, indecent exposure, aggravated assault and weapons offenses. The records don't list a defense attorney.


Court weighs halting release of videos of fatal Calif. police shootings

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Brian Melley Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. — A federal appeals court considered Monday whether to automatically halt lower court orders publicly releasing video of fatal shootings by police to prevent potential violence.

Judges on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel acknowledged that the case involving a 2013 shooting of an unarmed man by police in the Los Angeles suburb of Gardena was largely moot because the video was released and widely published.

But in considering whether U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson abused his discretion by denying Gardena a stay of execution and releasing videos sought by The Associated Press and other news organizations, the court questioned if future video releases should be put on hold to offer a chance of appeal.

Judge Andrew Kleinfeld said stays are automatically granted in other types of cases. He repeatedly questioned a news media lawyer about why it was in the public interest to release videos that might incite violence and rioting.

Attorney Kelli Sager said the law favored public disclosure of the video that was evidence in a lawsuit Gardena settled for nearly $5 million. Sager said the city failed to properly seek a stay of execution in 2015 and had presented a weak case for permanently sealing the video.

"They simply said it's a police video and it might lead to riots even though the shooting was two years earlier," Sager said. "In fact, the record shows that didn't happen."

The videos were sought by AP, the Los Angeles Times and Bloomberg at a time when intense public scrutiny was starting to focus on police shootings nationwide. The news media argued the videos should be unsealed under a First Amendment right to access court documents.

Wilson ordered the footage released after saying it was important for the public to see whether the shooting was justified and so taxpayers could understand why Gardena paid $4.7 million to settle the case with the family of Ricardo Diaz-Zeferino, who was killed, and a friend who was wounded.

Wilson rejected a stay of execution and the videos were public before the city could get a temporary stay from a 9th Circuit judge.

Attorney Scott Davenport said the city of Gardena realized it had lost, but said the issue was "bigger than this case" and was pursuing the appeal for other law enforcement agencies to avoid a repeat occurrence.

The three judges, however, cast doubts on parts of the appeal, saying the city had not met criteria for a stay from the trial court. They questioned the assertion that the same situation would play itself out again, which they said was an overly broad interpretation of the law.

Diaz-Zeferino was killed June 2, 2013, by police searching for a bike thief. In a tragic twist, Diaz-Zeferino was searching for the same bike — stolen from his brother — when he and two friends were stopped by police.

The theft had erroneously been relayed by dispatchers as a robbery, raising the possibility suspects could be armed.

Footage showed Diaz-Zeferino, who was drunk and had methamphetamine in his system, failing to follow police orders to keep his hands up. The video shot from two cruisers showed him lower his hands three times despite an officer yelling, "Get your hands up."

One camera showed he had his palms open and facing upward in front of him as he removed his ball cap and lowered his hands a final time. Footage shot from the side showed his right hand briefly disappear from view at his waist as shots were fired and he crumpled to the pavement.

The officers said they feared he was reaching for a weapon, though they later found he was not armed. Prosecutors said the shooting was justified and declined to bring charges.


Court weighs halting release of videos of fatal police shootings

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Brian Melley Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. — A federal appeals court considered Monday whether to automatically halt lower court orders publicly releasing video of fatal shootings by police to prevent potential violence.

Judges on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel acknowledged that the case involving a 2013 shooting of an unarmed man by police in the Los Angeles suburb of Gardena was largely moot because the video was released and widely published.

But in considering whether U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson abused his discretion by denying Gardena a stay of execution and releasing videos sought by The Associated Press and other news organizations, the court questioned if future video releases should be put on hold to offer a chance of appeal.

Judge Andrew Kleinfeld said stays are automatically granted in other types of cases. He repeatedly questioned a news media lawyer about why it was in the public interest to release videos that might incite violence and rioting.

Attorney Kelli Sager said the law favored public disclosure of the video that was evidence in a lawsuit Gardena settled for nearly $5 million. Sager said the city failed to properly seek a stay of execution in 2015 and had presented a weak case for permanently sealing the video.

"They simply said it's a police video and it might lead to riots even though the shooting was two years earlier," Sager said. "In fact, the record shows that didn't happen."

The videos were sought by AP, the Los Angeles Times and Bloomberg at a time when intense public scrutiny was starting to focus on police shootings nationwide. The news media argued the videos should be unsealed under a First Amendment right to access court documents.

Wilson ordered the footage released after saying it was important for the public to see whether the shooting was justified and so taxpayers could understand why Gardena paid $4.7 million to settle the case with the family of Ricardo Diaz-Zeferino, who was killed, and a friend who was wounded.

Wilson rejected a stay of execution and the videos were public before the city could get a temporary stay from a 9th Circuit judge.

Attorney Scott Davenport said the city of Gardena realized it had lost, but said the issue was "bigger than this case" and was pursuing the appeal for other law enforcement agencies to avoid a repeat occurrence.

The three judges, however, cast doubts on parts of the appeal, saying the city had not met criteria for a stay from the trial court. They questioned the assertion that the same situation would play itself out again, which they said was an overly broad interpretation of the law.

Diaz-Zeferino was killed June 2, 2013, by police searching for a bike thief. In a tragic twist, Diaz-Zeferino was searching for the same bike — stolen from his brother — when he and two friends were stopped by police.

The theft had erroneously been relayed by dispatchers as a robbery, raising the possibility suspects could be armed.

Footage showed Diaz-Zeferino, who was drunk and had methamphetamine in his system, failing to follow police orders to keep his hands up. The video shot from two cruisers showed him lower his hands three times despite an officer yelling, "Get your hands up."

One camera showed he had his palms open and facing upward in front of him as he removed his ball cap and lowered his hands a final time. Footage shot from the side showed his right hand briefly disappear from view at his waist as shots were fired and he crumpled to the pavement.

The officers said they feared he was reaching for a weapon, though they later found he was not armed. Prosecutors said the shooting was justified and declined to bring charges.


NC officer wounded after being hit by fleeing car

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

SPRING LAKE, N.C. — A motorist has been shot and wounded by a North Carolina police officer after he was hit during a traffic stop.

Spring Lake Police Chief Charles Kimble says the shooting happened about 8:40 p.m. Monday. Kimble said after the vehicle was stopped, the driver pulled away, striking the officer, who fired into the vehicle.

Kimble says the officer and driver were taken to Cape Fear Valley Medical Center in Fayetteville for treatment. There was no word on their injuries. Their names have not been released.

Kimble didn't respond to an email Tuesday morning. A dispatcher said the police office was closed until 8 a.m.

Spring Lake is about 10 miles northwest of Fayetteville.

The Cumberland County Sheriff's Office and the State Bureau of Investigation are assisting in the investigation.


US aggressively pursued police reform under Obama, but Trump’s intentions are unknown

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Jaweed Kaleem Los Angeles Times

CHICAGO — After the U.S. Justice Department recently issued a scathing report saying police in Chicago routinely violated the Constitution by using excessive force, many activists expected reforms — and federal oversight —to follow.

The findings on Chicago officers set the stage for the city to negotiate a court-enforced agreement with the federal government, called a consent decree, to change how it polices, with federal oversight. Police reform advocates applauded a similar agreement Justice officials recently announced with Baltimore after the department found that city’s officers discriminated against blacks.

Some police say the government has been heavy-handed, and that its agreements with cities have cost too much and taken too long to implement. Some activists say the agreements, which often require extra training in use of force and better tracking of personnel issues, don’t go far enough.

But over the nearly 20 years the Justice Department has gone to court to force changes in police agencies in more than two dozen cities, the results have largely been positive, according to data and criminologists.

“Having been in policing for 34 years, consent decrees certainly do work,” said Ronal Serpas, a criminal justice professor at Loyola University New Orleans who was the city’s police chief in 2012 when it agreed to reforms. “These agreements give you a road map, though it doesn’t mean things change with the snap of a finger.”

In Baltimore, a pending agreement with the Justice Department that awaits court approval was announced as tension continues over the death of Freddie Gray, a black man who died from a spinal cord injury after his arrest in 2015. Among other things, the agreement would require a community oversight task force for police in addition to officer training in de-escalation and implicit bias.

But while the Justice Department rushed to release its Chicago report and make its Baltimore announcement in the waning days of Barack Obama’s presidency in hopes of ensuring reforms, experts say the road ahead is unclear in the Trump administration.

“There can be backsliding,” said Samuel Walker, a former University of Omaha criminal justice professor who specializes in police accountability. “One thing it often depends on is who is leading police and how much they invest in change.”

On the national level, that’s the attorney general, the top law enforcement official.

Under Obama, the Justice Department entered into agreements with 12 police departments, four times as many as under President George W. Bush.

Trump’s pick for attorney general, Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama, said during his confirmation hearing that current decrees with police departments would “remain in force until and if they are changed,” adding that they were not “necessarily a bad thing.”

But Sessions also said there’s “concern that good police officers and good departments” get punished because of a few bad ones.

In 2008, he had stronger words. Consent decrees are “dangerous,” he wrote, calling them “exercises of raw power” that “constitute an end run around the democratic process.”

Serpas, who left New Orleans police in 2014, said that he understood concerns but that “if policing improves in the end, it’s certainly worth it.”

In its investigation of Serpas’ officers, the Justice Department said they had a pattern of racial profiling, excessive force and unconstitutional stops and arrests. In a September report, an outside monitor described a “remarkable turnaround” in how police worked with sexual assault victims and praised the use of body camera. The monitor also said police still had to do more to improve community relations.

Experts say it’s too early to assess the results of consent decrees signed in recent years for cities such as Cleveland, or Ferguson, Mo., where the police shooting of Michael Brown fueled the Black Lives Matter movement.

An independent lawyer hired to monitor Ferguson’s progress said last month that the city had missed recent deadlines to set up new policies in basic policing issues but was still acting in “good faith” toward improvements, such as implementing a new policy on use of force and a city ordinance to create a civilian review board to look at police misconduct complaints.

While many consent decrees are set up for five years — with the costs of outside monitoring paid by the cities — they can be extended to last much longer if officers don’t improve. In Oakland, Calif., police have worked for 13 years under monitoring stemming from findings of racial profiling and police brutality.

Congress gave the federal government the power to police local law enforcement departments in 1994, after the 1991 beating of Rodney King in Los Angeles. The law lets the government sue local police if they don’t comply with reforms.

It was 1997 before Pittsburgh became the first city to enter a consent decree after the American Civil Liberties Union sued over police abuses. The results there have been mixed. Use of force has gone up and down over the years, and a series of high-profile incidents, including a 2012 shooting of an unarmed black man that left him paralyzed, have tarnished the department’s image.

Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, pointed to an agreement with Los Angeles as a model.

The city was under monitoring for 12 years after investigations by the Justice Department over civil rights violations, including routine false arrests and excessive force. The agreement, which ended in 2013, pushed for better training of officers and tracking of misconduct, among other requirements.

In a 2009 review, Harvard criminal justice professors found the “quality of enforcement activity” among police had improved, with stops more frequently leading to arrests, and arrests more frequently leading to charges. Public approval had also gone up, with residents saying they were less fearful of crime and more trusting of police. Still, black and Latino residents were more likely than whites to say they were unsatisfied, and protests over police tactics and shootings have persisted.

“The process with these can move much more slowly than the public demand,” Wexler said. “But often they achieve real results.”

———

©2017 Los Angeles Times


Judge weighs trial for suspect in 1972 shooting of Ohio officer

Posted on February 7, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Andrew Welsh-Huggins Associated Press COLUMBUS, Ohio — A judge plans to hear arguments for and against bringing an 82-year-old suspect to trial in the nonfatal shooting of an Ohio police officer almost 45 years ago.

Defendant Charles Hays was indicted but never prosecuted following the shooting as the case fell through the cracks.

Columbus police officer Niki Cooper was hit in the left arm in March 1972 when he and his partner interrupted a burglary. Cooper never regained full use of the injured limb. He died just over three years ago at age 71.

Franklin County Judge Guy Reece scheduled a Tuesday hearing.

Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien acknowledges in court papers the state neglected the case. But he says Hays was aware of the charges even as he continued to commit crimes in Kentucky and Connecticut, where he served time in prison.

Hays was shot twice by Cooper during a struggle and left a paraplegic, according to court records. He is in poor health and unavailable for an interview, said his attorney, Robert Essex.

Essex argues the state missed opportunities to try Hays over the years, violating his constitutional right to a speedy trial.

Hays has a current Ohio driver's license that he's renewed twice and has lived at the same address in Dayton for 10 years, Essex noted.

Two accomplices were charged and pleaded guilty. Both sides agree Hays was properly indicted on counts of intentional shooting, burglary and larceny. What happened afterward is in dispute.

Hays was hospitalized for his injuries, first in Columbus, then at a veterans hospital in Cleveland.

Afterward, he went to Kentucky and ended up in jail where Ohio authorities were notified of his presence and told an ambulance would be needed to collect him.

Hays never demanded a speedy trial, and in the early years after his indictment highlighted his medical condition as a reason he shouldn't be returned to the state, prosecutors argue.


Cop killer released from Ind. prison

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

GARY, Ind. — After 35 years behind bars, a convicted cop killer is out of prison.

In 1981, Zolo Azania, formally known as Rufus Averhart, and two other men were robbing a bank when police responded to the scene, CBS Chicago reported.

As Lt. George Yaros, 57, approached the men, the suspects opened fire on the officer. Witnesses said Azania shot Yaros in the chest as he laid wounded on the ground.

Azania was convicted and sentenced to death in 1981, but his death penalty was overturned twice by the Indiana Supreme Court. He was then sentenced to 74 years in prison.

He admitted he was an accomplice, but claimed he did not shoot Yaros.

The killing wasn’t the first on Azania’s record. He pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter for the killing of another man during a botched robbery in 1972, according to the news station.

Before the third death penalty trial in the Yaros killing, the officer’s family agreed to drop the capital punishment request if Azania accepted a 74-year sentence, ABC 7 reported.

Officials said he was released Monday from prison for good behavior. But Yaros’ son Tim told ABC 7 he doesn’t believe Azania has changed.

"I just don't think justice was served,” Tim said. “All the times we went to Indianapolis for Supreme Court hearings, he would come out in the shackles, but he would never look me in the eye, not one time. He would never look at anyone in our family.”

Azania, now 61, claims his innocence to this day.

“Now he’s getting a third chance,”Tim said. “I don’t think he deserves any chance whatsoever.”


Suspect charged with homicide in Tenn. officer’s death

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A Tennessee woman will face criminal charges in the death of a Metro Nashville police officer who slipped into a bitterly cold river while trying to save her, police said Friday.

Police spokesman Don Aaron told news media outlets that 40-year-old Juli Glisson will be charged with aggravated vehicular homicide once she is discharged from the hospital. An arrest warrant was issued Friday.

Aaron says an investigation found that Glisson put the car into gear as 44-year-old Eric Mumaw and another officer were trying to get her out of it and away from the water's edge. Aaron said the officers were responding to a call that said Glisson was threatening to kill herself. Police say she was legally drunk.

Glisson and Mumaw went into the Cumberland River with the car. Glisson swam to the shore and was taken to the hospital, where she was listed in stable condition. Mumaw's body was pulled from the water hours later.

Mumaw, an 18-year veteran of the department who had been recognized multiple times for going above and beyond the call of duty to help others, apparently drowned.

Police said Glisson is on probation for an April 2016 DUI conviction. Court records show she has served jail time on prior charges including DUI, vandalism and leaving the scene of an accident.


Suicidal woman charged in death of cop who tried to rescue her

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A Tennessee woman will face criminal charges in the death of a Metro Nashville police officer who slipped into a bitterly cold river while trying to save her, police said Friday.

Police spokesman Don Aaron told news media outlets that 40-year-old Juli Glisson will be charged with aggravated vehicular homicide once she is discharged from the hospital. An arrest warrant was issued Friday.

Aaron says an investigation found that Glisson put the car into gear as 44-year-old Eric Mumaw and another officer were trying to get her out of it and away from the water's edge. Aaron said the officers were responding to a call that said Glisson was threatening to kill herself. Police say she was legally drunk.

Glisson and Mumaw went into the Cumberland River with the car. Glisson swam to the shore and was taken to the hospital, where she was listed in stable condition. Mumaw's body was pulled from the water hours later.

Mumaw, an 18-year veteran of the department who had been recognized multiple times for going above and beyond the call of duty to help others, apparently drowned.

Police said Glisson is on probation for an April 2016 DUI conviction. Court records show she has served jail time on prior charges including DUI, vandalism and leaving the scene of an accident.


Instagram video leads Fla. police to pursuit suspect

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

By David J. Neal Miami Herald

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Brooklyn-living, ATV-riding Wilfredo Garcia got away from Hollywood police officers’ hot pursuit back on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Then, Garcia indulged in the vogue social-media-or-it’s-not-real philosophy.

Which is how Garcia wound up in New York City’s Rikers Island jail for a week before being extradited to Broward County on Thursday.

Reckless driving and fleeing and eluding law enforcement charges await Garcia, whom Hollywood police tracked down through his social media posts, particularly a video selfie of Garcia racing from police.

Garcia’s Facebook page screams of his ATV affection. His last two posts: WPLG-Channel 10 overhead videos of the MLK Day “Bikes Up, Guns Down” motorcycle and ATV ride.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

The ride, also called “Wheels Up, Guns Down,” protests gun violence — although some critics, including many in law enforcement, believe swarms of stunt-trying, red-light running riders wind up promoting a different perilous behavior throughout the weekend. The public warnings of both Miami-Dade police and the Broward Sheriff’s Office were still echoing when an ATV rider crashed fatally on Jan. 15.

The next day around 5:20 p.m., according to Hollywood police’s arrest warrant, Garcia rolled up U.S. 441 at 50 mph in a 35 mph zone on his ATV. Around the 300 block, he made a U-turn through construction barriers into southbound traffic, which braked to avoid running him over.

That set Hollywood police after Garcia. Another U-turn and the chase buzzed south on U.S. 441. Garcia took a video of himself alternating cackles into the camera with dismissive glances over his shoulder at police SUVs. Eventually, Garcia mockingly shouted into the camera, “Get ’em! Get ’em!”

Police dropped off to apprehend another rider. Garcia got away.

Until, that is, Garcia posted the video to his Instagram page, @banshee_will, with the hashtag #bikesupgunsdown. Soon after, Hollywood Sgt. Justin Schweighardt found himself watching his pursuit of Garcia with a view that looked back at the front of his police Chevy Tahoe.

Several other posts depicting the chase, the arrest affidavit says, gave up information that clearly identified Garcia as the ATV driver who didn’t stop for the Hollywood cops. New York police picked up Garcia for Hollywood on Jan. 25.

David J. Neal: 305-376-3559, @DavidJNeal

———

©2017 Miami Herald

Visit Miami Herald at www.miamiherald.com


Probe: Cop/paramedic confrontation a result of miscommunication

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — After a confrontation between a police officer and a paramedic went viral last week, officials concluded that neither responder committed any wrongdoing.

An investigation conducted by police and EMS officials said that Portsmouth Police Sgt. Joel Robinson and a paramedic’s reactions at the scene of a bar fight were based off information they had at the time. Following the incident, a video surfaced, capturing only a part of the incident, which depicted Sgt. Robinson holding a paramedic by the neck, reported the Portsmouth Daily Times.

“Oftentimes we look at video in a vacuum,” Portsmouth Police Chief Robert Ware said. “We take what we see in one angle and we form an opinion based on that angle. Sometimes, subconsciously, we add our own filler to figure out what happened.”

During the incident, a patient had become combative and prompted Sgt. Robinson to tase him. It was later confirmed that Life Medical Response Capt. John Jenkins requested the TASER be used after he was kicked several times by the patient.

“I requested this officer, I worked hand-in-hand for many years with this officer, and I trusted everyone from the police department and Shawnee State University and the fire department,” Capt. Jenkins said.

Capt. Jenkins said the paramedic didn’t hear his request for officer assistance due to the noise from bystanders. The paramedic then interfered with Sgt. Robinson and put his hands on him. Sgt. Robinson, aware of the watching crowd, did not know who touched him and responded by hooking his arm and pushing the paramedic back.

The video that surfaced online captures only Sgt. Robinson guiding the paramedic across the street and pushing his clavicle.

“I don’t think he [the paramedic] meant any ill harm to the police officer by any means,” Capt. Jenkins said. “He was trying to do what he felt at the time was right for his patient and I have to give him kudos for that. That’s our job. We take care of the patient.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Probe: Cop/paramedic confrontation a result of miscommunication

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — After a confrontation between a police officer and a paramedic went viral last week, officials concluded that neither responder committed any wrongdoing.

An investigation conducted by police and EMS officials said that Portsmouth Police Sgt. Joel Robinson and a paramedic’s reactions at the scene of a bar fight were based off information they had at the time. Following the incident, a video surfaced, capturing only a part of the incident, which depicted Sgt. Robinson holding a paramedic by the neck, reported the Portsmouth Daily Times.

“Oftentimes we look at video in a vacuum,” Portsmouth Police Chief Robert Ware said. “We take what we see in one angle and we form an opinion based on that angle. Sometimes, subconsciously, we add our own filler to figure out what happened.”

During the incident, a patient had become combative and prompted Sgt. Robinson to tase him. It was later confirmed that Life Medical Response Capt. John Jenkins requested the TASER be used after he was kicked several times by the patient.

“I requested this officer, I worked hand-in-hand for many years with this officer, and I trusted everyone from the police department and Shawnee State University and the fire department,” Capt. Jenkins said.

Capt. Jenkins said the paramedic didn’t hear his request for officer assistance due to the noise from bystanders. The paramedic then interfered with Sgt. Robinson and put his hands on him. Sgt. Robinson, aware of the watching crowd, did not know who touched him and responded by hooking his arm and pushing the paramedic back.

The video that surfaced online captures only Sgt. Robinson guiding the paramedic across the street and pushing his clavicle.

“I don’t think he [the paramedic] meant any ill harm to the police officer by any means,” Capt. Jenkins said. “He was trying to do what he felt at the time was right for his patient and I have to give him kudos for that. That’s our job. We take care of the patient.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Probe: Cop, paramedic confrontation result of miscommunication

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — After a confrontation between a police officer and a paramedic went viral last week, officials concluded that neither responder committed any wrongdoing.

An investigation conducted by police and EMS officials said that Portsmouth Police Sgt. Joel Robinson and a paramedic’s reactions at the scene of a bar fight were based off information they had at the time. Following the incident, a video surfaced, capturing only a part of the incident, which depicted Sgt. Robinson holding a paramedic by the neck, reported the Portsmouth Daily Times.

“Oftentimes we look at video in a vacuum,” Portsmouth Police Chief Robert Ware said. “We take what we see in one angle and we form an opinion based on that angle. Sometimes, subconsciously, we add our own filler to figure out what happened.”

During the incident, a patient had become combative and prompted Sgt. Robinson to tase him. It was later confirmed that Life Medical Response Capt. John Jenkins requested the TASER be used after he was kicked several times by the patient.

“I requested this officer, I worked hand-in-hand for many years with this officer, and I trusted everyone from the police department and Shawnee State University and the fire department,” Capt. Jenkins said.

Capt. Jenkins said the paramedic didn’t hear his request for officer assistance due to the noise from bystanders. The paramedic then interfered with Sgt. Robinson and put his hands on him. Sgt. Robinson, aware of the watching crowd, did not know who touched him and responded by hooking his arm and pushing the paramedic back.

The video that surfaced online captures only Sgt. Robinson guiding the paramedic across the street and pushing his clavicle.

“I don’t think he [the paramedic] meant any ill harm to the police officer by any means,” Capt. Jenkins said. “He was trying to do what he felt at the time was right for his patient and I have to give him kudos for that. That’s our job. We take care of the patient.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Former NFL player takes his skills from the field to police work

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

MINNEAPOLIS — A former NFL player who became a cop says football helps him connect with citizens in the community.

Sgt. Deitan Dubuc told KARE news there are a lot of similarities between tackling opposing players and criminals on the streets.

"Being outside, being physically active and having the chance to chase somebody or make an arrest or help somebody," Dubac said.

According to the news station, before Sgt. Deitan Dubuc played in the CFL and with the Carolina Panthers, he played college ball with New England Patriots Quarterback Tom Brady.

“He knew what he could do and he never let anyone stop him from doing what he wanted to do and look where he is today,” Dubuc said.

The Patriots beat the Atlanta Falcons 34-28 in overtime Sunday night in Houston, securing Brady’s fifth Super Bowl title, the Associated Press reported.


Former NFL player takes his skills from the field to police work

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

MINNEAPOLIS — A former NFL player who became a cop says football helps him connect with citizens in the community.

Sgt. Deitan Dubuc told KARE news there are a lot of similarities between tackling opposing players and criminals on the streets.

"Being outside, being physically active and having the chance to chase somebody or make an arrest or help somebody," Dubac said.

According to the news station, before Sgt. Deitan Dubuc played in the CFL and with the Carolina Panthers, he played college ball with New England Patriots Quarterback Tom Brady.

“He knew what he could do and he never let anyone stop him from doing what he wanted to do and look where he is today,” Dubuc said.

The Patriots beat the Atlanta Falcons 34-28 in overtime Sunday night in Houston, securing Brady’s fifth Super Bowl title, the Associated Press reported.


Calif. city wants judge rebuked for releasing video of police shooting

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. — A California police chief who didn't want the public to see video of his officers killing an unarmed man that led to a nearly $5 million settlement wants the judge who released the video admonished.

Lawyers for the Gardena chief are scheduled to argue before an appeals court Monday that a Los Angeles federal court judge abused his authority by releasing the footage before they could get a higher court to intervene.

A ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will not have a practical impact on video of the fatal shooting of Ricardo Diaz-Zeferino because the footage has been public for more than a year and a half.

Judge Stephen V. Wilson ordered the video released it in 2015 after saying it was important for the public to see whether the shooting was justified and so taxpayers could understand why the LA suburb paid $4.7 million to settle a lawsuit with Diaz-Zeferino's family and a friend who was injured.

The videos were sought by lawyers for The Associated Press and other news media organizations at a time when intense public scrutiny was beginning to be focused on police shootings nationwide. The news media argued the videos should be unsealed under a First Amendment right to access court documents.

The city wants the court to deem that in future cases a stay should be granted automatically to allow an appeal.

But attorneys for AP, the Los Angeles Times and Bloomberg argued in court papers that the city didn't deserve a stay because it had little chance of winning an appeal on the merits of the case and didn't properly request a stay of execution. They also said the appeal is pointless because the video was widely published.

Diaz-Zeferino had been searching for his brother's stolen bicycle early the morning of June 2, 2013, when he and two other friends were stopped by officers. The theft had erroneously been relayed by dispatchers as a robbery, raising the possibility suspects could be armed.

The footage showed Diaz-Zeferino, who was drunk and had methamphetamine in his system, failing to follow police orders to keep his hands up. The video shot from two cruisers showed him lower his hands three times despite an officer yelling, "Get your hands up."

One camera showed he had his palms open and facing upward in front of him as he removed his ball cap and lowered his hands a final time. Footage shot from the side showed his right hand briefly disappear from view at his waist as shots were fired and he crumpled to the pavement.

The officers said they feared he was reaching for a weapon. Prosecutors said the shooting was justified and declined to bring charges.


Fallen NYPD deputy chief remembered as leader at funeral

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By William Murphy Newsday

NEW YORK — An NYPD deputy chief from West Islip who died of a Sept. 11-related illness this week was remembered Friday as a man who led by example and ultimately sacrificed his life because of his dedication to the job.

James Gerard Molloy was a deputy inspector at the time of the terror attacks at the World Trade Center and helped lead the rescue and recovery effort, NYPD Police Commissioner James P. O’Neill said in his eulogy at Molloy’s funeral in Bay Shore.

“In the days, weeks and months that followed the attacks, Jim worked with hundreds of other cops and volunteers to clear the burning pile, sifting through mountains of debris in the search for evidence and remains,” O’Neill said. “And with every breath, he was giving his life for the people of this great city. But that was his calling, because he was a New York City cop. And he was a great one.”

Molloy, 55, died Monday, his family said. He had brain cancer, according to multiple reports.

At Molloy’s funeral at St. Patrick Roman Catholic Church, O’Neill said the department has lost 132 members “due to illnesses related to that terrorist act.”

In his 35-year career Molloy worked dozens of commands and was commanding officer of five of them. He “truly found a home” in the elite Emergency Service Unit, which suffered more losses on 9/11 than any other unit, the commissioner said.

“He loved his cops,” O’Neill said. “And he loved this department. He made it his life’s work protecting everyone who lived, worked and visited this city. And we’re all better off because of that devotion.”

The coffin carrying Molloy was escorted from the church by six uniformed NYPD officers. Burial followed at Northport Rural Cemetery in Northport.

He is survived by his wife, Mary, and daughters, Alexa and Christina.

O’Neill said that the department’s “sworn pledge” to Molloy and his family is “that all of us will do our best to live up to his immense legacy.”

Copyright 2017 Newsday


SC deputy attacked while responding to burglary, 2 arrested

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

By Teddy Kulmala The State

RICHLAND COUNTY, S.C. — A Richland County sheriff’s deputy was hospitalized after being attacked when he confronted two suspects during a burglary Friday.

The two suspects, Jose Perez, 17, and a 15-year-old juvenile, were charged in connection with the break-in and assault.

The deputy, Christopher Soward, was responding around 11:30 a.m. to a burglary in progress on the 8500 block of Old Percival Road near Interstates 20 and 77, according to Lt. Curtis Wilson, a sheriff’s spokesman.

Soward was attacked and knocked out by Perez, said sheriff Leon Lott Friday night. The deputy sustained an injury to his head and remains in serious but stable condition at Palmetto Health Richland Hospital, Lott said.

Perez was charged with assault and battery, unlawful entry into a dwelling, breaking and entering a motor vehicle, and malicious injury to personal property. He was being held at the Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center.

The juvenile was charged with breaking and entering into a motor vehicle and unlawful entry into a dwelling. He was released to the custody of his parents, Lott said.


Wis. police receive criminal justice reform grant

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

By Lawrence Andrea The Daily Cardinal

DANE COUNTY, Wis. — Dane County has been selected as one of 20 sites in the nation to be awarded a grant—along with technical and advisory assistance—to help reform the criminal justice system, county officials announced Wednesday.

Providing $50,000 to the county, the grant will support local and surrounding communities on improving law enforcement systems.

It will go toward expanding throughout Dane County a Community Restorative Court program started on the south side of Madison in 2015. The program aides young adults, ages 17 to 25, in dealing with issues such as accountability and restitution.

Full story: Dane County among 20 sites nationwide to receive criminal justice reform grant


How brain science can improve your tactical training

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

The following is paid content sponsored by Innovative Services and Solutions.

By PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

Limited resources are a significant challenge for law enforcement, especially when it comes to training. How can police agencies improve the results of training programs without added funding, equipment or time?

Restructuring training programs to deliver information the same way the human brain learns will bring about better retention and better outcomes, says Dustin Salomon, owner of Innovative Services and Solutions, a certified law enforcement firearms instructor and author of “Building Shooters,” a book that describes how to approach firearms and other tactical training using brain science principles.

By using this method, Salomon says, agencies can improve results without adding to the overall training time and resources – and may even facilitate a long-term reduction in training budgets.

“Improving training effectiveness by applying brain science research literally allows us do more with less,” he said. “When you teach somebody in the same way that their brain learns, you maximize the efficiency of both training time and resource use.”

Redefine the objective

Most tactical training is based on an outcome defined by a qualification, such as successful completion of an exercise or meeting a performance standard. These standards are important for liability and administrative purposes and a useful tool to provide feedback and quality control, but they should not be the primary objective, says Salomon.

“Trainers, officers and agencies will always need a quantifiable, documented standard of qualification to use as an administrative tool and to help instructors provide feedback,” he said. “However, they are not a true indicator of skill retention or necessarily predictive of operational performance.”

In “Building Shooters,” Salomon argues that the primary objective of training should be creating long-term memories that will enable officers to act quickly and appropriately in the field despite unknown variables and the psychological effects of stress. This means training should focus on neural network development – allowing the brain to transfer new skills and information necessary for operational performance from short-term memory into the desired long-term memory system.

5 strategies to restructure training systems

Much of the training time dedicated to developing tactical skill sets is unproductive, says Salomon, because existing programs largely ignore the limitations of the brain and the biological processes required to assure long-term storage. He recommends the following five strategies, based on how the human brain learns, to improve retention and performance:

1. Prioritize effective learning over efficient delivery. Consider how students absorb information and design your training program accordingly so they effectively learn everything as it is presented. For most applications, particularly during in-service training, 20 to 30 minutes of new material is pushing the limits.

2. Limit the quantity of information. Consider the limitations of the brain’s capacity to learn. When too much information is presented in too short a time, the glut of new information interferes with long-term retention and can decrease the quality of the information and skills retained. This equates to non-productive use of training time and poor operational performance.

“Specific periods of instruction should be designed to only present the amount of new information that can be coded into the short-term memory system,” writes Salomon.

3. Provide resting time for the brain within 12 hours. Research indicates that some of the processes necessary for long-term retention of skills and information can happen only when the information is not being accessed or used while awake; others can only happen during sleep.

For best results, students should have both waking intellectual downtime and sleep within 12 hours of training, advises Salomon.

4. Provide at least 24 hours between instructional periods. New information is susceptible to being overwritten or corrupted by additional new information (interference) for 24 hours. Schedule at least 24 hours between instructional periods for optimal long term-retention and operational performance.

5. Apply instructional techniques to enhance students’ procedural memory. Instructors should make intentional, informed use of the factors that influence procedural memory development – including repetition, observation, emotional connection and stress – to assist the learning process so that students retain the skills and information necessary for operational performance during critical incidents.

Use interleaved training methods to link and enhance skills

Once skills and information have been consolidated to long-term memory, interleaved training can be a powerful training tool. Sometimes described as “chaotic training,” this means alternating the study of related skills and concepts.

Build on successful learning and skill development with increasingly complex training environments that replicate the use of brain functions required in the field, such as decision-making, said Salomon. This practice further links the neural networks required for operational performance within procedural memory.

Conclusion

Training methods that deliver information the same way the human brain learns have the potential to provide significant benefits to law enforcement. Not only can officers improve their clinical tactical skills and decision-making abilities in the field, agencies can also benefit through better resource management and reduced operational liability.

“It’s difficult for leadership to effectively manage the risk associated with employing armed professionals when the only tool they have available is a pass/fail qualification course run by a training staff,” Salomon said.

He suggests that making a change to brain-based training systems can not only improve individual outcomes but also provide agency leadership with better evaluative tools to identify and correct potential performance deficiencies before an incident occurs.


Texas officer hit by fleeing driver released from hospital

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

By Domingo Ramirez Jr. Fort Worth Star-Telegram

ARLINGTON, Texas — After being run over twice Wednesday night, Arlington police Cpl. Elise Bowden didn’t believe she was going to survive.

But the mother of eight made it, and on Sunday, Bowden got to go home from the hospital.

“I’m just overwhelmed,” an emotional Bowden said just outside John Peter Smith Hospital as she sat in a wheelchair.

Dozens of co-workers, police, friends, relatives and hospital staffers lined up and cheered as she was led outside, accompanied by her husband, Arlington police Sgt. Brad Norman, and Police Chief Will Johnson.

“Another detective from Dallas who got run over himself came to tell me, ‘You’ll survive this,’ ” Bowden said. “I know I will. I already did. Everything I have is mendable.”

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Corporal Bowden getting released from JPS. APD and officers from around the metroplex there to form a Wall of Honor for her.

Posted by Arlington Police Department on Sunday, February 5, 2017

Lt. Christopher Cook, police spokesman, said Sunday that two dashcam videos from patrol cars captured the incident.

“It’s a very difficult and hard video to watch,” Cook said. “It shows how close to death she was.”

Cook said that the department would work with the Tarrant County district attorney’s office on a possible release of the videos.

Bowden was conducting a traffic stop at 11:38 p.m. Wednesday in the 1700 block of Spring Lake Drive when she noticed that the driver, Tavis Crane, had warrants for his arrest. Four people were in the car, including a 2-year-old.

Crane had a felony warrant from Dallas County for a probation violation and multiple misdemeanor warrants out of Grand Prairie, police said.

Bowden called for backup, and two units responded.

“She was very polite. The suspect was given so many chances to get out of the vehicle that I’d say she was begging him to get out,” Cook said Sunday.

Crane refused to comply as Bowden walked to the back of the car and officer Craig Roper entered the suspect’s car through a passenger door. Crane put the car in reverse, hitting Bowden and slamming into her patrol car, police said.

“The impact knocked the police car out of position,” Cook said.

Crane pulled forward, again running over Bowden as Crane tried to flee, police said.

Roper, who by then was in a rear passenger seat, shot at Crane.

Crane’s car came to a stop at the end of the road, police said. Nobody else was injured.

Crane was taken to Arlington Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 12:31 a.m. Thursday.

Bowden has been with the Arlington Police Department since May 20, 2002.

Roper, who has been on the force since January 2015, remains on administrative leave.


Unpredictable Trump foreign policy may test US spy alliances

Posted on February 6, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Deb Riechmann and Eileen Sullivan Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump's unpredictable foreign policy could hamper long-standing U.S. intelligence-sharing partnerships as countries react to a president who seeks closer ties to Russia and is unafraid to offend American allies by cracking down on immigration or getting angry with friendly leaders.

Veteran spies say intelligence relationships are built to weather storms between political leaders. Even in the worst of times, allies share intelligence to thwart threats. But the lack of understanding about Trump's foreign policy direction and his potential new friendship with Moscow are creating jitters across the Western world.

"We are facing an unprecedented level of uncertainty today," said John Blaxland, a former Australian intelligence official and professor at Australian National University. He said there is mutual benefit to these "broad, deep" intelligence sharing relationships, but added: "It is hard to calculate just how much damage the new president's approach may have."

"It will be felt," Blaxland predicted, "and it won't be good."

Russia is a main concern.

If Trump moves forward with efforts to improve U.S.-Russian relations, European allies in particular will probably question how safe their intelligence is in American hands. Russia's annexation of Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula in 2014 and threatening movements near the borders of NATO members in Eastern Europe have contributed to the perception of Moscow as a threat to national sovereignty.

If American intelligence agencies are instructed to enhance cooperation with Russia, U.S. allies see "significant counterintelligence threats that come with that," said Steven Hall, a retired CIA chief of Russia operations. He said they "will be much more careful in the future."

As candidate and president, Trump has sparked widespread international unease by questioning the value of U.S. military alliances, if not necessarily intelligence partnerships. He called NATO "obsolete" and challenged countries such as South Korea and Japan to assume greater self-defense responsibility. In the last weeks, however, Trump advisers have gone out of their way to stress the durability of such arrangements and America's commitment to its friends.

Detente between Washington and Moscow is no sure thing, despite Trump's intentions. Under President Barack Obama, relations between the former Cold War foes strained dramatically over Syria, Ukraine and alleged Russian meddling in the U.S. presidential election after initially improving under a "reset" policy. In recent days, Trump's administration has reverted to criticizing the Kremlin after a flare-up of violence involving Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine.

Regardless of Trump's new direction, Rep. Will Hurd, R-Texas, a former CIA officer and new member on the House Intelligence Committee, said American intelligence professionals recognize the need to protect information they receive. "The point at which our allies will get concerned is if they believe that our intelligence professionals do not view Russia as an adversary," he said.

Trump's sometimes impulsive style and lack of experience handling classified information also have foreign officials concerned.

Mark Galeotti at the Institute of International Relations in Prague, said European intelligence officials worry that Trump or his advisers will "blurt something out at the wrong moment or to the wrong person."

Allies might curtail what they share as a result, said Galeotti, who talks with intelligence officials in Europe and Russia.

"It's not so much about how much," he said. "It's precisely how heavily edited it is, how carefully it's scrutinized to absolutely make sure that there is nothing that you are worried about leaking."

Former French internal intelligence chief Louis Caprioli said European countries might hold information related to Ukraine or other issues closer, given the uncertainty of Trump's relationship with Putin. But he said intelligence sharing will continue in critical areas, such as counterterrorism.

"Intelligence services go beyond the political world," Caprioli said.

Still, allies fret about politics seeping into U.S. intelligence findings.

Trump has disparaged U.S. intelligence agencies for past failures and publicly challenged their assessment that Russia meddled in the presidential election. A day after he was inaugurated, Trump delivered an unusual speech at the CIA headquarters criticizing the media's coverage of his inaugural crowds.

Wesley Wark, a University of Ottawa professor and national security expert, said U.S. allies may ask more questions about the source of American intelligence products. For example, he said, they might think a certain piece of intelligence is from Trump's strategic adviser Steve Bannon, a conservative media executive who now sits on the National Security Council.

"There will be a growing concern about politicized — as opposed to truthful, objective — judgments and reports," Wark said.

Last weekend's testy conversation between Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull concerned a refugee deal Trump inherited from Obama. It didn't relate to the "Five Eyes" intelligence-sharing program the U.S. has with Australia, Canada, Britain and New Zealand.

Nevertheless, California Rep. Adam Schiff, the House Intelligence Committee's top Democrat, said the spat can't be dismissed as simply "Trump being Trump."

Schiff said Australia shares America's interest in fighting terrorism and countering Chinese actions, and stood alongside the U.S. in every war of the last century. "This is not a relationship to be taken for granted or abused," he said.

The committee chairman, GOP Rep. Devin Nunes of California, isn't worried: "I have no doubt that intelligence sharing with our allies will continue to be robust and productive." ___

Associated Press writer Lori Hinnant in Paris contributed to this report.


Ga. sergeant dies while trying to save woman

Posted on February 5, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By James Folker The Augusta Chronicle

RICHMOND COUNTY, Ga. — A Richmond County sheriff’s deputy died Sunday after inhaling liquid nitrogen while trying to save a worker inside a sperm bank.

Three other deputies were injured but “are going to be OK,” Lt. Allan Rollins said late Sunday.

Sgt. Greg Meagher, 57, went to Xytex at 1100 Emmett St. about 3:30 p.m., according to a news release from the sheriff’s office.

“Upon arrival, Sgt. Meagher succumbed to injuries sustained after inhaling an unknown chemical substance,” the release said.

The chemical was liquid nitrogen, according to Dee Griffin, the spokeswoman for the Augusta Fire Department and Augusta’s Emergency Management Agency. The chemical is used to freeze sperm donations.

Three other deputies who had responded to the call already had been taken to a hospital after complaining of shortness of breath when firefighters arrived just before 4 p.m.

The firefighters found the unresponsive deputy and a female Xytex employee inside the building. Meagher had gone into the building to try to rescue the woman, according to Richmond County Coroner Mark Bowen.

Both were taken to AU Medical Center, where Meagher was pronounced dead about 4:30 p.m., according to Bowen. Meagher’s body was sent to Atlanta for an autopsy.

Two fire department hazardous materials teams were called out and shut off liquid nitrogen tanks, according to a news release from Griffin. No firefighters were injured.

There was no information on the condition of the Xytex employee.

Meagher was a 33-year veteran with the sheriff’s office and a former drug investigator. He was shot in the face in 2004 when he was assisting federal agents in a drug sting in Burke County. The bullet entered his jaw and exited the back of his neck. He was airlifted to the then-Medical College of Georgia Hospital, where he was listed in critical condition.

Meagher helped a colleague chase down motor vehicle thieves in 1985 and helped rush a pregnant woman from a south Augusta restaurant to University Hospital as she went into labor, according to records from Meagher’s personnel file, obtained by The Augusta Chronicle after his 2004 shooting.

Meagher also was commended for assisting the Office of the Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Justice during a 1996 undercover drug investigation of a deputy U.S. marshal, a letter states.

In 2000, officials at the Savannah River Technology Center commended Meagher and other colleagues for helping a Justice Department employee observe the use of a surveillance camera to make arrests in a drug trafficking area.

Records show Meagher went to the Criminal Investigation Division in 1989. He started with the sheriff’s office in 1984.


Ga. cop dies after inhaling liquid nitrogen during rescue attempt

Posted on February 5, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By James Folker The Augusta Chronicle

RICHMOND COUNTY, Ga. — A Richmond County sheriff’s deputy died Sunday after inhaling liquid nitrogen while trying to save a worker inside a sperm bank.

Three other deputies were injured but “are going to be OK,” Lt. Allan Rollins said late Sunday.

Sgt. Greg Meagher, 57, went to Xytex at 1100 Emmett St. about 3:30 p.m., according to a news release from the sheriff’s office.

“Upon arrival, Sgt. Meagher succumbed to injuries sustained after inhaling an unknown chemical substance,” the release said.

The chemical was liquid nitrogen, according to Dee Griffin, the spokeswoman for the Augusta Fire Department and Augusta’s Emergency Management Agency. The chemical is used to freeze sperm donations.

Three other deputies who had responded to the call already had been taken to a hospital after complaining of shortness of breath when firefighters arrived just before 4 p.m.

The firefighters found the unresponsive deputy and a female Xytex employee inside the building. Meagher had gone into the building to try to rescue the woman, according to Richmond County Coroner Mark Bowen.

Both were taken to AU Medical Center, where Meagher was pronounced dead about 4:30 p.m., according to Bowen. Meagher’s body was sent to Atlanta for an autopsy.

Two fire department hazardous materials teams were called out and shut off liquid nitrogen tanks, according to a news release from Griffin. No firefighters were injured.

There was no information on the condition of the Xytex employee.

Meagher was a 33-year veteran with the sheriff’s office and a former drug investigator. He was shot in the face in 2004 when he was assisting federal agents in a drug sting in Burke County. The bullet entered his jaw and exited the back of his neck. He was airlifted to the then-Medical College of Georgia Hospital, where he was listed in critical condition.

Meagher helped a colleague chase down motor vehicle thieves in 1985 and helped rush a pregnant woman from a south Augusta restaurant to University Hospital as she went into labor, according to records from Meagher’s personnel file, obtained by The Augusta Chronicle after his 2004 shooting.

Meagher also was commended for assisting the Office of the Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Justice during a 1996 undercover drug investigation of a deputy U.S. marshal, a letter states.

In 2000, officials at the Savannah River Technology Center commended Meagher and other colleagues for helping a Justice Department employee observe the use of a surveillance camera to make arrests in a drug trafficking area.

Records show Meagher went to the Criminal Investigation Division in 1989. He started with the sheriff’s office in 1984.


Police: Arrests made in 1993 Los Angeles fire that killed 10

Posted on February 5, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Police have arrested several people for a 1993 apartment building fire that killed 10 people, including seven children, it was announced Saturday.

Those arrested remained jailed, Officer Aareon Jefferson said. He had no other details. Police planned to hold a news conference on Monday.

The three-story building in the Westlake district caught fire on May 3, 1993. At the time, police said they believed the blaze was set by gang members kicked off the property for selling drugs.

The building, packed with mainly poor immigrants from Central America, had inoperable smoke alarms. Investigators found fire doors had been propped or nailed open for ventilation, allowing smoke to surge through the apartments.

Tenants tried to escape by jumping from windows, scrambling down fire escapes and climbing down bedsheets tied to balconies. At one point, neighbors formed a human chain to pass along children from upper floors.

Other children were dropped from balconies into waiting hands.

The dead included three women, two of whom were pregnant, and children as young as 4. One woman's baby was delivered by Caesarean section before she died.

Most of the bodies were found in a corridor on the third floor.

Investigators believe the fire was set by gang members who had been ordered off the property because the manager suspected they were dealing drugs. The apartment complex was known for cocaine dealing by a local gang, and the manager had begun reporting the activity to police.

"The local thugs in the area decided that she had to leave, and the fire was set," Detective Steven Spear said in 1998, after two gang members were arrested and charged with murder.

However, the case against the men was dropped two years later for lack of evidence.

"It wasn't clear these were the right guys," Deputy District Attorney Joseph Esposito said at the time.


Art of the drug deal? Seized heroin bore Trump’s image

Posted on February 5, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

BROOKSVILLE, Fla. — It might be called the art of the drug deal: Florida authorities seized scores of individually wrapped heroin packets stamped with the image of President Donald Trump.

The Tampa Bay Times reports law enforcement officers seized the heroin Jan. 27 in Hernando County.

Some of the packets bore the names or likenesses of other notorious figures, such as Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman and Colombian cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar.

Authorities couldn't explain the markings' purpose. Dealers often stamp heroin bags with street "brand names." The bust netted about 5,550 heroin doses altogether.

Police arrested 46-year-old Kelvin Scott Johnson on suspicion of heroin trafficking and other charges. His bail is set at $75,000.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said the dealer "made a big mistake" using Trump's picture.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk')); Heroin Arrest Press Conference - 2-3-17

Posted by Hernando County Sheriff's Office on Friday, February 3, 2017


Former Texas deputy at loss where to turn after medical issues, retirement

Posted on February 5, 2017 by in POLICE

By Matt Smith Cleburne Times-Review

JOHNSON COUNTY, Texas — Former Johnson County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Patrick Geyer went so far as to learn to shoot left handed after his other hand gave out.

“I was right handed and started carrying a gun left handed at work because I didn’t want to retire, and they allowed me to keep working another three or four years,” Geyer said. “I can’t write with my left hand, but I can shoot with it, which took me three to six months to learn how to do accurately. I can write some with my right hand still.”

Geyer, 45, worked 18 and a half years at JCSO and four for the Rio Vista Police Department before that until medical conditions made it impossible to continue and he finally had to retire on Nov. 30.

“He did a good job and was a good deputy, but he finally had to retire for medical reasons,” former Johnson County Sheriff Bob Alford said. “He didn’t want to, and if he had any choice he’d still be working today.”

Geyer, the single father of four children ages 9 to 15, instead now finds himself between continued physical pain and deterioration, financial hardship and unsure where to turn.

His sister, Tammy Stinson, continues to help as much as possible but is only able to do so much.

“The first thing Patrick said when I called him up about possibly discussing his situation was, ‘I don’t know what this is about, but I won’t say one bad thing about the sheriff’s office,’” Stinson said. “It says a lot to me that they allowed him to learn with his left hand and stay on as long as he could.

“I don’t even know what to ask for at this point. I just know that he’s worked hard and he needs help.”

Several have stepped in to help, Geyer and Stinson said, for which they’re thankful. For now, however, Geyer is without insurance and facing mounting debt on a limited income.

He’s applied for Social Security disability but the process can take months, Stinson said.

“I have never in my life asked for help from the government like food stamps or anything like that,” Geyer said. “Never once. And they gave us food stamps the other day. With my retirement I’m making $1,068 a month and, working for the county, you don’t make enough to much of anything in the way of savings.

“I was a year and a half from having my insurance paid for three years after you retire, but it’s gone now. I had to pay $714 a month to keep it. I paid it in December but couldn’t pay it in January. The county paid it in January but it was a mistake and they’re not going to pay it anymore. So, on top of that, I have to pay the county back and owe them $714 now.”

Friendship remembered

JCSO’s administrative offices were several years ago named after former JCSO Deputy Clifton Taylor, a man who Geyer said saved his life though Taylor lost his life in the process.

“We would meet up and talk everyday that we worked together so yes, we were friends,” Geyer said. “We worked out in the homestead area near Alvarado a lot and would check in with each other while we were on duty.”

Both Geyer and Taylor responded in aid of a Venus police officer to a disturbance call on April 23, 2011. A caller had informed the Venus officer that a man had assaulted a woman at the scene.

A woman at the residence told officers the suspect was “in the shed” and warned them to be careful, according to Geyer’s statement to the Texas Rangers after the events of that day.

The officers approached the shed, which they found to be locked from the inside. The suspect inside ignored the officer’s requests to exit the shed. Officers subsequently opened the shed’s door to find the suspect, Wesley Davis, sitting on a toolbox along the front wall to the left of the doorway, according to Geyer’s statement.

Davis’ right hand was not visible, which concerned Geyer.

“Deputies [Eric] McClelland and Taylor yelled for the man to show them his hands multiple times,” according to Geyer’s statement. “Wesley Davis said, ‘I can’t’ several times in a crying voice.”

Davis began shooting at that point, according to the statement. Taylor pushed McClelland back with his left hand to keep him from getting shot. Taylor then leaned in to the shed and attempted to push Davis’ gun away. Geyer said Taylor was in front of him at the time and was backing out of the shed when he gasped, jerked his head to the left and went down in front of the shed’s entrance door.

“Davis lowered his gun as if he was going to shoot Deputy Taylor while he was down,” according to Geyer’s statement. “I was scared he was going to kill Deputy Taylor and try to kill me. I stepped over Deputy Taylor to protect Deputy Taylor and to engage Davis. Davis raised the gun to shoot me. I became even more certain Davis was going to shoot me and kill me. I shot Davis two or three times. I heard Davis’ gun go off two times while I was shooting. Davis stumbled back. Deputy McClelland stepped to the left of me and returned fire as well. Davis fell.”

The shoot out left Taylor and Davis dead.

Geyer offered a copy of his statement after the fact because he said he still finds it hard to talk about Taylor and the events of that night.

“He was between me and the shooter,” Geyer said. “If he wouldn’t have been there the shooter would’ve shot me and probably others. Because Taylor was directly between us, he saved my life.”

Two years later, Geyer said injuries he suffered while answering a disturbance call led to multiple medical complications and surgeries, leaving him unable to work.

The call involved a mentally ill subject, Geyer said.

“I was trying to get him out of the kitchen, which had one of those horseshoe counters and knives were out everywhere,” Geyer said. “Finally I had to put my hands on him to forcefully get him out of the kitchen.”

In the process of doing that, Geyer and the man fell with the man landing on Geyer and Geyer landing on the floor.

“It didn’t show up immediately but within a few days I started hurting and went to a chiropractor,” Geyer said. “Once he adjusted me and before I could make it home, I lost the use of my right hand. He had shoved a disk fragment into my spinal cord.”

Surgery followed. Geyer regained use of three fingers on his right hand but not the other two and the muscle of that hand is now deteriorated.

The area above his hand began hurting, necessitating another surgery.

“Not long after that my legs began buckling and I got real weak,” Geyer said.

Myelograms, MRIs and other procedures uncovered spinal cord damage and yet another emergency surgery.

“I was sedated through the surgeries, but once you wake up you feel like death would be better,” Geyer said.

Additional surgeries and procedures followed, the most recent being neck surgery in September and lower back surgery in November at which point Geyer was forced to retire. A subsequent procedure was necessary to stem leakage of spinal fluid.

“The medicine they gave me for my back caused fast growing cataracts on my eyes,” Geyer said. “So, on top of all the back surgery, the medicine messed my eyes up and I had to have surgery on both to remove cataracts.”

Rods have also been attached to his vertebrae and the medicine he has to take leaves him nauseous.

Geyer didn’t file for worker’s compensation.

“Since these injuries happened and then I didn’t know about it till after the fact I couldn’t prove that it happened while I was at work,” Geyer said. “I didn’t try because I knew they wouldn’t accept it. With worker’s comp you have to jump through hoops and there was no way they were going to approve an emergency surgery.”

Geyer said he now remains unsure if he should or even can still attempt to file.

Geyer walks with a cane most days and several times became physically ill on Tuesday while visiting the Times-Review.

“Getting up is extremely hard and some days I can barely walk because I’m usually in extreme pain,” Geyer said. “Since that first surgery I’ve lost roughly 140 pounds.”

Former JCSO Chief Deputy Mike Powell called Geyer a good deputy beset by unfortunate circumstances.

“Bob Alford and the sheriff’s office have been nothing but great to me,” Geyer said. “Bob gave me like $400, $500 to cover Christmas for my kids and others at the sheriff’s office helped out as well.”

Geyer displayed several texts on his phone from Alford in recent days checking in to see how he’s doing and offering encouragement.

Stinson said a counselor at two of his children’s schools in Cleburne also arranged for help for Christmas through her church and that the Salvation Army has helped with Geyer’s water bill.

Geyer said he would love more than anything to return to work but has been told by doctors that he will never be able to work in any capacity again.

What scares him most, Geyer said, is what becomes of his children should he die.

“Our parents both passed away in 2009,” Geyer said. “Hopefully, my sister can take them.”

Stinson apologizes to her brother at that point.

“We have a brother between us and he helps where he can and the three of us depend on each other,” Stinson said. “But I’m raising three grandkids and so it’s going to have to be [Rick Geyer, their brother] that will have to take them. I’m sorry Patrick, but Rick’s a good guy and he’ll do a good job.”

Commissioners last month awarded certificates of recognition to Alford, who last year decided not to seek re-election after 20 years in office, and others retiring from the department, including Geyer. Geyer made his way to the podium using a cane to accept his certificate.

“Prayer, prayer for one thing,” Stinson said when asked what she’s hoping for. “Prayer’s a big thing. My brother and his kids are suffering and need all the help they can get.”

Geyer reiterated that he’s not sure where to turn.

“I think the main goal of coming here was to try to get some guidance of where to go and what to do, how to survive.”

Geyer became an officer when he was 24.

“Being a cop is a calling from God,” Geyer said. “It’s not something you choose to do. You’re called to do it. And from an early age, 9, 10, I knew that’s what I was going to do.”


Lawmakers consider expanding Ill. immigrant protections

Posted on February 5, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Sophia Tareen Associated Press

CHICAGO — Illinois legislators are proposing to boost immigrant protections statewide in response to President Donald Trump's executive orders on immigration, a move advocates say would essentially give the state "sanctuary" status.

One proposal says schools, medical facilities and places of worship don't have to give access to federal immigration authorities or local law enforcement working on their behalf. Another proposal would limit cooperation and communication between local police and immigration authorities.

"If there was ever a moment for things to move, it is now when we're seeing immigrant communities under unprecedented attacks," said Mony Ruiz-Velasco, a leader of a suburban Chicago immigrant organizing group called PASO.

The legislation's chances of passage are uncertain. Backers of Trump's moves say he is just fulfilling promises he made during the campaign, and warn that "sanctuary" cities and states risk losing their federal funding.

Ruiz-Velasco and others said the goal is to extend so-called sanctuary protections already on the books in Chicago and Cook County, where police aren't allowed to ask about citizenship status and don't cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

Reaction has been divided to a series of immigration-related executive orders signed in Trump's first days as president, including one designed to allow local law enforcement to investigate, apprehend or detain immigrants living in the country without legal permission. Some states, like Texas, have moved to reinforce Trump's orders, while lawmakers in California are advancing a statewide sanctuary proposal.

Illinois already has some of the nation's most immigrant-friendly laws. Advocates are pushing sanctuary ordinances in suburbs like Oak Park. The state's largest immigrant advocacy group, the Illinois Coalition of Immigrant and Refugee Rights, is pushing city officials to make Chicago's rules stronger.

Democratic lawmakers say the two statewide proposals are just the beginning of what they want to do. But the extent of any opposition isn't known.

While Democrats control the Illinois House and Senate, it's not clear where Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner stands. He said that there are "serious concerns" about another Trump executive order suspending the nation's refugee program, and urged resolution "through the courts." When asked about sanctuary cities and states, he said in a statement that it's "not a state issue" and he supports "comprehensive immigration reform."

Other Republicans are opposed.

Rep. John Cabello, a Republican from Machesney Park, noted that any entities adopting sanctuary status risk losing federal funding. Trump has threatened to strip federal money from sanctuary states.

"We're kind of playing a dangerous game," Cabello said of Illinois' plans, adding that Trump is simply following through on campaign promises. "He is doing absolutely everything he said he was going to do."

Democratic Rep. Emanuel Chris Welch of Hillside, who sponsored the schools bill, said his bill would offer peace of mind for immigrants in schools, churches or hospitals.

His plan would bar federal immigration agents from those sites, with few exceptions, such as obtaining a court-issued warrant. It'd also prohibit employees from asking about immigration status and require training on immigration issues.

"The day after the November election, I received calls that teaching and learning did not go on at my local school," he said. "Students were crying and worried about whether immigration officials were going to come into a school and teachers were predominantly counselors that day."

Of Illinois' nearly 13 million residents, close to 1.8 million are foreign born, according to Census data. The Pew Research Center estimates roughly 450,000 are living in Illinois illegally.

Democratic Rep. Lisa Hernandez of Cicero is drafting a separate bill that'd limit interaction between local authorities and immigration agencies. It would discourage information sharing and allow local police to decline requests from immigration officials to keep defendants in custody while they await deportation.

She said it would provide safeguards against Trump's orders.

"Either we submit to his request that we are going to go his way or we push back," Hernandez said.


Milwaukee sheriff’s star rises, but he remains polarizing

Posted on February 5, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Ivan Moreno Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — With a brash, unapologetic personality reminiscent of President Donald Trump, Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke is positioning himself as an in-your-face conservative firebrand who has some Republicans swooning over his prospects for higher office.

The tough-talking, cowboy-hat wearing lawman is also one of the most polarizing figures in Wisconsin politics, frequently dishing out eyebrow-raising comments that make even his one-time supporters blanch.

At a pre-inauguration party for Trump last month, Clarke addressed the crowd and told them his idea of bipartisanship.

"I am one of those bare-knuckle fighters," he said. "When I hear people say we need to reach across the aisle and work with the Democrats, you know what I say? The only reason I'll be reaching across the aisle is to grab one of them by the throat."

Once thought a possible candidate to be Trump's Homeland Security secretary, Clarke's window to join the administration is shrinking. But in recent weeks, some fans have launched a campaign to encourage him to challenge Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin in 2018.

Clarke hasn't publicly responded to the effort and he declined interview requests.

His rise in some conservative circles comes with Clarke facing the most scrutiny he's seen since he took office in 2002: Four people died last year at the jail he oversees, including the newborn of an inmate who is now suing and a man whose death from dehydration is being reviewed by the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office.

And this week, a 24-year-old Milwaukee man filed a lawsuit against Clarke alleging he had sheriff's deputies detain and question him after a flight from Dallas last month because, while boarding, the man shook his head at Clarke, who was wearing Dallas Cowboys gear on a day the team played the Packers. Clarke said afterward that "he reserves the reasonable right to pre-empt a possible assault" and mocked his accuser on the sheriff's office's Facebook page, calling him a "snowflake" and writing, "if Sheriff Clarke were to really mess with you, you wouldn't be around to whine about it."

Clarke was one of the few African-Americans to speak at the Republican Party convention last year. He has been vocal about gun rights and critical of what he called the "hateful ideology" of the Black Lives Matters movement, saying at times, "Stop trying to fix the police, fix the ghetto."

His combative persona is appealing to his supporters, who want him to run for higher office or get a spot in the Trump administration.

"He's got a little Trump in him. He's got a little snark. If you prick him, he fires back," said Nate Pendley, an attorney helping raise money to encourage Clarke to challenge Baldwin next year. The committee's website calls Clarke "The Black Rush Limbaugh with a Badge."

Clarke grew up in Milwaukee County, one of five children, and spent more than two decades in the city's police department before he became sheriff.

"He was raised value-oriented family. I do think that the background that Clarke came from — those are some of the things that ground him," said Mark Belling, a conservative talk-show radio host in Milwaukee. He said he believes millions of people agree with Clarke, but that "the media and liberals hate any African American who expresses conservative viewpoints."

The fact that he supports Trump, Belling said, "gets under the skin of a lot of people."

Clarke's ascent in the political spotlight has been lucrative. Last year, the frequent Fox News guest earned more than $105,000 in speaking fees — almost as much as his sheriff's salary — at more than three dozen events across the country.

"He's virtually invisible here in Milwaukee," said Charlie Sykes, a conservative former radio host who criticized Clarke on Twitter in September for spending so much time out of the city. Sykes, who's known Clarke for 15 years and once supported him, said the sheriff blocked him on Twitter after that and their relationship has soured.

"He wears a very big hat but he's very thin-skinned," Sykes said.

Clarke's provocative commentary has earned him new admirers — and cost him some of his earliest advocates.

Evan Zeppos, a public relations executive in Milwaukee who was an early supporter and financial backer of Clarke's, once called the sheriff "a John Wayne character" but has since changed his mind.

"Now, at best he's like Barney Fife," he said.

Zeppos said the turning point for him came in 2013 when he advised Clarke to tone down his comments after he accused the Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, a frequent foil, of "penis envy."

"All he did was scream at me," Zeppos recalled. "And that was the last meaningful conversation I had with him."


Court: NJ police with warrant can view private Twitter messages

Posted on February 4, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. — A New Jersey appeals court has ruled that law enforcement agencies can view private messages and tweets from private accounts on Twitter if they get a warrant.

The three-judge panel on Thursday ruled in favor of Essex County prosecutors who attempted to access video posts from two Twitter profiles.

The case turned on what type of warrant is needed: a communications data warrant or a wiretapping warrant, which is needed for electronic communications in transit and has tougher legal requirements.

Essex County officials argued they were trying to access audio that had already been transmitted as opposed to live transmissions. The court agreed, ruling that law enforcement could use a data warrant.

According to Assistant Essex County Prosecutor Camila Garces, the court's ruling "ensures that the state can access electronic footprints when conducting a criminal investigation."

Defense attorney Lawrence Lustberg said that investigators should only have a right to see private message if they get a wiretap because they happen in real time.

"The court's holding that seizing a tweet is not akin to a wiretap — with all of the protections that accompany wiretaps — fails to account for the reality of modern communication," Lustberg said.

A spokesman for Twitter declined to comment on the ruling but pointed to the company's guidelines for releasing users' private information.

Twitter says that it requires a court order to disclose private information to authorities, that it alerts users about these disclosures when it is legally allowed to, that it stores some data for a limited period of time, and that it publishes annual transparency reports listing all such requests from law enforcement agencies.


Growing number of women leading US police departments

Posted on February 4, 2017 by in POLICE

By Michael Balsamo Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — When Anne Kirkpatrick took the helm at the scandal-ridden Oakland Police Department, she inherited an agency that the city's mayor likened to a frat house.

The veteran police officer knew she inevitably would be asked what it's like to combat the culture as one of a growing number of women heading police departments, many struggling to repair their public image.

"What I will tell you is that I am leader," she said at a news conference announcing her appointment, listing qualities Oakland wanted in its police chief.

"Those character traits are not gender-based. Those are leadership-based," Kirkpatrick said.

Female police officers tend to use wits over brawn to deescalate potentially violent situations, experts say, and as departments shift their focus to nonviolent techniques, it's natural they would tap more women as leaders.

"A lot of police chiefs say women had a profound impact on the culture of policing," said Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a Washington-based think tank. "They bring their own set of skills to a traditionally male-dominated culture, and that is very helpful."

Still, the number of women leading police departments pales in comparison to their male counterparts. Of the nation's 50 largest police departments, only five are led by women. A 2013 survey conducted by the National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives found just 169 women leading the more than 1,500 police departments, sheriff's offices and other law enforcement agencies across the U.S. that responded.

"It's very pleasant to see some of these female chiefs across the country," said Dawn Layman, the group's president and a major in the Lenexa, Kansas, Police Department. Still, she says, there's much work to do.

"There are still a lot of agencies that you see there are no females in even supervisory or command-level positions," Layman said.

But as major cities continue to promote women to their top cop posts, Layman believes others will follow suit.

"I think females just bring something different to the table," she said. "The goal is to diversify the table. We don't want a cookie-cutter. We learn more, we bring more to the table when it is diverse."

Decades ago, female officers faced a much different atmosphere — there were public protests over them, men refused to ride with them, and many were forced to file lawsuits to ascend the ranks. While the protests have long subsided and the culture has changed within police departments, women still represent only a fraction of the country's police officers.

"If you go back, policing for a long time was predominantly male and predominantly white," said Wexler, of the police think tank. "Over the years, we've seen a tremendous increase in diversity and a tremendous increase of women officers."

He added research shows female officers tend to use communication to help diffuse potentially volatile situations, a technique many police departments are now shifting their focus toward.

"For women officers, this tends to come to them naturally," Wexler said. "I think departments who have had a lot of experience hiring women recognize how invaluable they are in diffusing contentious situations."

The first generation of female chiefs was in smaller police forces, including several university police departments, said Dorothy Moses Schulz, a professor emeritus at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of New York. In the past few years, she said, there appeared to be an uptick in women rising to the top of larger departments. The public expects many of them to be able to reform departments with poor public images just because they're women, she said.

"They are supposed to be the healers. It's a terrible burden," said Schulz, whose work includes two books on women in policing. "I don't think that's based on any solid research; I think that's based on a feeling that it is going to set a different tone."

Schulz added more female officers are applying for upper-level jobs today than years ago, and they have a better chance of being selected.

"Mayors don't have to feel like they are going out on a limb. Even if it is not common, it's common enough you're not risking your reputation," she said.


Ohio sheriff’s office wants to reinstate program to investigate immigration crimes

Posted on February 4, 2017 by in POLICE

By Lauren Pack Dayton Daily News

BUTLER COUNTY, Ohio — Butler County’s top law enforcement official wants to reinstate a program that allows local officers to enforce federal immigration law.

Just a few years ago, Butler County was one of dozens of jurisdictions that entered an agreement with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to allow local officers to investigate immigration crimes after receiving special training.

But about three years ago, that portion of the program was curtailed by former president Barack Obama.

But with President Donald Trump calling for stepped-up enforcement of undocumented immigration, the program may be ripe for a revival.

Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones has requested reinstatement of the investigative certification of the agreement.

Jones has been vocal about closing the borders and deporting those in the country illegally, pointing to crimes and drug trafficking in Butler County by those who are undocumented. He brashly sent a bill to Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto for the $900,000 he said it cost to house about 3,000 Mexican nationals over a 10-year period in the jail.

Today, the sheriff’s office only has an administrative role with ICE.

“(Deputies) help with the deportation paperwork here and set hearings up and work with the ICE agents,” Jones said.

But the department cannot investigate immigration crimes, such as businesses suspected of employing workers illegally.

“It is a tremendous asset to have in the county,” Jones said.

Businesses who are hiring illegal immigrants then mistreating them need to be investigated and stopped, he said.

“If you are an employer and you are hiring people then over-working them and not giving them benefits, I want to arrest you and put you in jail,” Jones said. “That is not the American dream.”

Some of the largest contracts the sheriff’s office holds are to house ICE and federal prisoners at the Butler County Jail, which the sheriff has previously said can average nearly 200 daily.

Some civil rights advocates have said deputizing local officials to enforce federal immigration laws could embolden police to racially profile those they encounter.

But Jones said the investigative agreement is just that — for investigation. Deputies do not question people on the street about immigration status, he said.

“This is not something where you are going out patrolling and pulling people over who you think are illegal,” Jones said.

He added that local agencies often come to Butler County for help when they have a person who has been arrested and is here illegally.

“Because there isn’t anyone else,” Jones said.


Wash. officer sues city over mayor’s Facebook post after fatal OIS

Posted on February 4, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

WAPATO, Wash. — A Wapato police officer is suing the city over comments its mayor posted on social media after an officer-involved fatal shooting.

The Yakima Herald reports that officer Michael Campos says he's suffered defamation and a hostile work environment as a result of the comments by Mayor Tony Guzman. Several other officers wrote letters supporting Campos' $1.5 million claim against the city.

Campos fatally shot 38-year-old Mario Martinez-Torres when responding to a domestic disturbance call on July 31. Police reports say Campos shot Martinez-Torres as he struggled with Campos and another officer. The Yakima County Prosecutor's Office ruled the shooting justified.

Guzman called Campos a murderer in a Facebook post and said the officer "deserves to die in prison."

Guzman declined requests for comment on Campos' claim.


ND police recover baby in stolen car; suspect shoots self

Posted on February 4, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

DEVILS LAKE, N.D. — An attempt to stop a pickup truck with a loud exhaust system led to a wild chase in which the driver shot at a trooper, stole a car with a baby inside, took two other people hostage and eventually shot and wounded himself, authorities said.

Only the pickup truck's driver, Daniel TwoHearts, was hurt during the ordeal, which began Thursday night with the attempted traffic stop in Grand Forks and ended Friday night with TwoHearts shooting himself in an apartment in Devils Lake, about 80 miles west, authorities said.

TwoHearts, who shot himself as officers began to negotiate with him to surrender, was hospitalized with an apparently non-fatal wound, Devils Lake police Capt. John Barnett told the Devils Lake Journal.

"People can relax. It got a little tense for a while in town," he said.

It began when a trooper tried to pull over a pickup truck with a loud exhaust on Interstate 29 in Grand Forks, which is along the state border with Minnesota, according to the North Dakota Highway Patrol. Instead, the driver tried to get away, reaching speeds of about 100 mph before law enforcement put down tire spikes, stopping the pickup about 40 miles down the highway.

The suspect jumped out and fired three shots at a trooper, who wasn't injured and didn't return fire, said patrol Lt. Troy Hischer.

Two others in the pickup were arrested and methamphetamine was found in the truck, authorities said. Meanwhile, TwoHearts ran into a neighborhood and jumped into an idling car with an infant inside it.

"The mother had started the car to warm it up, brought out the 1-year-old, then went back to retrieve an older child" when the suspect drove off, Hischer said.

Officers spotted that car on a county road about 20 miles away, again deployed road spikes, flattening the tires and recovering the infant unharmed, but TwoHearts got away again.

After dawn Friday, another truck was reported missing, and was later found abandoned at the Wal-Mart in town.

Law enforcement agencies in North and South Dakota and Minnesota were on the lookout, but Devils Lake Police and other agencies caught up with TwoHearts Friday night, barricaded inside an apartment with two hostages, Barnett said.

"We got the female out and the other male, and he was isolated" when they heard a shot fired and then forced their way in, he said.


De Blasio ‘very concerned’ about NYPD suicides

Posted on February 4, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Anna Sanders Staten Island Advance

NEW YORK — Mayor Bill de Blasio was "very concerned" that two cops on Staten Island committed suicide in a span of two weeks last month.

"I'm very concerned," de Blasio said at an unrelated event on Friday. "The folks who protect us and serve us go through tons of stress, some that you can see and some that you can't even see because it's deep inside them, and we have to support them."

Officer Yong Yun of Annadale died on Jan. 17 of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. Officer Ralph Conde also died of an apparent suicide in his Great Kills home just 13 days later, on Jan. 30.

De Blasio said the city is trying to increase access to mental health services through NYC Well. Free and confidential support is available by calling 1-888-NYC-WELL, texting WELL to 65173 or going online at nyc.gov/nycwell.

"I know NYPD does a lot to try and provide for anyone who's facing a mental health challenge or a job related stress," the mayor said.

"The tragic thing when you look at those stories, is there are no signs," de Blasio said. "I can only imagine how much pain their families are in because there were no warning signs."

The mayor said that the city and NYPD need to do more to make mental health services available to police and other first responders.

"The thing we have to focus on is relieving the stress that our first responders go through, and so many other people who serve us go through, by constantly making available to them if they need counseling, if they need mental health services, demystifying, destigmatizing and making it readily available," de Blasio said. "I think PD has come a long way in doing that, I think we have to keep doing it even more."

———

©2017 Staten Island Advance, N.Y.


Texas cop’s video to reassure immigrants sparks PD response

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

By Reece Kelley Graham The Dallas Morning News

FORT WORTH, Texas — A Fort Worth officer created a stir on social media this week by posting a video message assuring immigrants that police "don't care about your immigration status."

Trouble is, his bosses begged to differ.

Officer Daniel Segura, a well-known liaison in the local Hispanic community, created the video in response to growing fears about President Donald Trump's recent executive orders regarding immigration policies.

The video, posted Wednesday and titled "Calm friends!" has surpassed 1.1 million views as of Friday morning.

"If you are a victim of a crime, we don't care about your immigration status. You have the same rights as anyone else who lives in Fort Worth," Segura said in his video message, delivered in Spanish. "We are going to defend you. We are going to protect you."

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Calma amigos!

Posted by Daniel Segura on Wednesday, February 1, 2017

It was Segura's next statement that got the attention of the Police Department and city officials.

"In the City of Fort Worth for many, many years, we have not enforced immigration laws," Segura said. "We are not federal officials that can enforce federal immigration laws. I want to make that very, very clear. We, in Fort Worth, do not execute or enforce laws on immigration so that people that live in Fort Worth do not have to fear that we can possibly deport them. That is not true."

On Thursday, Fort Worth police responded Thursday to the unauthorized video.

"The Fort Worth Police Department enforces all laws and protects all its citizens and is not a sanctuary city. The video was not intended to represent the views of the City of Fort Worth on immigration or compliance with immigration policies."

According to a report from KDFW-TV, Segura won't face any disciplinary actions by the department for posting the video.

But he did release a follow-up statement on Thursday clarifying his message.

"Something very important that I have to be clear: we will continue and we will support all laws and we are not a sanctuary city."

———

©2017 The Dallas Morning News


Vandals target home, patrol cars of officers

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WHITESTOWN, Ind. — Officers from four different departments were targeted by vandals Wednesday night.

Fox 59 reported that “F*** WPD” was written in marker on one officer’s patrol car, while other profane messages written on one officer’s house.

“This is somebody that is attacking the central core of our community,” Whitestown Police Chief Dennis Anderson said.

Anderson told the news station that the vandals punctured tires on patrol cars belonging to four different police agencies, as well.

Police are asking neighbors to check surveillance footage to help authorities arrest the vandal.

Whitestown Town Manager Dax Norton said in a statement that the city was “disturbed and angry” about the vandalism and said incidents like this would not be tolerated.

“I believe it’s someone that had interaction with the police department and has an axe to grind,” Anderson said.

Whitestown police officers' squad cars vandalized at home https://t.co/FrIwspEsf3

— Whitestown Police (@Whitestown_PD) February 3, 2017


K-9 captures fleeing suspect who tried to drown him

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

ROYAL PALM BEACH, Fla. — A K-9 is recovering after capturing a suspect who fled and tried to drown the dog.

According to the Palm Beach Post, police pulled over Quinten Henderson, 25, Tuesday for speeding. He fled and reportedly hit a deputy’s patrol car in the process.

Police sent a helicopter and K-9 unit to pursue Henderson. K-9 Alex was able to capture Henderson after he tried to drown the K-9 in a nearby canal, police told the publication.

Officials said they found crack cocaine, heroin and marijuana in Henderson’s vehicle.

K-9 Alex is recovering and is doing fine.

Henderson was transported to a local hospital with hypothermia and minor injuries.

This isn’t the first attack on K-9 Alex. The Post reported K-9 Alex was punched in the face in July by a suspect in a domestic battery case.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

It was a tough day for K9 Alex, but he got the suspect. Great Job Alex! PBSO deputy attempted to stop for vehicle for...

Posted by PBSO - Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office on 31hb Januari 2017


Using technology in today’s loss prevention career environment

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

American Military University
Author: American Military University

By Garett Seivold

As an adjunct professor for AMU’s Center for Applied Learning, Dr. Robert Pittman imparts wisdom to next-generation loss prevention leaders, for whom he has the following warning—you can never “complete” your education. The world, risks, and business are always changing and loss prevention practitioners, and the loss prevention industry as a whole, must continually adapt. If not, individuals will find their career paths limited and the industry itself—just now gaining a seat at the management table—could be pushed to the background.

Today’s major retail operations are driven by technology, and entire supply chains rely on how effectively it is managed. Loss prevention practitioners need to have the skills to effectively navigate this tech-based environment if they want to advance their careers and help the LP industry thrive, Pittman believes. “Loss prevention used to be about focusing on the shoplifter in the store, but that’s completely changed. Those strictly physical security guys are quickly becoming extinct,” he said.

The traditional security knowledge that experienced practitioners have attained remains valuable, he noted, but advancing a loss prevention career in the future will require practitioners “to be more diverse in the application of the security concepts they’ve mastered.” For many of us, that may require going back to school to get better educated about cyber security. Some LP professionals will find they take to the subject easily, but even those who are uncomfortable with 1s and 0s will find the security-related terrain familiar and will benefit professionally by expanding their knowledge base. “The domains [of information and physical security] are similar. It’s the exact same concept, just applied to the virtual world,” said Pittman. “You don’t have to be an IT guy to understand cyber security, and it’s critical that you have enough of an understanding to know what questions to ask.”

Full story: Using Technology in Today’s Loss Prevention Career Environment


Off-duty officer killed, another injured in fiery crash

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NEW YORK — An NYPD officer is dead and another is injured after police said their car flipped and caught fire.

Police told NBC New York they believe Officer Bianca Bennett, 27, lost control of the vehicle Wednesday night. Witnesses said the car flipped and immediately caught fire.

Two off-duty officers witnessed the crash and rushed to help. They pulled the passenger, a nine-year veteran housing sergeant, out of the vehicle but could not pull Bennett out, News 12 reported. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

The passenger was taken to a local hospital with severe leg trauma and burns to his body. The two rescuing officers were transported to the hospital as well and treated for smoke inhalation.

According to NBC New York, Bennett graduated from the police academy in October.

The city's highway collision investigation team says that speed may have played a factor in the crash.

Thank You everyone for the outpouring of support during this difficult time as we prepare to say goodbye to a true shining star #NYPD pic.twitter.com/Wr1xpgZ3Qh

— NYPD 9th Precinct (@NYPD9Pct) February 3, 2017


Utah detective dies from medical condition while on duty

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

SALT LAKE CITY — A Unified police detective is dead after he suffered a medical emergency while on duty Thursday.

Detective Brian Holdaway, a 19-year law enforcement veteran, died from a medical condition while at work, according to KSL.com.

"I am heartbroken and devastated to inform you that early this morning, UPD detective Brian Holdaway suffered a medical condition and has fallen in the line of duty surrounded by friends and colleagues at the sheriff’s office building, who heroically tried to reverse this tragedy," Sheriff Jim Winder posted on the department's Facebook page.

Holdaway worked in the special victims unit dealing with sex crimes, the publication reported.

In 2013, Holdaway was awarded the chief’s award for breaking a high-profile sex crimes case.

Holdaway’s passing is the second death in the department within two weeks. Detective Brooks Green died from sudden cardiac event at his home on Jan. 25.


Texas Senate panel OKs ‘sanctuary city’ bill

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — A Texas Senate panel on Friday approved a so-called sanctuary cities bill that would withhold state money from local jurisdictions that don't hand over immigrants already in custody for possible deportation.

The Senate's state affairs committee passed the measure after more than 16 hours of often emotional testimony marked by outbursts and protests from spectators.

The bill moves to the full Senate for a vote expected next week.

Hundreds of people registered to testify before the panel Thursday, and the hearing was disrupted repeatedly, prompting security to remove several people. Committee Chairwoman Joan Huffman warned that the chamber would be closed if the outbursts continued.

The term "sanctuary cities" has no legal definition, but Gov. Greg Abbott has promoted the legislation as a move to crackdown on criminal suspects who are in the country illegally.

Individual sheriffs and police chiefs — particularly those in heavily Democratic areas of the state — have long opposed enforcing federal immigration law. Abbott has already ordered $1.5 million withheld from the Travis County sheriff who has said the jails in the state capital, Austin, would no longer honor most federal immigration detainers. That money supports projects such as family violence education and a special court for veterans. Abbott has warned that more money could be cut.

Opponents of the measure also contend immigrant communities wouldn't cooperate with law enforcement for fear of deportation.

Sen. Eddie Lucio, one of only two Democrats on the state affairs committee, said he has "moral" objections to the bill.

"(This) undermines trust between police and immigrant communities. We risk further endangering women and children who fall prey to violence and extortion such as human trafficking," Lucio said Thursday.

But the author of the bill, Republican state Sen. Charles Perry, said local authorities must enforce the law.

"This is not a deportation bill, this is a rule-of-law bill," Perry said. "We have almost a culture of contempt for federal immigration law."


Machete-wielding man shot, wounded after attacking soldiers outside Louvre

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By John Leicester, Raphael Satter, and Angela Charlton Associated Press PARIS — A knife-wielding man shouting "Allahu akbar" attacked French soldiers on patrol near the Louvre Museum Friday in what officials described as a suspected terror attack. The soldiers first tried to fight off the attacker and then opened fire, shooting him five times.

The attack at an entrance to a shopping mall that extends beneath the museum sowed panic and again highlighted the threat French officials say hangs over the country, which was hit repeatedly by extremist attacks in 2015 and 2016.

A police union official said the attacker was carrying two backpacks and had two machetes. He said the man launched himself at the soldiers when they told him that he couldn't bring his bags into the Carrousel du Louvre shopping mall underneath the world-famous museum where the "Mona Lisa" hangs and which went into emergency lock-down.

"That's when he got the knife out and that's when he tried to stab the soldier," said the official, Yves Lefebvre.

The four soldiers first tried to fight off the attacker before opening fire, said Benoit Brulon, a spokesman for the military force that patrols Paris and its major tourist attractions. President Francois Hollande praised the troops' "courage and determination."

Anti-terrorism prosecutors took charge of the investigation. There were no immediate details about the identity of the attacker. "Allahu akbar" is the Arabic phrase for "God is great."

The military patrols — numbering about 3,500 soldiers in the Paris area — were instituted following the January 2015 attacks on Paris' satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and reinforced after Nov. 13 suicide bomb and gun attacks that left 130 people dead at the city's Bataclan concert hall and other sites.

Friday's attacker slightly injured one of the soldiers, in the scalp, officials said. Another soldier opened fire, gravely wounding the attacker.

"He is wounded in the stomach," said police chief Michel Cadot. "He is conscious and he was moving."

Checks of the man's two backpacks found they didn't contain explosives, he said.

Something is going down at The #Louvre 30 National Police vehicles with guns drawn pic.twitter.com/kpLTCtVdZN

— VoiceB0xx (@voiceb0xx) February 3, 2017

Cadot said a second person who was "acting suspiciously" also was arrested, but appears not to have been linked to the attack.

Restaurant worker Sanae Hadraoui, 32, was waiting for breakfast at the Louvre's restaurant complex when she heard the first gunshot, followed by another and then a couple more.

"I hear a shot. Then a second shot. Then maybe two more. I hear people screaming, "Evacuate! Evacuate!"

"They told us to evacuate. I told my colleagues at the McDonald's. We went downstairs and then took the emergency exit."

Hadraoui, who has worked at the Louvre for seven years, said the evacuation was orderly.

The museum in the center of Paris is one of the French capital's biggest tourist attractions. Police sealed off entrances and closed the area to vehicles, snarling traffic, and shooed away confused tourists.

The Louvre's security protocol kicked in, with entrances locked down and visitors who came to admire the paintings and sculptures shepherded into rooms without windows.

Interior Ministry spokesman Pierre-Henry Brandet said about 1,000 people were inside and were held in safe areas before the all-clear was given.

Conor Bakhuizen, 18, who was in the museum on a school trip, said his group was "rushed upstairs really suddenly" and kept in a safe room before they were later slowly let out.

The attack's timing was poor for Paris, coming just hours before the city was unveiling its completed bid for the 2024 Olympics. Paris is competing against Budapest and Los Angeles for the games, which it hasn't hosted since 1924. With the International Olympic Committee choosing the host in September, Friday's attack generated renewed questions about security in the City of Light.

Speaking outside the Louvre, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo said terrorism threatens all of the world's big cities and "there is not a single one escaping that menace."

The speed with which Paris largely went back to normal after the attack, with officers gradually dismantling barricades and pulling down police tape around the Louvre some three hours later, underscored how the French city has — unwillingly but stoically — been forced to learn to live with the extremist threat. Within hours, French radio stations went back to talking about storms battering the west coast and school holiday traffic.

Exterminator Olivier Majewski says he was just leaving his scooter in the parking lot beneath the Louvre when he saw a crush of people running and screaming "there's been a terror attack."

"They were panicked," he said.

The 53-year-old hid for about 15 minutes before gingerly making his way upstairs.

Intervention des forces de l'ordre en cours dans le quartier du Louvre apres un "evenement grave". Les pompiers presents egalement. pic.twitter.com/mWRjZBzlSP

— Remy Buisine (@RemyBuisine) February 3, 2017

What is your inner voice telling you when you’re on scene?

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

Duane Wolfe
Author: Duane Wolfe

Despite all of the possible jokes about the voices in your head, officers need to understand how powerful your internal voice is. That voice is with you every day and it can lead you to success or failure in your professional and personal life.

Only you can hear the voice. Think about the last “conversation” you had with it and ask yourself if the conversation was helpful or not. If a friend spoke to you in the same way, would you remain friends? That voice, positive or negative, helpful or harmful, has a great influence on you.

By understanding and harnessing that power, you can make dramatic, positive steps in police work and home life. The first thing to understand is, ultimately, you control the voice. If that voice is harsh and critical, you can change the tone and the context of the conversation. Just that simple change of how you choose to talk to yourself can have a dramatic effect on how you perceive and respond to the world around you.

Here are three ways you can harness the power of your internal voice.

1. Positive mental imagery

There are several programs out there. I had the privilege of attending police trainer Brian Willis’s “Excellence in Training” course several years ago. It is the only class that I have ever been to that has a money back guarantee. If you don’t think it is the best training program you have ever attended, you get a refund. One of the main focuses in the class is the understanding and creation of Positive Mental Imagery sessions. The sessions can be created for you or for others that you train, your spouse or your kids.

It entails a specific method of addressing identified needs and then programming your brain on a subconscious level to begin working towards those goals. The method is relatively easy once you understand it, and it only takes the time to create a session by recording it and then listening to it. The session can be used once or on a regular basis depending on your need.

I have personally experienced the benefit, and Willis uses this method on professional and Olympic athletes with great success. If it has a proven record of success for elite athletes, why not give it a try yourself? Willis has sessions on healthy eating habits, rest and relaxation for better sleep, and firearms proficiency available.

I highly recommend the “Excellence in Training” program. Brian can be reached at Winning Mind Training where he also has a subscription training series, “Excellence in Training Academy” which provides resources and access to information for trainers.

2. Stress reduction

I first met Lisa WImberger of the Neurosculpting Institute at the ILEETA Conference in 2013. During that class, she took us through a guided meditation involving stress reduction. After that session, I had one of the best night’s sleep I have ever had. You can listen to her talk about the process.

Lisa has a series of DVDs specifically tailored to the reduction of stress, ending self-defeating behaviors and healing trauma. She has worked with LE personnel around the country using her techniques to improve the lives of officers.

3. Heightened situational awareness

You also have that little voice that speaks to you when there is danger. With time and experience, you know what the behaviors and the environment feel like when responding to specific calls or stops. As you approach each call and each stop, ask yourself these questions:

Does this look normal? Is what you are seeing matching up with your previous experiences? Are people acting within the range of normal behavior for this type of situation? Does this sound normal? Is it too quiet? Are people talking too much or too little? What is or isn’t being said? Take the time to truly listen to what people say. Does this feel normal?

Your brain can pick up on cues on a subconscious level. Deep down it may have identified a danger cue, but on a conscious level you cannot specifically identify it. You may just have an uneasy feeling, or the hair goes up on the back of your neck, or you get that feeling in the pit of your stomach that something just isn’t right.

If the answer to any of the above questions is no, slow down, identify what seems out of place, and attempt to deal with what it is that you are seeing or feeling. That may mean stopping and doing a better assessment of the scene, moving to cover, creating distance or calling and waiting for back up.

Those little voices are there for a reason. Use them to your advantage. Harness them to move you in a positive direction in your personal and professional life. Ask yourself right now what the little voice is telling you. Is it motivating you to make positive changes or is it telling you that you don’t have the time for all that? The little voices can guide you to excellence or mediocrity. You choose the voice you listen to and, as a result, the path you take.


4 tips for cops to get healthy habits back on track

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Duane Wolfe

By Joe LeFevre, PoliceOne Contributor

I had a bad weekend recently. Actually, it was a fun weekend. However, health-wise it was a crash and burn. When Monday came, I did not say "forget it" and ignore the healthy routine I had built up. I slid right back into the gym, along with sensible eating.

During the holiday season, Super Bowl weekend or any other time of celebration, the temptation to indulge is overwhelming. From family events to work-sponsored social functions, opportunities to overeat and skip workouts occur all the time. The food is always abundant, the desserts are impossible to pass up and alcohol is often present.

Recently for me, it was a busy Saturday that ended with a trip to the botanical gardens holiday light show. Heading home late, we decided to get burgers from a fast food drive up window. Then on Sunday, after taking down the Christmas tree and decorations, we decided to order a pizza. And, I might even have enjoyed a few beverages with the neighbor during a football game.

Unfortunately, some would find a derailment like this an excuse to quit all of their healthy habits. With various gatherings and events going on throughout the year, the common refrain can be the hope to get back on track after the weekend, vacation or whatever excuse you may have.

Why wait to get back on track? Why feel like a little cheat is a total derailment?

A fitness guru at a conference once said, "If you accidently put a hole in the wall trying to hang a picture, do you burn down your house and wait through months of rebuilding to fix the problem? No, you put a new hook up and hang that photo, so it covers the hole. Chances are you will forget the hole and no one else will ever know it is there."

But quitting is an attitude some take when it comes to good eating and exercise habits. Once the routine is broken the feeling is it can't be fixed. Then, when it becomes weeks or months later and efforts (or thoughts) about trying to get back to a healthy lifestyle are occurring, regaining a routine becomes a struggle. Here are four tips to keep on track if you do get a little derailed.

1. Relax

My coach always preaches the 80/20 rule. If you are following a healthy lifestyle 80 percent of the time you can make up for the 20 percent of time you don’t. The overall lifestyle of eating right and working out are more important than any one event. He does caution that a person should aim for healthy lifestyle choices closer to 95 percent of the time versus 80 percent.

Think about it in a reverse context. If you have an amazingly intense workout then eat a perfectly balanced meal, the next day you don’t wake up with diamond cut six-pack abs. Changes to the body take time to happen. Whatever you did today is not going to destroy the last few months of work.

2. Don’t punish yourself

I hear people around me talk about skipping lunch because of an eating decision they made when off work. Skipping a meal will make you hungry. When you get hungry, the cravings come. Once the cravings hit, bad decisions get made. Now you have been off plan for two days, and it can grow worse from there.

Keep in mind that it takes 3,500 calories to equal a pound of body fat. For an average person, on a simple three meals a day eating plan, a meal is assumed to be between 600-800 calories. If you overindulge, think about these numbers. To what extent has your little cheat actually done damage?

3. Focus

Football coach Lou Holtz asked his players, “What’s important now?” Author Brian Willis writes and talks about this question as the acronym “W.I.N.” for police officers. After a massive cheat, refocus on that question.

The holidays, family celebrations, social events and vacations are a time for fun. It’s a time to enjoy the company of others. It might be the only time per year you get to see certain family or friends.

When I talk to people about healthy lifestyle decisions, most are motivated by quality of life factors (followed quickly by physical appearance reasons). People want to feel good, have the energy to play when off duty and live long enough to spend more time with loved ones.

What’s important now? Yesterday, you spent time with people you care about and in doing so skipped the gym and ate too much. Today, focus on why you have your healthy habits, not on an event taking you off track.

4. Plan

You know what gatherings you have on your calendar. Before the next one takes place, take some time to think about what you will do. Then take steps to mitigate the damage beforehand.

Can you be more strict on eating habits in the days before an event? How about getting an extra workout in during the week before a massive meal? Go into an overindulgence with the feeling you will not need a rebound after it.

If you are traveling, and possibly missing an opportunity to use the gym, figure out a way to still get in a workout. I often take a jump rope and a kettlebell with me on road trips. You don't need a ton of machines to have a solid workout.

If this is the year for you to get back in shape, or kick some bad habit, remember the above four tips. Habits don’t happen overnight. You might stumble. Please don’t use that as an excuse to give up.


4 tips for cops to get healthy habits back on track

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Duane Wolfe

By Joe LeFevre, PoliceOne Contributor

I had a bad weekend recently. Actually, it was a fun weekend. However, health-wise it was a crash and burn. When Monday came, I did not say "forget it" and ignore the healthy routine I had built up. I slid right back into the gym, along with sensible eating.

During the holiday season, Super Bowl weekend or any other time of celebration, the temptation to indulge is overwhelming. From family events to work-sponsored social functions, opportunities to overeat and skip workouts occur all the time. The food is always abundant, the desserts are impossible to pass up and alcohol is often present.

Recently for me, it was a busy Saturday that ended with a trip to the botanical gardens holiday light show. Heading home late, we decided to get burgers from a fast food drive up window. Then on Sunday, after taking down the Christmas tree and decorations, we decided to order a pizza. And, I might even have enjoyed a few beverages with the neighbor during a football game.

Unfortunately, some would find a derailment like this an excuse to quit all of their healthy habits. With various gatherings and events going on throughout the year, the common refrain can be the hope to get back on track after the weekend, vacation or whatever excuse you may have.

Why wait to get back on track? Why feel like a little cheat is a total derailment?

A fitness guru at a conference once said, "If you accidently put a hole in the wall trying to hang a picture, do you burn down your house and wait through months of rebuilding to fix the problem? No, you put a new hook up and hang that photo, so it covers the hole. Chances are you will forget the hole and no one else will ever know it is there."

But quitting is an attitude some take when it comes to good eating and exercise habits. Once the routine is broken the feeling is it can't be fixed. Then, when it becomes weeks or months later and efforts (or thoughts) about trying to get back to a healthy lifestyle are occurring, regaining a routine becomes a struggle. Here are four tips to keep on track if you do get a little derailed.

1. Relax

My coach always preaches the 80/20 rule. If you are following a healthy lifestyle 80 percent of the time you can make up for the 20 percent of time you don’t. The overall lifestyle of eating right and working out are more important than any one event. He does caution that a person should aim for healthy lifestyle choices closer to 95 percent of the time versus 80 percent.

Think about it in a reverse context. If you have an amazingly intense workout then eat a perfectly balanced meal, the next day you don’t wake up with diamond cut six-pack abs. Changes to the body take time to happen. Whatever you did today is not going to destroy the last few months of work.

2. Don’t punish yourself

I hear people around me talk about skipping lunch because of an eating decision they made when off work. Skipping a meal will make you hungry. When you get hungry, the cravings come. Once the cravings hit, bad decisions get made. Now you have been off plan for two days, and it can grow worse from there.

Keep in mind that it takes 3,500 calories to equal a pound of body fat. For an average person, on a simple three meals a day eating plan, a meal is assumed to be between 600-800 calories. If you overindulge, think about these numbers. To what extent has your little cheat actually done damage?

3. Focus

Football coach Lou Holtz asked his players, “What’s important now?” Author Brian Willis writes and talks about this question as the acronym “W.I.N.” for police officers. After a massive cheat, refocus on that question.

The holidays, family celebrations, social events and vacations are a time for fun. It’s a time to enjoy the company of others. It might be the only time per year you get to see certain family or friends.

When I talk to people about healthy lifestyle decisions, most are motivated by quality of life factors (followed quickly by physical appearance reasons). People want to feel good, have the energy to play when off duty and live long enough to spend more time with loved ones.

What’s important now? Yesterday, you spent time with people you care about and in doing so skipped the gym and ate too much. Today, focus on why you have your healthy habits, not on an event taking you off track.

4. Plan

You know what gatherings you have on your calendar. Before the next one takes place, take some time to think about what you will do. Then take steps to mitigate the damage beforehand.

Can you be more strict on eating habits in the days before an event? How about getting an extra workout in during the week before a massive meal? Go into an overindulgence with the feeling you will not need a rebound after it.

If you are traveling, and possibly missing an opportunity to use the gym, figure out a way to still get in a workout. I often take a jump rope and a kettlebell with me on road trips. You don't need a ton of machines to have a solid workout.

If this is the year for you to get back in shape, or kick some bad habit, remember the above four tips. Habits don’t happen overnight. You might stumble. Please don’t use that as an excuse to give up.


Rioting could lead to racketeering charges under Ariz. Senate plan

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: PoliceOne Members

By Bob Christie Associated Press

PHOENIX — Participating in or being near a riot could lead to prosecution on felony racketeering charges and property seizures under a proposal advanced by an Arizona Senate committee Thursday.

Sen. Sonny Borrelli, R-Lake Havasu City, said his measure is needed to add deterrence to existing laws against rioting. His proposal adds rioting to the organized crime statutes, saying an overt act isn't needed to prove conspiracy to riot and adds property damage to the rioting law.

Opponents said it is so broadly written that it could ensnare innocent people and chill free speech rights.

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 4-3 for the measure with all three Democrats on the panel opposed.

The main hammer in Senate Bill 1142 would allow prosecutors to seize a person's assets under civil forfeiture laws in addition to filing enhanced felony criminal charges. Borrelli said it's important to deter violent riots and go after groups that pay protesters. He cited no evidence that protesters have been paid.

The law comes after violent protests in Washington, D.C., following President Donald Trump's inauguration and Wednesday night in Berkeley, California, over a right-wing speaker. But Borrelli said the idea has been around much longer and wasn't a "knee-jerk response."

"We should go after the people that are actually ... violating the First Amendment, trampling on the First Amendment," Borrelli said. "That's the intent of this. We want to put some teeth in going after the bad actors that are out there undermining the First Amendment."

A retired Phoenix police officer who was formerly the police union's president and the executive director of a state police association supported the bill.

Mark Spencer, the retired officer, said the proposal does not go after First Amendment rights to assemble or protest, instead targeting criminal behavior with tougher sanctions.

"When a good thing is used recklessly and harmfully, the penalty needs to be aggravated, whether it's with a weapon or weather it's with free speech protesting that turns into a riot," Spencer said.

But Kevin Heade, a Phoenix defense attorney and member of Arizona Attorneys for Criminal Justice, testified that the measure goes too far. He said the proposed law as written could allow prosecutors could go after innocent organizers of a protest if a riot broke out.

"What they mean about the deterrent effect of the statute is a chilling of First Amendment speech and association," Heade told the panel. "This is an extremely broad statute and we've not heard any justification why it is necessary, other than deterrence."

Heade and Democrats on the panel said current criminal law is sufficient, citing the ability to pursue felony property damage or assault charges when warranted.

Even Sen. Bob Worsley, R-Mesa, seemed conflicted, although he ultimately voted for the proposal. He said he was growing weary of bills with tougher sentences.

"We have 45,000 inmates in our prisons, Washington state is the exact same population with 22,000 inmates," Worsley said. "I understand and believe in being tough on crime but I am concerned we are over-criminalizing a lot of things and making it easier to put people in jail for longer."


NY department receives body armor, helmet grant

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

By Donna Thompson GateHouse New York

FRANKFORT, N.Y. — The Frankfort Village Police Department was one of four local police departments to receive grant funding under the 2016-17 Police Protective Equipment Program.

Police Chief Ronald Petrie informed the Village Board in a report submitted that the village applied for the grant with the assistance of Herkimer County.

The village was awarded $2,760, which Petrie plans to use to purchase protective vests and helmets for the village patrol officers.

Read more: Frankfort police receive grant for vests, helmets


P1 Photo of the Week: Stuck in the snow

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Members

Deputy Nathan Rankin of the Larimer County (Colo.) Sheriff's Department woke up to head to SWAT training when a massive snowstorm blocked his way. He hiked about two miles to get a different vehicle, and dug his patrol car out of the snow. Hours later, another storm hit, packing the state with more snow.

Calling all police photographers! PoliceOne needs pictures of you in action or training. Submit a photo — it could be selected as our Photo of the Week! Be sure to include your name, department information and address (including city, state and ZIP code) where we can reach you — Photo of the Week winners have a chance to win a PoliceOne.com T-shirt!


Off-duty NY cop, firefighter rescue driver from fiery crash

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Members

Associated Press

RONKONKOMA, N.Y. — An off-duty police officer and volunteer firefighter are being called "guardian angels" after authorities say they rescued a woman from a fiery crash on the Long Island Expressway.

Suffolk County police say Melissa Ortiz was heading east on the highway in Ronkonkoma when her vehicle collided with a National Grid truck around 10:50 a.m. Wednesday. The impact caused her SUV to overturn and burst into flames.

Ortiz was trapped in the vehicle. Highway Patrol Officer Thomas Mutarelli and Elmont volunteer firefighter Jeffrey Dupoux happened to be nearby and jumped into action, pulling Ortiz to safety with help from at least one other person.

Ortiz and the truck driver were treated at the hospital and released.

Commissioner Timothy Sini says the rescue was an "act of bravery and professionalism."

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk')); Off-Duty Officer, Volunteer Firefighter Rescue Woman from Burn...

OFF-DUTY OFFICER, VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER RESCUE WOMAN FROM BURNING CAR SCPD Highway Patrol Officer Thomas Mutarelli was off-duty and driving home eastbound on the Long Island Expressway when he witnessed the collision of a black Ford Expedition and a National Grid utility vehicle. The impact caused the Expedition to crash into the center median, overturn and catch fire. Officer Mutarelli sprung into action, using his car to block traffic and rushing over to the overturned vehicle. He was quickly joined by Jeffrey Dupoux, a volunteer with the Elmont Fire Department, and the two worked together to rescue a 23-year-old Medford woman from her car just minutes before it became engulfed in flames. "Officer Mutarelli and volunteer firefighter Dupoux, both of whom were off-duty during the incident, are truly guardian angels," Police Commissioner Timothy D. Sini said. "They were at the right place, at the right time, and performed an act of courage that saved a life." The drivers of the Ford Expedition and utility truck were both transported to Stony Brook Medicine Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.

Posted by Suffolk County Police Department on Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Ronkonkoma, NY- SCPD Highway patrol officer and Elmont Firefighter pull woman from burning vehicle this morning on the LIE near exit 60. pic.twitter.com/lk9LHDh3Wb

— Stringer News (@Stringernews) February 1, 2017


Policing Matters Podcast: Community outreach and crime reduction in 21st century policing

Posted on February 3, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

<!--cke_bookmark_409S--><!--cke_bookmark_409E--><!--cke_bookmark_146S--><!--cke_bookmark_146E-->

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

In December 2014, President Barack Obama signed an executive order establishing the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. The president charged the task force with identifying best practices and offering recommendations on how policing practices can promote effective crime reduction while building public trust. The task force released its final report in May of 2015. In it was what the task force called the “Six Pillars of 21st Century Policing.” In this week’s podcast, Jim and Doug discuss the fourth pillar — Community Policing and Crime Reduction — and in coming weeks will tackle each subsequent pillar in turn.


9mm vs. .40 caliber: How do these cartridges stack up?

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

In mid-2016, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) awarded Glock an $85 million contract for new pistols chambered in 9mm Luger. Then in early 2017, the U.S. Army awarded Sig Sauer a $580 million contract to supply a service pistol based on the company’s P320 handgun chambered in .40 caliber. The new Army .40 caliber sidearms will replace the venerable Beretta M9, a 9×19mm Parabellum pistol.

So, the debate rages on, and questions continue to be asked (and answered) by proponents of each. Which is better? What differences are there? What are the similarities? Is this a tectonic shift or simply another chapter in the rivalry? Here are some thoughts.

Differing history

For starters, the 9mm is a far older design. Georg Luger designed the 9mm in 1901, releasing it to the market about a year later. Smith & Wesson released the .40 S&W in 1990.

The intention behind the .40 design was to take a parent of the FBI’s 10mm load, shorten the case and enable a larger round in existing 9mm designs without having to make significant modifications to the frame. In the 25 years since, the .40 has definitely gained traction, but the 9mm remains far more commonly used.

The two cartridges have some substantially different characteristics. For example, the .40 caliber cartridge typically sports a heavier bullet with loads between from 155 to 180 grain, compared to between 115 and 145 grain for the 9mm. The heavier bullets of the .40 caliber will be a little slower in velocity. The .40 also delivers more felt recoil and has a slightly higher recoil velocity.

Another difference is that the 9mm round is in pistols around the globe. The .40 caliber pistol is — with some exception — restricted to United States deployment. This is quite probably because there simply are more pistols on the market chambered in 9mm. That’s slowly changing — with more .40 cal guns emerging — but availability of more purchase options as a factor, the 9mm still has a slight edge.

One of the biggest differences is that 9mm ammunition is generally cheaper because of the disparity in the cost of materials. The materials used to make cartridges — particularly the lead, zinc, copper, and tin — are sold by weight (provided that other factors like the number of units are the same) so with less materials used, the cost to manufacture 9mm is slightly less costly than .40 caliber.

Another reason for the cost differential is that there are many more 9mm cartridges sold than .40. With the Army’s new move to adopt a handgun in .40 caliber, the volume of .40 cartridges produced is sure to skyrocket, potentially affecting the price in the future.

Differing performance between the 9mm and .40 caliber

In terms of performance, the .40 has the edge. When comparing apples to apples (same brand/bullet design across the calibers) bigger calibers will almost always expand to a larger diameter and penetrate a little further. The bigger the bullet, the bigger the hole it makes. Sometimes, the 9mm will do better in penetration because of its high sectional density and because it easier to push a smaller frontal area through the tissue simulator.

When it comes to performance after barrier penetration (particularly auto glass in the FBI eight-part test) the bigger bullets will typically get more mass through the glass to do more damage to the target.

All that having been said, the margins between the performance of .40 cal vs. 9mm are close enough that in a real world situation, the damage done by each round is — for practical purposes — about the same. Further, the tests which net the results we discuss about penetration and expansion need to be assessed alongside a substantially sized grain of salt.

People are not comprised merely of muscle (which ballistics gelatin simulates). People have bones and vital organs, which affect the lethality of gunshot wounds. Consequently, shot placement and accuracy are far more important determining factors of a round’s lethality than how the gel looks after the test.

Finally, with bullet designs continuing to evolve, there may come a point in time where the performances practically intersect. So on balance, the “bigger hole” argument is a little, well, hollow.

Come to your own conclusions

So, which is better?

The short answer is, “It depends.” It depends on whether or not you have difficulty with the heavier, “snappier” felt recoil of the .40 caliber. It depends on whether or not you want to save money while shooting more in training with the 9mm. It depends on whether or not you want to drill slightly larger holes with a slightly smaller number of bullets. It depends on the load you choose in either cartridge.

Do yourself a favor.

Shoot both.

A lot.

Then decide.

Either way, make sure you keep training hard, ensure your maintain your positive, winning mindset, and stay vigilant always.


9mm vs. .40 caliber: How do the cartridges stack up?

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

In mid-2016, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) awarded Glock an $85 million contract for new pistols chambered in 9mm Luger. Then in early 2017, the U.S. Army awarded Sig Sauer a $580 million contract to supply a service pistol based on the company’s P320 handgun also chambered in 9mm. The new sidearms will replace the venerable Beretta M9, a 9×19mm Parabellum pistol.

Meanwhile, in the past couple of decades, police departments across the country have departed from the 9mm, electing instead to move to the slightly larger .40 caliber.

So, the debate rages on, and questions continue to be asked (and answered) by proponents of each. Which is better? What differences are there? What are the similarities? Is this a tectonic shift or simply another chapter in the rivalry? Here are some thoughts.

Differing history

For starters, the 9mm is a far older design. Georg Luger designed the 9mm in 1901, releasing it to the market about a year later. Smith & Wesson released the .40 S&W in 1990.

The intention behind the .40 design was to take a parent of the FBI’s 10mm load, shorten the case and enable a larger round in existing 9mm designs without having to make significant modifications to the frame. In the 25 years since, the .40 has definitely gained traction, but the 9mm remains far more commonly used.

The two cartridges have some substantially different characteristics. For example, the .40 caliber cartridge typically sports a heavier bullet with loads between from 135 to 180 grain, compared to between 115 and 147 grain for the 9mm. The heavier bullets of the .40 caliber will be a little slower in velocity. The .40 also delivers more felt recoil and has a slightly higher recoil velocity.

Another difference is that the 9mm round is in pistols around the globe. The .40 caliber pistol is — with some exception — restricted to United States deployment. This is quite probably because there simply are more pistols on the market chambered in 9mm. That’s slowly changing — with more .40 cal guns emerging — but availability of more purchase options as a factor, the 9mm still has a slight edge.

One of the biggest differences is that 9mm ammunition is generally cheaper because of the disparity in the cost of materials. The materials used to make cartridges — particularly the lead, zinc, copper, and tin — are sold by weight (provided that other factors like the number of units are the same) so with less materials used, the cost to manufacture 9mm is slightly less costly than .40 caliber.

Another reason for the cost differential is that there are many more 9mm cartridges sold than .40 caliber.

Differing performance between the 9mm and .40 caliber

In terms of performance, the .40 has the edge. When comparing apples to apples (same brand/bullet design across the calibers) bigger calibers will almost always expand to a larger diameter and penetrate a little further. The bigger the bullet, the bigger the hole it makes. Sometimes, the 9mm will do better in penetration because of its high sectional density and because it easier to push a smaller frontal area through the tissue simulator.

When it comes to performance after barrier penetration (particularly auto glass in the FBI eight-part test) the bigger bullets will typically get more mass through the glass to do more damage to the target.

All that having been said, the margins between the performance of .40 cal vs. 9mm are close enough that in a real world situation, the damage done by each round is — for practical purposes — about the same. Further, the tests which net the results we discuss about penetration and expansion need to be assessed alongside a substantially sized grain of salt.

People are not comprised merely of muscle (which ballistics gelatin simulates). People have bones and vital organs, which affect the lethality of gunshot wounds. Consequently, shot placement and accuracy are far more important determining factors of a round’s lethality than how the gel looks after the test.

Finally, with bullet designs continuing to evolve, there may come a point in time where the performances practically intersect. So on balance, the “bigger hole” argument is a little, well, hollow.

Come to your own conclusions

So, which is better?

The short answer is, “It depends.” It depends on whether or not you have difficulty with the heavier, “snappier” felt recoil of the .40 caliber. It depends on whether or not you want to save money while shooting more in training with the 9mm. It depends on whether or not you want to drill slightly larger holes with a slightly smaller number of bullets. It depends on the load you choose in either cartridge.

Do yourself a favor.

Shoot both.

A lot.

Then decide.

Either way, make sure you keep training hard, ensure your maintain your positive, winning mindset, and stay vigilant always.


Gun jams after shot fired into Boston Public School HQ

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

By PoliceOne Staff

BOSTON — Police said a single shot was fired into Boston Public School headquarters before witnesses tackled the two juvenile gunman.

Police Commissioner William B. Evans told The Boston Herald tragedy was averted after a shell casing jammed the suspect’s gun.

A 15-year-old suspect was arrested and another juvenile was questioned, according to the publication.

No one was injured in the incident.

"Thank God nobody was hurt," he said. "We're going to work with the school department to tighten up security here, and work so we never have anything like this happen in the future."

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Texas policewoman wins Fittest Games championship

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

By PoliceOne Staff

SAN ANTONIO — Criminals should be on the lookout for Officer Jessica Aelvoet now that she is the “fittest” San Antonio officer.

Aelvoet, a 12-year veteran of the San Antonio Police Department, competed in the CrossFit Games in Austin last weekend and won the 2017 Pro Women’s Championship, MySanAntonio.com reported.

The championship title is a step up for Aelvoet. In 2014, she placed 26th out of 30 athletes. According to the publication, last year Aelvoet’s team finished one place short of qualifying for the final workout of the competition.

She plans to take her title to the competition of the “fittest on earth” at the Reebok CrossFit Games Open in mid-February.


Fla. mayor steps down after making police ‘pig’ comment

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

By PoliceOne Staff

STUART, Fla. — A mayor who said, "What are we serving, pig today?" near an officer in a grocery store has stepped down.

According to WPTV, Mayor Eula Clarke resigned from her position Wednesday.

She did not step down from from her position as city commissioner.

“Unfortunately, I made a mistake. We all make mistakes and I am truly and humbly sorry,” Clarke said.

The city is in the process of hiring an independent investigator to look further into the statement and make sure policies were not violated.

“It’s not for the purpose of punishing anybody. It’s making sure that the work environment at the city is free from the perception of hostility,” Mortell said.

Stuart city hall packed to the max. "Unfortunately I made a mistake. We all make mistakes," says Eula Clarke. @WPTV pic.twitter.com/CfPrUjLH4m

— Meghan McRoberts (@MeghanWPTV) February 1, 2017


5 domestic terrorism threats you haven’t thought of in a while, but are still here

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Cole Zercoe

Police officers are on the front lines in the fight against terrorism in the United States. While much of the attention has been focused on foreign terror organizations like the Islamic State and Al-Qaeda (and the lone wolf terror attacks by domestic actors inspired by them), it’s important to remember the threats posed by domestic terror groups that don’t always dominate the headlines.

According to a 2015 study by the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, most police agencies view anti-government violent extremists – not radicalized Muslims – as the greatest threat of political violence they face. In that same study, eco-terrorism ranked third, right below violent extremism inspired by Al-Qaeda. Here are five threats you should know.

1. Army of God

Planned Parenthood clinic shooting survivor Ozy Licano describes his encounter with the shooter. (Christian Murdock/The Gazette via AP)

The Army of God is a Christian extremist organization linked to multiple incidents of anti-abortion violence spanning over decades. Formed in 1982, members of the terrorist group are notorious for the bombing of abortion clinics, acts of kidnapping, murder, and attempted murder.

One of the most well-known incidents of violence tied to the group was the 2009 assassination of physician George Tiller, who was shot to death while serving as an usher during a service in his church. He was targeted for performing late-term abortions.

The Army of God recently made headlines in 2015, when Robert Lewis Dear, Jr. opened fire in a Colorado Planned Parenthood clinic. A police officer and two civilians were killed. Five officers and four civilians were wounded. Dear told police "no more baby parts" after he was taken into custody.

While not directly affiliated with Army of God, Dear described its members as “heroes” years prior to the attack.

Donald Spitz, Army of God’s spokesperson, continues to run the organization’s website, where Dear is listed as a “hero who stood up for the unborn.” The FBI has been watching Spitz for over 20 years.

2. Phineas Priesthood

Police tape marks off the scene of a rampage in downtown Austin, Friday, Nov. 28, 2014, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Jim Vertun)

The Phineas Priesthood is not a group, but a name for individuals who commit acts of violence based on ideology detailed in a 1990 book written by white supremacist Richard Kelly Hoskins. This brand of Christian terrorism lists interracial relationships, homosexuality, and abortion among its targets.

As the Southern Poverty Law Center outlines, the Priesthood does not have leaders, meetings, or a traditional membership process. Those who wish to become a Phineas Priest are ordained by committing a “Phineas action.” Like many terror threats on this list, the lack of any formal organization makes predicting or thwarting an attack difficult.

Followers of the Phineas ideology are responsible for a number of violent attacks. Among them was a series of incidents in 1996 carried out by four men, which included the bombings of the Spokane Spokesman-Review and a Planned Parenthood office, as well as multiple bank robberies. The FBI has been investigating the Priesthood for decades.

The Priesthood recently made headlines after a 2014 shooting rampage in downtown Austin. Larry McQuilliams opened fire on a number of buildings, including the Austin police headquarters and a federal courthouse. Over 100 rounds were fired during the incident, in which McQuilliams also attempted to burn down the Mexican Consulate. Police later discovered a copy of Hoskins’ book in McQuilliams’ rented van.

"What keeps me up at night is these guys," then-Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo said at the time of the attack. "The lone wolf."

Morris Gulett, the former leader of the Aryan Nations, launched a new extremist group in 2016 that incorporates the Phineas Priesthood emblem.

3. Earth Liberation Front

The remains of Vail Mountain's Two Elks restaurant Tuesday, Oct. 20,1998. The Earth Liberation Front took credit for the attack. (AP Photo/Jack Affleck)

Defined as “eco-terrorists” by the FBI, the Earth Liberation Front is a decentralized domestic terror group responsible for a series of attacks that date back to the early 90s. The group is driven by a shared ideology of “economic sabotage and guerrilla warfare to stop the exploitation and destruction of the environment” and carries out attacks, most commonly in the form of arson and vandalism, in cells or individually. From 2001-2011, no group was responsible for more terrorist attacks on U.S. soil than the ELF.

Although the group’s activity has waned in recent years, these attacks have resulted in millions of dollars in damage. No deaths have been attributed to the ELF, but one FBI official told CNN in 2005, "Plainly, I think we're lucky. Once you set one of these fires they can go way out of control.”

Joseph Mamoud Dibee and Josephine Sunshine Overaker, both affiliated with the group, remain at large and on the FBI’s most wanted list for domestic terrorism. They are wanted for a string of attacks across multiple states totaling over $48 million in damages.

4. Sovereign Citizens .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

The threat on this list that law enforcement officers are likely most familiar with is the anti-government sovereign citizen movement. Sovereign citizens follow their own interpretations of the law and disregard all others. Members believe most or all of the U.S. government operates without legitimacy.

Sovereign citizens are responsible for a number of attacks on cops. In 2010, two officers were gunned down at a traffic stop by sovereign citizens. In 2014, a married couple that identified themselves as part of the movement entered a pizzeria and murdered two cops who were dining there, leaving a note on one of the bodies that read, “This is the start of the revolution.”

The fatal 2016 ambush that left three officers dead in Baton Rouge was perpetrated by a man who declared himself a sovereign citizen.

Although the movement has no leadership or formal organization, the SPLC estimated as many as 300,000 Americans identified in some way as sovereign citizens in 2011. Terry Nichols, who had a role in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, was a member.

5. Animal Liberation Front

The fire bombed Hertford College boat house, Oxford, England, Aug. 25, 2005. The ALF claimed responsibility. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Closely tied to the ELF, the Animal Liberation Front is a terror group that engages in crimes, including arson, harassment, and vandalism, in the name of animal rights. Like the ELF, it is decentralized and carries out its actions via autonomous cells and individuals.

The American branch of the ALF began in the late '70s, and over the decades broke into sub groups. While no deaths have been attributed to the ALF, its members have committed crimes of increasing severity. From 2001-2011, the ALF was second only to the ELF for the most terrorist attacks committed on U.S. soil. Their targets have included food producers, biomedical researchers and law enforcement, according to the FBI.

The group is responsible for millions of dollars in damage. A few of their tactics include the mailing of letter bombs, food scares, and the use of incendiary devices. In one particularly disturbing incident in 2006, a UCLA researcher was targeted in an attempted firebombing, but the device was placed at the wrong home. The FBI told reporters at the time of the incident that the crude explosive, which did not go off, had enough power to kill the home’s occupants.


Former mint worker who hid stolen gold in rectum sentenced

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

OTTAWA, Ontario — A former Royal Canadian Mint employee who stole 22 cookie-sized pieces of refined gold by hiding them in his rectum has been sentenced to 30 months in prison.

Thirty-five-year-old Leston Lawrence was found guilty last November of stealing the pieces from the mint and selling 17 of them through Ottawa Gold Buyers.

Ontario Court judge Peter Doody on Thursday sentenced Lawrence and ordered him to pay a fine of US$145,900 (CA$190,000).

Doody says the stolen gold was worth US$127,116.11 (CA$165,451.14).

Court testimony indicated that Lawrence was involved in purifying recently procured gold and sometimes worked alone, out of sight of security cameras.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Texas Senate starts push to ban ‘sanctuary cities’

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

By Jim Vertuno Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — Eager to capitalize on momentum from President Donald Trump's call for a crackdown on illegal immigration, Texas Republicans have begun their push to ban so-called "sanctuary cities," an issue Gov. Greg Abbott has declared one of his "emergency" issues for the state.

The Republican-controlled state Senate held its first hearing on a bill Thursday. The meeting in the stately chamber was disrupted several times by demonstrators singing songs or directing jeers at Abbott, who didn't attend.

The bill would deny state grant money to jurisdictions where police refuse federal requests to hand over immigrants already in custody for possible deportation.

Abbott has also called for the power to remove from office locally elected officials that resist. The Senate is expected to pass the bill as early as next week.


80-year-old man accused of punching cop at Elizabeth Smart event

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — An 80-year-old man is accused of punching a police officer who stopped him from approaching kidnapping survivor Elizabeth Smart with a knife at a book-signing event in Indiana.

Smart — who was 14 in 2002 when she was snatched from her bedroom in Salt Lake City and held for nine months — had been speaking about overcoming adversity at Indiana State University on Wednesday when the incident occurred.

ISU Police Chief Joseph Newport said Claude Hudson had been sitting in the front row during Smart's presentation and was later spotted fiddling with a 3-inch pocket knife, using it to open a tea bag wrapping and "just acting so peculiar,"

Hudson then concealed the knife and started to walk up a line of about 100 people who were waiting to meet Smart and have books signed, Newport said. An officer stepped between Hudson and Smart, and the suspect hit the officer twice in his midsection, Newport said.

Hudson, of Terre Haute, Indiana, pleaded not guilty to a battery charge Wednesday.

Smart issued a statement through her representative Thursday, saying she "is grateful for law enforcement and Indiana State University's quick response and that the event and her work continued undeterred."

The police chief said Hudson is a frequent visitor to Indiana State University and that investigators have found no connection between Hudson and Smart.

A judge set Hudson's bond at $25,000 bond and ordered a mental health evaluation. Hudson's trial is scheduled for May 9. He is currently on parole for a burglary conviction.

Hudson's public defender hasn't responded to a request for comment. There was no answer at a phone listed for Hudson in Terre Haute.


Tenn. officer dies while trying to rescue woman in river

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Search crews found the body of a Metro Nashville police officer who slipped into a bitterly cold Cumberland River while trying to rescue a woman, Tennessee officials said Thursday.

The Metro Nashville Police Department confirmed "with heavy hearts" in a tweet around 8 a.m. that a fire department diver found the body of 44-year-old Eric Mumaw. Police said Mumaw was an 18-year veteran of the department, "who gave his life this morning in service to Nashville."

"I know he died doing what he loves. He loved his midnight shift and he gave his life," Police Chief Steve Anderson told The Tennessean.

Media reported that Mumaw has been recognized multiple times by the department, including receiving the department's Life Saving Award in 2011 and the department's Exemplary Service Award in 2003.

Nashville Mayor Megan Berry said in a statement that "our worst fears were realized" with the officer's tragic death. "Officer Mumaw dedicated his life to the safety and protection of us all, and today he gave his life to that calling."

Police spokesman Don Aaron said during a news conference earlier Thursday that two officers were responding about 4:30 a.m. Thursday to a call about a 40-year-old woman who relatives said was contemplating suicide.

He said they found the woman in a car on the boat ramp near the water's edge. Aaron said it appeared that she was about to get out of the car to go with officers when the vehicle went into gear and rolled down the ramp, which ended abruptly under the water.

"The two officers as the car was rolling tried to make heroic efforts to save the woman who was in the vehicle," Aaron said, but both officers slipped into the river. One was able to get back to the bank. Aaron said that officer tried to grab the other officer but was unsuccessful.

He said crews found the woman from the car about an hour later on the riverbank and she was taken to a hospital for treatment.

Metro Nashville Fire Department spokesman Brian Haas said river conditions were brutal, with a fast current on top of cold temperatures.

"It's extremely dangerous for anybody to be in that kind of a situation," he said.


Tenn. officer dies while trying to rescue woman in river

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Search crews found the body of a Metro Nashville police officer who slipped into a bitterly cold Cumberland River while trying to rescue a woman, Tennessee officials said Thursday.

The Metro Nashville Police Department confirmed "with heavy hearts" in a tweet around 8 a.m. that a fire department diver found the body of 44-year-old Eric Mumaw. Police said Mumaw was an 18-year veteran of the department, "who gave his life this morning in service to Nashville."

"I know he died doing what he loves. He loved his midnight shift and he gave his life," Police Chief Steve Anderson told The Tennessean.

Media reported that Mumaw has been recognized multiple times by the department, including receiving the department's Life Saving Award in 2011 and the department's Exemplary Service Award in 2003.

Nashville Mayor Megan Berry said in a statement that "our worst fears were realized" with the officer's tragic death. "Officer Mumaw dedicated his life to the safety and protection of us all, and today he gave his life to that calling."

Police spokesman Don Aaron said during a news conference earlier Thursday that two officers were responding about 4:30 a.m. Thursday to a call about a 40-year-old woman who relatives said was contemplating suicide.

He said they found the woman in a car on the boat ramp near the water's edge. Aaron said it appeared that she was about to get out of the car to go with officers when the vehicle went into gear and rolled down the ramp, which ended abruptly under the water.

"The two officers as the car was rolling tried to make heroic efforts to save the woman who was in the vehicle," Aaron said, but both officers slipped into the river. One was able to get back to the bank. Aaron said that officer tried to grab the other officer but was unsuccessful.

He said crews found the woman from the car about an hour later on the riverbank and she was taken to a hospital for treatment.

Metro Nashville Fire Department spokesman Brian Haas said river conditions were brutal, with a fast current on top of cold temperatures.

"It's extremely dangerous for anybody to be in that kind of a situation," he said.


Where are the most dangerous cities in the U.S.?

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

By Megan Wells, PoliceOne Contributor

Each year, the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program releases crime rates in the United States.

One of the datasets the FBI releases observes crime rates in U.S. cities with populations over 100,000. The data addresses violent crimes and property crimes, independently. Violent crimes include murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Property crimes include burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson, or instances where there is no force or threat of force against the victims.

We’ve taken the 2016 dataset and solved for the crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants, for each type of crime. According to the data collected, here are the most dangerous cities in America, with populations over 100,000 for both property and violent crimes.

<!--cke_bookmark_117S--><!--cke_bookmark_117E--> Data source for map: FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program

Top 10 most dangerous cities in the U.S., by violent crimes:

1. St. Louis, Missouri

Population: 317,095 Total violent crime: 2,781 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 877.02

2. Memphis, Tennessee

Population: 657,936 Total violent crime: 5,733 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 971.36

3. Rockford, Illinois

Population: 148,178 Total violent crime: 1,238 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 835.48

4. Baltimore, Maryland

Population: 621,252 Total violent crime: 5,176 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 833.16

5. Detroit, Michigan

Population: 673,225 Total violent crime: 5,409 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 803.45

6. Kansas City, Missouri

Population: 473,373 Total violent crime: 3,668 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 774.86

7. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Population: 600,400 Total violent crime: 4,427 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 737.34

8. Little Rock, Arkansas

Population: 198,647 Total violent crime: 1,415 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 712.32

9. Stockton, California

Population: 304,890 Total violent crime: 2,158 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 707.80

10. Oakland, California

Population: 419,481 Total violent crime: 2,952 Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 703.73 Top 10 most dangerous cities in the U.S., by property crimes:

1. Springfield, Missouri

Population: 166,860 Total property crime: 6,283 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 3,765.43

2. Spokane, Washington

Population: 212,698 Total property crime: 8,000 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 3,761.20

3. Tacoma, Washington

Population: 206,884 Total property crime: 6,795 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 3,284.45

4. Little Rock, Arkansas

Population: 198,647 Total property crime: 6,476 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 3,260.05

5. Albuquerque, New Mexico

Population: 559,721 Total property crime: 17,888 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 3,195.88

6. Pueblo, Colorado

Population: 108,810 Total property crime: 3,439 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 3,160.56

7. Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Population: 178,598 Total property crime: 5,366 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 3,004.51

8. Tucson, Arizona

Population: 529,675 Total property crime: 15,773 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 2,977.86

9. Renton, Washington

Population: 100,015 Total property crime: 2,921 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 2,920.56

10. Kent, Washington

Population: 127,259 Total property crime: 3,669 Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 2,883.10

Click to access the full data set, which includes 264 cities.


Texas officer injured, fleeing driver killed during traffic stop

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Police near Fort Worth have shot and killed a 23-year-old motorist who attempted to flee a traffic stop and twice struck an officer with his car.

The Tarrant County medical examiner's office identified the dead man as Tavis Crane, who was wanted on several arrest warrants.

Arlington police said in a statement Thursday that as officers attempted to take Crane into custody late Wednesday, he put his car into reverse and struck an officer and rammed her patrol car.

Crane then drove forward and struck the officer again.

A second officer shot Crane, who was taken to a hospital where he died.

The injured officer, a 14-year veteran, was in serious condition with several broken bones but is expected to recover.

A toddler in Crane's car was not injured.


Man arrested in Denver transit security officer’s death set to appear in court

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

DENVER — A man accused in the shooting death of a transit guard in front of two women in downtown Denver is set to appear in court Thursday as police look for a motive for the apparent unprovoked attack.

Joshua Cummings, 37, was arrested shortly after Tuesday night's shooting near Union Station, a hub for buses and trains, and the city's pedestrian mall. Security camera footage helped police quickly find and arrest the suspected gunman.

The armed officer, Scott Von Lanken of Loveland, was wearing a dark blue uniform similar to those worn by police. In case he was targeted because he was believed to be a police officer, police Chief Robert White said officers have been warned to remain vigilant.

According to police, Von Lanken was trying to help two women who were afraid they had missed the last light rail train when one of them said she saw a man with a swollen face and "weird looking eyes" walk up to the officer and say something to the effect of "Do what you are told" before she heard a gunshot. He ran away but police found Cummings hiding on the patio of a nearby loft apartment building with a 9mm handgun.

Cummings, who has ties to a variety of cities in Texas, most recently Austin, was charged with a misdemeanor over five years ago out of state, police Commander Barb Archer said. It's not clear if he has a lawyer yet.

Gary Kim, the manager of the Holiday Motel in the Denver suburb of Englewood, said Cummings had been staying there for about three weeks.

Cummings previously stayed for about a month at the $365-a-week motel before leaving in late November and then returned in early January.

"He was one of my favorite tenants. I enjoyed seeing him," Kim said.

The motel manager said he didn't know what Cummings did for a living, but he would often volunteer to help people pay their rent.

Kim added that Cummings "kinda looked like a hippy" and had a full beard. He stayed at the hotel with a woman and a child, and Kim said he never noticed anything out of the ordinary.

Von Lanken was a contracted security officer for the Denver area's Regional Transportation District employed by Allied Universal.

Shellie Von Lanken told KUSA-TV in Denver that her husband of 35 years worked at least 65 hours a week to support her and their 32-year-old twin daughters, one of whom is disabled.

"It was unbelievable that any human being could even work what he was working," she said. "He just worked his heart out. He would tell me, 'If I could keep working, I would get another job just so I could provide for my family.'"

She added that if her husband were still alive, he would tell her and their daughters to forgive the shooter.

Soon after the area of the shooting reopened Wednesday morning, a group of motorcycle officers taped a blue sign along with flowers on a pole at the scene of the shooting offering their prayers as people walked by on their way to work.


Officials: 1 hostage dead after inmates take over Del. prison

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Randall Chase Associated Press

SMYRNA, Del. — Police breached a building at Delaware's largest prison early Thursday, ending a nearly 24-hour hostage standoff that left one staffer dead.

Inmates assumed control of the building at the James T. Vaughn Correction Center on Wednesday, taking four employees hostage. The inmates told a local newspaper that concerns about their treatment and the leadership of the United States had prompted their actions.

Authorities did not immediately explain how the employee died. They said Delaware State Police entered the building about 5:05 a.m. Thursday and found the man unresponsive. He was pronounced dead about 25 minutes later.

A second Department of Correction employee who had been held hostage was rescued. She is being examined at a hospital.

The prison is in Smyrna, about 15 miles north of the state capital of Dover.

Delaware Gov. John Carney said the priority now is to determine what happened and why.

In a statement released Thursday, the new Democratic governor said officials will "hold accountable anyone who was responsible" for taking the hostages. He said officials will "make whatever changes are necessary to ensure nothing like it ever happens again."

Details of how the inmates managed to take over the building were not immediately clear. Robert Coupe, secretary of the Delaware Department of Safety and Homeland Security, said authorities don't know "the dynamics of the takeover" or whether inmates had been held against their will.

A preliminary investigation suggests the disturbance began about 10:30 a.m. Wednesday when a correctional officer inside Building C, which houses more than 100 inmates, radioed for immediate assistance, Delaware State Police spokesman Sgt. Richard Bratz said. Other officers responded to help, and the employees were taken hostage, he said.

A news release from the Delaware Department of Correction said 14 more inmates were released about 12:30 a.m. Thursday from the building where the hostages had been held and were being held elsewhere at the prison. The news release said a total of 46 inmates had been released from the building since the hostage situation began.

The hostage situation drew dozens of officers and law enforcement vehicles and prompted a statewide lockdown of all prisons. One hostage was released Wednesday afternoon and another was released hours later.

One of the freed employees was taken to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening, authorities said. The condition of the second wasn't immediately available.

Earlier in the day, inmates reached out to The News Journal in Wilmington in two phone calls to explain their actions and make demands. Prisoners funneled the calls to the paper with the help of one inmate's fiancee and another person's mother. The mother told the paper that her son was among the hostages.

In that call, an inmate said their reasons "for doing what we're doing" included "Donald Trump. Everything that he did. All the things that he's doing now. We know that the institution is going to change for the worse."

That caller said education for prisoners was the inmates' priority. They also said they want effective rehabilitation for all prisoners and information about how money is allocated to prisons.

According to the department's website, the prison is Delaware's largest correctional facility for men, with about 2,500 inmates. It houses minimum, medium and maximum security inmates, and also houses Kent County detainees awaiting trial.

It employs 1,500 corrections officers, according to Bruce Rogers, counsel for the Correctional Officers Association of Delaware.

In 2004, an inmate at the Smyrna prison raped a counselor and took her hostage for nearly seven hours, according to an Associated Press report at the time. A department sharpshooter later shot and killed 45-year-old Scott Miller, according to the report, ending the standoff.

___

Associated Press writers Sarah Rankin in Richmond, Virginia, David Dishneau in Hagerstown, Maryland, and Sarah Brumfield in Washington, D.C., contributed to this report.


Officials: 1 CO dead after inmates take over Del. prison

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null

UPDATE: (10:43 a.m. CST) –

SMYRNA, Del. — Authorities say inmates used "sharp objects" to take over a Delaware prison and hold three prison guards and a counselor hostage.

One of the guards died during the nearly 24-hour ordeal. Two guards were released during negotiations and the counselor was rescued after authorities used a backhoe to breach a building at the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center.

Delaware Department of Safety and Homeland Security Robert Coupe said Thursday the inmates used "sharp objects" to take over the prison, but he couldn't describe the weapons in any more detail. He says inmates also filled foot lockers with water and stacked them at entryways to make it harder for authorities to get in.

The correctional officer who died was Sgt. Steven Floyd, who had been with the agency for 16 years. Authorities wouldn't say how the officer died.

Delaware Gov. John Carney called the situation "torturous" and promised a full investigation.

EARLIER:

By Randall Chase Associated Press

SMYRNA, Del. — Police breached a building at Delaware's largest prison early Thursday, ending a nearly 24-hour hostage standoff that left one staffer dead.

Inmates assumed control of the building at the James T. Vaughn Correction Center on Wednesday, taking four employees hostage. The inmates told a local newspaper that concerns about their treatment and the leadership of the United States had prompted their actions.

Authorities did not immediately explain how the employee died. They said Delaware State Police entered the building about 5:05 a.m. Thursday and found the man unresponsive. He was pronounced dead about 25 minutes later.

A second Department of Correction employee who had been held hostage was rescued. She is being examined at a hospital.

The prison is in Smyrna, about 15 miles north of the state capital of Dover.

Delaware Gov. John Carney said the priority now is to determine what happened and why.

In a statement released Thursday, the new Democratic governor said officials will "hold accountable anyone who was responsible" for taking the hostages. He said officials will "make whatever changes are necessary to ensure nothing like it ever happens again."

Details of how the inmates managed to take over the building were not immediately clear. Robert Coupe, secretary of the Delaware Department of Safety and Homeland Security, said authorities don't know "the dynamics of the takeover" or whether inmates had been held against their will.

A preliminary investigation suggests the disturbance began about 10:30 a.m. Wednesday when a correctional officer inside Building C, which houses more than 100 inmates, radioed for immediate assistance, Delaware State Police spokesman Sgt. Richard Bratz said. Other officers responded to help, and the employees were taken hostage, he said.

A news release from the Delaware Department of Correction said 14 more inmates were released about 12:30 a.m. Thursday from the building where the hostages had been held and were being held elsewhere at the prison. The news release said a total of 46 inmates had been released from the building since the hostage situation began.

The hostage situation drew dozens of officers and law enforcement vehicles and prompted a statewide lockdown of all prisons. One hostage was released Wednesday afternoon and another was released hours later.

One of the freed employees was taken to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening, authorities said. The condition of the second wasn't immediately available.

Earlier in the day, inmates reached out to The News Journal in Wilmington in two phone calls to explain their actions and make demands. Prisoners funneled the calls to the paper with the help of one inmate's fiancee and another person's mother. The mother told the paper that her son was among the hostages.

In that call, an inmate said their reasons "for doing what we're doing" included "Donald Trump. Everything that he did. All the things that he's doing now. We know that the institution is going to change for the worse."

That caller said education for prisoners was the inmates' priority. They also said they want effective rehabilitation for all prisoners and information about how money is allocated to prisons.

According to the department's website, the prison is Delaware's largest correctional facility for men, with about 2,500 inmates. It houses minimum, medium and maximum security inmates, and also houses Kent County detainees awaiting trial.

It employs 1,500 corrections officers, according to Bruce Rogers, counsel for the Correctional Officers Association of Delaware.

In 2004, an inmate at the Smyrna prison raped a counselor and took her hostage for nearly seven hours, according to an Associated Press report at the time. A department sharpshooter later shot and killed 45-year-old Scott Miller, according to the report, ending the standoff.

___

Associated Press writers Sarah Rankin in Richmond, Virginia, David Dishneau in Hagerstown, Maryland, and Sarah Brumfield in Washington, D.C., contributed to this report.


Police use backhoe to breach prison, end standoff; 1 CO dead

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Randall Chase Associated Press

SMYRNA, Del. — Police used a backhoe to breach a building at Delaware's largest prison early Thursday, ending what the governor called a "torturous" hostage standoff that left one guard dead.

Inmates used "sharp instruments" to assume control of the building at the James T. Vaughn Correction Center on Wednesday, taking three prison guards and a woman counselor hostage. The inmates told a local newspaper that concerns about their treatment and the leadership of the United States had prompted their actions.

Authorities did not say how Sgt. Steven Floyd died. He was a 16-year veteran with the prisons agency. During the standoff, inmates negotiated to have the water turned on, which authorities said the prisoners used to fill up small foot lockers to build a wall at the prison entryways.

Delaware State Police entered the building about 5:05 a.m. Thursday and found Floyd unresponsive. He was pronounced dead about 25 minutes later.

The counselor, a Department of Correction employee, was rescued. Delaware Department of Safety and Homeland Security Robert Coupe said some inmates had shielded her from harm. She is being examined at a hospital.

Coupe described the inmates' weapons as "sharp instruments" but did not elaborate.

"My prayers all day yesterday was that this event would end with a different result but it didn't," Gov. John Carney said. "So today all of us mourn for the family of Sgt. Floyd."

The prison is in Smyrna, about 15 miles north of the state capital of Dover.

The governor said the priority now is to determine what happened and why.

In a statement released Thursday, the new Democratic governor said officials will "hold accountable anyone who was responsible" for taking the hostages. He said officials will "make whatever changes are necessary to ensure nothing like it ever happens again."

It wasn't immediately clear whether any inmates had been held against their will. Coupe said all 120 inmates in the building were considered suspects while Department of Correction Commissioner Perry Phelps said dozens of inmates had been "released" during the standoff.

The disturbance began about 10:30 a.m. Wednesday when a correctional officer inside Building C radioed for immediate assistance, Delaware State Police spokesman Sgt. Richard Bratz said. Other officers responded to help, and the employees were taken hostage, he said.

A news release from the Delaware Department of Correction said 14 more inmates were released about 12:30 a.m. Thursday from the building where the hostages had been held and were being held elsewhere at the prison. The news release said a total of 46 inmates had been released from the building since the standoff began.

The hostage situation drew dozens of officers and law enforcement vehicles and prompted a statewide lockdown of all prisons. The first hostage was released Wednesday afternoon and another was released hours later. Both had injuries that are not life-threatening, authorities said.

Three maintenance workers who had been hiding in the basement were able to make their way to the roof, where they were rescued, Phelps said.

Earlier in the day, inmates reached out to The News Journal in Wilmington in two phone calls to explain their actions and make demands. Prisoners funneled the calls to the paper with the help of one inmate's fiancee and another person's mother. The mother told the paper that her son was among the hostages.

In that call, an inmate said their reasons "for doing what we're doing" included "Donald Trump. Everything that he did. All the things that he's doing now. We know that the institution is going to change for the worse."

That caller said education for prisoners was the inmates' priority. They also said they want effective rehabilitation for all prisoners and information about how money is allocated to prisons.

According to the department's website, the prison is Delaware's largest correctional facility for men, with about 2,500 inmates. It houses minimum, medium and maximum security inmates, and also houses Kent County detainees awaiting trial.

It employs 1,500 corrections officers, according to Bruce Rogers, counsel for the Correctional Officers Association of Delaware.

In 2004, an inmate at the Smyrna prison raped a counselor and took her hostage for nearly seven hours, according to an Associated Press report at the time. A department sharpshooter later shot and killed 45-year-old Scott Miller, according to the report, ending the standoff.

___

Associated Press writers Sarah Rankin in Richmond, Virginia, David Dishneau in Hagerstown, Maryland, and Sarah Brumfield in Washington, D.C., contributed to this report.


Ohio pastor claims Chicago gangs want to work with Trump to lower crime

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

By Annie Sweeney and Jeremy Gorner Chicago Tribune

WASHINGTON — A Cleveland minister's surprise comment to President Donald Trump on Wednesday that he had heard from "top gang thugs" in Chicago who wanted to meet with him to reduce the city's gun violence was quickly ridiculed by anti-violence groups here as likely to fail and certainly out of touch with longtime gang dynamics.

The Rev. Darrell Scott, a strong Trump supporter, could not be reached to provide details on the "sit-down" he said he planned to hold in Chicago in a couple of weeks about "lowering the body count."

But those who have been doing anti-violence work in Chicago for years said the idea of an outsider coming to Chicago to untangle gang conflicts was suspect.

"The idea is great, but trusted insiders are really crucial because you need that understanding of what both sides are dealing with," said Charles Ransford, director of science and policy at Cure Violence, which has mediated gang conflicts for more than 15 years in Chicago.

Ransford and others said Scott's plan also seemed out of step with Chicago's gang structure, which long ago splintered into smaller neighborhood divisions that are offshoots of the once-larger, more organized super-gangs that had powerful leaders.

"Chicago no longer has the gang hierarchy it used to have," Ransford told the Tribune. "It's much more a block-by-block clique system. How can I say this? They would need to call a lot of people to the table to really be able to cover all the different cliques and gangs. There is not just a handful. There is a lot of them."

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

But Trump, who met in the White House with Scott and others for an African-American History Month event, embraced the minister's remarks.

"That's a great idea because Chicago is totally out of control," the president said of Scott meeting with Chicago gang leaders to reduce the violence.

Scott went on to say that the gang leaders in Chicago had committed "to lower that body count" in return for added social programs from the federal government.

"If they're not going to solve the problem — and what you're doing is the right thing — then we're going to solve the problem for them because we're going to have to do something about Chicago," the president said. "Because what's happening in Chicago should not be happening in this country."

"They want to work with this administration," Scott said of the Chicago gangs. "They believe in this administration. They didn't believe in the prior administration. They told me this out of their mouth. But they see hope with you."

"I love it," Trump said.

The comments marked the third time in the first two weeks of his presidency that Trump has singled out Chicago for its surging violence. Homicides exceeded 760 last year, the worst in two decades.

Even as Scott and Trump were discussing their own solutions at the Washington event, Chicago police Superintendent Eddie Johnson was at the Englewood District station Wednesday morning for a news conference outlining part of the department's crime-fighting plans for 2017.

Johnson first addressed the disappointing crime statistics from January. Violence remains stubbornly high as the city recorded about the same amount of homicides and shootings in January as the year-earlier period.

Much of the violence remains centered in three police districts – Englewood on the South Side and Harrison and Austin on the West Side — where half of the 51 homicides took place in January.

While Trump's latest comments had not yet been made public, Johnson was asked about the president's repeated commentary about the city's violence woes.

Putting a positive spin on the issue, Johnson said he welcomed the president's attention to the problem.

"I like the fact that he recognizes Chicago has some challenges," he told reporters.

Johnson said he'd also welcome further federal help — more federal agents to work on gun cases that target repeat offenders and added financial support for crime-ridden neighborhoods that suffer from unemployment and economic opportunities.

"You have to give better jobs, better mental health, better education. Those are long-term solutions," Johnson said. "If I could write a blank check, I would ask for more funding and programs to give (offenders) an alternate path."

Scott, the Cleveland-area minister who served on the president's transition team, gained attention during the presidential campaign by saying on CNN that Trump had "bailed out the auto industry." He quickly realized his error and corrected himself.

According to New Spirit Revival Center's website, Scott is its co-founder and senior pastor since 1994. The church, in Cleveland Heights owns a gospel radio station and a record label that produces gospel music, according to the website.

Chicago Tribune's Katherine Skiba contributed.


Wis. police receive traffic enforcement grant

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

By Karen Pilarski Lake Country Now

MUKONAGO, Wis. — The Town of Mukwonago and Village of Mukwonago Police Departments have again been targeted by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Bureau of Traffic Safety for High Visibility Enforcement grants. BOTS targets local police departments for traffic enforcement grants based on traffic crash data.

According to a joint press release from Town of Mukwonago Sgt. Eric Schmidt and Village of Mukwonago Sgt. Chris DeMotto both police departments have awarded two grants this fiscal year.

The first is a $20,000 combined grant for OWI enforcement, and the second is a $25,000 combined grant for seat belt enforcement.

Read more: Mukwonago Police Departments receive grants to reduce traffic crashes


All NYPD officers required to wear body cams by 2019

Posted on February 2, 2017 by in POLICE

By Matthew Chayes Newsday

NEW YORK — The NYPD's largest police officer union has reached a $1.88 billion tentative deal with the de Blasio administration that increases the average rank-and-file officer’s salary by 11.73 percent and requires all patrol cops to wear body cameras by 2019.

The average member of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association will get $12,235 in retroactive pay under the deal, which covers 2012 through July 31, 2017, de Blasio labor negotiators said Tuesday.

By the end of the contract, the average officer’s salary will rise from $63,580 to $73,874, before overtime. That does not include a 2.25 percent bump starting March 15, a bonus the administration said is being given because the city is requiring officers to perform so-called neighborhood policing.

The higher salary will be offset by lower salaries for newly hired officers, the officials said.

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association President Patrick Lynch announced the deal Tuesday at City Hall. The last contract expired in 2010, and the city won an arbitration for two years afterward.

If the contract is ratified, about 99 percent of the city’s municipal workforce will be under negotiated contract — up from 0 percent when de Blasio took office in 2014.

The announcement represented a detente between the union and the de Blasio administration. The union had picketed the mayoral residence, Gracie Mansion, and his gym, the Park Slope YMCA, and other events, to protest the failure to strike a deal.

“There’s always a natural tension between management and the union and labor. It’s our job to make sure we’re standing up for our members. Sometimes we do that by agreeing. Sometimes we disagree. Sometimes we shake hands. Sometimes we poke each other,” Lynch said.

De Blasio described the 2.25 percent bonus as a “differential” for doing neighborhood policing. The differential will go to all of the roughly 23,000 members of the PBA, including those who aren’t tasked with neighborhood policing.

De Blasio hailed the deal as good for taxpayers and officers alike. “I think this is something that is healthy for the city of New York,” he said.

The issue of body cameras has come to the fore amid a national reckoning about policing and the communities officers serve. The city is under orders from a federal court to undertake a pilot program to outfit officers with cameras.

Under an understanding with the union, de Blasio said, rules such as when an officer must keep the camera on and how footage will be stored is to be hammered out later.

Copyright 2017 Newsday


Feds: Orlando mass shooter’s wife knew ‘he was going to commit the attack’

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Paul Elisa Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — A federal judge in California declined Wednesday to release the widow of the man who killed dozens of people at a Florida nightclub after prosecutors said she accompanied her husband on scouting trips for potential targets that included a Disney shopping complex.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Donna Ryu in Oakland said she wanted a psychiatric evaluation done of Noor Salman before deciding whether to release her from jail pending a trial on charges of supporting her husband's attack and then lying to investigators about it. Salmon, 31, has pleaded not guilty.

Federal authorities arrested Salman last month at her mother's home in suburban San Francisco, where Salman moved with her 4-year-old son after her husband Omar Mateen killed 49 people and wounded 53 others on June 12 at the Pulse nightclub.

Mateen pledged allegiance to several terror organizations during the attack before police shot and killed him.

Federal prosecutor Sara Sweeney divulged some details of the allegations for the first time while arguing against the release of Salman.

Sweeney said Mateen asked Salman whether attacking the Disney site would have a bigger impact than attacking a nightclub.

In addition to accompanying her husband on scouting trips, Salman watched him leave their apartment with a gun and a backpack full of ammunition on the night of the shooting, Sweeney said.

Authorities say Salman initially said she didn't know anything about the attack but later told investigators Mateen abused steroids, was "pumped up" on the night of the attack, and said "this is the one day" as he walked out the door, Sweeney said in court.

"I knew when he left he was going to commit the attack," Sweeney said Salman told investigators.

Sweeney also said the couple ran up $25,000 in credit card debt and spent $5,000 in cash in the days before the shooting. Among the purchases was an $8,000 diamond ring for Salman. In addition, Mateen and Salman made her the death beneficiary of his bank account.

Salman's attorney Charles Swift said outside court that Salman made those statements without a lawyer present during an 18-hour interrogation immediately after the attack.

He said he hasn't yet received a transcript or recording of Salman's interrogation to determine the context of her statements and accuracy of the allegations.

Swift also pointed out that Mateen was a security guard and left the couple's home hundreds of times with a gun and ammunition.

Swift argued that prosecutors were charging Salman with the crimes of her husband. Mateen physically abused Salman, he said, and never told her about his plans to carry out the killings.

It was the first time Salman's legal team heard details of the allegations as well.

"We frankly expected more," attorney Linda Moreno said outside court.

Salman's mother and uncle have pledged to put up their homes as collateral to secure her release from jail pending trial. Federal prosecutors are seeking to transfer Salman to Florida to face the charges that could bring a sentence of life in prison.


Trump, education top inmates’ reasons for hostage situation

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By Randall Chase Associated Press

SMYRNA, Del. — Inmates at a Delaware prison took five corrections department workers hostage Wednesday, a move the inmates told a local newspaper was due to concerns about their treatment and the leadership of the United States.

The hostage situation drew dozens of officers and law enforcement vehicles to the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center in Smyrna and prompted a statewide lockdown of all prisons. One hostage was released Wednesday afternoon, but four remained in custody and negotiations were ongoing as the evening stretched on, authorities said.

A preliminary investigation suggests the incident began around 10:30 a.m. when a correctional officer inside Building C, which houses over 100 inmates, radioed for immediate assistance, Delaware State Police spokesman Sgt. Richard Bratz said at a news conference. Other officers responded to help, and five Department of Corrections employees were taken hostage.

(1/2) Audio recording of inmate demands at #Smyrna prison in Delaware amid hostage situation. Difficult to discern exact words. pic.twitter.com/cJ9slVcwqk

— Alexander Rubinstein (@AlexR_DC) February 1, 2017

Later, inmates reached out to The News Journal in Wilmington in two phone calls to explain their actions and make demands. Prisoners funneled the calls to the paper with the help of one inmate's fiancee and another person's mother. The mother told the paper her son was among the hostages.

In that call, an inmate said their reasons "for doing what we're doing" included "Donald Trump. Everything that he did. All the things that he's doing now. We know that the institution is going to change for the worse."

That caller said education for prisoners was the inmates' priority. They also said they want effective rehabilitation for all prisoners and information about how money is allocated to prisons.

Bratz did not address the phone calls during the news conference or give details about negotiations, which he said were ongoing. He did not take questions.

"We are doing everything we can to ensure the safety of everyone involved and using all of our available resources," he said.

The inmates released one hostage around 2:40 p.m., and that person was taken by ambulance to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening, Bratz said. Authorities don't know whether anyone else has been injured, he said.

Bratz did not say how much of the prison, which houses about 2,500 inmates, was involved in the incident. But Bruce Rogers, counsel for the Correctional Officers Association of Delaware, told The Associated Press Building C was under the inmates' control.

(2/2) Audio recording of inmate demands at #Smyrna prison in Delaware amid hostage situation. Difficult to discern exact words. pic.twitter.com/J2BA85pOzz

— Alexander Rubinstein (@AlexR_DC) February 1, 2017

Rogers described the hostages as four guards and one counselor. He said he'd been briefed on the situation by the union president, who was talking to officials at the scene.

Video from above the prison Wednesday afternoon showed uniformed officers gathered in two groups along fences near an entrance to the prison. Later, video showed several people surrounding a stretcher and running as they pushed it across the compound. People could be seen standing near a set of doors with an empty stretcher and wheelchair.

A Corrections Department spokeswoman said firefighters were called to the scene after reports of smoke and were being held on standby.

According to the department's website, the prison is Delaware's largest correctional facility for men. It houses minimum, medium, and maximum security inmates, and also houses Kent County detainees awaiting trial. It was the site of the state's death row and where executions were carried out. The prison opened in 1971.

In 2004, an inmate raped a counselor and took her hostage for nearly seven hours at the Smyrna prison, according to an Associated Press report at the time. A department sharpshooter later shot and killed 45-year-old Scott Miller, according to the report, ending the standoff.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

#LIVE: Chopper 3 is over a hostage situation at the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center in Smyrna, Delaware. FULL STORY: http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2017/02/01/delaware-prison-lockdown/

Posted by CBS Philly on Wednesday, February 1, 2017


Cops working Super Bowl wanted more warning on Trump ban

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

HOUSTON — With protests over Trump’s presidency increasing in frequency, police working the Super Bowl this Sunday are on high alert. Some of them say the lack of information about one executive order Trump signed on Friday is further complicating matters.

Like many agencies across the nation, Trump’s order barring citizens of seven Muslim-majority nations from entering the U.S. came as a surprise to those working the sporting event.

Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez told USA Today the timing of the rollout was “problematic,” given the order is likely to spur protests at the Super Bowl.

“...because of the heightened emotion, you know, the visceral reaction at first notice of this, so it’s that recency effect, it just occurred,” Gonzalez said. “Obviously we’re trying to roll out some of our (security) measures. But that said, we’re anticipating anything anytime you have such a large-scale event.”

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo expressed concern as well. Acevedo said more information ahead of time about what the order entailed would have helped their departments plan.

“I’m not worried about it because we’re ready,” Acevedo said. “But, bottom line is I think a little information before you roll something out goes a long way in allaying fears and confusion and that would have been helpful.”

Acevedo and Gonzalez said the city was prepared for the influx of people coming to Houston for the Super Bowl, and they have a plan for protesters.

“We have a designated area (near NRG Stadium),” Acevedo said. “You can’t put somebody two miles away and say, ‘Hey, there you go, have at it.’ We will have a designated area close enough for folks so they can make their point. … The First Amendment is the cornerstone of our democracy, as it relates to the ability of folks to protest and as it relates to the media to do their job, and so we take the responsibility of protecting that very seriously."


I just designed my dream, custom Glock

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Travis Pike, PoliceOne Contributor

I was recently asked what my dream, custom Glock would look like. Sparing no cost. I knew I would start with the Glock 19 Gen 4 because the size and popularity make it possible to customize the weapon extensively. And, like the AR-15, the Glock 19’s popularity has spawned a massive market for customization, so my options are endless.

After pondering the accessory opportunities for a while, I determined these seven additions would be a part of my imaginary, custom Glock.

1. Zev grip service

The first step is to send my Glock to Zev to remove the finger grooves and have the grip stippled. I prefer a straight grip on my Glock and the standard stippling creates enough grip texture to hold onto my gun regardless on the conditions.

2. Zev dimpled threaded barrel replacement

The Zev replacement barrel is a drop-in upgrade I can do at home. This drop-in upgrade is a dimpled, match-grade barrel that is threaded to accept a compensator, a muzzle brake, or a suppressor on the end.

These barrels have an incredibly precise fit that aids in accuracy. The dimples reduce weight and improve cooling without lowering the barrel’s strength. The threading is a standard ½ x 28 pitch.

3. Zev Hexagon with RMR cut

The Zev Hexagon slide is cut with a grip surface on the front and rear of the slide. It’s pre-cut for a Trijicon RMR and features an option for suppressor height sights. These slides are cut for tighter tolerances that increase your Glock’s accuracy. The finish is tough as nails and comes in a variety of color options. I would select the titanium gray for my custom Glock.

4. Trijicon RMR Dual Illuminated

The Trijicon RMR is one of the strongest miniature red dots on the market. It fits perfectly on the Zev slide mentioned above. The dual illuminated nature means it will never need a battery. Instead, a combination of fiber optics and tritium absorbs light to power the system. I’d prefer the 9-MOA green dot reticle.

5. Lone Wolf Alpha Wolf Compensator

I won’t let the end of my Zev threaded barrel go to waste. Even though a muzzle brake is an option, I’d prefer a compensator. The Alpha Wolf Compensator by Lone Wolf will turn the 9mm Glock 19 into a kitten. Recoil and muzzle rise is almost completely eliminated. The 9mm Alpha Wolf compensators are threaded to ½ x 28 so it matches the barrel perfectly.

6. Haley Strategic Skimmer Trigger

Travis Haley is famous for his contributions to Magpul and the AR-15 platform. The new Skimmer Trigger is designed for 9mm Glocks in both Gen 3 and Gen 4 platforms. The Skimmer Trigger has a pre-travel reduction mod. Once you move past the first stage the trigger breaks cleanly and is very crisp. This is a drop-in kit I can install at home in less than 20 minutes. It’s also made entirely from Glock factory parts, which means no compromise in quality. This is the best Glock trigger in my opinion.

7. Selecting an extended magazine

Standard Glock magazines are pretty good and do not need to be replaced, however, it’s not about need with this customized Glock – it’s all about fantasy. I’d throw ETS magazines into my dream Glock 19. They are translucent and look amazing. They are also reliable and more varied than standard Glock magazines. ETS offers a variety of extended magazines. You have options for 31 rounds, 27 rounds and 21-round in the extended magazine category.

ETS also offer standard capacity magazines in 15 and 17 rounds. The translucent nature makes it easy to see your ammo count and the type of ammo loaded in the magazine.

This is the custom Glock I would design. This is only one configuration of literally hundreds available. One of the Glock's strengths as a series of firearms is their aftermarket support. You purchase triggers, grip frames, lasers, magazines, slides, optics, iron sights, and just about anything else you’d ever need to build a dream gun. With Glock’s aftermarket, you can create a truly unique piece of gear.

How would you customize your Glock?


Denver transit security officer fatally ambushed by suspect on terror watch list

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

DENVER — A contract transit security officer is dead after a suspect approached him from behind and shot him in the neck.

Police told The Denver Channel that suspect Joshua Cumming, 37, fatally shot Officer Scott Von Lanken, 56, at Union Station Tuesday night.

An investigation found two witnesses were talking to Von Lanken when Cummings attacked. Denver Police Commander Barb Archer told The Denver Post the witnesses heard Cummings say “something to the effect of, ‘Do as I tell you,’ and then he shot the officer.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

According to an RTD news release, Von Lanken died on his way to the hospital. Von Lanken was a contract RTD security officer through Allied Universal. He was armed, but did not have official arresting powers.

The Denver Post reported Cummings was arrested within 20 minutes near the crime scene. He is currently being held for investigation of first-degree murder. Police recovered a gun from the suspect.

Cummings has an out-of-state criminal history and is on the federal terror watch list. Further information regarding why he is on the list was not available.

Authorities sent out a warning to officers after the shooting asking them to be vigilant because they don’t know the motive behind the shooting, the Associated Press reported.

Detectives said, as far as they know, the shooting was unprovoked. They are currently investigating if Cummings shot Von Lanken for a personal reason.

Von Lanken is survived by his wife and twin daughters.

Members of Denver Police's motorcycle unit roll out from 16th & Wynkoop, leaving a sign and flowers as memorial for shooting victim pic.twitter.com/TvxBFRPCWy

— Jason Gruenauer (@JGonTV) February 1, 2017


Denver transit security officer killed by suspect on terror watch list

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

DENVER — A contract transit security officer is dead after a suspect approached him from behind and shot him in the neck.

Police told The Denver Channel that suspect Joshua Cumming, 37, fatally shot Officer Scott Von Lanken, 56, at Union Station Tuesday night.

An investigation found two witnesses were talking to Von Lanken when Cummings attacked. Denver Police Commander Barb Archer told The Denver Post the witnesses heard Cummings say “something to the effect of, ‘Do as I tell you,’ and then he shot the officer.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

According to an RTD news release, Von Lanken died on his way to the hospital. Von Lanken was a contract RTD security officer through Allied Universal. He was armed, but did not have official arresting powers.

The Denver Post reported Cummings was arrested within 20 minutes near the crime scene. He is currently being held for investigation of first-degree murder. Police recovered a gun from the suspect.

Cummings has an out-of-state criminal history and is on the federal terror watch list. Further information regarding why he is on the list was not available.

Authorities sent out a warning to officers after the shooting asking them to be vigilant because they don’t know the motive behind the shooting, the Associated Press reported.

Detectives said, as far as they know, the shooting was unprovoked. They are currently investigating if Cummings shot Von Lanken for a personal reason.

Von Lanken is survived by his wife and twin daughters.

Members of Denver Police's motorcycle unit roll out from 16th & Wynkoop, leaving a sign and flowers as memorial for shooting victim pic.twitter.com/TvxBFRPCWy

— Jason Gruenauer (@JGonTV) February 1, 2017


How cops can combat cyberbullying

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Jenny Holt

The massive increase in the use of digital devices in recent years has led to a corresponding rise in issues concerning technology and remote communication. One of the most significant of these is cyberbullying, a widespread problem that can have all the same effects as “traditional” bullying: depression, anxiety, loneliness, insomnia, lack of interest in daily life, physical health issues, decreased academic engagement and achievement. It also creates the risk of more extreme outcomes like violent retaliation and suicide.

The CDC estimates that 15 percent of students have been cyberbullied in the last year, with a heavy weighting toward older children and teenagers. Law enforcement has an important role to play in cracking down on cyberbullying, at the community level through education and awareness and on a criminal level through dealing with infractions promptly and correctly.

What is cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying is officially defined as willful and repeated harm inflicted through the use of computers, cell phones and other electronic devices. Because of the intangible nature of digital evidence, the growing acceptability of anti-social online behavior among teens, and the difficulty in pinpointing an exact point of departure for unacceptable online habits, cyberbullying is notoriously tricky to address.

Yet the relentless nature of cyberbullying makes it one of the most oppressive and aggressive forms of bullying around. Even in the safety of their own bedrooms, teenagers can be targeted by their persecutors with harmful messages or images, leaving them no respite from the torment.

How does ‘sexting’ fit in?

“Sexting” or ”sex texting” is the sending or receiving of sexually explicit or sexually suggestive nude or semi-nude images or video, generally via cell phone, with estimates of prevalence ranging from 4 percent to a worrying 31 percent. Often initiated as a seemingly affectionate interaction between couples, the images can then later be used in cyberbullying attacks, stepping up the intensity and severity of the bullying, and the criminal implications of the situation.

How are officers responding to cyberbullying?

A survey undertaken by the FBI uncovered some interesting information about how law enforcement officers feel about the issue of cyberbullying. Approximately 82 percent of participants felt that cyberbullying was a significant issue which required police involvement. But one of the most striking outcomes of the research was the range of responses from officers. The bottom line is that opinions on the severity of cyberbullying, the need for intervention by officers and the point at which police intervention was appropriate or necessary varied massively. Officers who had children under eighteen or were female reported earlier intervention rates and believed in officers taking a more active role.

There was a consensus that the issue of how to deal with cyberbullying needed to be addressed. Survey participants called for eliminating the gray area between the role of administrators and officers in handling cyberbullying, and the establishment of clearer initiatives. Over 80 percent of study participants believed they needed further training on how to respond to and prevent cyberbullying, with around 30 percent being unaware of their own state’s laws on the issue.

What can law enforcement do?

The first step in countering cyberbullying is to get a thorough understanding of the scope and nature of the problem. If you’re unfamiliar with the type of interactions that can go on, read a thorough factsheet on cyberbullying and speak to someone with direct experience. Crucially, you also need to be aware of your own obligations and authority on the issue, which vary from state to state. While some incidents may be an infraction of policy, others may be addressable by federal law, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; Rehabilitation Act of 1973; Civil Rights Act of 1964; or Education Amendments of 1972. Consult with your district attorney liaison to determine which existing criminal statutes apply, and keep in mind that criminal law often applies to any issues concerning stalking, coercion, sexually explicit images or the sexual exploitation of youth.

Work with others

Collaborate with school administrators to help them understand their own power in disciplining students involved in cyberbullying attacks. In most states, administrators have the right to exercise their power over students who take part in bullying outside school time if their actions are affecting the school environment in some way. Advise your local schools to adopt stringent anti-cyberbullying policies that have a clear line of consequences that correspond to the severity and frequency of the infractions. Establishing a relationship with the Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force in your area is a good way to get assistance related to electronic devices, Electronic Service Providers and websites or apps that are common channels for cyberbullies.

Educate others

Encouraging your community toward a greater understanding of the issues and risks involved in cyberbullying can create a culture of transparency and compassion that helps victims of cyberbullying speak out and educates parents and caregivers about the dangers, as well as letting the bullies know that their actions haven’t gone unnoticed. Police officers should advise schools to create methods by which students can report cyberbullying without fear of reprisal, make sure there’s a clear system in place for managing these complaints and organize talks and education sessions to spread awareness.


Official: COs taken hostage by inmates at Del. prison

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By Randall Chase Associated Press SMYRNA, Del.?? — At least four guards and a counselor were taken hostage by inmates Wednesday inside a Delaware prison, according to a union attorney, and all the state's prisons were put on lockdown as police swarmed the facility.

Bruce Rogers, counsel for the Correctional Officers Association of Delaware, told The Associated Press that inmates had taken control of one building at the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center. Injuries to both officers and inmates were reported, he said.

In a brief statement, the Department of Corrections said DOC Response Teams and Delaware State Police were on the scene responding to a hostage situation.

A DOC spokeswoman said an emergency situation was reported at the Smyrna prison late Wednesday morning. The facility was placed on lockdown, as were all prisons in the state per DOC policy. Spokeswoman Jayme Gravell provided few details but described the situation as an isolated incident, adding that there was no threat to the public.

Rogers said he'd been briefed on the situation by the union president, who was talking to officials at the scene.

He described the building under inmate control as housing between 120-150 inmates. The population is considered medium to maximum security, he said.

There has been very little communication between inmates and those on the outside, and no demands have been communicated to the union, according to Rogers.

Video from above the prison shows uniformed officers gathered in two groups along fences near an entrance to the prison. Later, video showed several people surrounding a stretcher and running as they pushed it across the compound. It wasn't clear if a person was on the stretcher. People could be seen standing near a set of doors with an empty stretcher and wheelchair.

Gravell said firefighters were called to the scene after reports of smoke and were being held on standby.

According to the department's website, the prison is Delaware's largest correctional facility for men, housing about 2,500 inmates. It houses minimum, medium, and maximum security inmates, and also houses Kent County detainees awaiting trial. It is also the site of the state's death row and where executions were carried out. The prison opened in 1971.

In 2004, an inmate raped a counselor and took her hostage for nearly seven hours at the Smyrna prison, according to an Associated Press report at the time. A department sharpshooter later shot and killed 45-year-old Scott Miller, according to the report, ending the standoff.

___

Associated Press writer Sarah Rankin in Richmond, Virginia, contributed to this report.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

#LIVE: Chopper 3 is over a hostage situation at the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center in Smyrna, Delaware. FULL STORY: http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2017/02/01/delaware-prison-lockdown/

Posted by CBS Philly on Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Union-backed Ronald Vitiello named to lead Border Patrol

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Elliot Spagat Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — A career Border Patrol official who was backed by the agents' union has been named chief of the agency, less than a week after his predecessor resigned under pressure.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Ronald Vitiello was appointed Tuesday to lead the agency at a time when President Donald Trump has pledged to erect a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico and add 5,000 agents from the current level of about 20,000.

The National Border Patrol Council — an early and outspoken backer of Trump's presidential bid — openly supported Vitiello for the job and pushed for the ouster of his predecessor, Mark Morgan, who resigned Thursday at the request of the new administration. Morgan stepped down only seven months after being named the first outsider to run the agency since it was created in 1924.

Vitiello, who was most recently CBP's executive assistant commissioner for operations support, was acting Border Patrol chief when Morgan was appointed last year and had been considered a leading contender for the job then. He joined the Border Patrol more than 30 years ago and served as deputy chief in the administration of President Barack Obama.

Brandon Judd, the union president, said in an interview days before Trump took office that Morgan never had the support of agents.

"(Vitiello) and I do not see eye to eye on a great, great many things but we were always able to keep it respectful, always," Judd said. "Morgan and I have not been able to do that."

The union said Tuesday that Vitiello's experience will be invaluable for executing Trump's plans.

"The previous administration's attempts to treat the Border Patrol like any law enforcement agency resulted in leadership that was reactive and in constant crisis," it said in a statement.

Morgan's abrupt departure alarmed advocacy groups that criticized the Border Patrol for lack of oversight of agents and what they consider a culture that condoned abuse and misconduct.

"We look forward to working with Chief Vitiello to ensure that Border Patrol operates with the highest professional policing practices by implementing sorely needed transparency, oversight, and accountability reforms," said Christian Ramirez, director of the Southern Border Communities Coalition.

Morgan was briefly CBP's internal affairs chief in 2014 while on loan from the FBI, where he worked for 20 years and climbed the ranks to assistant director for training. During his first stint at CBP, he oversaw an extensive review of complaints of excessive use of force and employee misconduct.

Ronald Colburn, who preceded Vitiello as deputy chief and recommended him as his replacement, said Vitiello brings experience and a mild-mannered temperament to the job.

"He's a bootstraps leader, raised up the rough the ranks, tested by fire," Colburn said. "If I were picking among (the Border Patrol's) 20,000 employees, he's the first one I would think of."

The leadership change comes a week after Trump issued an executive order to build a wall on 2,000-mile border with Mexico, extending it from about 700 miles currently, much of it in California and Arizona. Vitiello also faces a tall order in hiring more agents. CBP says about two-thirds of job applicants fail a required lie detector, causing the Border Patrol to recently fall below 20,000 agents for the first time since 2009.

CBP did not make Vitiello available for an interview Tuesday and declined to comment beyond the announcement on Twitter, which was signed by Kevin McAleenan, CBP's acting commissioner.

The appointment is not subject to Senate confirmation.


Jaw-dropping biometric advancements for law enforcement are coming sooner than you think

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Megan Wells, PoliceOne contributor

The practice of identification based on human physical variation has been studied since the 1700s. In 1891, the classification system and method to individualize prisoners using fingerprints was first unrolled. This was considered the first use of fingerprint science by law enforcement.

It’s unbelievable how far technology has come since then.

Behavioral biometrics will help paint a more accurate picture.

Humans are creatures of habit. Soon, identifying characteristics not of what you are, but of what you do will find their way into law enforcement biometrics. These include:

Signature recognition Typing pattern recognition How a person selects and reads information (verbs and predicates used) Eye movement tracking Reading speed

We may not pay close attention to each of these habits, but they can be analyzed to paint a more robust picture of an individual.

Other non-traditional biometrics could include gait analysis (how an individual walks). For example, a woman in Ontario, Canada was identified as the winner of a lottery prize from video surveillance, and behavioral biometrics (such as gait).

Olfactory analysis – the use of a person’s odor to identify him or her is another possibility. Research has shown that body odor patterns remain constant enough over time to allow people to be identified with an accuracy rate of 85 percent – think a high-tech version of the old bloodhound.

Facial recognition libraries will be filled with social media data.

In 2007, the FBI created the Biometric Center of Excellence to continue fine-tuning biometrics programs for law enforcement. Since 2011, the FBI has been actively growing its facial recognition database, used for several purposes, including comparing the faces of suspected criminals to their driver’s license and ID photos.

According to the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy & Technology, the FBI database is currently up to 117 million American faces, meaning “one in two American adults [are] in a law enforcement face recognition network.”

It’s not just the FBI taking advantage of increased biometric data: “Across the country, state and local police departments are building their own face recognition systems, many of them more advanced than the FBI’s,” according to the Georgetown Law Center.

Although they are becoming more accurate, current facial recognition systems still have issues with minor differences like poses, resolution and wardrobe changes that can impact reliability. But technology will inevitably advance, and the abundance of available data will improve existing systems.

Facebook and Google already have collected enough data and perfected algorithms to distribute information that can fill in missing faces in the FBI and local department facial recognition library; however, privacy concerns have limited the collection of information to date.

As improved facial recognition for law enforcement moves full speed ahead, the next five to 10 years will bring near-perfect and robust facial recognition abilities, along with laws that accommodate the use of data for law enforcement purposes.

Gaining awareness of potential terrorist threats will become easier.

As biometrics become more fine-tuned, optimists believe potential terrorism will be easier to spot before tragedy strikes.

Lie-detecting robots using biometric sensors have already begun to pop up in airport kiosks. They are called Automated Virtual Agent for Truth Assessment in Real Time, and you can spot them at the Canadian Border Services Agency.

The robot uses eye detection software along with an array of sensors to pick up on the physiological signs that indicate a person is lying, and once it becomes suspicious, it can flag the passenger for further inspection.

In January, Donald Trump signed an executive order addressing refugee admissions to the U.S., which included a note to expedite biometric exit-entry screening for U.S. travelers.

DNA shaming will be mainstream.

DNA shaming, or using someone’s DNA to link them to a crime and bringing them shame for their missteps, could be a reality for law enforcement.

Maybe you missed the “Face of Litter” ad campaign that went viral a couple of years back. As a way to crack down on litter, Hong Kong partnered with Ogilvy advertising and Parabon Nanolabs (using technology developed in partnership with the Department of Defense) to deploy technology that identified physical characteristics of a litterbug. The technology took a two-dimensional look at DNA, and without identifying a person specifically, extrapolated portraits using DNA found on pieces of litter and posted the images in public places to shame the litterbugs. This technology was crude in 2015 and purposely limited, but it is just the beginning of what DNA shaming can lead to.

University of Calgary Prof. Thomas Patrick Keenan points to a more recent case of DNA shaming. In Florida, residents were required to submit their dog’s DNA, and owners who did not pick up after their dogs were sent a bill.

DNA is only as good as the database matches. We’ve already used technology like Passive Start and Entry, or PASE, while collecting fingerprints to help broaden the available data for law enforcement. Now, companies like TouchDNA have made it easier to collect and analyze DNA left behind, such as a few cells left on a pen or water glass. LEOs can use DNA shaming to deter criminal actions.

Heartbeats could be used for identification.

We already know that facial, iris and ear prints, as well as body odor and vein pattern recognition, have been tested for human identification but biometric identification could become as individualized as a heartbeat.

Traditional security measures like cryptography or encryption can be expensive, time-consuming and resource-intensive. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York, have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat.

The researchers encrypted patient data using a person's unique electrocardiogram (EKG) – a measurement of the electrical activity of the heart measured by a biosensor attached to the skin – as the key to lock and unlock the files.

While heartbeats may not be an absolute biometric, when combined with other biometrics, LEOs can get a unique signature for a person that can't be concealed.

VAWD engineering is a company actively working on ways to use this unique signature. They believe a heartbeat biometric can improve disaster relief and medical care by providing a "reliable, real-time medical status equal to or better than the current devices while increasing the mobility and comfort of the patient." But they are also using the technology as a part of their “automated human life-form target tracking" system, which has already been explored by the United States Army.

Essentially, they’ve developed a technology that deploys Doppler radar technology to find “Human” signatures. They can detect heartbeats, breathing, postural sway and speech at standoff ranges behind walls/obstructions. LEOs may soon be able to use this technology in situations like police pursuits, or standoff situations – identifying a mark based on their biometric signature.

Advanced biometrics will be connected to body-worn cameras.

The current landscape of biometric measurement in law enforcement is primitive at best, yet as the technology develops in sophistication, the implications will be of high importance.

Imagine if police officers could get real-time facial recognition data through their body-worn cameras: Instead of taking a photo or video and passing it from agency to agency to identify an individual, facial recognition systems will be able to analyze video captured by body-worn cameras, checking faces against databases in real time.

With faster, more accurate facial recognition, police may be able to scan faces the way license plates are scanned now. In the longer term, some futurists predict that real-time iris recognition could replace facial recognition as a key identification mechanism.

Missing persons cases will be easier to solve.

Most police are familiar with the FBI’s Combined DNA Index System, or CODIS database, which can identify and compare DNA profiles electronically. In the future, this database will be enhanced by newer tools such as kinship analysis software that will help to identify missing persons.

By using kinship software, which examines DNA profiles of those related to the missing person, and analyzing metadata police will be better able to identify a missing person’s whereabouts.

The FBI has already stated that efforts to enhance kinship analysis for missing persons data is a top priority for them.

Undercover police officers and agents will need robotic assistance.

The challenge of building a persona for an undercover officer has become much more difficult in recent years. There is far too much information online to ensure anyone’s privacy.

It’s already common practice to create false social media profiles to help advance a persona, but biometrics will work both for and against law enforcement. Many points of entry are employing facial recognition and iris scanners to link eyeballs irrevocably to a particular name. Biometric passports and microchips are also widespread.

Without the ability to travel undetected, undercover missions will become impossible. Employing the use of robotics or tackling matters completely through digital means will be the only ways to remain anonymous in pursuits.

Laws will change to address biometric crime-fighting tools.

As the technology to collect and analyze DNA and other biometric data continues to become cheaper and easier to use, laws about evidence, how it can be collected and what’s admissible in court will certainly need to be addressed.

The substantial advancements in biometric crime-fighting tools are very real and happening in a quick period of time, and the possibilities astounding.


Texas governor blocks sheriff funds over ‘sanctuary cities’

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — Texas Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has blocked funding for the first time over so-called "sanctuary cities" after Austin's sheriff stopped complying with all federal immigration detainers.

Abbott spokesman John Wittman said Wednesday that $1.5 million in previously approved criminal justice grants will no longer go to Travis County.

The move follows Sheriff Sally Hernandez announcing after President Donald Trump's inauguration that she would stop honoring all immigration holds in her jails.

The blocked funding in Texas' fifth-largest county is only a fraction of Hernandez's budget but funds programs such as crime victim services and drug treatment courts.

Abbott has asked the Texas Legislature to prioritize a "sanctuary city" law between now and June. The Republican wants the power to remove locally elected officials and block a wider array of funds.


DOJ: Reforms in Baltimore will withstand presidential change

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

BALTIMORE — The U.S. Justice Department assured a federal judge Wednesday that a proposed agreement to reform Baltimore police practices will withstand the change in presidents.

Civil Rights Division lawyer Timothy Mygatt said the agreement with the city was negotiated cooperatively and outlines a proven process for achieving its goals.

"It endures over administrations. It endures across shifting political winds," he said. "It allows there to be surety for all parties involved that there's going to be consistency."

U.S. District Judge James Bredar said political winds change, but orders of the court do not.

"In this courtroom we don't operate on a four-year cycle," he said. "I know that's clear, but I wanted to say it."

Once the judge is satisfied that the agreement's sweeping reforms are fair, adequate and reasonable and enters the decree, it becomes court-enforceable.

Mayor Catherine Pugh told the judge she's confident Baltimore can afford to implement the reforms. She didn't provide dollar figures, but she told reporters later that she has put money in the city budget for implementation, expects a Ford Foundation grant and is seeking state funds.

"I'm really confident that we'll be able to get this done," she said. "I want to get this signed so we can move forward."

The judge has asked about any conflicts between the proposed agreement and the police union contract, and about timelines and compliance measurements under the decree.

Former Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake asked the Justice Department to launch its investigation to rebuild public trust after the 2015 death of Freddie Gray, a young black man injured in a police van.


Calif. police fatally shoot suspect in stabbing rampage

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

LOS ANGELES — A knife-wielding suspect was fatally shot by police Tuesday after he stabbed three people.

According to Fox News, police received reports of a man with a knife at a local Jack in the Box and responded to the scene.

The suspect’s rampage left two people in critical condition and one with non-life-threatening injuries.

Described as a man in his 30s, the suspect stabbed a bicyclist then ran down the street, the LA Times reported.

A CNN building is on the same block as the restaurant. CNN reporter Maeve Reston tweeted that before police responded, the suspect "tried to come into our fave coffee place w/ his knife, but customer held glass door shut, blocking him.”

After unsuccessfully entering the coffee shop, the man ran into the Jack in the Box where he stabbed another man, according to the LA Times.

Police rushed into the fast-food restaurant as the suspect stabbed a third person.

Officers attempted to use a TASER before opening fire.

Police do not know the motive behind the stabbings, but witnesses said the suspect appeared mentally unstable, according to the report.

An investigation is ongoing.


What Trump’s selection of Neil Gorsuch means for police

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

Many of the people who voted for Donald Trump had just one issue on their minds when they cast their ballots: the United States Supreme Court seat made vacant by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. With the election of the Republican candidate, the balance of the Court would likely remain the same. A victory by the Democratic side would almost surely swing the Court to the left.

During the campaign, Trump promised that — should he be elected to the presidency — the ninth seat would be filled by someone who closely mirrors Scalia’s ideological philosophy. On the final day of January 2017, President Trump publicly announced his nominee for the high court.

Trump’s pick is 49-year-old Judge Neil Gorsuch, who in his career has served at the Department of Justice and clerked for Supreme Court Justices Byron White and Anthony Kennedy. Gorsuch is a professor at the University of Colorado Law School. In 2006, President George W. Bush appointed the Denver native to the 10th Circuit Court, which covers Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, and Wyoming. Perhaps most interestingly, Gorsuch is a former classmate of Barack Obama — both studied at Harvard Law School, each graduating in 1991.

Who is Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch?

During his remarks at the White House announcement ceremony, Gorsuch revealed his tendency as a textualist and originalist in his interpretation of the Constitution, saying that “it is for Congress, and not the courts, to write new laws.”

One remark in particular might be incredibly telling about his likely performance as a Supreme Court Justice. “It is the role of judges to apply, not alter, the work of the people’s representatives,” Gorsuch said.

This statement indicates that Gorsuch’s addition to the court will keep Scalia’s seat solidly conservative.

However, Gorsuch’s track record also indicates that — like Justice David Souter and Chief Justice John Roberts, both of whom have disappointed conservatives in some of their decisions — the nominee has an independent streak which may provide some surprising opinions. Gorsuch even foreshadowed this in his comments at the White House.

“A judge who likes every outcome he reaches is very likely a bad judge, stretching for results he prefers rather than those the law demands,” Gorsuch said.

Indeed, Gorsuch has shown a willingness to side with both police and defendants in criminal law cases, depending entirely on the merits of the case, not on political ideology.

Decisions indicate a reasonable, level-headed jurist

In the case of United States v. Rodriguez, Gorsuch sided with a law enforcement officer’s felony arrest of a New Mexico man carrying a concealed weapon without a permit. Gorsuch did not write the opinion in the Rodriguez case, but he sided with it, choosing the law enforcement position and the precedent of Terry v. Ohio. That case certainly gives legally-armed citizens and Second Amendment advocates reason for concern, but there’s little doubt that it was a decision that favored the police.

On the other side of the ledger, Gorsuch has been praised by a prominent plaintiff’s attorney from Denver named David Lane who called Gorsuch “fair and open-minded” with regard to cases between police and citizens, according to the Associated Press.

Lane told the AP, “He is a very, very smart man. His leanings are very conservative, but he’s qualified to be on the Supreme Court. I don’t know that Judge Gorsuch has a political agenda and he is sincere and honest and believes what he writes.”

For example, Gorsuch sided with a New Mexico seventh-grade student who was arrested by an SRO. In that case, the boy had been making burping noises in gym class. The teacher called the administration, and the administration called the SRO. The boy was arrested, and the mother sued on the basis of excess force and unlawful arrest.

The 10th Circuit’s Chief Judge Timothy Tymkovich and the opinion’s author, Judge Jerome Holmes held in favor of the school and the police. Gorsuch wrote a four-page dissent disagreeing with colleagues who ruled that that Principal Susan LaBarge, Assistant Principal Ann Holmes and school police officer Arthur Acosta were entitled to qualified immunity.

Gorsuch wrote, “If a seventh-grader starts trading fake burps for laughs in gym class, what’s a teacher to do? Order extra laps? Detention? A trip to the principal’s office? Maybe. But then again, maybe that’s too old school. Maybe today you call a police officer.”

Plain-spoken and straightforward prose like that is reminiscent of Scalia, whose writing has been lauded as being among the most eloquent in the history of the Court. Further, these examples reveal that as a justice, Gorsuch would base his decisions not on loyalty to an ideology, but a devotion to the Constitution.

Gorsuch’s nomination means that if confirmed, law enforcement cases that reach the Supreme Court will be judged on the merits and the facts. This means that cops will have neither an ally nor an opponent on the bench. They will have an objective arbiter, and that is good news indeed.

A pitched political battle is really just beginning

For the better part of a year, the Court has remained in a four-to-four deadlock. Following Scalia’s death, President Obama nominated Judge Merrick Garland for the Court. Senate Republicans stonewalled, saying that the American people should make the decision on the next justice, effectively making the 2016 presidential campaign a referendum on Scalia’s vacant seat.

Ironically, Republicans invoked an unlikely ally in their argument. In 1992 while serving as a fourth-term senator from Delaware, Joe Biden was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Biden then called for a block on Supreme Court nominees in an election year.

Based on Gorsuch’s career, Democrats will have a difficult time mounting a case against Gorsuch. He has a record of accomplishment and non-partisan decisions based on his evaluation of cases measured against a strict interpretation of the Constitution.

However, early indications are that the opposition will be intense. House minority leader Nancy Pelosi joined a vocal group of demonstrators on the steps of the Supreme Court decrying the nomination. Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) issued a statement — literally seconds after the announcement — indicating that the Democrats in the Senate would entertain the idea of a filibuster to block Gorsuch’s confirmation.

Democrats may want to keep their powder dry. The filibuster — the so-called nuclear option — could potentially result in some very messy consequences for Democrats, especially if Trump gets the chance to name another justice to the court. The fact is, the naming of Gorsuch to the bench does not change the balance of power — he is as close to a mirror image of Scalia as one might imagine.

With the advancing years of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (83) and Justice Stephen Breyer (78), there is a high probability that Trump will have the opportunity to add at least one more justice to the Court. This almost certainly would change the balance of power and shape SCOTUS rulings for a half century. And with Republican control of the Senate, the filibuster may have been removed as an option by the time that fight happens, thus opening the door for a very different type of appointment.

We shall soon see what we shall see.


NYPD deputy chief dies from 9/11-related cancer

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NEW YORK — An NYPD deputy chief died Monday after a long battle with brain cancer.

Deputy Chief James Molloy, 55, died at a local hospital surrounded by his family Monday night, the NY Daily News reported. Molloy led search efforts at Ground Zero for six months following the terror attacks.

“Deputy Chief Molloy is as courageous a guy as you can find,” Roy Richter, head of the Captains Endowment Association, said. “He led search efforts tirelessly at Ground Zero. His dry wit and get-it-done attitude can always be counted upon to effectively respond to constant dangers he and his command faced. All in the department who knew or worked with him held Jim in the highest regard.”

Yesterday, the #NYPD lost a great leader. Deputy Chief James Molloy, former #ESU C.O. succumbed to 9/11 related illnesses.#RIP #NeverForget pic.twitter.com/IvresOvXtW

— NYPD Special Ops (@NYPDSpecialops) January 31, 2017

On Sept. 11, 2001, Molloy was driving to work when he was stopped in the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel by authorities as the towers fell, the publication reported. Molloy’s wife said he went straight to Ground Zero to work, still covered in dust.

Just over two years ago, Molloy began having vision problems and doctors discovered a brain tumor. Doctors performed surgery, and it appeared to be successful, but his cancer later returned.

In 1989, at age 28, he became the youngest captain in the NYPD. He commanded the same precinct his grandfather had in the 30s, according to the publication.

“Being a cop wasn’t just an occupation for him,” his brother, John Molloy, said. “He was completely devoted to his work and his family. Many a night, he would get a call in the middle of the night. He was committed 100 percent.”

Molloy is survived by his wife and two daughters.


NY detective’s death classified as homicide

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Anthony M. Destefano Newsday

NEW YORK — NYPD Det. Steven McDonald’s death last month from an apparent heart attack has been classified as a 2017 homicide, even though he survived being shot by a teenager in Central Park in July 1986, officials said Tuesday.

The NYPD’s classification of McDonald’s death as a homicide decades after he was injured is often done in cases where crime victims die as a result of assaults and shootings that take a toll later in life, a police spokesman said.

McDonald, of Malverne, was shot by Shavod Jones and left a quadriplegic, though a wheelchair gave him mobility and a respirator he used to breathe allowed him to talk. He was an active member of the NYPD until he died at age 59.

McDonald, who was stricken Jan. 6, was taken off life support Jan. 10. His funeral Mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan on Jan. 13 drew thousands of mourners.

Jones, who was sent to prison for attempted murder and was released in 1995, died in a motorcycle accident a few days after being freed.

McDonald’s death has been factored into 2017 NYPD crime data. Through Sunday, there have been 17 killings for the year, compared with 22 in the same period in 2016.

Copyright 2017 Newsday


Bill mandates Baltimore police report surveillance tactics

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By Carrie Snurr Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — The Maryland House Judiciary Committee heard arguments for and against a bill that would require the Police Commissioner of Baltimore City to notify the city council, mayor and delegation about the development of new tactics and use of specific enforcement zones within 30 days of their use.

The bill requires the police commissioner to submit a report explaining the potential establishment of "high crime" or "stop and frisk" zones in Baltimore and the use of surveillance devices or "innovative tactics," according to a state document.

Delegate Frank Conaway, D-Baltimore, the sponsor of the bill, said in an interview with Maryland's Capital News Service that it is in reference to a Department of Justice report that said the Baltimore Police Department was designating certain areas of the city as "high crime" or "stop and frisk" zones, which violated civil rights.

Conaway introduced several bills based on a January Baltimore City consent decree, which enforces reforms to the Baltimore Police Department, and a Department of Justice report. A federal judge still needs to sign off on the agreement before the requirements of the decree go into effect.

The Department of Justice opened an investigation into the Baltimore police in 2015 after the death of Freddie Gray, who suffered an injury while being transported in a police van and later died. Gray's death sparked protests and riots in the city.

Conaway testified that he believed the people living in zones designated as "high crime" should be informed of that designation.

Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger testified in opposition to a similar statewide bill that would also require all police departments in the state notify local officials of the use of new technologies -- it does not include "high crime zone" language.

He expressed concerns that the language of the bill was too vague and that the reports would be subject to public information requests, even if the notification was for an active investigation.

License plate readers and wiretap technology, which he said are used by police several times a day as forms of electronic surveillance, may be subjected to the statute, Schellenberger testified. He expressed concern that the reports could compromise active investigations.

The Baltimore consent decree includes language that requires the city police to notify the local government when it uses new technologies.

The state does not have power to appoint the Baltimore police commissioner nor is it responsible for funding police operations. However, the state can write laws to implement policy changes in the police department.

Conaway added that the Baltimore police used aircraft for aerial surveillance of the city without notifying Baltimore City officials.

In August 2016, it was revealed that the Baltimore Police Department authorized a private firm to use cameras mounted on a small plane for aerial surveillance of Baltimore City. The program began in early 2016, according to a state document.

The bill requires that once the Baltimore police begin using new technologies, such as drones or cell-site simulators, they notify the Baltimore City Council, mayor and state government delegation within 30 days.

Cell-site simulators are devices that act like cell-phone towers but allow police to track and collect information from nearby phones.

Then-Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, the Baltimore City Council and state officials were not initially made aware of the program and were not notified until months after it began.

"They need to have some kind of transparency or accountability beyond themselves," Conaway told Maryland's Capital News Service.

Conaway said that he has gotten negative feedback from law enforcement officers who have told him that the requirement to update Baltimore officials on new technology used by the police is too broad. He added that the police only have to notify city officials when that technology is deployed, not when the city police acquire the technology.

Proponents of the program said that the cameras do not capture high resolution images and it is very hard to personally identify people. However, privacy advocates argue that the market for the technology would accelerate development of more high-resolution cameras.


Dallas police receive $1M grant for ballistic vests, helmets

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By Fox 4 News

DALLAS — The Dallas Police Department received a $1 million-plus grant Thursday to go toward new ballistic helmets and bullet proof vests.

Governor Greg Abbott announced the Homeland Security Grants Division funds for the city and cited the deadly July 7 ambush in downtown Dallas as the reason.

"What the attack in Dallas last year showed us is that more needs to be done to protect the brave men and women who run into danger and not away from it,” Abbott said in a statement. “I hope that these grants will help address some of the needs of our men and women in blue, and look forward to doing even more this legislative session that shows Texas has their back."

Read more: Dallas police get $1 million grant for new helmets, bullet proof vests


Okla. sheriff seeking body cameras after fatal 2015 OIS

Posted on February 1, 2017 by in POLICE

By Justin Juozapavicius Associated Press

TULSA, Okla. — An Oklahoma sheriff's agency where an ex-reserve deputy fatally shot an unarmed black man in 2015 is applying for federal money to outfit 50 of its deputies with body-worn cameras, the sheriff said Tuesday.

If the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office is approved for its 50 percent match grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, the county would have to come up with roughly $50,000 of the equipment cost. The sheriff's office has 250 deputies.

With the deaths of about two-dozen black people following police encounters in the past several years, civil rights groups have called on law enforcement agencies to outfit officers with more body cameras and other technology to show transparency in their dealings with the public.

The Tulsa Police Department received about $600,000 from the DOJ in 2015 for body cameras and announced a plan in November to distribute the first 40 to officers who frequently interact with the public.

"It's a tool that will provide for better accountability," Sheriff Vic Regalado said Tuesday. "Body cameras are not the cure-all, but they are certainly a big step in alleviating a lot of those issues." If the agency receives the grant, Regalado said deputies will begin field-testing the equipment in the fall.

Two of the fatal shooting incidents happened in Tulsa. In September, a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black man. Officer Betty Jo Shelby has pleaded not guilty to first-degree manslaughter in the death of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher.

The shooting was captured on video from a police helicopter and a dashboard camera, but the images don't offer a clear view of when Shelby fired the single shot because she wasn't wearing a body camera.

In April 2015, ex-volunteer sheriff's deputy Robert Bates, who is white, fatally shot an unarmed Eric Harris in a city street. Part of the incident was captured on a camera mounted in a pair of a deputy's glasses, but it was his personal device.

The Harris shooting drew thousands of county residents to petition for a grand jury to investigate allegations that Bates was unqualified to serve as a deputy but was kept on the force because of his friendship with indicted ex-Sheriff Stanley Glanz. Bates was convicted of second-degree manslaughter and sentenced to four years in prison last year.

Regalado, who replaced Glanz after he retired in November, said the public fallout from the Harris shooting spurred the agency into seeking the technology.

"That was part of it," he said. "We certainly need to catch up and jump on board with that technology. It's a priority here."

Community activist Marq Lewis, a founder of We the People Oklahoma, the group that lobbied for a grand jury to investigate the sheriff's office in 2015, welcomed the potential investment as one way to heal "the divide in the community" after the Harris and Crutcher shootings.

"They have a lot of repairing to do," Lewis said Tuesday. "They have to repair the community by saying, 'trust us, I'm there for you.'

"But (the cameras have) to be backed by action and policies; it can't be a buzzword."


How to mitigate the dangers of TASER deployment against armed subjects

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

Duane Wolfe
Author: Duane Wolfe

There are two popular videos showing police officers dealing with subjects armed with contact weapons. One, here in the U.S., involves a man with a knife. Because the suspect is outside the range of the TASER, the device does not work and the officers are, unfortunately, forced to shoot him. The other in England involves a man armed with a hammer. Officers do not use lethal force cover and the TASER fails due to the suspect’s clothing. Both of these videos serve as reminders of the considerations that officers must make when attempting to deploy a TASER against an armed subject.

Lethal, then less lethal

In any situation with an armed subject, the primary officer should always arm themselves with a firearm in order to be ready to deal with the deadly force threat. When a decision to attempt to have a less-lethal option is made, the second or third officer on scene should take that role.

TASER vs reaction/response time

The TASER is a very common less-lethal option. Typical ranges for the cartridges are 15 and 25 feet. To effectively use them you must be closer than the length of the wires.

In 1983, Dennis Tueller devised a drill to demonstrate reaction/response time. Reaction time is the time it takes for the brain to recognize a threat and formulate a response. If you apply it to the OODA Loop, reaction time is the first three steps – observe, orient and decide. Response time is the time it takes to complete the physical motions required. In this case, drawing and firing a pistol once—or action. The Tueller Drill demonstrated that police officers could draw and fire one round, on average, in 1.5 seconds. Tueller then determined that people could travel, on average, 21 feet in 1.5 seconds.

What a lot of people don’t seem to realize is that if someone is armed with a knife and charges from 21 feet away, and both the officer and the suspect are average, the suspect will stab the officer before he or she can draw his or her weapon. Why? Because in a real situation, the officer will have a delay because he or she has to determine what the suspect’s actions mean and then make the decision to draw. In other words, during a drill all officers already know what they need to do – draw and fire on a signal. Drills often eliminate the need to observe, orient and decide before acting.

That additional reaction time, during a real situation, will add about a half second before the officer can start to draw and fire the weapon. Some people refer to the Tueller Drill as the “21- foot rule” and some have come to believe that 21 feet from an armed subject is a safe distance to deploy. It isn’t. Taking a step back to 22 feet doesn’t make you any safer. Research by Force Science takes into account the reaction/response time coupled with an understanding about the movement of any suspect who is attacking an officer. This often results in misses and multiple rounds that may be required to stop a subject. Therefore, I suggest a distance of 30 feet as the minimum from an armed subject, and a greater distance is advised whenever possible.

30 foot recommendation

Compare the 30 foot recommendation to the 15 or 25-foot cartridges you currently carry or even the 35-foot cartridges. Consider that any time you get close enough to deploy your TASER, you are close enough for an armed subject to fatally attack you. The TASER is a great tool, and I wished I had it for my entire career. However, for the TASER to be effective, both probes must strike, they must penetrate through clothing far enough for the electrical current to reach the skin, the circuit cannot be broken for the duration of the cycle(s), the probes must be far enough apart, they must be in the proper muscle groups for effective results and the suspect has to be someone who is affected by the electrical current.

Those are a lot of “if’s,” and that is why it is strongly suggested that anyone employing a TASER against an armed subject should be working in tandem with an officer armed with a firearm. Officers also need to understand that in real situations suspects may have to be shot multiple times before they stop. Those rounds will take time to take effect. Until the suspect stops, they can cause death and injury. In other words, while an officer may be armed with a gun, he or she is in the same danger at the same distances.

With that understanding, I strongly suggest against standing within TASER range for long periods of time while talking with suspects. If the suspect charges with deadly intent, both lethal and less lethal measures may fail to stop the homicidal assault.

Instead, stay at a minimum of 30 feet away, with cover/concealment whenever possible. Move to TASER range only when the decision has been made to attempt a TASER deployment.

The desired outcome in any armed/barricaded subject call is to take the suspect into custody alive. A plan, professionally executed with good teamwork and an understanding of the limitations of technology and human performance (both officer and suspect), is essential for the safety of the subject, community and officer(s). Realistic expectations lead to realistic training. Keep it real.


How to mitigate the dangers of TASER deployment against suspects

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

Duane Wolfe
Author: Duane Wolfe

There are two popular videos showing police officers dealing with subjects armed with contact weapons. One, here in the U.S., involves a man with a knife. Because the suspect is outside the range of the TASER, the device does not work and the officers are, unfortunately, forced to shoot him. The other in England involves a man armed with a hammer. Officers do not use lethal force cover and the TASER fails due to the suspect’s clothing. Both of these videos serve as reminders of the considerations that officers must make when attempting to deploy a TASER against an armed subject.

Lethal, then less lethal

In any situation with an armed subject, the primary officer should always arm themselves with a firearm in order to be ready to deal with the deadly force threat. When a decision to attempt to have a less-lethal option is made, the second or third officer on scene should take that role.

TASER vs reaction/response time

The TASER is a very common less-lethal option. Typical ranges for the cartridges are 15 and 25 feet. To effectively use them you must be closer than the length of the wires.

In 1983, Dennis Tueller devised a drill to demonstrate reaction/response time. Reaction time is the time it takes for the brain to recognize a threat and formulate a response. If you apply it to the OODA Loop, reaction time is the first three steps – observe, orient and decide. Response time is the time it takes to complete the physical motions required. In this case, drawing and firing a pistol once—or action. The Tueller Drill demonstrated that police officers could draw and fire one round, on average, in 1.5 seconds. Tueller then determined that people could travel, on average, 21 feet in 1.5 seconds.

What a lot of people don’t seem to realize is that if someone is armed with a knife and charges from 21 feet away, and both the officer and the suspect are average, the suspect will stab the officer before he or she can draw his or her weapon. Why? Because in a real situation, the officer will have a delay because he or she has to determine what the suspect’s actions mean and then make the decision to draw. In other words, during a drill all officers already know what they need to do – draw and fire on a signal. Drills often eliminate the need to observe, orient and decide before acting.

That additional reaction time, during a real situation, will add about a half second before the officer can start to draw and fire the weapon. Some people refer to the Tueller Drill as the “21- foot rule” and some have come to believe that 21 feet from an armed subject is a safe distance to deploy. It isn’t. Taking a step back to 22 feet doesn’t make you any safer. Research by Force Science takes into account the reaction/response time coupled with an understanding about the movement of any suspect who is attacking an officer. This often results in misses and multiple rounds that may be required to stop a subject. Therefore, I suggest a distance of 30 feet as the minimum from an armed subject, and a greater distance is advised whenever possible.

30 foot recommendation

Compare the 30 foot recommendation to the 15 or 25-foot cartridges you currently carry or even the 35-foot cartridges. Consider that any time you get close enough to deploy your TASER, you are close enough for an armed subject to fatally attack you. The TASER is a great tool, and I wished I had it for my entire career. However, for the TASER to be effective, both probes must strike, they must penetrate through clothing far enough for the electrical current to reach the skin, the circuit cannot be broken for the duration of the cycle(s), the probes must be far enough apart, they must be in the proper muscle groups for effective results and the suspect has to be someone who is affected by the electrical current.

Those are a lot of “if’s,” and that is why it is strongly suggested that anyone employing a TASER against an armed subject should be working in tandem with an officer armed with a firearm. Officers also need to understand that in real situations suspects may have to be shot multiple times before they stop. Those rounds will take time to take effect. Until the suspect stops, they can cause death and injury. In other words, while an officer may be armed with a gun, he or she is in the same danger at the same distances.

With that understanding, I strongly suggest against standing within TASER range for long periods of time while talking with suspects. If the suspect charges with deadly intent, both lethal and less lethal measures may fail to stop the homicidal assault.

Instead, stay at a minimum of 30 feet away, with cover/concealment whenever possible. Move to TASER range only when the decision has been made to attempt a TASER deployment.

The desired outcome in any armed/barricaded subject call is to take the suspect into custody alive. A plan, professionally executed with good teamwork and an understanding of the limitations of technology and human performance (both officer and suspect), is essential for the safety of the subject, community and officer(s). Realistic expectations lead to realistic training. Keep it real.


Quiz: Can you talk like a cop?

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Uniform Stories Staff

By Uniform Stories Staff


What can law enforcement expect from Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch?

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

Terrence P. Dwyer, Esq.
Author: Terrence P. Dwyer, Esq.

The pick is in and President Donald Trump has nominated Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch as the replacement for Justice Antonin Scalia. Gorsuch, considered an exceptional writer and an interpretive textualist, is the youngest Supreme Court nominee since Justice Clarence Thomas in 1991. He holds a Ph.D from Oxford University, with a law degree from Harvard University and an undergraduate degree from Columbia University. Clearly the judicial nominee is well-educated and intelligent, but a quick review of some of his Tenth Circuit opinions shows that he writes very clearly and directly, often cutting right to the core of the issue in a case.

Professional experience

As a Supreme Court nominee he follows the familiar path of many of his predecessors—he clerked for a sitting Supreme Court Justice. Gorsuch first clerked for fellow Coloradoan Justice Byron White and then for Justice Anthony Kennedy, after White’s retirement. If confirmed by the Senate, Gorsuch will re-join Justice Kennedy in the Supreme Court.

Prior to his Supreme Court clerkships, Gorsuch clerked for District of Columbia Circuit Court Judge David B. Sentelle. He later entered private practice as an attorney where he remained for ten years before joining the Justice Department as a principal attorney to the associate attorney general and then as the associate attorney general. In 2006, after two years in the Justice Department, he was appointed to the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals by President George W. Bush.

Judicial philosophy

As a judge who has spent just over a decade on a federal appeals court, there is plenty of written work available to gauge his judicial philosophy. Much has already been written about his conservatism and the potential impact he might have on the Supreme Court in case dealing with the Establishment Clause and reproductive rights. Speculation has also begun on the effect his prior relationship as a law clerk may have on Justice Kennedy, who is often a “swing vote” in many close cases, in voting as well as on his possible decision to retire.

However, not much has been written on Judge Gorsuch’s criminal law decisions. In a March 2016 dissent, Gorsuch disagreed with a majority decision siding with law enforcement officers who ignored “No Trespassing” signs and entered the curtilage of a home to knock and inquire about a complaint of an individual possessing a gun. The investigation led to drug and weapons charges against several individuals. Judge Gorsuch’s dissent took issue with what he viewed as the majority’s strained reasoning.

Much like Justice Scalia’s majority opinions in Kyllo v. United States (2001) and Florida v. Jardines (2013), Gorsuch’s dissent argued for constitutional protection around the home from overt government intrusion in line with the guarantees of the Fourth Amendment. A few months later, writing for the majority, Gorsuch issued an opinion which found that the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children was a governmental actor and that a search warrant should have been obtained to secure internet material from AOL through its Image Detection Filtering Process. Since the government preserved its third-party doctrine argument, the district and circuit court reserved decision on that issue. However, it is clear from these two 2016 case that Gorsuch takes as clear and straight-forward view of the protections of the Fourth Amendment as Justice Scalia.

Qualified immunity

On a separate subject, that of qualified immunity, recently addressed by the Supreme Court in White v. Pauly, Gorsuch was the author of a series of opinions from January 2012 to February 2013 which sided with law enforcement officers and their municipal employers in civil rights claims brought against the officers and their agencies. In one case, Hernandez v. Story, et al., Gorsuch, writing for a three judge panel, reversed the lower district court’s denial of summary judgment for two police officers sued under 42 USC §1983 for malicious prosecution.

The plaintiff in the case sued after he was arrested, but was not convicted for battery during a drunken bar brawl. Gorsuch wrote that the plaintiff “failed to carry his burden of establishing that his arrest and prosecution clearly lacked probable cause under existing law…” The Hernandez opinion and other Gorsuch opinions concerning qualified immunity show him to be in line with Supreme Court decisions over the past six years which have dealt with police officer qualified immunity.

Time will tell how the new Supreme Court nominee will turn out, if confirmed, as a Justice upon the nation’s highest court. There is nothing in the tea leaves to suggest Gorsuch will be antagonistic toward our nation’s law enforcement, in fact the opposite appears to be in evidence. However, he will expect the values and protections of the Constitution to be adhered to and applied, which is nothing less and nothing more than anyone who puts on a uniform can expect.


6 strategies for preventing radicalization in US jails and prisons

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By Eugene Atherton

Since 9/11, Orlando, and other attacks in the U.S. and abroad, we have experienced heightened concern over terrorist violence. This article offers recommended strategies for the mitigation of the radicalization of inmates in American jails and prisons. Before discussing mitigation strategies for radicalization, the academic community strongly suggests the discussion is assisted by adopting a common, standard language to ensure an equal understanding among all readers. I offer the following definitions for that purpose:

Radicalization: A process by which inmates adopt extreme views, including beliefs that violent measures need to be taken for political and/or religious purposes. Terrorism: Symbolic, politically motivated acts of violence with specific targets and/or generally targeting civilians or non-combatants. Terrorist inmate: An inmate who is radicalized and serving a sentence for being convicted for acting as a terrorist in violation of criminal law. Deradicalization: A process whereby individuals (or groups) cease their belief in organized violence and/or terrorism. Disengagement: A process whereby individuals (or groups) cease their active involvement in terrorist organizations.

The following are six strategies to mitigate against the radicalization of inmates.

1. Strong corrections management

Research shows that bad things happen in ineffectively managed prisons. The Jam'iyyat Ul-Islam Is-Saheeh, or JIS, case in a U.S. prison is often used as an example of a prison environment where a terrorist cell was allowed to develop and find its way into the surrounding communities. Fortunately, it was detected and neutralized by law enforcement before an attack was successful.

At the time of the incident, I visited the facility for security assessment training. There is no question it was one of the most violent and tense correctional environments I experienced in my career. It was the perfect storm to breed radicalism towards terrorist acts. While these conditions are a major concern among European nations, they must also be a concern in U.S. jails and prisons.

Again, effectively managed prisons are the best strategy to mitigate inmate tendency to radicalize.

2. Comprehensive policy

This section assumes compliance with policy is the standard practice in a corrections facility. Disciplinary policy is very important in managing inmates who wish to radicalize others towards terrorist behavior. It is further enhanced by the myriad of advantages in being an American Correctional Association standards compliant system. Florida Department of Corrections, as an example, has a policy that prohibits inmates from proselytizing.

Most corrections agencies have policies that manage inmates’ ability to form in groups and to use prison resources for activities associated with membership in a group. In very good religious service programs in corrections, policy includes selection criteria for staff and standard curriculum for training and certification. Good policy prohibits inmates from possessing literature that proposes violence and hatred, which often are seen as important to the character of a terrorist inmate. Ineffective prison management typically does not have or enforce such policies.

3. Programs with cognitive restructuring

Prison environments that are program-rich provide hope for inmates. This hope makes the decision to radicalize towards violence less attractive. At minimum, a multitude of programs act against the old adage that the idle hands are the devil’s workshop. However, the greatest potential for all classification of inmates lies in the program known as cognitive restructuring.

Cognitive restructuring is based upon the notion that if someone changes the way they think, it will change the way they behave. Two popular programs implemented in the U.S. are 7 Habits on the Inside and Thinking for a Change. Having been an instructor for the 7 Habits on the Inside program, I have witnessed changes in inmate participant behavior and attitude that have been profound and extremely effective in every aspect of their lives.

For an inmate involved in such programs, I expect there is very little chance of being radicalized towards terrorist conduct.

4. Effective religious services

In Mark Hamm’s survey of United State Prison systems, he focuses on the role of the religious service provider as central to knowing and influencing an inmate’s tendency towards radicalization. I recognize the value of an effective coordinator of the religious services in the correctional populations. Some are priceless and have very positive influence on those inmates wishing to pursue a spiritual path. I have also experienced those that are of little value or a potential negative influence, as was the chaplain in the JIS case.

Hamm’s survey findings suggest we need more religious service providers for all faiths in correctional systems. I don’t disagree. However, the emphasis ignores the potential good that could be done by helping all other staff with regular inmate contact to exhibit similar interpersonal skills.

5. Prisoner intelligence systems and surveillance

Prisoner intelligence systems must provide accurate, current, quality information that identifies inmates who have high potential to radicalize towards violent behavior.

During the JIS incident, I personally witnessed a facility overwhelmed with violent gang activity. The gang activity was to the extent that staff seemed to have little time or resources to tend to less obvious social developments. This included the radicalization that was occurring in the prison chapel with the support of the chaplain who was providing literature that embraced violence as imperative in the terrorist struggle.

The days are gone in which staff could walk the yard and speak to each inmate by name and be familiar with who they are. The overall numbers of inmates has grown dramatically, and they are frequently transferred among facilities.

Because of this, all prisons need to have intelligence systems. The historical information may not be very telling. However, information produced by staff observing on the front lines and interacting with inmates may be extremely valuable toward recognizing potential problems before they arise and skillfully intervening before harm is done. Such information reported and analyzed through carefully designed software systems can give staff the advantage as inmates contemplate radicalization or consider deradicalization and disengagement from their group.

Very often the information is available, but the challenge that corrections agencies have is how to get it packaged, maintain its quality and integrity and swiftly move it to those who should know.

The Colorado Department of Corrections and the Florida Department of Corrections are outstanding examples of sophisticated incident reporting systems. These systems begin with the officer managing inmates on the shift where a critical incident occurs. The circumstances are documented and submitted to a digital report which is submitted to a higher level of processing. There, it gets considered as impacting multiple areas of concern.

After analysis, the information is further elevated where all is prioritized and high level supervision can formulate action plans. Some portions of the Florida system perform data analysis automatically. In both systems leadership can identify an issue by a general label and then drill down through layers of data that provide information that is extremely important. Such analysis can help prevent escapes, inmate violence and can provide information that resolves problems before radicalization appears.

In the last decade, camera systems have become more affordable and an integral part of the prison and jail operation. More advanced technology offers software that includes facial identification of inmates under view of the camera. The cameras have become the eyes and ears of staff confined to duty stations. Cameras can often detect movement and inmate behavior that indicates a pattern of inmate social behavior that would identify potential for radicalization.

6. Staff and inmate training

Training for staff and inmates in order to prevent and dissolve radicalization toward terrorist inmate behavior can take many forms. It can emphasize effective relationships between inmates and staff as would be an outcome of 7 Habits on the Inside for graduates of the course. The results can build trust and confidence in relationships which serves as pathways to solving issues surrounding radicalization.

Training can emphasize behavior observation and intervention by staff. Under a great deal of public concern over terrorist gangs on the streets and in prisons, European nations have taken the initiative in preparing front line staff to be effective in responding to radicalization. Both the United Kingdom and the Netherlands have produced training programs for frontline staff on the streets and in prisons. This training prepares staff to recognize the behavior as a sign of radicalization and to effectively intervene to resolve the problem.

In every correctional system there are hot button issues that negatively impact relationships among staff and inmates. Some examples are attitudes concerning gender with respect to staff and inmates. Another is when, for example, a white, male, Christian officer supervises an inmate who worships Islam. He/she may believe that all worshipers of Islam hate and would do violence to non-believers. Training could replace dangerous mythology with accurate, factual information. Another example could be when that same officer supervises an inmate who worships as a Native American. When mated with a policy emphasis on religious tolerance, the effect can dramatically improve relationships between inmate and staff. It is the relationship between front line staff and inmates that counts the most, and effective training can give them the tools to be successful.

There are three things to remember as a leader in your corrections organization.

First, there is no one magic formula or strategy for success. Each corrections agency must have a plan to successfully manage radicalization of inmates. The plan toward success must implement numerous strategies.

Second, leadership in corrections is most often challenged with achieving a balance between competing influences. On the one hand, it is everyone’s job to achieve safety and control toward a humane environment. Sometimes that pursuit requires the imposition of rules and sanctions. There are times where many are unhappy with the rules. On the other hand, it is important to allow inmates to participate in activities that promote personal growth towards an effective, non-criminal life experience. There is clear evidence that many religious conversions support character development among inmates that leads to productive, non-criminal behavior in the prison populations.

It is balance that achieves success. Implementation of multiple strategies and achieving a balance on critical issues is the hallmark of an effectively managed prison environment. Such an accomplishment is the most important force in managing inmate radicalization in prison.


DA: No charges against NC trooper in fatal shooting of deaf driver

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By Michael Gordon The Charlotte Observer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Mecklenburg District Attorney will not bring charges against a state trooper who fatally shot a deaf driver in Charlotte last August after a high-speed chase.

District Attorney Andrew Murray announced Monday that Trooper Jermaine Saunders had legal justification to fire the shot that killed Daniel Harris not far from his north Charlotte home.

Murray’s findings were included in a 122-page report that included details on the chase and other events leading up to Harris’ killing, including a statement that Harris ran at the trooper with a metal object in his hand. Saunders told investigators he thought Harris was carrying a weapon. It turned out to be a metal carabiner key ring.

Murray also raised the possibility that Harris was undergoing a “mental health crisis” during the confrontation.

Prosecutors said Harris had a history of mental illness and had been in a psychiatric hospital in Florida for seven years. In 2015, after Harris was arrested in Kansas for fleeing a police traffic stop, a psychological assessment said Harris regularly “perceives something telling him to stab himself or someone else,” the report states.

“Given the choices faced by Trooper Saunders, the compressed window of time in which he had to evaluate the situation and act, along with the stress of the situation, I have concluded it was not unreasonable for Trooper Saunders to fire his weapon,” Murray wrote.

Jay Harris, the dead man’s brother, said the family disagrees with Murray’s decision and allege that “relevant information was excluded from the report.” According to Jay Harris, Saunders told several people on the scene that he could not see what Harris was carrying in his hands, and only mentioned the metal object in later interviews with the State Bureau of Investigation.

Charlotte attorney Will DeVore, who is representing the family, took particular exception of prosecutors’ release of Daniel Harris medical information, which he said had no relevance to the criminal case or any civil action the family might bring because Saunders was not aware of Harris’ past mental problems at the time.

“The District Attorney did not ask for the family’s consent to publish any of Daniel’s medical information,” DeVore said, “and it is my belief that this information (was used) to justify a conclusion.”

“While we will never know why Daniel fled from the police over a traffic violation, his actions toward Officer Saunders did not warrant the taking of his life,” DeVore said.

Murray said he included Harris’ mental history in the report not to disparage him but “so people might understand how this could happen.”

The chase

Criminal charges in police use of deadly force are rare in Mecklenburg County. In the past 35 years, only one officer – Charlotte-Mecklenburg police Officer Randall “Wes” Kerrick in 2013 – has been charged in connection with an on-duty shooting. That case ended in a mistrial, and the manslaughter charge against Kerrick dismissed.

The legal standard for the use of deadly force is what is known as “objective reasonableness,” meaning would a reasonable officer in the same circumstances have responded the same way. Officers have the right to fire their weapons if they have a reasonable fear of death or serious injury for themselves or others.

Murray says witness accounts and physical evidence show “that Trooper Saunders retreated from Harris before firing the shot that killed Harris,” Murray wrote. “There is no evidence that Harris being deaf played any role in this incident.”

Jay Harris singled out that that comment is a “red flag for the extreme miscommunication and disconnect between the deaf community and law enforcement. Police must receive appropriate training for interacting with a large part of our population.”

The chase between Harris and Saunders began the evening of Aug. 18 when Saunders reported that a blue Volvo passed him going 88 mph. The chase appeared to escalate from there. Murray said multiple witnesses on Interstate 485 reported the Volvo swerving in and out of traffic, at speeds reaching 100 mph.

Harris, according to prosecutors, lost control of his car once during the chase. Saunders “spun the Volvo out on two occasions.” After one of the times Saunders tried to run Harris off the road, a witness described Harris as appearing “confused” as he sat in his car, gesturing with hands up in the air “as if asking what was going on,” the report says.

Another witness to the chase said Harris’ car came within a few feet of his as it sped up the off ramp to Rocky River Road.

Harris, he said, made a “goofy, almost laughing expression” that led him to believe he was on some kind of drug. Harris, according to this witness, “seemed not to care how reckless he was being ... and was acting bat-s*** crazy.”

According to Murray’s statement, after spinning Harris out, Saunders approached the Volvo with his gun drawn, banged on the vehicle and ordered Harris to get out. Saunders, however, took cover when he said Harris appeared to be reaching for something in the car, prosecutors say.

Harris sped off, leading the trooper into the Seven Oaks neighborhood where his family lived. A neighbor, according to prosecutors, saw Harris’ approach. He told authorities that two of the Volvo’s tires were blown and that he feared the car was going to strike him as it passed.

In the neighborhood, Saunders exited his car with his gun drawn and his left arm raised in a “stop” gesture. He told prosecutors that he yelled at Harris several times to “Stop, let me see your hands” before firing a shot into Harris’ chest when the driver was 2 to 4 feet away, Murray says.

Saunders told state investigators that “I was in fear for my life” and that he thought Harris intended to assault him with a metal weapon. “It was clear to me that he wasn’t going to give up for anything,” Saunders said, according to the report.

One witness, described in the report as a former law enforcement officer now working as a security guard, followed the chase into the neighborhood. According to Murray, the witness told authorities that Harris ran screaming at the trooper “with his hands spread and his eyes and mouth wide open,” Murray said.

The neighbor added: “It looked like he was coming for the cop.”

Two experts in law enforcement training told the Observer last year that Saunders’ decision to mount a high-speed chase may have escalated the incident beyond what was needed to make a safe arrest.

———

©2017 The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, N.C.)


IACP ‘strongly opposes’ use of local, state police to enforce Trump immigration mandate

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The International Association of Chiefs of Police released a statement Monday in reaction to a series of executive orders on immigration signed by President Donald Trump.

Since President Trump signed Executive Order: Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States and Executive Order: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States there has been a growing concern about the requirements and roles of local and state law enforcement in carrying these out to the satisfaction of the new administration.

The IACP’s statement highlights the importance for law enforcement agencies to develop strategy, tactics and impact assessments to carry out these policies identified in Trump’s “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” order.

Regarding “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States,” the IACP pointed out that this “only directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to use his existing authority under Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act to enter into voluntary agreements with state and local agencies to perform immigration enforcement duties,” which is consistent with previous administrations.

The IACP also reiterated their opposition to any initiative that mandates local and state law enforcement to enforce federal immigration law, stating that decisions to enforce such laws should be made by locally and independently.

The IACP's full statement reads:

On January 27th, U.S. President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order on “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.” While recognizing that the measures outlined in the executive order were implemented so to enhance the security of the United States, the IACP believes that to minimize confusion and ensure the effectiveness of these changes, it is critically important that they be implemented in a carefully thought out and structured fashion. Both law enforcement officials in the United States, and their international partners, need clear guidance on the impact that these adjustments will have on their daily operations and the changes that may be required to their policies and procedures.

There have also been recent reports that the Trump Administration is considering using state and local law enforcement agencies in the apprehension and removal of illegal aliens in the United States. To be clear, President Trump’s January 25th Executive Order (Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States) only directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to use his existing authority under Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act to enter into voluntary agreements with state and local agencies to perform immigration enforcement duties. This approach is consistent with the efforts of previous administrations and is dependent upon the consent of the state or local entity.

However, the IACP has, and will continue to strongly oppose any initiative that would mandate that state and local law enforcement agencies play a role in the enforcement of federal immigration law. The IACP believes that the issue of state, tribal, or local law enforcement’s participation in immigration enforcement is an inherently local decision that must be made by law enforcement executives, working with their elected officials, community leaders, and citizens.


Chicago cops create ‘Be The Change’ recruitment program

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

CHICAGO — With police struggling to overcome the violent crime in Chicago, the department is looking for citizens to join the force and “Be The Change” in their communities.

A group of “ambassador” officers took to the streets Monday to recruit new cops, an effort the department has coined the “Be The Change” program, Fox 32 reported.

“I was one of those guys that grew up in a communities just like this one, and one of the things that happened was I realized that not a lot of people in my community that were the police, looked like me,” Officer Tim Crawford said. The officers said the only requirements are recruits have to be 21 and have 60 credit hours. Officers receive full health care coverage, tuition benefits and a retirement plan.

“You'd be surprised to find out that most officers go their whole career without ever having to shoot their weapon, other than to qualify,” Crawford said. “It’s not as bad as people think. This is a great career. ”

The program is a part of a two-year hiring process that will add almost 1,000 new officers to CPD.


Woman calls Australian police over drug dealer’s prices

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NORTHERN TERRITORY, Australia — Australian police received a call Saturday that topped their unusual grievance list.

A woman called police because she was upset after her drug dealer increased the price of marijuana.

She demanded police investigate the “outrageous” price hike, the department wrote on Facebook.

“If you know a drug dealer who is ripping you off, give us a call, we’d love to help,” the department wrote.

When asked for more details, she hung up.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Is your drug dealer ripping you off? A call to police yesterday had to top the list of ‘unusual’. A woman called...

Posted by Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services on Sunday, January 29, 2017


Tenn. firefighter shot by deputies outside home

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A firefighter was shot outside his home Monday evening after a confrontation with deputies.

Cheatham County Sheriff's Office deputies initially responded to reports of a woman who was almost run off the road near the home of firefighter Charles Holland, 44. They arrived to the scene and attempted to speak to a vehicle’s driver that was backing out a driveway nearby.

While deputies were speaking to the driver, Holland came out of his home wielding a gun and walked toward them, reported the Tennessean.

Holland was then shot and transported to the hospital. It was not immediately clear how many deputies fired at Holland or how many times we was hit, Josh DeVine, Tennessee Bureau Investigation spokesman, told the publication.

Holland was reported to be in stable condition. The incident remains under investigation.

AT 11: Father of #Nashville firefighter shot by deputies in #CheathamCounty last night says son was being a "Good Samaritan". @WKRN pic.twitter.com/4hSjClvTVV

— Josh Breslow (@JoshBreslowWKRN) January 31, 2017


Confrontation between Ohio cop, EMT goes viral

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio — A video capturing an aggressive confrontation between a police officer and EMT surfaced over the weekend, prompting an internal police review.

The video was taken by a bystander, who shared the video on Facebook.

Witnesses said they were leaving a bar Saturday night when police and EMS responded to a call of a man who was knocked unconscious during a fight. Witness Trevor Conley told WSAZ that when the man regained consciousness he was not calm; he then stated the police officer used a TASER on the man.

An EMT on scene attempted to intervene.

“The EMT said, ‘You can’t be tasing this guy, he’s bleeding, got head problems,’” witness Josh Journey said. “Then after that [the officer] grabbed the EMT, took him across the street, and I saw him have his hands on this throat all the way across the road and had him up against that cruiser.”

Journey said once the officer saw that he was being recorded, he attempted to confiscate the phone.

Portsmouth Police chief said the incident is under administrative review, which will conclude Wednesday. The chief also said that he has seen the video and stated that it only captures part of the incident.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

A Facebook video appears to show a Portsmouth police officer with his hand on or around a medic's neck and throat at the...

Posted by WSAZ NewsChannel 3 on Monday, January 30, 2017


Black Panthers pledge legal action after NC cops disarm them during march

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By Makenzie Holland and Tim Buckland Star-News

WILMINGTON, NC — The Revolutionary Black Panther Party pledged legal action Sunday against local officials for their response to a planned armed march at a news conference interrupted when law enforcement officers arrived to remove their weapons.

The news conference was taking place on the steps of the New Hanover County Courthouse when members of the New Hanover County Sheriff's Office and the Wilmington Police Department arrived. New Hanover County Sheriff's Office Lt. Donald Warnick told party leader Dr. Alli Muhammad they were not allowed to have their weapons on courthouse property.

Tensions heightened when some party members noticed officers with the Wilmington Police Department, dressed in tactical gear, aiming weapons toward the group.

“Can you tell them to lower their weapons,” one of the party members asked Warnick. “They need to lower their weapons.”

Warnick responded, “We’re just being ready, sir.”

Warnick continued to ask members to put their weapons on the courthouse steps, as well as remove any facial coverings. At the direction of Muhammad, party members voluntarily put their weapons down.

Members of the party were in violation of a local county ordinance prohibiting the display of firearms and possession of concealed handguns on courthouse property, as well as a state law that prohibits wearing masks at meetings or demonstrations, according to a New Hanover County Sheriff's Office news release.

On Sunday, the Revolutionary Black Panther Party was disarmed, but not deterred in Wilmington #ilm #RBPP => https://t.co/zU4kwjHbz1 pic.twitter.com/r68y2MX0AN

— Port City Daily (@PortCityDaily) January 30, 2017

Sheriff’s deputies then picked up the weapons, two revolvers, five semi-automatic pistols and three shotguns, and began unloading them before taking them to be inventoried. All of the weapons were loaded and some had bullets in the chamber.

“We just want justice,” said Wilmington resident Sheila Haskins, who was observing the event. “This looks like terrorism to me. Why can’t we have a peaceful march?”

The news conference stemmed from a legal entanglement involving the cancellation of a tribunal event that was supposed to be held Saturday in the Creekwood community, as well as an armed march that was supposed to take place Sunday.

"Law enforcement officers went to the Creekwood community. … They went there and frightened these people,” Muhammad claimed. “Because of the intimidation of law enforcement they wouldn’t open their doors. ... That is a form of terrorism.”

Muhammad contended that the group’s right to bear arms, peacefully assemble and equal protection of the law are “under siege.”

Members of the Revolutionary Black Panther Party had their weapons seized. They have not picked them up yet > https://t.co/4w7r5TmHW5 pic.twitter.com/rvHhjopqLV

— Ashlea Kosikowski (@AshleaOnAir) January 30, 2017

While planning legal action against the Wilmington Police Department, Police Chief Ralph Evangelous and District Attorney Ben David, Muhammad said he is planning to gather more people for an even larger armed march in the Wilmington area.

Despite having several of their guns taken Sunday, which Muhammad said the group will be able to retrieve Monday morning, the group carried on with planned events the rest of the day at the intersection of 12th and Dock streets. A significant police presence followed the group, as several WPD vehicles could be seen on streets at and around the intersection and a helicopter hovered above both the news conference and the intersection.

The event drew hundreds, and Black Panther members had rearmed themselves, saying they had a constitutional right to bear arms.

"You have the right to open carry in the state of North Carolina," Muhammad said.

The event was wide-ranging, with Muhammad speaking about injustice against blacks, including slavery, police persecution, economic suppression and, locally, the shooting of Brandon Smith, who was unarmed when he was killed by police in Wilmington in 2013. Police said Smith was suspected of shooting a police detective days earlier and, on the night he died, raised a dark object, later identified as a cellphone, following a chase.

Smith's relatives spoke during the event.

"I wish they could feel what I feel inside," Paula Davis, Smith's mother, said of law enforcement. "They'd never kill anyone again."

Denise Barnes, who lives on Dock Street near the site of the event, said she welcomed the Panthers' presence.

"I'm not really worried with them having the guns," she said. "I'm fine with them having this protest."

Wilmington resident Gwendolyn Allen said she appreciated the Panthers being in the area because it "starts to open dialogue."

"It is a global movement toward equality for everybody," she said.


Baltimore police launch mobile app for submitting tips, receiving alerts

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By Kevin Rector The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — The Baltimore Police Department on Monday launched a mobile app that allows residents to submit crime tips, receive alerts and peruse other department data and information — calling it a "one stop shop" for city residents looking to engage with the department.

"We think that this will assist in both the crime fight and our interactions with everyday citizens," said Police Commissioner Kevin Davis. "Our goal is to make it easy and simplistic for people to connect."

Through the app, residents will be able to make anonymous tips, and even engage in dialogue with an officer. Davis said the app will be constantly monitored, and tips related to homicides or nonfatal shootings will be given priority.

He said tips to the department increased 174 percent in 2016 over 2015 after the launch of an anonymous text-to-tip line — 443-902-4824 — and he hopes the app will continue growing the amount of information the department receives from the community.

The app also provides access to the department's Facebook and Twitter pages, the state's court records page, city crime data, the department's website and other information.

The Police Department recently agreed with the U.S. Department of Justice to usher in sweeping reforms, including to its communications with the public. Officials did not link the launch of the app to the federal consent decree process, though they touted it using the catchphrase "Transparency at Your Fingertips."

The app, available for download on Apple and Android devices, was developed for the department by the company Mobile PD, which works with about 100 other agencies across the country and in Canada, officials said. The department paid the company $10,000 to develop the app and $20,000 for a two-year subscription to the software, said T.J. Smith, a police spokesman.

Smith cautioned that the app is not intended to replace 911, which residents should still call immediately if there is an emergency or a crime in progress.

After the first two years, the department will pay the company $15,000 a year. It will also pay $99 and $25 annually for the app to appear in the Apple and Android app stores, respectively, Smith said.

Davis said the administration of Mayor Catherine Pugh is fully behind the launch of the app and the drive toward greater transparency. He cited studies that have shown more Americans are getting more of their news from mobile phones.

Kushyar Kasraie, CEO of Mobile PD, said versions of the app are being used by police departments in Austin, St. Louis, Toronto and elsewhere. But Baltimore — which has the eighth-largest police department in the country — is "by far the largest police force in the country launching this application, and we believe this will spur many other law enforcement agencies to follow their lead."

He said the app is "all about improving transparency" and has led to positive results in other cities, including assisting in finding missing people and in solving major drug cases.

"I really look forward to seeing the same positive results here," he said.

Smith said the department would "continuously evaluate" how the app is working for the department.

Some users expressed concerns Monday about prompts in the Android app asking for access to their pictures, location and other data. Smith said such access is routinely requested by mobile apps to support their features, such as the one in the police department app that allows users to send police pictures within their phones.

Smith said there is "no monitoring going on by the department to anyone that downloads the app."


Calif. officials search for escaped inmate

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By C1 Staff

HAYWARD, Calif. — Authorities are searching for an inmate who escaped from deputies Tuesday morning.

The inmate was being transferred from Kentucky to California, possibly for extradition, when he escaped from police custody, ABC 7 reported.

The Alameda County Sheriff's Office tweeted a photo of Shawn New, 27, and reported he is wanted by Kentucky authorities for fraud and ID theft.

The Sheriff’s Office has joined the search for the inmate.

Escaped prisoner: Shawn New, age 27, wanted by Kentucky authorities for fraud and ID theft. Escaped from their vehicle 880@ A St 0945. #BOLO pic.twitter.com/ZuNs8BHaGG

— Alameda Co. Sheriff (@ACSOSheriffs) January 31, 2017


Neb. police officer, suspect wounded in shootout

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

OMAHA, Neb. — A police officer and a suspect were wounded Monday after an exchange of gunfire between the suspect and officers.

According to the Omaha World-Herald, police were investigating a report of a suspicious person looking into vehicles and checking for unlocked doors when they saw a man who matched the description of the suspect.

Witness Greg Powell said he saw Officer Jill Schillerberg tell the suspect, Monroe G. Evans III, to sit on the curb and put his hands behind his back; Powell said Evans pulled something out of his jacket or backpack instead.

Police told the publication that Evans opened fire on officers and a handgun was recovered at the scene. Officers returned fire, wounding Evans.

Schillerberg suffered a leg wound and was treated and released from the hospital. Evans was taken to the hospital in critical, but stable condition where he underwent surgery.

An investigation is ongoing.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

NC police release video from fatal 2012 shooting

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Police in Charlotte, North Carolina, have released two dash camera videos from the shooting death of a black man by a white officer in 2012.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department's released the material Monday evening on a judge's order.

The video from the lead car shows two officers chasing Michael Laney on a following on a motor scooter for more than a minute and a half at about 20 mph. Laney pulls into his mother's yard. The officers were looking for a robbery suspect.

Police said the officers tackled Laney outside the view of the cameras.

A prosecutor ruled that officer Anthony Holtzhauer was justified in shooting Laney as he struggled with another officer, who yelled that Laney had a gun.

Laney's brother, Antoine Laney, said he was disappointed the videos don't show what happened. He thinks the shooting was unjustified.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Wash. lawmakers weigh police deadly force bills

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

By Alexis Myers Associated Press

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Lawmakers in Washington state are weighing bills that would raise the bar on when an officer can use deadly force.

Current law shields officers from prosecution unless they acted with malice and without good faith. That could change with new legislation proposed in the House and the Senate this year.

The House Committee on Public Safety is scheduled to hear public testimony on two bills Tuesday related to recommendations from a task force created by Gov. Jay Inslee to reduce the number of violent interactions between law-enforcement and the public.

Democratic Rep. Cindy Ryu from Shoreline, the lead sponsor of House Bill 1529, said in an interview the most crucial part of this process will be to find a balance and to create a feasible budget for the recommendations.

Ryu estimates it will cost at least $60 million to implement the task force's recommendations, which include police training and data collection.

"It's not going to be a quick fix," she said. "We are going to have to spend a lot of time discussing the best ways to handle these situations, and meet somewhere in the middle."

The task force voted 14-10 to remove the phrases "malice" and "good faith" from the current law, which makes it difficult to charge an officer for wrongfully killing a person. Ryu said if nothing else the word "malice" should be removed from the law immediately.

Rep. Roger Goodman, who is the co-chair of the task force and also the sponsor of the second bill being discussed at the hearing, said some of the language should be tweaked and some should be removed altogether.

"That (malice) is too high of a bar, there is no state in the country that prevents prosecution for manslaughter," he said. "So that is language I would prefer to see removed."

However, Goodman said he believes prosecutors need "good faith" to prove to a jury that a crime was committed.

"You need to prove intent, and good faith is a reasonable standard," he said. "We would just want to articulate what good faith means ... We also need to protect law enforcement, not only through the language, but through generous support for their training and their other operations - it's a package deal."

Goodman's bill implements some of the task force's recommendations, including the collection of data when deadly force is used, funding for advanced training programs and grant proposals to obtain less lethal weapons for primary responding - all of which he hopes to combine with Ryu's plan down the line.

Advocacy groups including the Olympia Coalition to Reform Deadly Force — which formed as a result of the task force last year — want to eliminate the language and create better policing practices, while still protecting and respecting the work of law enforcement.

"We believe police officers should be held accountable for unlawful use of deadly force," said Leslie Cushman, co-founder of the group.

James McMahan, policy director for the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, said in an interview removing "good faith" from the current law is 100 percent nonnegotiable, but mentioned they are "open" to having a discussion about removing the word "malice" from the current state law.

"We fundamentally believe that any bill that attempts to eliminate good faith from the standard on police officer's use of deadly force is not a negotiable thing for us," McMahan said.

McMahan said the WASPC supports Goodman's bill and any measure aimed to reduce the number of violent interactions between law enforcement and the public. The "no brainer" part of this legislation he said is to create a statewide uniform standard to track and collect data relating deadly force.


Some LA officers not eager to help Trump enforce immigration laws

Posted on January 31, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Cindy Chang, Kate Mather and Nicole Santa Cruz Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — A day after Donald Trump was elected president, two detectives walked up to a building site in Los Angeles’ Koreatown. The pair was hoping to find someone who might have witnessed a motorist intentionally knocking down a construction worker.

They introduced themselves to a group of Latino workers. The workers got up and walked away.

“Trump is coming,” one of them said as he left.

To Detective Brent Hopkins, the scene was a stark illustration of the difficulties he could face depending on how far President Donald Trump goes in enlisting local law enforcement to rid the country of people who are in the U.S. illegally.

“It is my job to investigate crimes,” said Hopkins of the Los Angeles Police Department’s Wilshire Division, who also serves on the police union’s communications committee. “And if I can’t do that, I can’t get justice for people, because all of a sudden, I’m losing my witnesses or my victims because they’re afraid that talking to me is going to lead to them getting deported.”

After Trump’s unveiling last week of two executive orders that called for empowering local law enforcement officers to take on the duties of immigration agents, police officers and sheriff’s deputies across the Los Angeles area said in interviews that enforcing immigration laws is not in their job descriptions. Many expressed concerns that immigrants already wary of reporting crimes or being interviewed as witnesses will retreat further into the shadows.

“They should be running to us, not away from us,” said LAPD Deputy Chief Robert Arcos of Central Bureau, which includes Boyle Heights, MacArthur Park, Chinatown and other areas with many immigrant residents. “We are here to be their protectors.”

Besides, some officers said, they are too busy answering 911 calls, arresting robbers, stopping erratic drivers and solving homicides to add federal immigration enforcement to their to-do lists.

“We have enough issues just trying to keep the peace anyway,” said J.C. Duarte, a veteran LAPD officer in Northeast Division. “It’s just going to create a wedge between immigrants and law enforcement. Whether they’re here legally or not, there’s going to be a fear generated.”

Many officers said they believe their bosses will resist Trump’s directives, despite the president’s threat to withhold federal funding.

The LAPD has long had a policy that forbids officers from initiating contact with a person solely to ask about immigration status.

On Wednesday, hours after Trump unveiled his executive orders, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck reiterated that his officers would continue to focus on building relationships with city residents, regardless of where they were born. L.A. County Sheriff Jim McDonnell said his deputies do not ask anyone about their legal status and that immigration enforcement remains a federal responsibility.

In the state Legislature, Senate leader Kevin de Leon is championing a measure that would prohibit California police officers from engaging in immigration enforcement.

“We’re not going to be enforcing any immigration laws whatsoever,” said Cmdr. Keith Swensson, who oversees the Central Patrol Division, which includes Compton and parts of East and South L.A., for the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department. “The whole concept seems to be overpoliticized, when in fact we’re going to be doing the same thing we’ve always been doing.”

The racial demographics of L.A County’s two largest law enforcement agencies reflect those of the region as a whole. In both the LAPD and the county’s Sheriff’s Department, nearly half of the sworn officers are Latino. It is not uncommon for a police officer or sheriff’s deputy to be an immigrant or the child of immigrants. Duarte, the Northeast Division officer, came to the U.S. legally from Guatemala at age 2.

During the presidential election, Trump found support among some law enforcement officers who viewed him as more pro-police than his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton. But locally, even some officers who privately said they voted for him are not eager to help with his immigration agenda.

Trump’s executive orders call for the resurrection of Secure Communities, a program from earlier in Obama’s administration that asked jail officials to hand over inmates to immigration authorities, including inmates who had no criminal records and were guilty only of immigration violations.

But Trump has not spelled out any specific plans to enlist street officers in apprehending immigrants without legal status. The executive orders say that local law enforcement agencies will be empowered “to perform the functions of an immigration officer … to the maximum extent permitted by law” but provide no detail.

An Arizona law, Senate Bill 1070, tested the legal limits of what immigration enforcement duties police officers could perform. In 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down most of the Arizona law but let stand a provision that required police to check the immigration status of someone they had already stopped if there was “reasonable suspicion” the person was in the country illegally.

If Trump asks police agencies to perform immigration checks along the lines of the Arizona law, participation would have to be voluntary, because the federal government cannot coerce local governments to do its work, constitutional law scholars say.

The funding component of Trump’s executive orders, which involves withholding federal funds to so-called sanctuary cities, could face legal hurdles, because courts could view it as an underhanded way to force cooperation, said Hiroshi Motomura, an immigration scholar and professor at UCLA School of Law.

“If the LAPD doesn’t want to be involved in immigration checks, the feds can’t force the LAPD to do that,” Motomura said.

Still, the specter of police officers checking residents’ legal status has stirred anxiety among some immigrants.

At roll calls, Capt. Martin Baeza of the LAPD’s Hollenbeck Division has been reiterating to his officers that their job is enforcing state laws, not federal immigration laws.

At community meetings, he tries to tamp down fears, answering questions that included one about whether internment camps, such as those used to imprison Japanese Americans during World War II, might arise again.

“I completely understand the anxiety that our community is having, because I’ve lived that as a child,” said Baeza, who came to the U.S. from Mexico when he was 2.

Baeza’s parents had green cards, but they still viewed the police with fear. His parents would tell him not to get into trouble and not to have anything to do with the police, he recalled.

After the presidential election, the LAPD’s Central Division, which includes Hollenbeck, held a series of community meetings to reassure immigrants that police officers are there to help them, not deport them.

But comforting words can only go so far when people fear being separated from their families and livelihoods.

At a community meeting in South Los Angeles on Thursday night, a man asked if he could be deported for a traffic ticket. LAPD Officer Marcela Garcia assured him that would not happen.

Inglewood Police Officer Chris Beckman said that when he investigated sex crimes, he had a hard time getting some Spanish-speaking victims to come forward because they feared being deported.

If police officers do take a role in immigration enforcement, some victims “are not going to want to deal with the police whatsoever,” Beckman said.

Some police officers and sheriff’s deputies said that if their bosses tell them to ask people about immigration status, they will have to obey the orders.

But Duarte, the LAPD officer in Northeast, said he would “flat-out just refuse.” He plans to retire next year and has little to lose.

“At this point in my career, I’d take whatever consequence came down the pipe,” he said. “So what? Go ahead and suspend me for 10 days. I’m not going to do it.”

———

©2017 Los Angeles Times


Fla. mayor apologizes for police ‘pig’ comment

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Jim Hayward The Palm Beach Post

STUART, Fla. — Stuart Mayor Eula Clarke apologized for saying, "What are we serving, pig today?" within earshot of a Stuart police officer in a grocery store, according to Palm Beach Post news partner WPTV NewsChannel 5.

Clarke sent a letter to the Palm Beach County Police Benevolent Association asking for forgiveness for the Jan. 11 incident, union president John Kazanjian told WPTV. "The poor guy walked out, you know, hurt," Kazanjian said. "That's coming from the mayor of the city?"

Clarke told WPTV that she apologized to the officer. "I have met with him and I have expressed to him how sorry it is that this unfortunate event happened," she said.

Kazanjian called the letter "a first step," adding that Clarke needs to meet with the entire police force in person.

Clarke said she's willing to do that. "I want to move on. I want the officers to work for our community," she told WPTV. "I want them to believe in what I do as mayor. To believe in what they do for their jobs. I just want to make sure that they know I have their backs

See more from WPTV


Kan. PDs respond to Tostitos chips bag ‘breathalyzer’

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By Stan Finger The Wichita Eagle

KANSAS — If you’re half-convinced the world has been turned upside down, here’s further proof: Agencies in the homes of Kansas and Kansas State actually getting along well with each other.

The Lawrence Police Department and Riley County Police Department launched into a humorous thread on Twitter on Thursday about the new Tostitos bags that developers say can detect if someone may have had too much to drink.

Twitterdom gave approval in its unique way, with gifs and sharing.

If you’re looking for one of the bags, good luck: Frito-Lay manufactured only 1,000 of them.

If you have to blow into a Tostitos bag to know if you're intoxicated, for the love of all that is holy, DO NOT DRIVE https://t.co/gnTcIIL7Oj

— Lawrence Police (@LawrenceKS_PD) January 26, 2017

@LawrenceKS_PD “I’m fine to drive, officer. The chip bag told me I was under the limit.” “Sir, I’m going to need you to step out of the car"

— RCPD (@RileyCountyPD) January 26, 2017


Va. cops decompress in ‘quiet rooms’

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

HAMPTON, Va. — To help officers decompress and refocus on the job, the Hampton Police Department has created “quiet rooms” in the city.

Sgt. Matt Bond told 13News Now he got idea from a Nevada police department. The rooms provide a quiet space for them to relax while on-duty.

“There is another department that's currently out in Las Vegas that’s using the same tactic, and they've had great success with it,” Bond said.

The rooms are furnished with recliners, futons and televisions. Only one officer can use a room at a time and they may only use it during their lunch break.

“For the designated amount of time, they can come in, take their belt off, turn their radio off, close the door, turn off the lights, and just get some rest,” Crp. Reggie Williams told the news station. “Sometimes people would just elect to come in here and eat, or come in here and quietly meditate.”

Officers must contact their supervisor and indicate they are using the quiet room. If their radio is turned off, the officer’s phone must be nearby.

Bond said that the rooms will help officers refocus, decompress and relax. Their hope is that it will reduce fatigue and help officers have a clearer mind on duty.

“Eighty percent of decision-making errors and accidents in police work are a result of fatigue, so that’s something we took into account when we came up with this idea,” Bond said.


Texas cop fired over feces sandwich fired again

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

SAN ANTONIO — A Texas cop fired in October for giving a homeless man a feces sandwich a few months prior has been given a second indefinite suspension, MySanAntonio.com reported.

According to the publication, Matthew Luckhurst defecated in the women’s bathroom at the department and spread a brown substance with the consistency of tapioca on the toilet seat, giving the appearance that there was feces on the seat. The incident occurred a month after the sandwich incident.

Officer Steve Albart was also involved in the prank. He was originally given an indefinite suspension as well, but the police chief reduced it to 30 days without pay. Albart finished his suspension Jan. 19.

KSAT reported Albart is a two-year veteran of the department.

Luckhurst was originally given an indefinite suspension for giving a fecal sandwich to a homeless man in October.

He is appealing both suspensions.


DOJ’s Chicago PD report reveals agency’s alarming suicide rate

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

CHICAGO — The Department of Justice released a report Jan. 13 revealing institutional problems regarding use of force and police training in the Chicago Police Department. It also revealed a high suicide rate among CPD officers.

The report states the rate of suicide within the department is 60 percent higher than other police departments.

According to the Chicago Sun-Times, 13 officers have been killed in the line of duty in the past decade. Close to twice as many died by suicide in the same time span.

The Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 7 estimates that out of the 10,000 CPD patrol officers, an average of three will take their lives each year.

“There is a problem, and nobody’s doing anything about it,” Ron Rufo, former officer and peer support counselor, told the publication. “Supervisors don’t talk about it. The rank-and-file don’t talk about it. And it’s like the administration does not want to admit it’s a problem.”

Due to the rising violence in the city, psychologist Alexa James says that Chicago officers have a difficult job that differs from their fellow big-city officers.

“When you have 760 homicides in the city in a year, that’s a war zone — and that’s where [police] are working every day,” James told the Sun-Times. “It is a hard, hard job, and police officers get very little support.”

But experts said Illinois officers may be reluctant to seek mental help because it could put them at risk of losing their job.

The state permanently prohibits anyone who has been involuntarily committed to an in-patient mental health treatment facility from receiving a Firearm Owner’s Identification Card.

Psychologist Marla Friedman said officers wrongly believe that if they seek help from a therapist, take psychiatric medication, or receive outpatient treatment, they could lose their FOID card.

“This is a real problem,” Friedman said. “Police officers are the only class of citizen in the U.S. who is going to lose their job for seeking mental health care.”

James said something that would help would be creating a “culture of care” within the department. Supervisors would watch for signs of depression or trauma and let their officers know they are there to help.

“We want police to be out there with the clearest head, we want people with a strong constitution,” she said. “ Then, they can be thinking clearly in a job where they make quick decisions.”


DOJ’s Chicago PD report reveals alarming suicide rate

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

CHICAGO — The Department of Justice released a report Jan. 13 revealing institutional problems regarding use of force and police training in the Chicago Police Department. It also revealed a high suicide rate among CPD officers.

The report states the rate of suicide within the department is 60 percent higher than other police departments.

According to the Chicago Sun-Times, 13 officers have been killed in the line of duty in the past decade. Close to twice as many died by suicide in the same time span.

The Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 7 estimates that out of the 10,000 CPD patrol officers, an average of three will take their lives each year.

“There is a problem, and nobody’s doing anything about it,” Ron Rufo, former officer and peer support counselor, told the publication. “Supervisors don’t talk about it. The rank-and-file don’t talk about it. And it’s like the administration does not want to admit it’s a problem.”

Due to the rising violence in the city, psychologist Alexa James says that Chicago officers have a difficult job that differs from their fellow big-city officers.

“When you have 760 homicides in the city in a year, that’s a war zone — and that’s where [police] are working every day,” James told the Sun-Times. “It is a hard, hard job, and police officers get very little support.”

But experts said Illinois officers may be reluctant to seek mental help because it could put them at risk of losing their job.

The state permanently prohibits anyone who has been involuntarily committed to an in-patient mental health treatment facility from receiving a Firearm Owner’s Identification Card.

Psychologist Marla Friedman said officers wrongly believe that if they seek help from a therapist, take psychiatric medication, or receive outpatient treatment, they could lose their FOID card.

“This is a real problem,” Friedman said. “Police officers are the only class of citizen in the U.S. who is going to lose their job for seeking mental health care.”

James said something that would help would be creating a “culture of care” within the department. Supervisors would watch for signs of depression or trauma and let their officers know they are there to help.

“We want police to be out there with the clearest head, we want people with a strong constitution,” she said. “ Then, they can be thinking clearly in a job where they make quick decisions.”


DC police: Cyberattack affected surveillance cams before inauguration

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WASHINGTON — Police surveillance cameras stationed around D.C. were unable to record days before President Donald Trump’s inauguration, authorities said Friday.

The Washington Post reported that the hackers targeted the surveillance system’s storage devices with ransomware. The attack affected 123 of 187 video cameras, leaving them unable to record between Jan. 12 and Jan. 15.

On Jan. 12, police noticed that four of the sites weren’t functioning correctly and reported it to authorities. After an investigation, they found more infected camera sites.

Archana Vemulapalli, D.C.’s Chief Technology Officer, told the publication that they are investigating the source of the hacking, but the cyberattack was confined to the police CCTV cameras. It did not extend deeper into the computer networks.

Vemulapalli said although the hack appeared to be an extortion effort, the city paid no ransom and no criminal investigations were affected.

A Secret Service official said the public’s safety was never jeopardized.


DC police: Cyberattack affected surveillance cams before inauguration

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WASHINGTON — Police surveillance cameras stationed around D.C. were unable to record days before President Donald Trump’s inauguration, authorities said Friday.

The Washington Post reported that the hackers targeted the surveillance system’s storage devices with ransomware. The attack affected 123 of 187 video cameras, leaving them unable to record between Jan. 12 and Jan. 15.

On Jan. 12, police noticed that four of the sites weren’t functioning correctly and reported it to authorities. After an investigation, they found more infected camera sites.

Archana Vemulapalli, D.C.’s Chief Technology Officer, told the publication that they are investigating the source of the hacking, but the cyberattack was confined to the police CCTV cameras. It did not extend deeper into the computer networks.

Vemulapalli said although the hack appeared to be an extortion effort, the city paid no ransom and no criminal investigations were affected.

A Secret Service official said the public’s safety was never jeopardized.


10 lessons learned from the 2012 Sikh temple terror attack

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

Lt. Dan Marcou
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

Domestic terrorism can occur any time at any place. There are no geographic or location constraints. Since 2001, we have seen acts of domestic terrorism on military bases, at places of worship, in workplace environments, in major cities – the reality is that no place is exempt. The lessons learned from the attack at a Sikh temple in 2012 should be adopted by officers and every police department.

1. Be prepared for a potentially life changing/ending call anytime, anywhere.

On August 5, 2012, at approximately 10:30am, the founder of the Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, 65-year-old Satwant Singh Kaleka, was preparing the temple for services. Wade Michael Page, the assailant, invaded this house of worship and opened fire. Six individuals died from this act of domestic terrorism.

Someone reported the disturbance and officers from the Oak Creek Police Department were dispatched.

2. Stopping or impeding an active killer takes a deliberate act of courage.

As the assailant sought out victims, the 15 children inside the temple were led into a kitchen pantry in hopes of saving them from the rampage. Kaleka bravely and deliberately placed himself between the assailant and the hidden children armed only with his kirpan, a ceremonial knife carried by Sikhs.

There is no nobler deed than to sacrifice one’s life in the defense of innocents as Kaleka did on this day. While there were no witnesses to the struggle waged between Kaleka and Page, it is safe to speculate his efforts ensured that his was the last innocent life lost that day. The children were spared.

3. Immediate engagement by initial responding officers saves lives.

Lt. Brian Murphy was the first Oak Creek police officer to travel down the blind drive into the parking lot of the Sikh temple. He immediately discovered two deceased victims. Murphy exited his squad and scanned the area for threats. Luckily for the 15 children in hiding, Murphy’s arrival distracted the assailant.

4. Prepare for highly trained adversaries.

As Murphy drew his weapon, the assailant, dressed in a white T-shirt and black fatigues, exited the front door of the temple and began walking calmly toward him. As Murphy radioed this fact to the dispatcher and responding units, the assailant suddenly broke into a run laterally across the parking lot while bringing his 9mm semi-automatic pistol to bear on Murphy.

The assailant was U.S. military trained in combat tactics, and he employed those skills. Murphy immediately recognized the assailant’s lateral movement as an attempt to make himself a hard target. Murphy radioed while firing at him, “Man with a gun, white T-shirt.” The shots went over the radio and alerted Officer Sam Lenda, who was a short distance away.

5. Wear a bullet resistant vest.

Murphy would later say, “I missed. He didn’t.”

The lieutenant was hit initially in the throat and chin. Unfazed, he moved to cover and tried to re-acquire the assailant. The assailant had executed a flanking maneuver and came up behind Murphy. When Murphy spun to re-engage, the assailant shot him, knocking Murphy’s gun out of his right hand and blowing apart his right thumb.

As a result of this confrontation, the assailant continued to fire and bullets rained down on Murphy. To stay as safe as possible during this gunfight, Murphy moved under a car he was next to in order to protect his vitals, while keeping his vest toward the suspect and making himself a small target.

In short order, Murphy was hit fifteen times by the assailant, but because he practiced these tactics and wore his vest that day, he survived the horrific attack.

6. Train for the sudden patrol rifle dismount.

As Lenda arrived in the midst of the attack, the assailant directed his fire frantically in two directions, causing him to miss.

Lenda found himself having to operate the mechanical release on the patrol rifle-mount and his seat belt simultaneously, while the window of his squad was being shattered by gunfire.

Both Lenda and Murphy were SWAT trained, and Lenda was a well-respected firearms instructor in Wisconsin. He would later encourage all officers to not only practice drawing their sidearm, but also practice for the sudden patrol rifle dismount.

7. Ignore the pain until the fight is over.

The shattered glass of his windshield slapped Lenda’s face as it embedded into his flesh. He deliberately decided to ignore the pain and finish the fight. He moved quickly to the “V” between his open squad door and the door frame and prepared to engage the assailant as rounds zipped past him.

8. Use long guns for accuracy over long distances.

Lenda fired his patrol rifle at the moving assailant, but his first shot missed. The officer took careful aim and fired a second time. The assailant instantly went down and rolled into some shrubs.

While hidden in the shrubs, the assailant realized he had been mortally wounded by Lenda and deduced his murderous rampage was over. The gunman died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

9. Always choose life.

Murphy believes that he survived the barrage directed at him because he consciously told himself he was not going to die in that parking lot. He now gives presentations to officers on survival, and tells them that they will increase their odds of surviving a life or death encounter when they deliberately choose life.

10. Never give up.

Murphy believes his mantra before the Sikh temple attack kept him alive. It is simple, but powerful: Never give up.


Pa. man admits he conspired to help ISIS

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By Mark Scolforo Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A 20-year-old Pennsylvania man faces the potential of a lengthy federal prison sentence after pleading guilty to conspiring to help the Islamic State group and tweeting out a list that identified and targeted people serving in the U.S. military.

Jalil Ibn Ameer Aziz pleaded guilty Monday in Harrisburg federal court to the conspiracy count and to transmitting a communication containing a threat. Both are felonies.

Aziz is a natural born American who was arrested in Harrisburg in December 2015.

The offenses carry a maximum total sentence of 25 years and a $500,000 fine.

His defense lawyer says Aziz is very sorry and calls him a "young kid who was tweeting from his bedroom."

Federal officials say the service members on the list were notified and appropriate security measures were taken.


Off-duty Chicago deputy wounded in triple shooting

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By Elvia Malagon Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — An off-duty Cook County deputy was one of three people who were wounded in a shooting early Saturday in the city's Gold Coast neighborhood, officials said.

The shooting happened about 3:30 a.m. in the 1200 block of North State Street. Police did not release details about what led to the shooting.

Sophia Ansari, spokeswoman for the Cook County sheriff's office, said an off-duty Cook County courts deputy was wounded in the shooting. He has worked for the sheriff's office for 11 years.

She did not have additional information about the deputy's involvement in the shooting, and she said the investigation was being handled by Chicago police.

Jeff Lyle, deputy district chief for the Fire Department, said three people were taken in serious condition from the scene.

Ansari said the off-duty officer was grazed in the head. Police previously said a 39-year-old man had been grazed in the head.

A 33-year-old man was shot in the leg. Both men were taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where their conditions were stabilized.

A 30-year-old man was shot in the lower back and was listed in good condition at Illinois Masonic Medical Center.

One of the wounded men was carried out on a stretcher past a crowd that had gathered at the corner of State and Division streets.

Officers patted down a man dressed in all black before placing him in the backseat of a police car. Bouncers from area bars and clubs huddled on the corner and watched as the man was placed into the car.

Officers later walked a man in handcuffs out of the crime scene. Police said detectives were questioning a person of interest in the shooting.

Officers blocked with police tape a public parking garage on State. Officers could be seen talking to several people inside the first floor of the garage and they were looking at a car. It was across the street from McFadden's Restaurant and Saloon, which also was taped off by police.

Men who had been speaking to officers inside the parking garage declined to comment.

The area where the shooting happened has several popular bars and clubs. As officers interviewed witnesses, people continued walking in and out of the bars. Flower petals could be seen along Division.

Hector Cruz, 23, was among those who watched the aftermath of the triple shooting. He had traveled from Romeoville to go to Detention Nightclub with friends.

He said he was smoking a cigarette outside the nightclub when he heard two gunshots and then saw people running.

Down the street, a man, who did not want to be identified, was on his phone perplexed by the shooting.

"What the (expletive)," he said.

The man moved to Chicago about two months ago. He was at a nightclub around the corner from where the shooting took place, and he said he would think twice before spending another night out in the Gold Coast neighborhood.

"I'm from Kentucky," he said. "I don't see this."

As the crowd of bar patrons left the neighborhood, officers continued to guard the crime scene. Along Divison, a man waved a large sign at motorists in the area. It read: "President Trump Will Stop Chicago Carnage."

———

©2017 the Chicago Tribune


Off-duty Ill. deputy wounded in triple shooting

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

By Elvia Malagon Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — An off-duty Cook County deputy was one of three people who were wounded in a shooting early Saturday in the city's Gold Coast neighborhood, officials said.

The shooting happened about 3:30 a.m. in the 1200 block of North State Street. Police did not release details about what led to the shooting.

Sophia Ansari, spokeswoman for the Cook County sheriff's office, said an off-duty Cook County courts deputy was wounded in the shooting. He has worked for the sheriff's office for 11 years.

She did not have additional information about the deputy's involvement in the shooting, and she said the investigation was being handled by Chicago police.

Jeff Lyle, deputy district chief for the Fire Department, said three people were taken in serious condition from the scene.

Ansari said the off-duty officer was grazed in the head. Police previously said a 39-year-old man had been grazed in the head.

A 33-year-old man was shot in the leg. Both men were taken to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where their conditions were stabilized.

A 30-year-old man was shot in the lower back and was listed in good condition at Illinois Masonic Medical Center.

One of the wounded men was carried out on a stretcher past a crowd that had gathered at the corner of State and Division streets.

Officers patted down a man dressed in all black before placing him in the backseat of a police car. Bouncers from area bars and clubs huddled on the corner and watched as the man was placed into the car.

Officers later walked a man in handcuffs out of the crime scene. Police said detectives were questioning a person of interest in the shooting.

Officers blocked with police tape a public parking garage on State. Officers could be seen talking to several people inside the first floor of the garage and they were looking at a car. It was across the street from McFadden's Restaurant and Saloon, which also was taped off by police.

Men who had been speaking to officers inside the parking garage declined to comment.

The area where the shooting happened has several popular bars and clubs. As officers interviewed witnesses, people continued walking in and out of the bars. Flower petals could be seen along Division.

Hector Cruz, 23, was among those who watched the aftermath of the triple shooting. He had traveled from Romeoville to go to Detention Nightclub with friends.

He said he was smoking a cigarette outside the nightclub when he heard two gunshots and then saw people running.

Down the street, a man, who did not want to be identified, was on his phone perplexed by the shooting.

"What the (expletive)," he said.

The man moved to Chicago about two months ago. He was at a nightclub around the corner from where the shooting took place, and he said he would think twice before spending another night out in the Gold Coast neighborhood.

"I'm from Kentucky," he said. "I don't see this."

As the crowd of bar patrons left the neighborhood, officers continued to guard the crime scene. Along Divison, a man waved a large sign at motorists in the area. It read: "President Trump Will Stop Chicago Carnage."

———

©2017 the Chicago Tribune


Details emerge in Canadian mosque shooting

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Tracey Lindeman and Rob Gillies Associated Press

QUEBEC CITY — A shooting at a Quebec City mosque during evening prayers left six people dead in an attack that Canada's prime minister called an act of terrorism. Police arrested two suspects.

More than 50 people were at the Quebec Islamic Cultural Centre when the shooting erupted Sunday night. Five are in critical condition and 12 others suffered minor injuries, University of Quebec Hospital Centre spokeswoman Genevieve Dupuis said Monday. The dead ranged in age from age 35 to 70.

One suspect was arrested at the scene and another nearby in d'Orleans, and police said they did not believe there were other suspects but were investigating. Police didn't release names of the suspects or give a possible motive.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard both characterized the attack as a terrorist act, which came amid heightened tensions worldwide over President Donald Trump's travel ban on several Muslim countries.

"We condemn this terrorist attack on Muslims in a center of worship and refuge," Trudeau said in a statement. "It is heart-wrenching to see such senseless violence. Diversity is our strength, and religious tolerance is a value that we, as Canadians, hold dear.

"Muslim-Canadians are an important part of our national fabric, and these senseless acts have no place in our communities, cities and country," he said.

Canada is generally very welcoming toward immigrants and all religions, but the French-speaking province of Quebec has had a long-simmering debate about race and religious accommodation. The previous separatist government of the province called for a ban on ostentatious religious symbols such as the hijab in public institutions.

In the summer of 2016 a pig's head was left on the doorstep of the Quebec Islamic Cultural Centre in the middle of Ramadan, when Muslims fast from dawn to sunset. Practicing Muslims do not eat pork.

"The Muslim community was the target of this murderous attack," Couillard said at an early morning news conference. He said solidarity rallies would be held across Quebec on Monday.

Quebec City Mayor Regis Labeaume, appearing shaken, said, "No person should have to pay with their life, for their race, their color, their sexual orientation or their religious beliefs," Labeaume said.

Cultural Centre President Mohamed Yangui said the shooting in occurred in the men's section of the mosque. He said he wasn't at the center when the attack occurred, but he got some details from people on the scene.

Ali Hamadi said he left the mosque a few minutes before the shooting and said a friend, Abdelkrim Hassen was killed. He said Hassen, who worked in information technology for the government, had three daughters and a wife, whom he had to notify of the death.

Quebec City police spokesman Constable Pierre Poirier said the mosque had been evacuated and the situation was under control.

Trudeau had earlier reacted to Trump's visa ban for people from some Muslim-majority countries by tweeting Saturday: "To those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength #WelcomeToCanada."

Trudeau also posted a picture of himself greeting a Syrian child at Toronto's airport in late 2015. Trudeau oversaw the arrival of more than 39,000 Syrian refugees soon after he was elected.

The mayor of Gatineau, Quebec, near Canada's capital of Ottawa, said there would be an increased police presence at mosques around his city following the attack.

The New York Police Department also said it was stepping up patrols at mosques and other houses of worship.

"NYPD is providing additional protection for mosques in the city. All New Yorkers should be vigilant. If you see something, say something," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Twitter.

"Our prayers tonight are with the people of Quebec City as they deal with a terrible attack on a mosque. We must stand together," de Blasio said in another tweet.

Canada's public safety minister, Ralph Goodale, said on Twitter Sunday that he was deeply saddened by the loss of life. His office said no motive had been confirmed.

Francois Deschamps, an organizer of a refugee-support group in Quebec City, said the motive for Sunday's attack was unknown, but right-wing groups are very organized in Quebec City, distributing fliers at the university and plastering stickers around town.

Deschamps said he has received death threats after starting a refugee support group on Facebook and people have posted his address online.

"I'm not very surprised about the event," Deschamps said.

The Canadian Council of Imams said in a statement that "Islamophobia has killed innocent Canadians."

"We ask all decent people to stand against hatred of Islam and Muslims in any forum," the statement read.

"Our message to anyone in the Canadian Muslim community who may experience Islamophobia is not to suffer in silence."

___

Associated Press writer Sean Farrell in Montreal contributed to this report. Rob Gillies reported from Toronto.


Suspects named after 6 killed in Canada mosque shooting

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Tracey Lindeman and Rob Gillies Associated Press

QUEBEC CITY — A shooting at a Quebec City mosque during evening prayers left six people dead in an attack that Canada's prime minister called an act of terrorism. Police arrested two suspects, including one who called 911 to say he was armed but ready to give himself up.

More than 50 people were at the Quebec Islamic Cultural Centre when the shooting erupted Sunday night. In addition to the six who died, five were in critical condition and 12 others suffered minor injuries, University of Quebec Hospital Centre spokeswoman Genevieve Dupuis said Monday. The dead ranged in age from 35 to 65.

Quebec City court clerk Isabelle Ferland identified Alexandre Bissonnette and Mohamed el Khadir as the suspects.

One was arrested at the scene and another nearby, in his car on a bridge near d'Orleans where he called 911 to say he wanted to cooperate with police. Police said they did not believe there were other suspects but were investigating.

Police didn't give a possible motive for the suspects, who they said were in their late 20s or early 30s and had no prior police records.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard both characterized the attack as a terrorist act, which came amid heightened tensions worldwide over President Donald Trump's travel ban on several Muslim countries. Neither leader specified who carried out the attack or what the motive might be.

"We condemn this terrorist attack on Muslims in a center of worship and refuge," Trudeau said in a statement. "It is heart-wrenching to see such senseless violence. Diversity is our strength, and religious tolerance is a value that we, as Canadians, hold dear.

"Muslim-Canadians are an important part of our national fabric, and these senseless acts have no place in our communities, cities and country," he said.

Trudeau will make a statement in Parliament before travelling to Quebec City, his office said.

Canada is generally very welcoming toward immigrants and all religions, but the French-speaking province of Quebec has had a long-simmering debate about race and religious accommodation. The previous separatist government of the province called for a ban on ostentatious religious symbols such as the hijab in public institutions.

In the summer of 2016 a pig's head was left on the doorstep of the Quebec Islamic Cultural Centre in the middle of Ramadan, when Muslims fast from dawn to sunset. Practicing Muslims do not eat pork.

"The Muslim community was the target of this murderous attack," Couillard said at an early morning news conference. He said solidarity rallies would be held across Quebec on Monday.

Quebec City Mayor Regis Labeaume, appearing shaken, said, "No person should have to pay with their life, for their race, their color, their sexual orientation or their religious beliefs," Labeaume said.

Cultural Centre President Mohamed Yangui said the shooting in occurred in the men's section of the mosque. He said he wasn't at the center when the attack occurred, but he got some details from people on the scene.

Ali Hamadi said he left the mosque a few minutes before the shooting and said a friend, Abdelkrim Hassen was killed. He said Hassen, who worked in information technology for the government, had three daughters and a wife, whom he had to notify of the death.

Quebec City police spokesman Constable Pierre Poirier said the mosque had been evacuated and the situation was under control.

UPDATE: RCMP spokesperson says second suspect in #QuebecCity mosque shooting called 911, identified himself to police pic.twitter.com/yfc4eTiu5f

— Global Montreal (@Global_Montreal) January 30, 2017

Trudeau had earlier reacted to Trump's visa ban for people from some Muslim-majority countries by tweeting Saturday: "To those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength #WelcomeToCanada."

Trudeau also posted a picture of himself greeting a Syrian child at Toronto's airport in late 2015. Trudeau oversaw the arrival of more than 39,000 Syrian refugees soon after he was elected.

The mayor of Gatineau, Quebec, near Canada's capital of Ottawa, said there would be an increased police presence at mosques around his city following the attack.

The New York Police Department also said it was stepping up patrols at mosques and other houses of worship.

"NYPD is providing additional protection for mosques in the city. All New Yorkers should be vigilant. If you see something, say something," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Twitter.

"Our prayers tonight are with the people of Quebec City as they deal with a terrible attack on a mosque. We must stand together," de Blasio said in another tweet.

Canada's public safety minister, Ralph Goodale, said on Twitter Sunday that he was deeply saddened by the loss of life. His office said no motive had been confirmed.

Francois Deschamps, an organizer of a refugee-support group in Quebec City, said the motive for Sunday's attack was unknown, but right-wing groups are very organized in Quebec City, distributing fliers at the university and plastering stickers around town.

Deschamps said he has received death threats after starting a refugee support group on Facebook and people have posted his address online.

"I'm not very surprised about the event," Deschamps said.

The Canadian Council of Imams said in a statement that "Islamophobia has killed innocent Canadians."

"We ask all decent people to stand against hatred of Islam and Muslims in any forum," the statement read.

"Our message to anyone in the Canadian Muslim community who may experience Islamophobia is not to suffer in silence."

___

Associated Press writer Sean Farrell in Montreal contributed to this report. Rob Gillies reported from Toronto.


6 counts of murder for Quebec mosque attack suspect

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Lt. Dan Marcou

By Tracey Lindeman and Rob Gillies Associated Press

QUEBEC CITY — A French Canadian known for far-right, nationalist views was charged Monday with six counts of first-degree murder and five counts of attempted murder over the shooting rampage at a Quebec City mosque that Canada's prime minister called an act of terrorism against Muslims.

Suspect Alexandre Bissonnette made a brief court appearance and did not enter a plea in the attack that left six people dead during evening prayers Sunday. Wearing a white prisoner jump suit, his hands and feet shackled, he stared down at the floor and fidgeted, but did not speak.

The 27-year-old suspect, who has espoused support for the French far-right party of Marine Le Pen and had liked U.S. President Donald Trump on his Facebook page, was known to those who monitor extremist groups in Quebec, said François Deschamps, an official with a refugee advocacy group. "It's with pain and anger that we learn the identity of terrorist Alexandre Bissonnette, unfortunately known to many activists in Quebec for taking nationalist, pro-Le Pen and anti-feminist positions at Laval University and on social media," Deschamps wrote on the Facebook page of the group, Bienvenues aux Refugiés, or Welcome to Refugees.

An anthropology and political science major at Laval University in Quebec City, Bissonnette had also expressed support on his Facebook profile for "Génération Nationale," a group whose manifesto includes the rejection of "multiculturalism."

More than 50 people were at the Quebec Islamic Cultural Centre when the shooting erupted. In addition to the six dead, 19 people were wounded — all men. Of the five victims who remained hospitalized, two were in critical condition, authorities said. The dead ranged in age from 39 to 60.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard both characterized the attack as a terrorist act, which came amid heightened tensions worldwide over Trump's travel ban on seven Muslim countries. Le Pen, leader of the National Front in France, is known for her anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant positions and has won the endorsement and admiration of white supremacists.

Canada is generally welcoming toward immigrants and all religions, but the French-speaking province of Quebec has had a long-simmering debate about race and religious accommodation. The previous separatist government of the province called for a ban on ostentatious religious symbols, such as the hijab, in public institutions.

Trudeau said in Parliament the victims were targeted simply because of their religion and spoke directly to the more than 1 million Muslims who live in Canada, saying, "We are with you."

"Thirty-six million hearts are breaking with yours," Trudeau said. "Know that we value you."

The prime minister later attended a vigil outside the mosque.

The suspect was arrested in his car on a bridge near d'Orleans, where he called 911 to say he wanted to cooperate with police. Authorities, who initially named two suspects, said the other man taken into custody was a witness to the attack and was released earlier Monday. They said they did not believe there were other suspects but were investigating.

Police did not give a motive for the attack.

Trump called Trudeau to express condolences to the Canadian people and to offer any assistance that might be needed.

The White House pointed to the attack as an example of why Trump's policies were needed. "We condemn this attack in the strongest possible terms. It's a terrible reminder of why we must remain vigilant and why the president is taking steps to be pro-active, rather than reactive when it comes to our nation's safety and security," White House spokesman Sean Spicer said.

The victims were businessmen, a university professor and others who had gathered for evening prayers, said Mohamed Labidi, the vice president of the mosque.

"'It's a very, very big tragedy for us," Labidi said tearfully. "We have a sadness we cannot express."

He said the victims were shot in the back. "Security at our mosque was our major, major concern," he said. "But we were caught off guard."

The shooting took place just before 8 p.m. Sunday. Witnesses described chaos as worshippers scrambled to find friends and loved ones, as police responding to the scene called for backup.

Couillard said he would "not go there" when asked if he blamed recent rhetoric in in the U.S. for the attack.

"Quebec is a good, generally loving society, but we have these devils as other societies have. We have to recognize that and fight them," Couillard said at a news conference in Quebec City at which he and Muslim leaders held hands in a display of solidarity.

"The Muslim community was the target of this murderous attack," Couillard said, adding that solidarity rallies would be held across Quebec later Monday.

The mosque has been a target of hate crimes in the past, including last summer when pig's head was left on its doorstep during Ramadan, when Muslims fast from dawn to sunset. Practicing Muslims do not eat pork.

Quebec City Mayor Regis Labeaume, appearing shaken, said: "No person should have to pay with their life, for their race, their color, their sexual orientation or their religious beliefs."

Worshipper Ali Hamadi said he left the mosque a few minutes before the shooting and a friend, Abdelkrim Hassen, was killed. He said Hassen, who worked in information technology for the government, had three daughters and a wife, whom he had to notify of the death.

Majdi Dridi of the Muslim Association of Canada said he knew two of the victims. One was a work colleague who was a father of three little girls, he said.

"I don't know what to say, I just hope that his family and his children can have the patience to accept what happened," Dridi said

Trudeau had earlier reacted to Trump's visa ban for people from some Muslim-majority countries by tweeting Saturday: "To those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength #WelcomeToCanada."

Trudeau also posted a picture of himself greeting a Syrian child at Toronto's airport in late 2015. Trudeau oversaw the arrival of more than 39,000 Syrian refugees soon after he was elected.

The mayor of Gatineau, Quebec, near Canada's capital of Ottawa, said there would be an increased police presence at mosques around his city following the attack. The New York Police Department also said it was stepping up patrols at mosques and other houses of worship.


After Trump criticism on Chicago violence, Emanuel touts police smarts

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Bill Ruthhart, Jeremy Gorner and Hal Dardick Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Two days after President Donald Trump told a national television audience that Mayor Rahm Emanuel needed to "smarten up and toughen up" on fighting gun violence, the mayor held a carefully orchestrated news conference to discuss Chicago's "smart-policing strategy."

As Emanuel summoned a swarm of cameras to the 7th District police station in Englewood on Friday to highlight new police cameras and gunshot tracking technology, sources said the Police Department's top brass was busy carrying out an order to flood the city's most violent neighborhoods with extra officers this weekend.

In a Tuesday night tweet in which he said he "will send in the Feds!" if the city doesn't fix its violent crime problems, Trump cited Chicago Tribune crime data that showed January homicides up 24 percent compared with 2016, a year marred by the highest number of killings in two decades. Trump again criticized Emanuel and the city's handling of gun violence in his first television interview as president Wednesday night, describing Chicago's rampant shootings as "horrible carnage" and "a problem that is very easily fixable."

Now, hundreds of additional Chicago police officers assigned to tactical, gang, saturation and mission teams have had their regular days off canceled from Friday through Sunday, according to police sources familiar with the change that was announced during a meeting at police headquarters. The city's beat officers also were given the option of earning overtime by working weekend days off, the sources said.

Adding so many officers to the street on their day off is more typical during hot summer months or special occasions such as when the president is visiting the city; is unusual for a cold-weather month such as January. This month has been marked by weekends with dozens of shootings, including 54 people shot last weekend alone.

Through Thursday, there had been 42 homicides so far with five days left in the month. In January 2016, there were 50 homicides. If the number of killings for January were to come in lower than last year, that would allow Emanuel to try to counter Trump's narrative of this year being off to an even worse start.

Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said the staffing adjustment was unrelated to recent attention paid to Chicago's gun violence by the Republican president.

The mayor did not bring up the weekend staffing increase at his Friday news conference, instead focusing on technological advances the department is making in its two most violent police districts on the South and West sides -- including the expansion of a gunshot detection system and crime cameras on the street along with new surveillance centers and new cellphones with software to instantly inform officers of shootings.

The mayor's announcement came to an abrupt end when police Superintendent Eddie Johnson grew faint and had to be helped to a chair, leading officers to call paramedics and escort reporters out of the room. On Friday night, Johnson said he had become lightheaded earlier in the day after taking blood pressure medication on an empty stomach, but he confirmed he's had a kidney disease for more than 30 years and is on a list waiting for a transplant.

While Johnson's health episode Friday came as a surprise, the rest of Emanuel's policing message for the day was scripted for public consumption.

Before Emanuel's arrival at the Englewood district, six police officers already were stationed at computers in a small, windowless room that featured four large flat-screen TVs on the wall. While a sign proclaimed the spot as a "viewing room," the Police Department's brass and the mayor's office called it the "Strategic Decision Support Center," which is staffed by a district intelligence officer who will incorporate the new technology with offender criminal history and crime data.

"The mayor is 10 minutes out, so if everyone could stage and get ready, all right? No pressure," Jonathan Lewin, CPD's deputy chief of bureau support services, told the room. "I need the officers who are going to meet the mayor in the lobby."

About 15 minutes later, Emanuel arrived through the station's back door and greeted the officers who were staffing the new "nerve center," as the mayor called it. "I'll be back," he told them. "They want me to do something."

Emanuel then made his way to the lobby, where 17 television cameras were recording as Emanuel and Johnson greeted the four officers -- one each African-American, Asian, Latino and white -- who had been waiting to participate in the prearranged shot.

After that photo op, the crush of cameras followed Emanuel into the tiny surveillance room, where Lewin walked Emanuel through the new technology as officers remotely zoomed in street cameras on license plates and explained how the gunshot tracking technology would allow officers to respond to a scene five minutes faster than from a 911 call.

"You can control the cameras from here?" Emanuel asked. "Yes," Lewin responded. "This is real time?" the mayor inquired. "Yes," was the answer again.

Much of what was discussed was difficult to hear, as the Police Department's media handlers barked orders to the TV photographers, who were being directed in and out of the room in shifts to record Emanuel's interest in the effort.

"Which screen are you looking at?" a photographer asked the mayor at one point.

"The one on the far left," Emanuel responded, pointing to a map of the 7th District that had labels for territory covered by various gangs, including the Gangster Disciples, Conservative Vice Lords, Mickey Cobras, Black P Stones, Black Disciples and Latin Kings. A second screen showed a "heat map of homicides." A third was streaming live street surveillance footage.

As Lewin explained how all the technologies eventually will be merged into one cohesive software system, Emanuel stopped him. "Do that again for me," the mayor said as the cameras rolled. "I'm slow."

Once Lewin finished his presentation, Emanuel headed upstairs to the district's roll call room, where he lauded the new technology, which he's paying for with money from unclaimed property tax rebates aimed at easing the pain from the record property tax increase he and aldermen approved.

"This allows our police officers to be all that much smarter and more effective in using technology and command ability to make sure people are in the right place at the right time to prevent a shooting in the first place," Emanuel said.

In a news release, Emanuel's office described the technology as part of the city's "smart-policing strategy," a term that had not been used in previous mayor's office announcements.

Less than 48 hours earlier, Trump had called Emanuel out on needing to run a smarter policing effort.

"It has been going on for years," Trump said of Chicago's rash of shootings and homicides. "So, all I'm saying is, to the mayor, who came up to my office recently, I say you have to smarten up and you have to toughen up, because you can't let that happen. That's a war zone. I want them to straighten out the problem. It's a big problem."

At the news conference, Emanuel was asked if there "was any coincidence" that his Friday announcement came after Trump's recent criticism.

"You don't put something like this together overnight," Emanuel replied. "It's about what's right for the future, not about any current event."

Chicago Tribune's Rosemary Regina Sobol contributed.


Can Baltimore address intense violence and police reform simultaneously?

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

By Kevin Rector The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — Days into 2017, as Baltimore's historic spike in homicides stretched into a third calendar year, Mayor Catherine Pugh and Police Commissioner Kevin Davis announced the latest approach to violence.

They would reassign 100 officers from mostly administrative posts to join street patrols.

They did not say where they would find the officers. But according to transfer documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun, nearly half were members of the Police Department's Community Collaboration Division — the unit that was expanded after the unrest of 2015 to rebuild relations with the community.

The reassignments slashed the unit by more than 80 percent.

A week later, Pugh and Davis appeared again in the same ornate room in City Hall to announce the agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to reform the department. Among the requirements: to "develop and implement community-engagement plans" to create opportunities for "routine and frequent positive interactions between officers and community members."

The debate around resources and budgets, and whether the need to protect lives and property is in conflict with the march toward justice, isn't new. But analysts say it has become more complicated.

"It's not that you're just taking on a new challenge," said Samuel Walker, a professor emeritus of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. "You're taking on a whole new approach to policing.

"We are going to have to go the extra mile here to get over this initial learning process, this steep learning curve."

Justice Department investigators concluded that police in Baltimore routinely violated residents' constitutional rights, and most often in poor, predominantly black neighborhoods; used excessive force; dismissed sexual assault complaints improperly; and engaged improperly with protesters, youths and those with mental disabilities.

Under the consent decree, officers will be required to contact a supervisor before making arrests for minor crimes such as resisting an officer or disorderly conduct. They will be barred from using restraints such as chokeholds, unless deadly force is authorized, and from stopping and detaining people who are in the company of others suspected of a crime without being able to make a case that they have committed a crime or are about to themselves.

They will be required to undergo new training. Techniques that have in recent decades become staples of the Baltimore police officer's tool kit — such as indiscriminately "clearing corners" in trouble spots — would be prohibited.

Meanwhile, violence in the city has grown in the 21 months since the death of Freddie Gray. The 25-year-old Baltimore man died in April 2015 after sustaining a severe spinal cord injury in police custody. On the day of his funeral, the city erupted in arson, looting and riots.

Homicides in Baltimore jumped from 211 in 2014 to 344 in 2015 — the most, per capita, in city history. There were 318 more killings in 2016, the second deadliest year.

And with 28 homicides in the first 27 days, 2017 is now on pace to surpass both.

The Police Department — it's the eighth-largest in the nation, in the 29th-largest city — routinely blows through a $480 million budget before spending millions more in overtime.

The police union says the department has too few officers. Many activists think it has too many. Some residents complain of a constant, harassing police presence in their neighborhoods. Others say they don't see officers often enough.

The collective bargaining agreement between the city and the union controls the shift structure under which officers work. City officials have said the system presents a staffing problem, and low recruitment and retention have exacerbated the issue.

Pugh, who took office in December, has unfrozen 100 police officer positions to help address the violence. But the timeline for when those positions will be filled is unclear.

Early city estimates have put the cost of complying with the consent decree in the millions.

Other cities that have entered into similar agreements have underestimated the eventual cost.

The federal government does not pay for the reforms it mandates.

U.S. District Judge James K. Bredar, whose approval is required to make the consent decree binding, has scheduled a preliminary hearing this week to discuss his concerns about the deal.

He has cited a lack of clarity around the cost, the city's ability to comply, deadlines for specific initiatives and the interplay between the deal, the police union's collective bargaining agreement, and judicial precedent around standard policing actions such as stopping a person on the street.

While the administration of President Donald Trump is seen as skeptical of federal oversight of local police departments, analysts expect the deal to move forward in some form.

Baltimore is not the first city to attempt consent decree reforms while battling high crime. Analysts say other jurisdictions — from Los Angeles to Camden, N.J. to Prince George's County — have handled it successfully.

Many see the reforms proposed for Baltimore as part of the public safety solution, rather than as a competing draw on limited funding.

In order for the reforms to be successful, analysts and activists say, the city will have to be smart about tackling inefficiencies identified in the consent decree quickly in order to redirect the savings — in time and money — toward reforms and the crime fight.

Some savings, they say, will come through improvements to technology, such as the purchase of mobile computers for patrol vehicles. Some will come from redirecting resources away from street enforcement of minor infractions and toward violent offenders, gangs and the drug trade.

More, they say, will come from the "comprehensive staffing study" required by the consent decree to assess the appropriate number of sworn and civilian personnel needed "to perform the functions necessary for BPD to fulfill its mission."

Jonathan Smith oversaw consent decrees as chief of special litigation for the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division under President Barack Obama. Pitting reform against public safety, he said, is a "false choice."

Relations between police and the community in Baltimore have deteriorated to the point that victims and witnesses aren't willing to come forward and police are left without tips in some of the most violent neighborhoods in Baltimore, Smith said.

"We know the strategies and tactics being used until now have not worked to reduce crime and are not going to work to reduce crime," Smith said. "That makes the reforms all the more urgent."

He said implementing the reforms could exacerbate staffing shortages, in part because training pulls officers off the streets and into classrooms, and backfilling shifts can become difficult.

But there are also opportunities, he said. New officers brought in to fill empty positions receive training on new policies from the start. And training everyone properly will reduce the need for specialized units.

For example, he said, the reduction of the community collaboration division could be cause for concern now, but at its core, the consent decree requires that "engagement be part of what every officer does, not just part of what some officers do."

Once engaging community members in a friendly way is part of every officer's job, Smith said, there won't be a need for a collaboration division.

Davis said he believes the reforms will help the department reduce crime — in part because he has already experienced the consent decree process as a commander in Prince George's County.

He noted the decline in violent crime in Prince George's County since it came out from under the nearly decade-long decree in 2009.

"It's all doable," he said. "Change is hard, and people have anxiety when change is afoot. All I have been saying to police officers is, 'Listen, we're going to get better training, better technology, better equipment and better help in the crime fight from the community.'"

Ganesha Martin, chief of the Police Department's compliance division, has said unilateral efforts by the department to implement reforms have primed it to hit the ground running under the consent decree.

But the deal cannot jeopardize public safety, she said, and officials overseeing the consent decree — from the judge to the yet-to-be-selected federal monitor — must recognize that Baltimore is burdened by a high rate of violent crime and be willing to work with the department as it tries to right it.

"I want them to be able to take high-level concepts and be able to break them down into a mechanism and manner that is easily translated to the streets, and to not get in the way of officers who have to do really hard jobs every day," she said.

Lt. Gene Ryan, president of the police union local in Baltimore that represents rank-and-file officers, said there are "definitely going to be some challenges and a conflict" in Baltimore between the reforms and the crime fight.

"Some of the stuff that the DOJ recommended we think is unconstitutional, and the police commissioner already put into place some policies that we think are overreaching," he said.

He cites the department's new use-of-force policy, which imposes new limits on the circumstances under which officers can use weapons.

"It's going to restrict the police officers from actually being able to do their jobs," Ryan said.

Others — including law enforcement analysts and civil liberties advocates — disagree. They say past concerns that reforms would undermine the crime fight proved unfounded.

David Rocah, senior staff attorney at the ACLU of Maryland, said there is "an inherent difficulty" in introducing reforms and dealing with high crime rates at the same time.

But there will never be a time when that isn't the case, he said, and allowing unconstitutional policing to continue indefinitely is not an option.

"There are precisely zero police departments in this country that have gone through consent decrees that haven't had to fight crime at the same time," he said.

Rocah said arguments against reforms were made in Baltimore a decade ago, as well, when the ACLU of Maryland sued the city over its "zero tolerance" policing strategy.

The advocacy group won, and the city saw a dramatic decline in arrests.

The decline coincided with a drop in crime, he said, not an increase.

"Everyone who I have heard advocating for police reform in Baltimore, including myself, wants a safe city, wants people to feel safe and to be safe," he said. "Changing the culture of policing in Baltimore and changing the way police officers are perceived by significant segments of the city's population is a necessary condition for that."

David Harris, a law professor at the University of Pittsburgh who studies policing and consent decrees, pointed to New York City.

For years, police in New York relied on controversial stop-and-frisk policing, and crime fell. Civil liberties advocates challenged the practice, it was ruled unconstitutional because it was directed disproportionately at minorities, and police dropped it.

Some law enforcement officials warned of a new wave of crime. But that never happened.

Instead, Harris said, crime continued to fall. He said the same thing can happen in Baltimore.

"The idea of addressing violence and public safety is not at war with the idea of reforming the Police Department," he said. "They do not contradict each other."

Ray Kelly, a community organizer with the No Boundaries Coalition, said the "time is ripe" to implement reforms.

Community members and police officials are finally agreeing in large part on what needs to be done, he said, and that will pave the way for cooperation to stop the violence where it never could have existed before.

"The parties involved in our city all recognize that these reforms need to happen, and since we've agreed, we need to put them in place as soon as possible," Kelly said. "We can actually create a safer environment by working together, and not pointing out the deficiencies in each other."

Baltimore Sun reporter Justin Fenton contributed to this article.


Chicago police expand tech to curb shootings

Posted on January 30, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Bill Ruthhart, Jeremy Gorner and Hal Dardick Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Two days after President Donald Trump told a national television audience that Mayor Rahm Emanuel needed to "smarten up and toughen up" on fighting gun violence, the mayor held a carefully orchestrated news conference to discuss Chicago's "smart-policing strategy."

As Emanuel summoned a swarm of cameras to the 7th District police station in Englewood on Friday to highlight new police cameras and gunshot tracking technology, sources said the Police Department's top brass was busy carrying out an order to flood the city's most violent neighborhoods with extra officers this weekend.

In a Tuesday night tweet in which he said he "will send in the Feds!" if the city doesn't fix its violent crime problems, Trump cited Chicago Tribune crime data that showed January homicides up 24 percent compared with 2016, a year marred by the highest number of killings in two decades. Trump again criticized Emanuel and the city's handling of gun violence in his first television interview as president Wednesday night, describing Chicago's rampant shootings as "horrible carnage" and "a problem that is very easily fixable."

Now, hundreds of additional Chicago police officers assigned to tactical, gang, saturation and mission teams have had their regular days off canceled from Friday through Sunday, according to police sources familiar with the change that was announced during a meeting at police headquarters. The city's beat officers also were given the option of earning overtime by working weekend days off, the sources said.

Adding so many officers to the street on their day off is more typical during hot summer months or special occasions such as when the president is visiting the city; is unusual for a cold-weather month such as January. This month has been marked by weekends with dozens of shootings, including 54 people shot last weekend alone.

Through Thursday, there had been 42 homicides so far with five days left in the month. In January 2016, there were 50 homicides. If the number of killings for January were to come in lower than last year, that would allow Emanuel to try to counter Trump's narrative of this year being off to an even worse start.

Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said the staffing adjustment was unrelated to recent attention paid to Chicago's gun violence by the Republican president.

The mayor did not bring up the weekend staffing increase at his Friday news conference, instead focusing on technological advances the department is making in its two most violent police districts on the South and West sides -- including the expansion of a gunshot detection system and crime cameras on the street along with new surveillance centers and new cellphones with software to instantly inform officers of shootings.

The mayor's announcement came to an abrupt end when police Superintendent Eddie Johnson grew faint and had to be helped to a chair, leading officers to call paramedics and escort reporters out of the room. On Friday night, Johnson said he had become lightheaded earlier in the day after taking blood pressure medication on an empty stomach, but he confirmed he's had a kidney disease for more than 30 years and is on a list waiting for a transplant.

While Johnson's health episode Friday came as a surprise, the rest of Emanuel's policing message for the day was scripted for public consumption.

Before Emanuel's arrival at the Englewood district, six police officers already were stationed at computers in a small, windowless room that featured four large flat-screen TVs on the wall. While a sign proclaimed the spot as a "viewing room," the Police Department's brass and the mayor's office called it the "Strategic Decision Support Center," which is staffed by a district intelligence officer who will incorporate the new technology with offender criminal history and crime data.

"The mayor is 10 minutes out, so if everyone could stage and get ready, all right? No pressure," Jonathan Lewin, CPD's deputy chief of bureau support services, told the room. "I need the officers who are going to meet the mayor in the lobby."

About 15 minutes later, Emanuel arrived through the station's back door and greeted the officers who were staffing the new "nerve center," as the mayor called it. "I'll be back," he told them. "They want me to do something."

Emanuel then made his way to the lobby, where 17 television cameras were recording as Emanuel and Johnson greeted the four officers -- one each African-American, Asian, Latino and white -- who had been waiting to participate in the prearranged shot.

After that photo op, the crush of cameras followed Emanuel into the tiny surveillance room, where Lewin walked Emanuel through the new technology as officers remotely zoomed in street cameras on license plates and explained how the gunshot tracking technology would allow officers to respond to a scene five minutes faster than from a 911 call.

"You can control the cameras from here?" Emanuel asked. "Yes," Lewin responded. "This is real time?" the mayor inquired. "Yes," was the answer again.

Much of what was discussed was difficult to hear, as the Police Department's media handlers barked orders to the TV photographers, who were being directed in and out of the room in shifts to record Emanuel's interest in the effort.

"Which screen are you looking at?" a photographer asked the mayor at one point.

"The one on the far left," Emanuel responded, pointing to a map of the 7th District that had labels for territory covered by various gangs, including the Gangster Disciples, Conservative Vice Lords, Mickey Cobras, Black P Stones, Black Disciples and Latin Kings. A second screen showed a "heat map of homicides." A third was streaming live street surveillance footage.

As Lewin explained how all the technologies eventually will be merged into one cohesive software system, Emanuel stopped him. "Do that again for me," the mayor said as the cameras rolled. "I'm slow."

Once Lewin finished his presentation, Emanuel headed upstairs to the district's roll call room, where he lauded the new technology, which he's paying for with money from unclaimed property tax rebates aimed at easing the pain from the record property tax increase he and aldermen approved.

"This allows our police officers to be all that much smarter and more effective in using technology and command ability to make sure people are in the right place at the right time to prevent a shooting in the first place," Emanuel said.

In a news release, Emanuel's office described the technology as part of the city's "smart-policing strategy," a term that had not been used in previous mayor's office announcements.

Less than 48 hours earlier, Trump had called Emanuel out on needing to run a smarter policing effort.

"It has been going on for years," Trump said of Chicago's rash of shootings and homicides. "So, all I'm saying is, to the mayor, who came up to my office recently, I say you have to smarten up and you have to toughen up, because you can't let that happen. That's a war zone. I want them to straighten out the problem. It's a big problem."

At the news conference, Emanuel was asked if there "was any coincidence" that his Friday announcement came after Trump's recent criticism.

"You don't put something like this together overnight," Emanuel replied. "It's about what's right for the future, not about any current event."

Chicago Tribune's Rosemary Regina Sobol contributed.


Quebec police report fatalities in mosque shooting

Posted on January 29, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

QUEBEC CITY — People have died in a Sunday evening in a shooting at a mosque in the provincial capital of Quebec City, police say.

Authorities did not specify the number of fatalities

JUST IN: Video shows police in Quebec City responding to reports of deadly shooting at Mosque. https://t.co/OfIp2Nx1u9 pic.twitter.com/KPeDuZD4V4

— ABC News (@ABC) January 30, 2017

Quebec City police spokesman Constable Pierre Poirier said two suspects were arrested.

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard termed the act "barbaric violence" and expressed solidarity with victims' families.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said on Twitter Sunday that he is deeply saddened by the loss of life. His office says no motive has been confirmed.


Canada PM says mosque attack that killed 6 is terrorism

Posted on January 29, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Tracey Lindeman and Rob Gillies Associated Press

MONTREAL — Six people were killed and eight were injured in a shooting at a Quebec City mosque during evening prayers. Authorities reported two arrests in what Canada's prime minister called an act of terrorism.

Quebec provincial police spokeswoman Christine Coulombe said early Monday that some of the wounded were gravely injured. She said the deceased were approximately 35 to 70 years of age. Thirty-nine people were unharmed. More than 50 were at the mosque at the time of the attack.

One suspect was arrested at the scene and another nearby in d'Orleans, Quebec. Police did release their names.

Quebec City Islamic Cultural Centre President Mohamed Yangui said the shooting in the provincial capital happened in the men's section of the mosque. He said he wasn't at the center when the attack occurred, but he got some details from people on the scene. "We are sad for the families," he said.

Both Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard characterized the attack as a terrorist act, which came amid heightened tensions worldwide over U.S. President Donald Trump's travel ban on certain Muslim countries.

"We condemn this terrorist attack on Muslims in a centre of worship and refuge," Trudeau said in a statement. "It is heart-wrenching to see such senseless violence. Diversity is our strength, and religious tolerance is a value that we, as Canadians, hold dear.

"Muslim-Canadians are an important part of our national fabric, and these senseless acts have no place in our communities, cities and country," he said. "Canadian law enforcement agencies will protect the rights of all Canadians, and will make every effort to apprehend the perpetrators of this act and all acts of intolerance."

Quebec City police spokesman Constable Pierre Poirier said two suspects were arrested. Police said the mosque had been evacuated and things were under control.

Trudeau said on Twitter that he spoke to Quebec's premier and was being briefed by officials. The prime minister said the government had offered "any & all assistance needed."

Trudeau had earlier reacted to Trump's visa ban for people from certain Muslim-majority countries by tweeting Saturday: "To those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength #WelcomeToCanada."

Trudeau also posted a picture of him greeting a Syrian child at Toronto's airport in late 2015. Trudeau oversaw the arrival of more than 39,000 Syrian refugees soon after he was elected.

Couillard termed the Sunday mosque attack as "barbaric violence" and expressed solidarity with the victims' families.

The mayor of Gatineau, Quebec, near Canada's capital of Ottawa, said there would be increased police presence at mosques around his city following the attack.

The New York Police Department said it was stepping up patrols at mosques and other hours of worships in its city.

The NYPD issued a statement Sunday night saying Critical Response Command personnel had been "assigned to extended tour coverage" at certain mosques.

"NYPD is providing additional protection for mosques in the city. All New Yorkers should be vigilant. If you see something, say something," New York City Mayor Bill Blasio said on Twitter.

"Our prayers tonight are with the people of Quebec City as they deal with a terrible attack on a mosque. We must stand together," Blasio said in another tweet.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said on Twitter Sunday that he was deeply saddened by the loss of life. His office said no motive had been confirmed.

In the summer of 2016 a pig's head was left on the doorstep of the Quebec Islamic Cultural Centre.

The incident occurred in the middle of Ramadan, when Muslims fast from dawn to sunset. Practicing Muslims do not eat pork.

Francois Deschamps, an organizer of a refugee-support group in Quebec City, said the motive remains unknown, but right-wing groups are very organized in Quebec City and distribute fliers at the university and plaster stickers around town.

Deschamps said he has personally received death threats after starting a refugee support group on Facebook and people have posted his address online.

"I'm not very surprised about the event," Deschamps said.

Canada is generally very welcoming toward immigrants and all religions, but it's less so in the French-speaking province of Quebec.

JUST IN: Video shows police in Quebec City responding to reports of deadly shooting at Mosque. https://t.co/OfIp2Nx1u9 pic.twitter.com/KPeDuZD4V4

— ABC News (@ABC) January 30, 2017


NFL, legal future for Bengals’ Adam Jones under review

Posted on January 29, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Dan Sewell Associated Press

CINCINNATI — Bengals cornerback Adam "Pacman" Jones is trying to prove to the people who will determine his future that he's making up for his latest mistakes in a career marked by legal troubles.

His team, the NFL and a county prosecutor all have decisions to make about how to discipline Jones, who is getting treatment for alcohol and anger issues as he stands accused of scuffling with a security guard and police and spitting on a jail nurse. Authorities say the confrontation started when Jones started pounding on doors at a hotel near the Bengals' stadium.

One factor to consider is Cincinnati police video released this week that shows Jones swearing at police after his Jan. 3 arrest on charges including assault, disorderly conduct and obstructing official business. The video prompted apologies from the Bengals and Jones, whose attorney Timothy Schneider said the 2014 All-Pro kick returner was getting professional care.

"These are difficult situations," Schneider said, declining to discuss details of Jones' care.

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters earlier this month raised some eyebrows by saying he wanted to know how the NFL plans to discipline Jones before deciding what to do.

Deters has said showing remorse and getting help could affect his decision.

"If he gets suspended for four games, he loses $2 million," Deters told The Cincinnati Enquirer earlier this month. "We have drunken idiots every night that don't get fined $2 million."

Deters is also waiting for information on Jones' treatment efforts, Deters' spokeswoman Julie Wilson said Thursday.

Jones said as he left jail Jan. 4 that he shouldn't have been arrested and expected to have charges dropped.

The NFL has said only that it is reviewing the case under its personal conduct policy. The league can suspend or otherwise discipline Jones even if he isn't convicted in court.

Some fans are calling for the Bengals to sever ties with Jones, who is 33 and has two years left on his contract. The Bengals' statement said the team was "extremely disappointed" with Jones' behavior, but didn't comment on his future.

The Bengals gave Jones the opportunity to resurrect his career by signing him in 2010 after Jones missed a year following a series of arrests and suspensions with the Tennessee Titans and Dallas Cowboys. He became a starting defensive back and kicker returner, making the 2015 Pro Bowl team.

___

AP Sports Writer Joe Kay in Cincinnati contributed to this report.


Chicago police chief says he’s had kidney transplant offers

Posted on January 29, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

CHICAGO — Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson says some of his own officers and citizens alike have offered to donate a kidney to him since he disclosed that he's on a kidney transplant waiting list.

After nearly fainting at a Friday news conference, Johnson announced that he's had a kidney condition for decades and is now awaiting a transplant.

He said Saturday that since he made that disclosure, citizens have called 911 to give their information for possibly becoming a kidney donor for him.

The Chicago Tribune reports Johnson says those kind offers have given him "a humbling, humbling feeling."

Johnson says he was diagnosed with an ailment that causes an acute inflammation of the kidney at age 25 when he underwent testing while applying to become a Chicago police officer.


Videos: Protests erupt at airports following Trump travel ban

Posted on January 29, 2017 by in POLICE

The Associated Press

President Donald Trump's travel ban barring citizens of seven predominantly Muslim nations entry into the U.S. has sparked protests around the country Saturday night and early Sunday morning.

A look at what is happening:

___

SEATTLE

Individuals who were detained at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport as a result of President Trump's executive order have been released by the Department of Homeland Security, a Port of Seattle spokeswoman said Sunday.

Kathy Roeder said DHS told port officials the individuals can continue their travels. She didn't know how many people had been released.

About 3,000 protesters holding signs and chanting "no hatred, no fear, immigrants are welcome here" and "let them in" gathered Saturday evening and continued demonstrating into early Sunday morning.

Roeder said the crowd dispersed shortly after midnight, but that about 30 to 35 were arrested during the demonstration and face various misdemeanor charges. She said there were no injuries or damage to the facilities.

The Port of Seattle Commissioners, which oversees the airport, issued a statement criticizing the executive order.

Live stream Seattle Airport protest. https://t.co/QpsDcQi5Ye

— Toon The News! (@Santiagojjjr) January 29, 2017

___

NEW YORK

Cries of "Let them in!" rose up from a crowd of more than 2,000 people protesting at John F. Kennedy Airport, where 12 refugees were detained Saturday. Celebrities including "Sex and the City" actress Cynthia Nixon joined the demonstration. "What Donald Trump did in the last 24 hours is disgusting, disgraceful and completely un-American and I'm here in protest," said protester Pamela French. The agency that runs the airport tried to restore order by shutting down the train that runs to airport terminals. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, reversed that decision, saying people had a right to protest. "The people of New York will have their voices heard," he said in a statement.

Protest at JFK Airport #NoBanNoWall #JFKTerminal4 https://t.co/W8xZZQBUkC

— Kamil Abbas (@KamilChachu) January 29, 2017

___

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY

More than 120 people clutching signs denouncing the Trump immigration orders gathered at Newark Liberty International Airport. NorthJersey.com reports that they joined lawyers who'd rushed to the airport to defend the rights of refugees and immigrants who were being detained and denied entry.

Immigration ban, Protests, legal defense, online disagreement & lost reunions all @ 10PM @News12NJ @PhotogAlex Newark Airport pic.twitter.com/wxQ8jbJHts

— Ranji Sinha (@ranjisinha) January 29, 2017

___

FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA

Dozens of protesters inside Washington Dulles International Airport chanted "Love, Not Hate, Makes America Great" and "Say It Loud, Say it Clear, Muslims Are Welcome Here," as travelers walked through a terminal to a baggage claim area to collect luggage and greet their loved ones. There was a heavy police presence during the peaceful protest. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said during a press conference at Dulles that he has asked Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring to look into "all legal remedies" available to help individuals who may be detained in Virginia.

Dulles airport protest! https://t.co/nzZJUvRw6a

— Aaron Bland (@dcdoubleaa) January 29, 2017

___

DENVER

Dozens of people converged on Denver International to show their support for refugees. Standing in the main terminal Saturday, they sang "Refugees are welcome here." Some held signs declaring their identity, such as Jew or Christian, and the phrase "I come in peace." Denver has some direct international flights but it wasn't clear whether anyone has been detained under the president's executive order.

Watch on #Periscope: denver airport trump protest https://t.co/kGf2o5IFT2

— Deborah (@devora11dog) January 29, 2017

___

CHICAGO

A crowd of demonstrators held a rally at O'Hare International Airport. The Chicago Sun-Times reports protesters blocked vehicle traffic to O'Hare's international terminal for a time. The newspaper says some arriving travelers joined the protest, while others were upset by the demonstrations.

Lawyers working with the International Refugee Assistance Project tell the Chicago Tribune that 17 people who had been detained at O'Hare all released by late Saturday.

Among those released before the federal judge's order was Hessan Noorian, a suburban Park Ridge resident returning with his family from Iran, the Tribune reported.

Noorian, who is of British and Iranian citizenship and has a green card, was detained at O'Hare after he and his wife, Zahra Amirisefat, a U.S. citizen, arrived from Tehran, the newspaper said.

The couple, who told the Tribune that they work at a community college in the Chicago area, said they were questioned for five hours.

After Noorian was released, his wife told the Tribune: "I can't believe something like this can happen to someone with a green card."

Great turnout at Chicago's O'Hare airport. Lots of people were still showing up at the time the protest was scheduled to end. #NoBanNoWall pic.twitter.com/ZFskSHlI6H

— Taniel (@Taniel) January 29, 2017

__

DALLAS

Protesters who gathered at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Saturday evening voiced their displeasure with Trump's executive order. The crowd of a few dozen ballooned into hundreds of demonstrators who frequently chanted "Set them free!" At times, cheers erupted from the crowd as those who were detained got released.

Among those still held at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport at midnight Saturday was a 70-year-old Iranian widow, Shahin Hassanpour, whose son said she suffers from high blood pressure and had breast cancer surgery four years ago. She obtained an immigrant visa in November on her son's petition.

Bahzad Honarjou, a 43-year-old network engineer, said he spoke twice to his mother by phone after her 9 a.m. arrival, but that they hadn't talked since courts stayed the executive order, meaning she should have been released.

Hundreds of protesters stood in the waiting area and chanted "This is what democracy looks like."

Immigration agents were not being very communicative, Honarjou said.

"They were like a machine when I talked to them today," he said. His mother only speaks a few words of English and a fellow passenger was translating for her from her native Farsi as no immigration agents spoke the language, he said.

Hassanpour was originally going to be deported on a Sunday flight, she informed her son the first time they spoke.

"She was about to cry," he said. "She is not able to take (tolerate) a 20-hour flight back to Iran."

Honarjou said he is a U.S. citizen, obtained entry in a lottery, and has been in the country for seven years. Why did he come?

"To have a better life and to make more money," he said. "And, you know, for the freedom."

Watch on #Periscope: Dallas airport protest https://t.co/4pN7riSQJ7

— MissTweak2003 (@MissTweak2003) January 29, 2017

___

PORTLAND, OREGON

A protest by several dozen people in and around Portland International Airport briefly disrupted light rail service at the airport. The Oregonian/OregonLive reports that the demonstrators carried signs and chanted "Say it loud, say it clear, refugees are welcome here" and "No ban no wall America is for us all."

Protest at Portland Intl Airport https://t.co/CsCLhrJGzu

— mike popovic (@mikepop) January 29, 2017

___

LOS ANGELES

About 300 people expressed their displeasure with the ban at Los Angeles International Airport Saturday night. Protesters entered the airport's Tom Bradley International Terminal after holding a candlelight vigil.

Avriel Epps held a candle and a large photo a drowned 3-year-old Syrian boy who washed up on a Turkish beach in 2015 and became a haunting symbol of the Syrian refugee crisis.

People continue to protest President Trump’s travel ban at the Tom Bradley Terminal at LAX on January 29, 2017. pic.twitter.com/2Qrp969Gjd

— Genaro Molina (@GenaroMolina47) January 29, 2017

___

SAN FRANCISCO

Hundreds of protesters blocked the street outside at San Francisco International Airport's international terminal to express their opposition to the barring of some people from Muslim-majority nations.

.@califmartini is on #Periscope: #MuslimBan protest in San Francisco airport SFO ?? https://t.co/1TiZcKiZ14

— CE (@demopinions) January 29, 2017

___

SAN DIEGO

As motorists honked their support, demonstrators outside San Diego International Airport chanted "No hate, no fear, everyone is welcome here."

#sandiego #san #sd airport protest @ international terminal earlier tonight against #MuslimBan #NoBanNoWall pic.twitter.com/O21qDhqOoN

— clinton tolley (@clintontolley) January 29, 2017


New charges filed against suspected Fla. cop killer

Posted on January 29, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — A Florida man suspected in the killing of his pregnant ex-girlfriend and an Orlando police officer is being charged with additional crimes.

Markeith Loyd was back in an Orange County courtroom on Saturday regarding three charges of aggravated assault with a firearm.

The Orlando Sentinel reported that this time Loyd's court appearance went smoothly. During a court appearance earlier this month Loyd cursed and shouted at a judge.

The Sentinel reported that the new charges are related to an August incident that occurred nearly four months before Loyd was accused of killing 24-year-old Sade Dixon.

Loyd is facing two first-degree murder counts and a host of other charges related to the deaths of his ex-girlfriend and Lt. Debra Clayton.


Trump wants to enlist local police in immigration crackdown

Posted on January 29, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Jacques Billeaud and Amy Taxin Associated Press

PHOENIX — To build his highly touted deportation force, President Donald Trump is reviving a long-standing program that deputizes local officers to enforce federal immigration law.

The program received scant attention during a week in which Trump announced plans to build a border wall, hire thousands more federal agents and impose restrictions on refugees from Middle Eastern countries.

But the program could end up having a significant impact on immigration enforcement around the country, despite falling out of favor in recent years amid complaints that it promotes racial profiling.

More than 60 police and sheriff's agencies had the special authority as of 2009, applying for it as the nation's immigration debate was heating up. Since then, the number has been halved and the effort scaled back as federal agents ramped up other enforcement programs and amid complaints officers weren't focusing on the goal of catching violent offenders and instead arrested immigrants for minor violations, like driving with broken tail lights.

Sheriff Joe Arpaio used the program most aggressively in metro Phoenix, and he became arguably the nation's best-known immigration enforcer at the local level in large part because of the special authority. In a strange twist, he was thrown out of office in the same election that vaulted Trump to the presidency, mostly because of mounting frustration over legal issues and costs stemming from the patrols.

In his executive order this week, Trump said he wants to empower local law enforcement to act as immigration officers and help with the "investigation, apprehension, or detention" of immigrants in the country illegally.

The move comes at a time when the country is sharply divided over the treatment of immigrants. Cities such as Chicago and San Francisco have opposed police involvement in immigration while some counties in Massachusetts and Texas are now seeking to jump in.

Proponents say police departments can help bolster immigration enforcement and prevent criminals from being released back into their neighborhoods, while critics argue that deputizing local officers will lead to racial profiling and erode community trust in police.

Cecillia Wang, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney, said police bosses who want to get into immigration enforcement should consider what happened when 100 of Arpaio's deputies were given the federal arrest power.

The longtime sheriff used the authority to carry out traffic patrols that targeted immigrants. The patrols were later discredited in a lawsuit in which a federal judge concluded Arpaio's officers had racially profiled Latinos. The lawsuit so far cost county taxpayers $50 million.

"There are people like Joe Arpaio who have a certain political agenda who want to jump on the Trump bandwagon," Wang said, adding later that the Arizona sheriff was "most vocal and shameless offender" in the program.

When asked to comment on Trump's effort to revitalize the program, a Department of Homeland Security spokeswoman said the executive orders would speak for themselves.

Traditionally, police stayed out of immigration enforcement and left those duties to federal authorities. But a 1996 federal law opened up the possibility for local agencies to participate in immigration enforcement on the streets and do citizenship checks of people in local jails.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement trained and certified roughly 1,600 officers to carry out these checks from 2006 to 2015.

The Obama administration phased out all the arrest power agreements in 2013, but still let agencies check whether people jailed in their jurisdiction were citizens. If they find that an inmate is in the country illegally, they typically notify federal authorities or hand them over to immigration officers. Today, more than 30 local agencies participate in the jail program.

Alonzo Pena, a retired deputy director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement who once oversaw such agreements with police agencies, said some officers were using the authority in ways that didn't match the agency's enforcement priorities.

He said federal officials need to closely monitor participants to ensure their actions don't veer away from the goal of catching violent offenders and confronting national security threats. "It's hard to regulate to make sure it's followed," Pena said.

In California, three counties nixed the program after state legislation and a federal court ruling in nearby Oregon limited police collaboration with immigration enforcement. Orange County still makes the immigration checks inside its jail and flags inmates for deportation officers, but won't hold anyone on behalf of federal authorities out of legal concerns.

"The window has narrowed to a large extent," said Orange County sheriff's Lt. Mike McHenry.

With Trump in office, the program has new life.

Even before the change in administration, two Republican county sheriffs in Massachusetts said they were starting programs. In Texas, Jackson County sheriff A. J. "Andy" Louderback said two officers will get trained to run immigration jail checks this spring and nearby counties want to follow suit.

Louderback said teaming up with federal agents will cost his agency roughly $3,000 — a small price to pay to cover for officers while they're on a four-week training course, especially in an area struggling with human smuggling. Once the program is underway, he said immigration agents will send a daily van to pick up anyone flagged for deportation from jail.

"It just seems like good law enforcement to partner with federal law enforcement in this area," he said. "It takes all of us to do this job."

Experts said Trump's outreach to local law enforcement will create an even bigger split between sanctuary cities that keep police out of immigration enforcement and those eager to help the new president bolster deportations.

"There is no question that in order to do the type of mass deportation that he promised, it will require him conscripting local law enforcement agencies," said Chris Newman, legal director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network. "It is going to balkanize things ... and we're going to see more of the extremes."


NYC to pay $6.9M to man shot by off-duty officer

Posted on January 28, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

NEW YORK — New York City on Friday agreed to pay $6.9 million to a man shot six times by an off-duty police officer who had consumed 10 drinks before getting in his car to drive home.

A spokesman for the city law department said Friday's settlement in the shooting by former officer Brendan Cronin was in the best interests of the city.

Joseph Felice and Robert Borrelli sued the city after Cronin fired a barrage of bullets into their car in suburban Pelham on April 29, 2014. Borrelli was not hit and was able to drive his wounded friend to the hospital.

Friday's settlement awards $6.9 million to Felice and $1.275 million to Borrelli.

The two men were driving home from a recreational hockey game when Cronin opened fire on them without provocation. Cronin told Pelham police that he had downed 10 drinks at a bar after spending the day training at an NYPD shooting range.

He pleaded guilty to attempted murder and other charges and is serving a nine-year prison sentence.

An attorney for Felice and Borrelli, Debra S. Cohen, said the plaintiffs hope that the settlement demonstrates "the beginning of a zero-tolerance policy for alcohol abuse" by police officers.


NH bill would require body cams for cops with complaint history

Posted on January 28, 2017 by in POLICE

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.H. — The debate over whether the police should wear body cameras is back before New Hampshire lawmakers.

A bill up Tuesday for a hearing would require any officer who is the subject of a "substantiated complaint" based on their job conduct to wear a body camera. The cameras would be paid for by upping the penalty assessment on court fines to 27 percent.

New Hampshire doesn't require police to wear body cameras. But there are guidelines and procedures in place if local departments choose to use them. The debate over body cameras has heated up nationwide as the focus on officer-involved shootings increases.

The New Hampshire State Police use dashboard cameras in some of their vehicles.


Chicago police chief discloses he needs kidney transplant

Posted on January 28, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Caryn Rousseau and Herbert G. McCann Associated Press

CHICAGO — Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson disclosed after a public dizzy spell on Friday that he has battled a kidney condition for more than three decades and is on a waiting list for a transplant.

Johnson said his dizziness at a news conference announcing a crime initiative was due to taking blood pressure medication on an empty stomach. He was taken to a suburban Chicago hospital for several hours of evaluation and later released.

"For 32 years I've been treating a kidney condition that hasn't interfered with my ability to lead a normal life or be your police superintendent," he said at a news conference later in the day. "I don't require dialysis nor do I have diabetes."

Johnson said that once a donor is found and the operation takes place he should be back to work after three to five weeks. Johnson said that he informed Emanuel of his kidney condition before he was appointed superintendent in March.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel expressed "absolute confidence" that Johnson can run the department and his deputies can run the department in the event Johnson had to take leave.

Earlier Friday, Johnson appeared dazed and had to sit down while Emanuel was announcing an initiative to reduce homicides and shootings.

While Emanuel was speaking at the podium during the news conference, he stopped suddenly and turned to the police superintendent, asking "Are you OK?"

People then surrounded Johnson and several shouted: "Call 911." Emanuel handed Johnson a bottle of water and the superintendent drank from it after sitting down in seats reserved for reporters.

Dr. Paul Crawford, a nephrologist, said Johnson's test results did not contain anything that would require admission. He also stressed that one of every nine people in the U.S. has high blood pressure

Johnson and the mayor were announcing technological advances for police at a station on the city's South Side. Chicago police and city officials are under tremendous pressure to curb a rash of homicides and shootings in recent years.

Chicago ended 2016 with 762 homicides — or an average of two people killed per day, a rate that was widely reported at year's end. It was the highest number of homicides in the city in two decades and more than Los Angeles and New York combined. Last year, there were 3,550 shootings, a nearly 50 percent increase over 2015.

Three days ago, President Donald Trump tweeted that he would "send in the Feds" if the city couldn't fix the problem.

Johnson told the Chicago Tribune on Wednesday that Trump's tweet baffled him.

"The statement is so broad. I have no idea what he's talking about," Johnson said.

Johnson replaced former Superintendent Garry McCarthy, who was fired following the release of dashcam footage showing a white police officer fatally shooting an unarmed black teenager 16 times. He didn't apply to be the city's top police officer. Emanuel chose Johnson for the job in March 2016, after rejecting three finalists recommended by the city's police board.


Ferguson missed deadlines in consent decree with DOJ

Posted on January 28, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Jim Salter and Eric Tucker Associated Press

FERGUSON, Mo. — Ferguson officials have missed critical deadlines in the early stages of an agreement with the Justice Department, but the manager of the beleaguered Missouri city said the process is now moving "in the right direction."

Clark Ervin, a Washington lawyer monitoring the consent decree involving the St. Louis suburb that has been under Justice Department scrutiny since the fatal 2014 police shooting of Michael Brown, told The Associated Press this week that Ferguson has missed some 120- and 180-day deadlines in crafting new policies and procedures on basic policing practices.

The missed deadlines underscore the challenges police departments can face complying with the sweeping overhauls mandated by the Justice Department, particularly when the troubles are as deeply-rooted as in Ferguson. The progress in Ferguson will be under particular scrutiny given how the city emerged as a flashpoint in the national debate over race and police use of force, and because of the city's initial resistance last year to signing a federal agreement that local officials feared would be too costly.

"While a number of deadlines have been missed, and deadlines are important, that does not mean that the city is not working hard both in terms of police reform and court reform," said Ervin, who is responsible for ensuring the city's compliance with the agreement.

He said the city was working in "good faith" toward meeting the procedures required by the federal government.

"This is difficult work," Ervin said. "Needless to say, there's a lot to be done, but progress is being made."

City Manager De'Carlon Seewood acknowledged that U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry, at a status hearing last month, felt the city was behind. But Seewood said the judge "also recognized we are further ahead than a lot of other places with similar consent decrees."

"It's moving and I think we're moving in the right direction and I see a positive outcome," Seewood said.

Ervin said one problem early on was that the city did not have a designated employee focused specifically on the consent decree. The city hired Frank McCall, formerly the police chief in neighboring Berkeley, Missouri, in October as a police commander tasked with shepherding the agreement. Ervin, Seewood and Justice Department attorneys are confident that will help expedite the process.

Ervin noted that the city had passed an ordinance to set up a civilian review board to handle allegations of police misconduct. Some revised policies, including on the duty to report use of force, have already been judged to comply with the consent decree. Others, including on accountability, are in the process of being reviewed.

The shooting of Brown, 18, who was black and unarmed by white officer Darren Wilson on Aug. 9, 2014, resulted in an examination of Ferguson's criminal justice system that led to a March 2015 Justice Department report citing racial bias. Perry signed off an agreement between the city and the Justice Department last April that called for significant changes in police and court procedures.

Wilson resigned in November 2014, although a St. Louis County grand jury and the Justice Department found no evidence that he committed a crime.

The city's agreement with the Justice Department, expected to cost about $2.3 million over three years, requires diversity training for officers, body cameras for police and jail workers, dashboard cameras for squad cars, establishment of a civilian police oversight board, municipal court reforms and other changes.

The agreement spelled out a series of deadlines for compliance, including that the city within 120 days develop a process for reporting and investigating use of force incidents and provide crisis intervention training within 180 days to call-takers, dispatchers and their supervisors.

A key provision requires community policing, which relies on officers getting involved in neighborhood groups, meeting with people, and generally being pro-active, rather than simply responding to crime. But the city hasn't been able to fully implement community policing because the Ferguson Police Department is so short-staffed: Nearly one-third of the 49 police jobs are vacant.

As a result, Seewood said the city has re-prioritized its goals to put police recruitment — with a special focus of bringing in more minority officers — at the top of the list.

"You can do community policing with our current staff, but you can't do it at the higher level that you want because you are taking care of the day-to-day operations of the police force," Seewood said. "They're going on calls, they're handling those type of services."

Emily Davis, a member of a consent decree-mandated steering committee tasked with helping the city implement community policing, said she's been disappointed by the city's effort so far.

"The city has been so resistant to change because they didn't believe they'd ever done anything wrong," Davis said. "Community policing has not gotten implemented the way it needs to be because they've been dragging their feet."

Ervin said Ferguson officials are contemplating ways to free up officers to do more community policing.

Given the negative publicity surrounding the Ferguson Police Department, the city does face challenges in bringing in new officers.

On the other hand, Ervin said, "An officer could look at it as an opportunity to join a police department that's in the process of reforming itself and is in the national spotlight."


Fashion police: Cops ease rules on tattoos, turbans, beards

Posted on January 28, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Colleen Long Associated Press

NEW YORK — The Joe Friday look is out. Tattoos, turbans and beards are in.

Police departments, compelled by a hiring crisis and eager for a more diverse applicant pool, are relaxing traditional grooming standards and getting away from rules that used to require a uniformly clean-shaven, 1950s look.

More officers are on the job with tattoos inked on their forearms, beards on their chins or religious head coverings like hijabs and turbans in place of — or tucked beneath — their blue caps.

"My turban is a part of me," said Mandeep Singh, among 160 Sikhs in the New York City Police Department who last month were allowed to wear navy blue turbans in place of the standard-issue police caps. "This opens a gate for other potential candidates who felt they could not be a police officer because they would have to choose either the job or their faith."

That followed a 2014 move by the St. Paul, Minnesota, police to create a special hijab for its first female Somali Muslim officer.

Muslim NYPD officer Masood Syed, who grows a beard for religious reasons, was suspended for its length and sued his department last year over a rule requiring beards to be trimmed to within a millimeter of the skin. As a result, the department changed the length to a half-inch and reinstated him. Syed's suit is still pending, though, because he said the length is arbitrary and it should be case by case, depending on the officer's needs.

"It's 2017," Syed said. "The police department is supposed to reflect the community that it's policing."

Many departments say it's tougher to attract candidates to a physically demanding job that offers low pay and is under increasingly intense public scrutiny. That has led many to make a nod to shifting fashion trends, particularly among millennials, and ease longstanding bans on beards and visible tattoos.

New Orleans; Portland, Oregon; Austin, Texas; and Pinellas Park, Florida, are among the departments that look the other way if a recruit comes in with visible tattoos.

"Modern practice is colliding with dress codes," said Will Aitchison, an attorney who represents police unions during labor-related disputes. "And what police departments really should be focused on is how the officer performs his or her job, as opposed to how they look."

In Kansas, state police did a public survey on whether officers should be allowed to have tattoos to help determine whether to change their policy after they couldn't fill about 100 trooper jobs.

Half of the nearly 20,000 respondents had tattoos themselves. Sixty-nine percent said the department shouldn't have a policy prohibiting visible tattoos.

"We were surprised by the response," said Lt. Adam Winters. "It just doesn't seem to bother people."

Still, the department's prohibition on visible tattoos has stayed in place, in part because of the potential challenge of regulating the content of tattoos that might be offensive.

In Philadelphia, the department is considering tightening its policy after photos surfaced last fall of an officer in uniform with a tattoo on his forearm showing a Nazi symbol: a spread-winged eagle under the word "Fatherland."

In Chicago, a federal judge threw out a lawsuit filed by tattooed officers — all military veterans — who objected to a new requirement that they wear long sleeves to cover up their inked arms during a sweltering Midwestern summer. The judge argued it would be too difficult for departments to determine what would be considered offensive and need to be covered.

But, the police brass recently started allowing them again — they said as a morale booster for a beleaguered force.


Why cops should focus on the lone-actor domestic terrorist

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

The FBI defines terrorism as “the unlawful use of force or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives.”

Stated simply, a terrorist wants to change the behavior of a targeted group, and uses violence — or the threat of violence — in order to accomplish the objective. Radicalized Islamist terrorists have been increasingly active in Europe in the past eight years, and of course have laid waste to large swaths of territory in the Middle East.

At present, terrorist attacks happening in the United States have been different from what typically occurs overseas.

Overseas — where large volumes of unexploded ordinance and other explosives are readily available — attacks can be relatively large in scale, leaving scores dead and injured from an improvised bomb. Due to the nature of the battlefield in Syria and Iraq especially, terror groups are able to operate largely in the open with little fear of arrest or other consequence. Terrorists can form fairly large groups and conduct somewhat complicated operations. With the exception of suicide bombers, they commit attacks and retreat into the shadows, intending to live to fight another day.

None of this is the case here in the United States.

Because of the difficulty in covertly planning and executing a large-scale attack involving a significantly sized “cell” of like-minded terrorists and utilizing explosives as weapons, the most common type of terrorist attack in the U.S. is now committed by “lone actors” who have become radicalized by online propaganda from groups like ISIS. Their weapons of choice are small arms, edged weapons and vehicles. Their plans are uncomplicated — they can barely even be called plans in many cases. They sometimes include their own deaths in their tactics.

Consider this list of terrorist attacks conducted by radical Islamic jihadists since Sept. 11, 2001. Recall these incidents and think for a moment on their commonalities.

2002 — Shooting at El Al ticket counter at LAX — 2 dead 2002 — D.C. Beltway sniper killings — 10 dead 2006 — Shooting at the Seattle Jewish Federation — 1 dead 2009 — Shooting at Fort Hood — 13 dead 2009 — Shooting at a Little Rock military recruiting office — 1 dead 2013 — Boston Marathon Bombing — 5 dead 2014 — Beheading in an Oklahoma food processing plant — 1 dead 2015 — Shootings at two military facilities in Chattanooga — 5 dead 2015 — The San Bernardino shooting — 14 dead 2016 — The Orlando nightclub shooting — 49 dead

In all but two of those attacks, the weapons used were small arms — the outliers were a pair of homemade bombs and a blade. In all but three of those 10 attacks, the terrorists were lone actors. In the three instances in which more than one terrorist was involved, one pair was virtually father and son (D.C. Beltway), one pair were brothers (Boston), and one pair a married couple (San Bernardino).

Three may keep a secret ...

Benjamin Franklin once famously said, “Three may keep a secret if two of them are dead.”

The plotters who work in groups larger than two have a much higher probability of being detected by police. A Sept. 11-type attack has become monumentally more difficult to successfully commit. The level of preparation necessary for the 9/11 attacks was unprecedented. According to the Sept. 11 Commission Report, the attacks committed by those 19 foreign-born jihadis cost somewhere between $400,000 and $500,000 to execute and was more than five years in the planning phase. An operation of that scope today would very probably be seen by a much more watchful security apparatus.

A lone actor is far more difficult to discover before they launch an attack. They are, however, often less lethal than a large group working in concert. Sept. 11 cost more than 3,000 lives. While horrible, deplorable and tragic, the most deadly attack by a lone actor has taken the lives of 49 innocents.

It is important to note that lone actors are generally not “loners” who feel detached from society. Contrary to common opinion that lone actors suffer from social isolation, self-radicalized jihadi lone actors tend to be fairly well connected with their community, especially to their friends at their place of worship, whether that is online or in the real world.

This is why one of the most important elements in preventing lone actor attacks is the engagement of the non-radicalized majority of Muslims. They will have the highest likelihood of seeing behavior that might foretell the desire to commit a violent terrorist attack.

Agencies that serve even the smallest community of Muslims should make every effort to make a positive connection with elders and leaders of those houses of worship. It will take a period of time to establish the necessary levels of trust, but that is true of police establishing trust with any community. Police need to build those bridges to allow for the exchange of information that can prevent an attack by a lone actor.

Online propaganda and recruiting

ISIS has stopped publishing Dabiq, but that doesn’t mean they’re out of the online recruitment and propaganda game. The group is now putting out a magazine called Rumiyah, which is Arabic for Rome. The name refers to an Islamic prophecy that tells of the downfall of Rome and calls for killing infidels.

The new publication is meant to be easier to read and digest by the potential recruits in the western world. Dabiq — which was named for the location of apocalyptic battle in Muslim mythology — was heavily theological. Rumiyah is written in straightforward “how to” style, which closely mirrors Inspire, the online propaganda magazine published — on and off — by al Qaeda.

For example, the latest issue of Rumiyah contains an article which instructs potential terrorist recruits on how to commit an attack with a fixed-blade knife. It advises, “ When carrying out a knife operation, it is not advised to target very large gatherings or overly crowded areas, as this presents a disadvantage and only increases the likelihood of being prevented from achieving kills.”

Jihadi rhetoric in online videos and recruiting magazines has for some time called for attacks on military and police. In fact, one issue of Dabiq said, “You must strike the soldiers, patrons, and troops of the tawaghit. Strike their police, security, and intelligence members, as well as their treacherous agents. Ruin their sleep. Embitter their lives for them and busy them with themselves … kill them in any manner possible.”

These two passages form an important nexus. We have already seen self-radicalized jihadi attackers come at police with edged weapons — recall the machete-wielding man who attacked four NYPD officers.

Police should pay attention to the online rhetoric put out by groups like ISIS and AQAP. The fact is those groups have specifically targeted the mentally unstable in their recruitment efforts. They would far rather have American citizens carry out attacks on Americans than have to send fighters from the battlefields of the Middle East to commit terrorism here.


Policing Matters Podcast: Technology and social media in 21st century policing

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

<!--cke_bookmark_146S--><!--cke_bookmark_146E-->

Download this week's episode on iTunes, SoundCloud or via RSS feed

In December 2014, President Barack Obama signed an executive order establishing the Task Force on 21st Century Policing. The president charged the task force with identifying best practices and offering recommendations on how policing practices can promote effective crime reduction while building public trust. The task force released its final report in May of 2015. In it was what the task force called the “Six Pillars of 21st Century Policing.” In this week’s podcast, Jim and Doug discuss the third pillar — Technology and Social Media — and in coming weeks will tackle each subsequent pillar in turn.


NYC challenges lawsuit targeting NYPD use of ‘sound weapon’

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

By John Riley Newsday

NEW YORK — In one of the first legal challenges over police use of a so-called “sound weapon” against protesters, a New York City lawyer argued on Thursday that deploying the “Long Range Acoustical Device” at a 2014 march over the Eric Garner case did not violate demonstrators’ constitutional rights.

“In order to make the street safe for protesters and provide for the flow of traffic, the use of the LRAD was justified and not arbitrary,” city lawyer Ashley Garman told Manhattan U.S. District Judge Robert Sweet, arguing for dismissal of the case.

But lawyers for six plaintiffs — including protesters, bystanders and members of the news media — said the device’s high-pitched tone amounted to using “pain compliance” that indiscriminately affected law-abiding citizens and forced them to leave places where they were entitled to be.

“Sound waves by operation of physics can constitute uses of force and can cause injury,” said lawyer Gideon Oliver. “ . . . The NYPD is treating an LRAD as if it’s just a bullhorn, when it clearly is not.”

The portable LRAD, court papers say, serves two functions — amplifying sound like a super-megaphone to make police orders intelligible up to 600 meters, and emitting a targeted beam of high-decibel noise to cause ear discomfort and modify behavior for crowd control or “area denial.”

The NYPD has had the devices since the 2004 Republican Convention in New York City, when they were used to make announcements. The lawsuit targets the use of the crowd control function at a Manhattan intersection on Dec. 5, 2014, to break up a protest over a Staten Island grand jury’s failure to indict a cop for Garner’s death during his arrest for selling loose cigarettes.

Although the plaintiffs in the case contend they suffered “incredible pain” and injuries ranging from migraines and dizziness to vertigo, Garman said the police were justifiably responding to a chaotic scene of bottles and garbage being tossed into the street at 57th and Madison.

The 2016 lawsuit only alleges that the “deterrent tone” was activated for three minutes, she argued, and videos suggested the noise wasn’t that bad. “People were walking away casually,” Garman said. “They’re not running, not screaming, not covering their ears.”

Oliver said the LRAD’s manufacturer uses the term “pain compliance” in its literature, but since the 2014 incident, the NYPD has steadfastly refused to adopt use-of-force policies on LRADs, and there are no court precedents setting standards for when their use constitutes excessive force.

He also complained that — like tear-gas — the device doesn’t affect only protesters or wrongdoers, but also deprives others of their rights by forcing them to move.

“If you’re a photojournalist and the police force you to move to location B, you’re prevented from reporting what’s occurring at location A,” he said.

The lawsuit is seeking both damages and an injunction limiting the use of LRADs. Sweet has to first decide whether the allegations if proved, would make out a valid legal claim. He did not indicate when he may rule.

©2017 Newsday


NY cops rescue 103 puppies after delivery van crashes

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

Associated Press

AVOCA, N.Y. — An animal welfare group is caring for the scores of puppies that were being transported in a box van when it crashed and overturned on an upstate New York highway.

State police say the vehicle crashed Tuesday on Interstate 86 in the Steuben County town of Avoca,, 50 miles south of Rochester.

Troopers say a Missouri woman was driving the van carrying 103 puppies when she lost control of the vehicle, causing it to hit a ditch and overturn.

Troopers and employees of a towing company helped rescue the puppies, which were being delivered to pet stores. Five of the puppies sustained minor injuries.

The local SPCA's website says it's caring for "a large number of puppies" from the accident. The puppies are expected to be returned to their out-of-state owner.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

A few more pictures of the rescued puppies, and Andrea Williams, L.V.T., who was on the scene to triage. Way to go Andrea!!!

Posted by Finger Lakes SPCA, Inc. on Thursday, January 26, 2017 (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

UPDATE ON ACCIDENT INVOLVING PUPPIES On 1/24/17, Finger Lakes SPCA (FLSPCA) was contacted by the New York State Police...

Posted by Finger Lakes SPCA, Inc. on Thursday, January 26, 2017 .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

White paper: Guidelines for Evaluating and Implementing eCitation Systems

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

The following is paid content sponsored by Thin Blue Line Reporting.

By PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

New eCitation systems have evolved to replace inefficient handwritten citation processes, offering higher efficiency and productivity. With less time devoted to manually issuing and recording tickets, officers can cover more ground when on duty while enhancing both their and the public’s safety by spending less time on dangerous roadsides. Digital data entry and automatic formatting produce organized, legible and accurate citations with fewer errors and fewer dismissals in court. This leads to both the recapture of revenue that is currently lost to errors common to handwritten tickets and the additional benefit of faster revenue collection for the issuing jurisdiction.

However, there are many factors to consider when procuring or upgrading an eCitation system. The eCitation Coalition has assembled this white paper to help law enforcement agencies learn:

The value of eCitation systems How to choose an eCitation system compatible with an agency's available technology options How to choose between a government-developed or private sector-developed eCitation system How to measure ROI for eCitation systems

You can download the white paper for free by clicking the link below:

Download: eCitation Coalition: Guidelines for Evaluating and Implementing eCitation Systems


Thin Blue Line Reporting White Paper: Guidelines for Evaluating and Implementing eCitation Systems

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: Jim Dudley and Doug Wyllie

By Thin Blue Line Reporting

Over the past two decades, the emergence of electronic citation (eCitations) technology has represented a breakthrough in law enforcement technology. By transforming traditional hand written citations into digital documents that can be quickly populated and accurately issued, eCitation has significantly helped enhance the effectiveness and safety of law enforcement officers in the field.

With more than twenty years of experience, the adoption of eCitation systems is expanding across the country. There are many software and hardware options that must be taken into consideration when a law enforcement agency is considering the procurement of a new (or upgrading an existing) eCitation system. This White Paper is designed to help decision makers make a more informed choice.

Read the complete white paper


Videos: Charlotte police fatally shoot bus gunman

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

By Fred Clasen-Kelly and Mark Washburn The Charlotte Observer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Body and dashboard camera video showing police killing an armed teenage suspect in a June 2016 confrontation near University City was released Thursday under the first test of a new state law for making public such material.

Footage matched the narrative given by authorities after the shooting: That Rodney Rodriguez Smith, after wounding a rival aboard a CATS bus, fired at responding officers while fleeing from them, and they fired multiple shots in return.

From different vantage points, the six videos showed the search for a man who’d fired aboard the bus.

From his body camera, Officer Garret Tryon can be seen searching in the dark for a suspect, then pulling in and calling out seven times, “Drop the gun!” A fusillade of shots follow, then Tryon orders the man four more times to drop the gun. Then came four more shots.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Tryon tells another officer at the scene, “He shot at me.”

Release of the video reflected the policy declared by CMPD Chief Kerr Putney in September toward more transparency in conflicts between police and the public.

It also represented a legal milestone in the public’s right to gain access to police video because it was the first time a court approved a petition under North Carolina’s new law requiring judicial approval to release police dashcam and body camera video.

Legal milestone

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police and the city of Charlotte did not oppose the request this month for release of the video, brought by WFAE-FM (NPR, 90.7) reporter Lisa Worf.

But attorneys for the two officers in the shooting – Michael Bell and Tryon, who were cleared of criminal wrongdoing by prosecutors and are back at work – argued this month in court that the footage should not be released because of the possibility of inflaming the public and inciting someone to seek revenge.

“Another person killed by police – that’s the narrative,” said attorney Jeremy Smith, who represented Tryon. “They could seek retribution. Officers have enough to deal with.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

But Superior Court Judge Jesse Caldwell ruled Jan. 12 that there was a compelling public interest in demonstrating how the officers handled the circumstances and ordered the tapes to be released.

He said the nation’s attention is focused on the killings of minorities at the hands of police officers. He said he strongly doubted the release of the video posed a threat to the officers safety since so much time had passed since the shooting.

Shooting on bus

After an investigation into the shooting, authorities gave this account of what happened:

Police were alerted to a shooting aboard at CATS bus on the night of June 2, 2016. Officers Tryon and Bell arrived in separate cars at the scene on North Tryon Street near University City.

Tryon told investigators he saw Smith walking along the street holding something in his waistband. Tryon said he repeatedly ordered Smith to show his hands.

Smith clutched something from his waistband, Tryon said. Bell, who had just arrived, said he saw Smith holding a handgun. Smith fired at Tryon, police said, and both officers returned fire.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

“I got out of the car I went to about the front bumper of my own car and drew my weapon and focused on him,” Bell told investigators. “I took two or three breaths just to gather myself and steady my aim and I remember thinking the whole time, ‘Tryon, if you don’t shoot him you’re gonna die.’ And as I’m getting out of the car I looked at Tryon, Tryon’s pointing at him, yelling at him, ‘Show me your hands.’”

Smith ran up an embankment after the officers fired, an investigative report said. He raised his right hand, which Tryon said was still gripping the weapon, and Tryon fired three to four more shots. An image from Bell’s body camera showed Smith pointing what the report said was a gun at Tryon.

Smith was shot five times. District Attorney Andrew Murray concluded that deadly force was justified because the officers were defending themselves.

An image recovered later from a camera on the CATS bus shows a man identified as Smith seated with a handgun. A second image shows him pointing a gun before the passenger, a man with whom Smith had a long-term dispute, was shot from behind.

Family questions

Though not a party to the court action to release the video, Smith’s grandparents have said they had unresolved questions: Why did police shoot Smith so many times? Was he threatening officers with a gun or was he holding a cellphone or something else? They said wanted to see the video to erase those doubts.

They raised Smith and said he had trouble in school. He suffered from Attention Deficit Disorder and mental illness.

Woodard said she questioned the official account because word had spread that Smith sent his girlfriend a text about the same time as the shooting.

“How could all this be going on if he’s texting his girlfriend?” Woodard asked.

Legal challenge

On Oct. 1, a new state law regulating release of police videos went into effect. It called for police to get a court order to release video from dashboard cameras or body cameras and allowed courts to deny such requests for a number of factors including potential interference to an active investigation or disclosing information that could “harm the reputation or jeopardize the safety of a person.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Supporters of the law say it balances citizens’ right to know with the interest of police. Opponents say the added restriction undermines transparency and public accountability.

A request from Worf and WFAE for police video in the Smith case was denied by Superior Court Judge Eric Levinson in November because it was before the district attorney’s office resolved whether the shooting was justified. Murray announced Dec. 12, 2016 that a review by his office found the officers had acted in self defense, and Worf returned to court this month seeking the video.

Unlike the first time she requested the video, CMPD supported its release. Mark Newbold, a CMPD attorney, said there was no longer a need to keep the video sealed from public view since prosecutors had finished reviewing evidence.

Newbold indicated CMPD would be supporting the release of other videos in the future because, he said, the need for transparency trumps other concerns. He said releasing video could dispel rumors and misinformation, which many blame for the protests that roiled the city following the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in September 2016.

“In keeping with department protocol, we do not oppose the release of video evidence after a case has been thoroughly investigated and adjudicated,” CMPD said in a statement Thursday with the video release. “Our preference is to always allow for a thorough investigation with the intent to have all sides presented.”

More transparency

Greg Collard, WFAE’s news director, said he hopes the case will encourage other judges to lean toward transparency in future cases.

Collard said the Smith case stood out from other police shootings because officers fired more than 20 shots from different angles. Release of the videos would help the public understand Murray’s decision to not pursue charges against the officers, Collard said.

“Part of our job is to advocate for the public,” he said. “That’s the role of journalism.”

Balance of protection

Sponsoring the new law on release of videos was state Rep. John Faircloth, R-High Point. He said the intent of the law was to protect police videos for evidential reasons in active cases and protect those recorded on the tapes.

Before the law, release of such material was left to the discretion of various law enforcement agencies. Under Faircloth’s measure, anyone recorded in a law enforcement video can ask to see it and, if denied, to appeal to the decision to Superior Court.

As the bill moved through committee in the General Assembly, a provision was added that allowed anyone to seek release of a video if there is a “compelling public interest” in it, which was the argument in the WFAE case.

In a parallel case, Superior Court Judge Lisa Bell on Monday ordered the release of video in another police shooting requested by The Charlotte Observer. It is expected to be made public soon.

Faircloth said there have been few cases under the new law and legislators may look at it during the next session to see whether further tweaks are needed.

Jonathan Jones, director of the North Carolina Open Government Coalition and Sunshine Center based at Elon University, said he is troubled by the law’s provision for “compelling public interest.”

“It’s a very high standard,” Jones said, making it more difficult for the public to gain access to the videos. “If they were looking to make it easier for the public, they would have made the law say that videos are taken in a place where there’s no presumption of privacy.”

©2017 The Charlotte Observer


Videos: Charlotte police fatally shoot bus gunman

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

By Fred Clasen-Kelly and Mark Washburn The Charlotte Observer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Body and dashboard camera video showing police killing an armed teenage suspect in a June 2016 confrontation near University City was released Thursday under the first test of a new state law for making public such material.

Footage matched the narrative given by authorities after the shooting: That Rodney Rodriguez Smith, after wounding a rival aboard a CATS bus, fired at responding officers while fleeing from them, and they fired multiple shots in return.

From different vantage points, the six videos showed the search for a man who’d fired aboard the bus.

From his body camera, Officer Garret Tryon can be seen searching in the dark for a suspect, then pulling in and calling out seven times, “Drop the gun!” A fusillade of shots follow, then Tryon orders the man four more times to drop the gun. Then came four more shots.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Tryon tells another officer at the scene, “He shot at me.”

Release of the video reflected the policy declared by CMPD Chief Kerr Putney in September toward more transparency in conflicts between police and the public.

It also represented a legal milestone in the public’s right to gain access to police video because it was the first time a court approved a petition under North Carolina’s new law requiring judicial approval to release police dashcam and body camera video.

Legal milestone

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police and the city of Charlotte did not oppose the request this month for release of the video, brought by WFAE-FM (NPR, 90.7) reporter Lisa Worf.

But attorneys for the two officers in the shooting – Michael Bell and Tryon, who were cleared of criminal wrongdoing by prosecutors and are back at work – argued this month in court that the footage should not be released because of the possibility of inflaming the public and inciting someone to seek revenge.

“Another person killed by police – that’s the narrative,” said attorney Jeremy Smith, who represented Tryon. “They could seek retribution. Officers have enough to deal with.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

But Superior Court Judge Jesse Caldwell ruled Jan. 12 that there was a compelling public interest in demonstrating how the officers handled the circumstances and ordered the tapes to be released.

He said the nation’s attention is focused on the killings of minorities at the hands of police officers. He said he strongly doubted the release of the video posed a threat to the officers safety since so much time had passed since the shooting.

Shooting on bus

After an investigation into the shooting, authorities gave this account of what happened:

Police were alerted to a shooting aboard at CATS bus on the night of June 2, 2016. Officers Tryon and Bell arrived in separate cars at the scene on North Tryon Street near University City.

Tryon told investigators he saw Smith walking along the street holding something in his waistband. Tryon said he repeatedly ordered Smith to show his hands.

Smith clutched something from his waistband, Tryon said. Bell, who had just arrived, said he saw Smith holding a handgun. Smith fired at Tryon, police said, and both officers returned fire.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

“I got out of the car I went to about the front bumper of my own car and drew my weapon and focused on him,” Bell told investigators. “I took two or three breaths just to gather myself and steady my aim and I remember thinking the whole time, ‘Tryon, if you don’t shoot him you’re gonna die.’ And as I’m getting out of the car I looked at Tryon, Tryon’s pointing at him, yelling at him, ‘Show me your hands.’”

Smith ran up an embankment after the officers fired, an investigative report said. He raised his right hand, which Tryon said was still gripping the weapon, and Tryon fired three to four more shots. An image from Bell’s body camera showed Smith pointing what the report said was a gun at Tryon.

Smith was shot five times. District Attorney Andrew Murray concluded that deadly force was justified because the officers were defending themselves.

An image recovered later from a camera on the CATS bus shows a man identified as Smith seated with a handgun. A second image shows him pointing a gun before the passenger, a man with whom Smith had a long-term dispute, was shot from behind.

Family questions

Though not a party to the court action to release the video, Smith’s grandparents have said they had unresolved questions: Why did police shoot Smith so many times? Was he threatening officers with a gun or was he holding a cellphone or something else? They said wanted to see the video to erase those doubts.

They raised Smith and said he had trouble in school. He suffered from Attention Deficit Disorder and mental illness.

Woodard said she questioned the official account because word had spread that Smith sent his girlfriend a text about the same time as the shooting.

“How could all this be going on if he’s texting his girlfriend?” Woodard asked.

Legal challenge

On Oct. 1, a new state law regulating release of police videos went into effect. It called for police to get a court order to release video from dashboard cameras or body cameras and allowed courts to deny such requests for a number of factors including potential interference to an active investigation or disclosing information that could “harm the reputation or jeopardize the safety of a person.”

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Supporters of the law say it balances citizens’ right to know with the interest of police. Opponents say the added restriction undermines transparency and public accountability.

A request from Worf and WFAE for police video in the Smith case was denied by Superior Court Judge Eric Levinson in November because it was before the district attorney’s office resolved whether the shooting was justified. Murray announced Dec. 12, 2016 that a review by his office found the officers had acted in self defense, and Worf returned to court this month seeking the video.

Unlike the first time she requested the video, CMPD supported its release. Mark Newbold, a CMPD attorney, said there was no longer a need to keep the video sealed from public view since prosecutors had finished reviewing evidence.

Newbold indicated CMPD would be supporting the release of other videos in the future because, he said, the need for transparency trumps other concerns. He said releasing video could dispel rumors and misinformation, which many blame for the protests that roiled the city following the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in September 2016.

“In keeping with department protocol, we do not oppose the release of video evidence after a case has been thoroughly investigated and adjudicated,” CMPD said in a statement Thursday with the video release. “Our preference is to always allow for a thorough investigation with the intent to have all sides presented.”

More transparency

Greg Collard, WFAE’s news director, said he hopes the case will encourage other judges to lean toward transparency in future cases.

Collard said the Smith case stood out from other police shootings because officers fired more than 20 shots from different angles. Release of the videos would help the public understand Murray’s decision to not pursue charges against the officers, Collard said.

“Part of our job is to advocate for the public,” he said. “That’s the role of journalism.”

Balance of protection

Sponsoring the new law on release of videos was state Rep. John Faircloth, R-High Point. He said the intent of the law was to protect police videos for evidential reasons in active cases and protect those recorded on the tapes.

Before the law, release of such material was left to the discretion of various law enforcement agencies. Under Faircloth’s measure, anyone recorded in a law enforcement video can ask to see it and, if denied, to appeal to the decision to Superior Court.

As the bill moved through committee in the General Assembly, a provision was added that allowed anyone to seek release of a video if there is a “compelling public interest” in it, which was the argument in the WFAE case.

In a parallel case, Superior Court Judge Lisa Bell on Monday ordered the release of video in another police shooting requested by The Charlotte Observer. It is expected to be made public soon.

Faircloth said there have been few cases under the new law and legislators may look at it during the next session to see whether further tweaks are needed.

Jonathan Jones, director of the North Carolina Open Government Coalition and Sunshine Center based at Elon University, said he is troubled by the law’s provision for “compelling public interest.”

“It’s a very high standard,” Jones said, making it more difficult for the public to gain access to the videos. “If they were looking to make it easier for the public, they would have made the law say that videos are taken in a place where there’s no presumption of privacy.”

©2017 The Charlotte Observer


5 programs actively reducing recidivism rates

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Megan Wells, PoliceOne Contributor

The United States has the highest population of incarcerated individuals in the world, and as you can imagine, the cost of maintaining a prison population of this size is massive.

For the year 2015, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that an estimated 6,741,400 total persons were supervised by the US adult correctional system or approximately 1 in 37 adults. The budget to maintain the prison population is around $74 billion. Unfortunately, the data indicates that individuals who have been released often end up being incarcerated again.

A comprehensive study conducted in 2005 found that over two-thirds of released prisoners were arrested again within 3 years and over three-fourths were arrested again within 5 years.

With statistics like these, it is increasingly important to get creative in order to reduce recidivism. Reducing the recidivism rate nationally could offer numerous benefits. Here are five programs that succeed in guiding released prisoners to new paths.

1. Prison Entrepreneurship Program (PEP)

The Prison Entrepreneurship Program is a nonprofit organization that connects released felons with executives and entrepreneurs. This re-entry program focuses on teaching leadership and innovation skills. Since the program began in 2004, there have been over 1,300 graduates who begun careers with starting wages 60 percent higher than the minimum wage and almost 100 percent are still employed 12 months after their release.

Most importantly, the recidivism rate for graduates is below 7 percent, which is far below the national average.

2. Community Bridges FACT Team

Statistics show that up to half of our prison population suffers from mental illness. Community Bridges in the Phoenix area offers help to individuals in a variety of ways like coordinating treatments plans and/or locating housing options. the FACT team also helps their clients secure benefits and employment.

The program has reduced in the number of arrests, incarceration days and hospitalizations of participants. As of January 2015, the program had an 85 percent success rate in preventing its clients from returning to jail.

3. Delancey Street Foundation

The Delancey Street Foundation is a residential self-help program dedicated to assisting drug addicts, ex-convicts, ex-gang members, and homeless individuals. Delancey Street provides residents with skills that can be used in a job market and education that makes employment possible. Since its founding 40 years ago, over 10,000 men and women have graduated into society as taxpaying citizens leading successful lives. Along with recidivism, other risk factors have been substantially reduced for participants, including drug use, and overall well-being.

4. SAFER Foundation

The Safer Foundation has been operating for over 44 years in the state of Illinois and has always focused on helping individuals with criminal records and reducing recidivism. According to Loyola University in Chicago, participants in the program that have achieved employment upon re-entering society are 58 percent less likely to return to prison than without the help of SAFER.

Through their programs, SAFER helps over 300 individuals earn their GED annually; they have a network of over 400 employers that hire participants and they were able to match 4,200 individuals to positions in 2014.

Their PACE Program begins by offering a curriculum within the Cook County Department of Corrections and upon release; SAFER provides housing, training and employment assistance.

5. The Last Mile

This program is based out of San Quentin State Prison in California. The Last Mile teaches prisoners about technology, digital commutation, and business. The Last Mile offers a program called Code.7370 where students are taught computer code. In 2015, the inmates were offered actual entry-level front-end coding positions from companies outside the prison walls. Programs like the ones San Quentin prison leads have as low as a 7.1 percent recidivism rate.

Recidivism comes with a high price tag. Lessening our prison population by lowering recidivism rates has the potential to decrease the current cost of the prison system.


5 programs actively reducing recidivism rates

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Megan Wells, PoliceOne Contributor

The United States has the highest population of incarcerated individuals in the world, and as you can imagine, the cost of maintaining a prison population of this size is massive.

For the year 2015, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that an estimated 6,741,400 total persons were supervised by the US adult correctional system or approximately 1 in 37 adults. The budget to maintain the prison population is around $74 billion. Unfortunately, the data indicates that individuals who have been released often end up being incarcerated again.

A comprehensive study conducted in 2005 found that over two-thirds of released prisoners were arrested again within 3 years and over three-fourths were arrested again within 5 years.

With statistics like these, it is increasingly important to get creative in order to reduce recidivism. Reducing the recidivism rate nationally could offer numerous benefits. Here are five programs that succeed in guiding released prisoners to new paths.

1. Prison Entrepreneurship Program (PEP)

The Prison Entrepreneurship Program is a nonprofit organization that connects released felons with executives and entrepreneurs. This re-entry program focuses on teaching leadership and innovation skills. Since the program began in 2004, there have been over 1,300 graduates who begun careers with starting wages 60 percent higher than the minimum wage and almost 100 percent are still employed 12 months after their release.

Most importantly, the recidivism rate for graduates is below 7 percent, which is far below the national average.

2. Community Bridges FACT Team

Statistics show that up to half of our prison population suffers from mental illness. Community Bridges in the Phoenix area offers help to individuals in a variety of ways like coordinating treatments plans and/or locating housing options. the FACT team also helps their clients secure benefits and employment.

The program has reduced in the number of arrests, incarceration days and hospitalizations of participants. As of January 2015, the program had an 85 percent success rate in preventing its clients from returning to jail.

3. Delancey Street Foundation

The Delancey Street Foundation is a residential self-help program dedicated to assisting drug addicts, ex-convicts, ex-gang members, and homeless individuals. Delancey Street provides residents with skills that can be used in a job market and education that makes employment possible. Since its founding 40 years ago, over 10,000 men and women have graduated into society as taxpaying citizens leading successful lives. Along with recidivism, other risk factors have been substantially reduced for participants, including drug use, and overall well-being.

4. SAFER Foundation

The Safer Foundation has been operating for over 44 years in the state of Illinois and has always focused on helping individuals with criminal records and reducing recidivism. According to Loyola University in Chicago, participants in the program that have achieved employment upon re-entering society are 58 percent less likely to return to prison than without the help of SAFER.

Through their programs, SAFER helps over 300 individuals earn their GED annually; they have a network of over 400 employers that hire participants and they were able to match 4,200 individuals to positions in 2014.

Their PACE Program begins by offering a curriculum within the Cook County Department of Corrections and upon release; SAFER provides housing, training and employment assistance.

5. The Last Mile

This program is based out of San Quentin State Prison in California. The Last Mile teaches prisoners about technology, digital commutation, and business. The Last Mile offers a program called Code.7370 where students are taught computer code. In 2015, the inmates were offered actual entry-level front-end coding positions from companies outside the prison walls. Programs like the ones San Quentin prison leads have as low as a 7.1 percent recidivism rate.

Recidivism comes with a high price tag. Lessening our prison population by lowering recidivism rates has the potential to decrease the current cost of the prison system.


Man fights speeding ticket with deer defense

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

NEWBURYPORT, Mass. — A Massachusetts man fighting a speeding ticket in court had a unique explanation — the officer's radar gun may have picked up a deer.

The Newburyport Daily News reports that Dennis Sayers, of Haverhill, was clocked going 40 mph in 30 mph zone in West Newbury in November.

He got a $105 ticket.

He appealed in court on Thursday, asking Officer Royster Johnson if he was 100 percent sure his radar captured Sayers' speed or the speed of a deer that could have been in the vicinity.

When confronted by the skeptical judge, Sayers replied that anything was possible.

The fine was upheld.

Deer, by the way, can run approximately 30 mph.


Want to track cellphones? Get a warrant, lawmakers say

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Dave Collins Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. — Law enforcement cellphone tracking devices are coming under scrutiny in several states, where lawmakers have introduced proposals ranging from warrant requirements to an outright ban on the technology.

Privacy and constitutional concerns, including Fourth Amendment search and seizure violations, are being cited with the proposed laws on cell-site simulators.

The suitcase-size devices, widely known under the brand name Stingray, mimic cellphone towers and allow law enforcement to collect unique subscriber numbers and other basic data from cellphones in a particular area. The data can help police determine the location of a targeted phone — and phones of innocent bystanders — in real time without the users even making calls or sending text messages.

Law enforcement officials say the devices are vital in helping to find suspects and victims, and to solve crimes.

At least 13 states already require warrants to track cellphones in real time: California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Utah and Virginia.

Federal law enforcement officers also must get warrants, under policies put in place in 2015 by the departments of Justice and Homeland Security.

Courts around the country, meanwhile, have issued conflicting opinions about whether warrants are needed for cellphone location data, leading to a hodgepodge of rules.

Bills addressing use of the devices are now pending in at least eight states, according to a review by The Associated Press. Most of them would require police to get warrants. One bill, introduced by South Carolina state Rep. J. Todd Rutherford, would ban the purchase and use of cell-site simulators by law enforcement.

"I think most people would be offended if they knew exactly how much surveillance the government is doing," said Rutherford, a Democrat from Columbia who is the House minority leader and a criminal defense lawyer. "It's got to stop somewhere."

Rutherford isn't even sure if any police agencies in his state are using the simulators. Many state and local law enforcement agencies sign nondisclosure agreements with the device manufacturer.

The American Civil Liberties Union says it has identified 70 law enforcement agencies in 23 states and the District of Columbia that own cell-site simulators. But the actual number may be much higher because many agencies keep their use of the devices secret, the ACLU said.

This year, lawmakers in at least six states are proposing bills to require warrants to use cellphone surveillance devices: Connecticut, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York and Oregon. A California bill would require local governments to approve the use of cell-site simulators and other surveillance technology.

In Connecticut, state Rep. Rob Sampson introduced a bill to require warrants, with exceptions for terrorism and other life-and-death situations.

"A cellphone is an individual's private property and law enforcement has no right monitoring activity on these devices unless there is strong reason to believe the individual is engaging in illegal activity," the Wolcott Republican said.

It also isn't clear whether any police agencies in Connecticut are using cell-site simulators. State police, Hartford police and New Haven police say they don't use the devices. Police in Bridgeport said they do not comment on their surveillance technology.

Last month, the U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee issued a report calling for clearer guidelines.

"There's still a real pressing need for states to regulate this technology," said Nathan Freed Wessler, staff attorney for the ACLU's speech, privacy and technology project. "These devices are extraordinarily powerful and invasive. They can very precisely track where people's phones are, and knowing where someone's phone is can tell you a lot about them."


Suspect in Orlando officer’s death will act as own lawyer

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Mike Schneider Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — A man suspected in the killings of his pregnant ex-girlfriend and an Orlando police officer is insisting on defending himself against murder charges. Markeith Loyd made the decision in court on Thursday despite repeated warnings from a judge that it's a bad idea.

Judge Frederick Lauten warned Loyd that it's almost always unwise to represent oneself, and said Loyd would have only limited legal resources available while awaiting his trial in jail on no bond.

However, the judge said Loyd appeared competent to make that decision.

Loyd is facing two first-degree murder counts and a host of other charges related to the deaths of his ex-girlfriend and Lt. Debra Clayton.

He cursed and interrupted judges in three previous court appearances from jail, but appeared subdued during Thursday's hearing.


Spotlight: Thin Blue Line Reporting creates cutting-edge mobile solutions for the LE community

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Sponsors

Company Name: Thin Blue Line Reporting Headquarters: Claremont, Calif. Signature Product: A mobile app officers can use to create reports and issue citations on tablet devices Website: http://www.thinbluereports.com/

1. Where did your company name originate from?

Thin Blue Line Reporting (a TBL Systems company) was conceived by DOD systems integration engineers and Law Enforcement professionals.

2. What was the inspiration behind starting your company?

The Law Enforcement professionals were frustrated by the many expensive and difficult to deploy technologies available to them. The engineers came up with a solution that we are excited to be a part of.

3. What is your signature product and how does it work?

eCitation, Mobile Reporting and Digital Evidence.

An application can be downloaded on an iPhone or iPad. Modules such as eCitation, Crash Reporting, Tow Forms, Case Reporting and/or Digital Evidence Management are distributed to each account as needed. A CJIS compliant web-based database (cloud or on-premise) is then created to house and disseminate all repot data using TBL’s proprietary RESTful API. Reports can also be generated, edited, quality controlled and reviewed in the portal allowing for rapid creation of reports and adjudication of cases. Courts and Prosecuting Attorneys can also access appropriate information in the portal.

4. Why do you believe your products are essential to the Police community?

Law Enforcement technology is comprised of many types of technologies that don’t communicate well or at all. Additionally, mobility has been limited historically, due in large part to CJIS Security Policies prior to 2013. Many Law Enforcement activities are mobile in nature and require more nimble and scalable tools that are newer and easier to deploy.

5. What has been the biggest challenge your company has faced?

The biggest challenge has been the reluctance of some in the LE community to consider the significant benefits of updated mobile platforms. There are, however, a very large number of leaders within the law enforcement family that see the benefits and have adopted the TBL platform.

6. What makes your company unique?

We have a unique mix of capabilities that derive from within law enforcement as well as a very talented technical team. We also look at our work as a calling and are not simply here to make a living. We are passionate about truly enabling officers with better tools to protect the public, increase officer safety and reduce data errors.

7. What do your customers like best about you and your products?

Ease of use and simple, yet robust interfaces. Traffic and Patrol officers tell us all the time that they like the ability to clear accidents and create reports faster than before.

8. What is the most rewarding part of serving the first responder community?

The most rewarding part of our jobs is interacting with law enforcement professionals, from officer to Chief, on a daily basis. We are heartened to be providing the best available technology to our first responders!

9. Do you support any charitable organizations within public safety?

We support the 100 Club and various First Responder charities across the country. We believe in giving back to the officers and families that sacrifice so much.

10. Is there any fun fact or trivia that you’d like to share with our users about you or your company?

We are working on a program to bring autonomous drones from DOD only to the civilian law enforcement community. It’s a very interesting project and we are excited about it.

11. What’s next for your company? Any upcoming new projects or initiatives?

We just launched the iPhone version of the app which lowers the cost of deployment for departments and allows leverage of a tool that we all use. We will be announcing an embedded MDC hardware platform with the leading police vehicle manufacturer in the U.S. Stay tuned for details!


Va. GOP proposes ‘enormous’ raise for state police

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: PoliceOne Sponsors

By Travis Fain Daily Press

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. — Legislative budget writers will include $6,000 raises for Virginia State Police and a 3 percent pay bump for general state employees in their budget rewrite, they announced Wednesday.

The police increase will address concerns that the agency has been losing troopers to better paying local police jobs. Wayne Huggins, head of the Virginia State Police Association, called the raises "enormous."

Local deputies will also get pay increases aimed at addressing compression issues in sheriff's office pay scales. Local teachers will not be included in the legislature's plans for raises, though local systems may get funding with enough flexibility to use state funds to help cover raises already paid out of local funds, House Appropriations Chairman S. Chris Jones said.

All but about a dozen systems in the state have already boosted teacher salaries, said Jones, R-Suffolk. Teachers from across the state demonstrated at the statehouse earlier this week, though, calling for state raises.

Jones and other budget writers, including Senate Finance Co-Chairmen Thomas K. "Tommy" Norment and Emmett Hanger, acknowledged that there will be cuts elsewhere in the state budget to pay for these raises, but those details may not be released for another week and a half. The boosts won't rely on tax increases, and the state won't raise it's annual revenue estimate to inflate the budget beyond totals Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced in Virginia, Republican budget writers said.

Rising monthly revenues, after tax collections last year came in lower than expected, have boosted confidence in the overall health of the state's two year spending plan, though.

The raises will be paid with the first paychecks of July, Jones said. Unlike raises placed in the budget last year, then cut, there's no trigger rolling back these raises if the state doesn't hit revenue targets.

Addressing state police pay was a top issue for the Republican majority in the legislature, and providing a pay increase for other state employees was a priority as well. McAuliffe had proposed a one-time bonus in December, but that was rejected in favor of the permanent increases.

Law enforcement salary issues are coming to a head for state leaders, even as budget writers look for the cuts to fill a revenue hole.

The head of the Virginia State Police has told legislators that troopers are leaving the force in big numbers for better paying jobs, including jobs at local departments.

The starting salary for state police, now about $36,200 a year, will increase to $43,000. Pay steps above that will also increase about $6,000, with the 3 percent raises added in on top of that.

Legislation that would have increased annual vehicle registration fees by $1.25, with the money earmarked for state police, has been killed off as a result.

Hanger, R-Mount Solon, said there will be "unmet needs" in the budget, in part because of efforts to identify funding for raises, but funding for mental health reform will remain a priority.

Hanger also said that the legislature will stick with the governor's schedule for the state's Accelerated Sales Tax program, which requires businesses to remit sales taxes early each June, the last month of the fiscal year. That gives the state an end-of-the-year revenue boost, but is widely considered a budgeting gimmick and is not popular with retailers.

Other details of the budget House and Senate leaders have been crafting will be rolled out February 5, commonly referred to as "Budget Sunday" at the statehouse. ___ (c)2017 the Daily Press (Newport News, Va.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


Calif. police see dangers in Trump’s immigration plan

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: PoliceOne Members

By Cindy Chang, Paloma Esquivel and Maya Lau Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — President Donald Trump’s plan to enlist local police and sheriff’s departments in immigration enforcement has set the stage for a pitched battle with California officials who have long prioritized building ties with immigrant communities.

Trump’s plan, which was issued Wednesday as part of a pair of executive orders, seeks to broaden the reach of federal immigration authorities into county jails.

It also calls for empowering police officers and deputies to act as immigration enforcers, leaving open the possibility that they would be required to inquire about the immigration status of the people they encounter on the streets.

Such a regime could conflict with the Los Angeles Police Department’s decades-old policy that prohibits officers from initiating contact with a person solely to ask about whether he or she is in the country legally.

Local governments that defy the Trump administration’s immigration policies by acting as “sanctuary cities” could be denied federal funding, one of the executive orders states.

More than 400 jurisdictions across the country, including Los Angeles, San Francisco and about 40 others in California, have such policies protecting immigrants.

California state officials have signaled that they will put up a fight. The California Legislature has selected former U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. to serve as outside counsel on the state’s legal strategy for dealing with the incoming administration.

The state’s new attorney general, former congressman Xavier Becerra, said at his swearing-in Tuesday that he will form a united front with officials from other states to defend their policies against any federal challenges.

Hours after Trump signed the executive orders, Los Angeles leaders suggested they would mount a legal challenge if funding is taken away.

L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti told reporters Wednesday that he doesn’t believe the federal government can cut off funding to Los Angeles, citing the 10th Amendment, which addresses the powers of state and federal governments.

“We feel very strong the legal case is clear,” Garcetti said.

The particulars of Trump’s orders are still being dissected by Los Angeles leaders. But City Council President Herb Wesson told reporters that “the city is going to continue to operate the way it operates.”

Los Angeles will receive about $500 million this fiscal year from the federal government to pay for an array of services, including port security, anti-gang programs and services for senior citizens.

That doesn’t include federal funding that flows to entities such as the Los Angeles Unified School District or Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority.

“It would be folly for any administration to take away funds to protect America’s port,” Garcetti said. “Or take away vouchers that help get veterans who have fought for our country off the street.”

Shortly after Trump’s election, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck announced that he would not work with federal authorities on deportation efforts.

“We have built relationships by effective law enforcement that doesn’t focus on where a person was born or the color of their skin. And we don’t intend to change that,” Beck said Wednesday.

Trump’s plan for local jails involves reinstating a program called Secure Communities, which asks jail officials to hand inmates over to federal immigration authorities up to 48 hours past when the inmate would otherwise have been released. Federal authorities can ask for inmates who have committed only immigration violations, in addition to those with serious criminal records.

In 2013, California passed the Trust Act, which limited jail officials’ ability to cooperate with federal immigration requests to only those inmates who have been convicted of “serious” or “violent” crimes.

In 2014, after a federal court held an Oregon county liable for damages for holding an inmate beyond her release date at the request of immigration authorities, hundreds of cities and counties around the country stopped complying with many immigration hold requests.

Later that year, then-President Barack Obama ended the Secure Communities program, creating a new jail program that focused only on inmates convicted of “significant” criminal offenses or who posed a danger to public safety.

The return of Secure Communities could mean that California sheriffs would have to choose between state law and federal law.

Los Angeles County and Orange County sheriff’s officials said Wednesday that the president’s executive order likely won’t have any immediate effect on how they do business.

Federal immigration agents are inside the Los Angeles County jails “almost on a daily basis,” said Assistant Sheriff Kelly Harrington, head of the Sheriff’s Department’s custody division, speaking to the county Board of Supervisors earlier this month.

If the agents want access to an inmate, sheriff’s officials vet the name to ensure that the person has been charged with or convicted of a serious or violent crime, in accordance with the Trust Act, Harrington said.

Sheriff Jim McDonnell said in a statement Wednesday that Trump’s order would not “change the mission” of his department, which he said would continue to follow the Trust Act and other state immigration law.

“Our department policy clearly states that our deputies do not ask for one’s immigration status,” he said. “Immigration enforcement remains a federal responsibility.”

At the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, officials are conferring with attorneys to figure out the new landscape

“What the future looks like a few weeks out, we will talk to county counsel about. But today, nothing is changing,” said Lt. Mark Stichter, public information officer for the Orange County Sheriff’s Department.

Neither the L.A. County nor Orange County sheriff’s departments permit their deputies to initiate contact with anyone solely on the basis of a suspected immigration violation.

Deputies cannot question a suspect about immigration status even if the person was stopped for another reason, officials from both agencies said.

“We do not conduct or participate in any immigration enforcement,” Stichter said.

Kern County Sheriff Donny Youngblood, a critic of the Trust Act who once vowed to defy the law, said in an interview Wednesday that he was still reviewing the administration’s orders and that it would take some time to sort out the implications. But he is concerned about a possible clash between the state and federal governments over immigration enforcement.

When state and federal laws aren’t in sync, he said, law enforcement is “in the crosshairs.”

“We’re trying to avoid being in the middle,” he said.

Youngblood, who worked around limits on immigration holds by letting federal immigration agents into his jails and giving them access to arrest records, said his deputies are not immigration agents and “are not in the business of immigration.” They do not ask about immigration status after an arrest.

Hiroshi Motomura, an expert in immigration law at the University of California, Los Angeles, said that despite the tough rhetoric in Wednesday’s White House announcement, there are constitutional and other legal limits on how much the federal government can punish states and cities that don’t go along with its priorities.

“The federal government can’t take over state and local governments,” Motomura said. “You have a lot of federal vehicles to facilitate cooperation by state and local governments. But there are limits on the federal government’s ability to force cooperation.”

Chris Newman, an attorney for the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, was involved in legal challenges to oppose Secure Communities under the Obama administration.

He said the policies announced by Trump sounded “eerily similar” to those enacted in the first years of Obama’s presidency. Those policies, he said, led to a backlash in many communities in California, which eventually adopted the Trust Act.

Newman predicts a similar backlash in response to Trump’s crackdown on illegal immigration.

“The idea of a return to Secure Communities combined with Trump’s racist rhetoric will likely inspire more sanctuary policies,” he said.

(Times staff writers Dakota Smith and Ruben Vives contributed to this report.)

Copyright 2017 Los Angeles Times


P1 Photo of the Week: Going above and beyond

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Members

Detroit Lakes Police Chief Steven Tood snapped this photo of Officer Wayne Tolbert. Tolbert stopped to help a stranded driver in -18 degree weather with a 37 degree windchill.

Calling all police photographers! PoliceOne needs pictures of you in action or training. Submit a photo — it could be selected as our Photo of the Week! Be sure to include your name, department information and address (including city, state and ZIP code) where we can reach you — Photo of the Week winners have a chance to win a PoliceOne.com T-shirt!


Miss. senate passes ‘Blue Lives’ bill, House eyes alternate plan

Posted on January 27, 2017 by in POLICE

Author: PoliceOne Members

By Jeff Amy Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. — A bill that would double penalties for crimes targeting police officers, firefighters and medics passed the Mississippi Senate by a 37-13 vote Thursday, despite impassioned cries against it from African-American senators.

Senate Bill 2469, a "Blue Lives Matter" proposal that moves onto the House, says any crime committed against emergency personnel because of their status as police officers, firefighters or emergency medical technicians would be a hate crime. State law currently doubles penalties for targeting people because of race, ethnicity, religion or gender.

Though there have long been enhanced penalties for certain crimes against police and others, the idea that a hate crimes law could cover someone because of their occupation and not because of intrinsic qualities is a new innovation that only sprung up after shootings of police officers last year in Dallas and Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

"This is a response to law enforcement being shot down for nothing more than putting on their uniform and wearing the badge," said Sen. Sean Tindell, R-Gulfport, the bill's lead sponsor.

The measure drew opposition from African-American senators. Some warned they feared that police would use the heavy penalties as a shield to abuse black men.

"If we pass this law, it will only embolden those law enforcement officers who hold a grudge, who don't like people," said Sen. John Horhn, D-Jackson.

There was also a general concern that supporters were trying to change the terms of the national conversation from police violence against African-Americans to supporting police.

"I think this bill is another way that you can target black males," said Sen. Barbara Blackmon, D-Canton.

She said her two teenage sons had been stopped unreasonably by police, just because they were young, black and driving nice vehicles. She said she and her husband, Rep. Ed Blackmon, had to teach their sons to be submissive to police.

"You haven't walked in our shoes," Blackmon told white senators. "You haven't experienced that. Our concern is our child making it home after having been stopped by law enforcement."

The House Judiciary B Committee sent a separate proposal to the full House Thursday. House Bill 645 would triple penalties against anyone who commits a violent crime against emergency personnel. Unlike the hate crime bill, it doesn't require prosecutors to prove intent. However, it wouldn't apply to crimes that some skeptics of the bills had worried could be used to impose harsh penalties on protesters, such as resisting arrest.


How responding officers are affected by terrorist attacks

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

Olivia Johnson
Author: Olivia Johnson

September 11, 2001, marked the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil. Since this date, attacks like the Boston Marathon bombing, the Orlando nightclub shooting, and the San Bernardino attack were so horrific we remember them like yesterday.

These domestic terror attacks are fresh in our minds because of the continual reporting of stories, sharing of graphic images, and because we are still seeking to learn from these horrific attacks to prevent future occurrences. Images capturing desperate people jumping from the Twin Towers to escape immense heat and flames to lifeless children carried from the rubble of the Murrah Federal Building in the arms of first responders can never be forgotten. They are permanently etched in our minds.

Side effects of exposure

Despite how disturbing these incidents are to those who observe from afar, these graphic images do not affect the casual viewer the same way they do those who viewed these incidents on the front lines. A once peaceful world is quickly brought into focus once an officer graduates the academy and hits the street. This reality was seen during the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013 and during the subsequent shootout with the attackers on April 19, 2013.

It is impossible to predict how the aftermath of this type of attack will affect first responders on an individual level – everyone reacts to trauma differently – but there are both short and long-term effects that can occur. These effects are physical, emotional and psychological. In fact, 20 years after the Oklahoma City Bombing, survivors are still coming forward for mental health assistance and “…nearly one in four survivors has markers for PTSD.”

The critical incident

Critical incidents are major stressors for law enforcement, according to a 2002 study on “Routine Occupational Stress and Psychological Distress in Police.”.

Yet, many officers believe they are fully prepared for whatever the streets throw at them. The truth, however, remains that there is no amount of training, education or life experience that can fully prepare an officer for critical incidents which are, according to Kulbarsh, those “… abrupt, powerful events that fall outside the range of ordinary human experiences.” These incidents have such a dynamic impact that regular coping skills no longer suffice, leaving an officer in a downward tailspin. This can seem like a dark, lonely place and can lead some to believe they are losing it or that they may never get better. Often, the officer tries desperately to fix him or herself, often believing they are suffering alone.

First responders are required to deal with death, destruction and human misery. However, there is a difference between dealing with natural versus manmade events, even if both have life-changing outcomes. Terrorists hide behind false narratives, anti-terroristic slogans and deceptive rhetoric. They believe taking the lives of the innocent is justified because of social, religious and/or political injustice. Officers, like many first responders and survivors of these attacks, are left to pick up the pieces. Sadly, many of our heroes are unaware at that moment that their own lives have been shattered in some way.

The aftermath

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the aftermath of the critical incident can present in numerous ways and in varying degrees and severities. This chart below is a compilation of common signs and symptoms associated with critical incident stress. However, this is not an exhaustive list.

Physical

Cognitive

Emotional

Behavioral

Fatigue

Uncertainty

Grief

Inability to rest

Chills

Confusion

Fear

Withdrawal

Unusual thirst

Nightmares

Guilt

Antisocial behavior

Chest pain

Poor attention and decision making ability

Intense anger

Increased alcohol consumption

Headaches

Poor concentration, memory

Apprehension and depression

Change in communications

Dizziness

Poor problem solving ability

Chronic anxiety

Loss/increase appetite

The majority of first responders exposed to a critical incident experience signs and symptoms within the first 24 hours. However, about half will not experience immediate symptomology. Rather, these officers may see noticeable changes days or even weeks after the incident. Some will even experience symptoms years after the initiating event. The lack of immediacy in symptomology can leave many confused as to what is happening or perplexed by the actual cause of the signs being presented.

The sad reality remains that even one event, like that of 9/11, leaves thousands to suffer. The aftermath still reverberates today. According to the Officer Down Memorial Page, in the 15 years since the 9/11 attacks, 181 officers have lost their lives. Of these, 72 were killed at Ground Zero and 109 have passed away due to 9/11 related illnesses. The number of deaths due to 9/11 related health issues is expected to rise.

Combating terrorism is a huge undertaking and a fight that will continue for many years. However, we must not forget to protect our first responders in any way we can. Harmful exposure to these attacks can be limited by sound mental health prior to events, training in disaster preparedness, limiting on-scene exposure, maintaining adequate sleep and limiting work shifts, providing critical incident stress debriefings, and most importantly providing adequate availability to mental health practitioners and resources.


Philly mayor: Trump’s murder surge claim is insult to cops

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Larry Rosenthal Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — President Donald Trump made a misleading claim when he told Republican lawmakers Thursday that Philadelphia's murder rate has been "terribly increasing."

Last year, the city logged 277 homicides. That was a slight decline from 2015, when the city had 280 homicides.

The numbers were up from 2013 and 2014. But in previous decades the homicide totals nearly always exceeded 300, and reached 500 in 1990. The city's population has remained relatively stable over that time.

Trump's full comments at the GOP meeting were: "Here in Philadelphia, the murder rate has been steady — I mean just terribly increasing."

It is true that the 27 homicides recorded for the month through Wednesday were the highest total for January since 2012. But a single month's numbers can't be used to predict how a year will end up.

Mayor Jim Kenney, a Democrat, called the president's statement "an insult to the men and women of the Philadelphia police force."


Trump’s tweet sends Chicago police scrambling to figure out its meaning

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Jason Meisner, Annie Sweeney and Jeremy Gorner Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — The roots of Chicago's gun violence epidemic are so deep and multifaceted that experts have long said law enforcement alone can't solve it.

But in 24 characters of a tweet sent Tuesday night, President Donald Trump proposed his solution if Chicago can't reduce the violence.

"I will send in the Feds!" Trump, who campaigned on a law-and-order platform, tweeted Tuesday night in a post that also quoted data on Chicago shootings published by the Tribune this week.

What exactly the president meant by the vague missive was a matter of open debate for hours Wednesday as law enforcement agencies scrambled to read between the lines and decide how — or even if — to respond.

Was Trump talking about delivering more federal aid to the Chicago Police Department? Would he send more resources to the FBI or other federal agencies that already have been working on the problem for years? Or did he intend to send in the National Guard?

"The statement is so broad. I have no idea what he's talking about," Chicago police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said.

At the White House daily briefing Wednesday afternoon, press secretary Sean Spicer sought to clarify Trump's remark, telling reporters that the president was upset about "turning on the television and seeing Americans get killed by shootings."

But Spicer gave no indication the president was close to ordering in troops.

"What he wants to do is provide the resources of the federal government, and it can span a bunch of things," Spicer said. "There's no one thing. There can be aid, if it was requested up through the governor, through the proper channels, that the federal government can provide on a law enforcement basis."

The Tuesday tweet was not the first time Trump had used his favorite social media platform to jab at Chicago's homicide rate or imply that Mayor Rahm Emanuel needed help. But it was the president's first direct comment on the issue since a stinging report from the U.S. Department of Justice released Jan. 13 that found Chicago police routinely used excessive force and violated the civil rights of citizens, particularly in the mostly minority communities that are hardest hit by violence.

In fact, the report specifically said that overly harsh policing tactics did more harm than good, making residents feel like the police were an "occupying force."

Jonathan Smith, former head of special litigation for the Justice Department, told the Tribune on Wednesday that in Chicago and other cities, federal help to combat gun violence has come in the form of a "surge" of federal agents to work on task forces with local police. But those are short-term solutions at best, he said, and bringing in the National Guard would be even more unsustainable.

"To solve a public safety problem, troops are not the answer," Smith said. "Is (Trump) going to put National Guard troops on every corner for the next two years? It's a long-term problem that needs long-term solutions."

Trump's tweet came just four days after he took the oath of office and referred back to a line from his inaugural address Friday citing the "American carnage" left behind by crime, gangs and drugs.

Last year, Chicago experienced its worst violence in two decades — with more than 4,300 people shot and 762 killed, according to official Police Department statistics. And the violence has continued at comparable levels so far in January.

The issue was being debated in a Fox News segment Tuesday night that cited numbers from a Tribune analysis of homicides and shootings. Less than an hour later, Trump tweeted: "If Chicago doesn't fix the horrible 'carnage' going on, 228 shootings in 2017 with 42 killings (up 24% from 2016), I will send in the Feds!"

The chain reaction Trump's words set off illustrated how even from the Oval Office he has continued to use social media to set his agenda, regardless of the complexity or sensitivity of the subject matter.

It seemed to catch police brass in Chicago off-guard. In an exclusive telephone interview with the Tribune on Wednesday morning, Johnson said he was baffled by the meaning of the president's words.

If it meant a mobilization of National Guard troops, Johnson said he would be opposed.

"They're not trained for this type of action," he said, noting in addition that federal troops may not have the power to make arrests.

Johnson said he does not oppose increased assistance from the federal government — whether that would mean more agents from the FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives or more help geared toward youth living in Chicago's most violent neighborhoods.

"We would use (federal funding for) mentorship programs, after-school programs," he said. "Those are the things I think we can use."

Trump's tweet also prompted phones to light up Wednesday at the Chicago FBI office and the U.S. attorney's office in Chicago, where national reporters were calling seeking reaction.

In response, the Chicago FBI put out a general statement saying the agency "works closely" with state, local and federal partners "to combat violent crime."

The U.S. attorney's office had no comment.

The tweet was also being talked about Wednesday in some of Chicago's hardest-hit communities. The Rev. Marshall Hatch, who heads New Mount Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church in West Garfield Park, said he'd welcome any kind of help kick-starting economic recovery. But adding more military-style policing to a neighborhood where Chicago police are already seen as aggressive and disconnected from residents would be a recipe for disaster, he said.

"We don't want martial law," Hatch said. "If the president means more resources to deal with some of the socio-economic issues, if the president means more resources with the plan to hire more police that could be part of the community, then that is the kind of help that could make sense. But not sending in the National Guard."

Although it's difficult to pull context out of a 140-character tweet, Trump's words, to some, belied the fact that "the Feds" have been deeply involved in the gun violence issue for years.

Agencies like the FBI, ATF and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration devote significant resources to going after gun offenders, often partnering with Chicago police in task forces designed to get the most violent criminals off the streets. In recent years, federal prosecutors have stepped up collaborative efforts with the Cook County state's attorney's office to determine where certain gun cases should be brought to maximize potential sentences.

But many experts warned that while smart and aggressive policing can help stem the tide for a time, in the end it's a complex social justice problem entrenched in neighborhoods where joblessness and hopelessness have existed for generations.

Since taking over as Chicago's top federal prosecutor in 2013, U.S. Attorney Zachary Fardon has repeatedly tempered expectations about how much of a dent federal authorities can make with limited resources.

"We're not going to arrest our way out of the gang problem that we have in the city of Chicago," Fardon said.

Meanwhile, a report released this week that surveyed police chiefs across the country found that a "surge" of federal agents is low on the list of help they want to address violent crime. In the report, released by the Police Foundation and Major Cities Chiefs Association, "short-term surges of federal law enforcement staffing" was ranked second-to-last in a list of 17 ways the federal government could help local cops fight gun violence.

Instead, the chiefs were looking for more tools — like ballistics imaging and gun tracing — to fight crime, the report said.

The report also noted that budgets and salaries for the agencies charged with fighting crime — including the DEA and ATF — have "only grown modestly" since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, while Immigration and Customs Enforcement resources have grown considerably.

Though the White House seemed to tamp down any immediate plan to put boots on the ground in Chicago, it wouldn't be the first time that calling up the National Guard has been discussed in the face of the city's persistent gun violence.

In 2008, Gov. Rod Blagojevich said violent crime was "out of control" and "reaching epidemic proportions" in certain neighborhoods while suggesting the National Guard and Illinois State Police could help.

Two years later, when the city's homicide rate rose slightly over the previous year, two Democratic state legislators suggested Gov. Pat Quinn dispatch the National Guard to Chicago, even though the number of shootings was actually down from earlier in the decade. Quinn downplayed the idea, saying it could be counterproductive to police efforts and that local law enforcement was trained differently than military personnel.

Then-Mayor Richard M. Daley also shot down the suggestion as too simplistic.

More recently, in the wake of the brutal 2015 killing of 9-year-old Tyshawn Lee, an online petition to call up the National Guard was circulated on the grass-roots website change.org that garnered thousands of signatures.

The issue was again in the news last August, the city's deadliest month in 23 years. South Side Rev. Michael Pfleger called for Gov. Bruce Rauner to declare a state of emergency due to the violence. But when a reporter suggested to Rauner that residents were in favor of troops being deployed, the governor ruled out the idea, saying that doing so would be an "emotional" reaction that "wouldn't make sense."

There's also a question of how such a deployment would take shape. Although the National Guard is deployed during natural disasters or in the event of civil unrest, it's typically at the invitation of local officials.

If Trump were to deploy troops to address Chicago's gun violence, it would be "highly unusual and almost surely unconstitutional," said Ronald Allen, a law professor at Northwestern University.

©2017 the Chicago Tribune


Secret Service agent suggests she wouldn’t ‘take a bullet’ for Trump

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

By Geoff Herbert Syracuse Media Group

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Secret Service is investigating an agent who suggested she wouldn't "take a bullet" for President Donald Trump if someone tried to assassinate him.

CNN reports Kerry O'Grady, a senior agent in Denver field office, said in a series of since-deleted Facebook posts that she supported Hillary Clinton, violating a federal law that bars agents from sharing political beliefs in public.

"As a public servant for nearly 23 years, I struggle not to violate the Hatch Act. So I keep quiet and skirt the median," she wrote. "To do otherwise can be a criminal offense for those in my position. Despite the fact that I am expected to take a bullet for both sides..."

"But this world has changed and I have changed. And I would take jail time over a bullet or an endorsement for what I believe to be disaster to this country and the strong and amazing women and minorities who reside here. Hatch Act be damned. I am with Her."

According to the Denver Post, O'Grady's comments were made in October, shortly after a tape leaked with audio of Trump making lewd remarks about women. The social media posts were published by the Washington Examiner Tuesday and removed quickly afterwards from her personal page.

The Secret Service said Tuesday it was "aware of" the situation and "taking quick and appropriate action." A person familiar with the matter told CNN they were trying to determine if her comments were made while working.

"All Secret Service agents and employees are held to the highest standards of professional and ethical conduct," the agency said in a statement. "Any allegations of misconduct are taken seriously and swiftly investigated."

It's unclear whether O'Grady was ever assigned to protect Trump or anyone in his family or campaign. Secret Service agents memorably rushed to protect Trump during a speech in Reno on the final weekend before Election Day.


Border Patrol chief out day after Trump border fence decree

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Elliot Spagat and Alicia A. Caldwell Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Border Patrol chief is leaving the agency on the heels of President Donald Trump's announcement of an ambitious plan to build a massive wall at the Mexican border and hire 5,000 Border Patrol agents.

It was not immediately clear whether Mark Morgan resigned or was asked to leave.

Customs and Border Protection said Thursday that Morgan's last official day in office will be Tuesday. But a U.S. official and a former official said Border Patrol agents were told Thursday that Morgan was no longer with the agency.

The U.S. official wasn't authorized to discuss the move before a public announcement and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. The former official asked not to be identified before a government announcement.

Morgan was named to the post in June and took office in October. The former FBI agent briefly led the internal affairs department at the Border Patrol's parent agency before heading the agency of roughly 20,000 agents.

Morgan leaves office only seven months after being named the first outsider to lead the agency since it was founded in 1924.

From the start, he clashed with the Border Patrol's union, which endorsed Trump early and forcefully during the presidential campaign. The National Border Patrol Council had advocated for an insider to lead the agency and sharply criticized Morgan at almost every turn.

The former official said Morgan was not at work yesterday and did not attend a gathering at the Homeland Security Department with Trump and newly appointed Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly.

During that visit Trump singled out the union's president, Brandon Judd, while pointedly avoiding mention of Morgan. Judd served on Trump's transition team.

The union was incensed when Morgan told a Senate hearing Dec. 1, in response to a question from Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., that he supported a comprehensive immigration overhaul, which is often interpreted to include a path to citizenship for people who are in the country illegally. Morgan clarified his remarks in a note to Border Patrol staff the following week.

"I want to be clear what my position is regarding immigration reform," Morgan wrote. "I do not, as some have suggested, support what is often referred to as 'blanket amnesty.' This assertion could not be further from my position. I encourage everyone to listen to my testimony."

Despite pressure from the union, many agency officials said Morgan appeared to embrace the job. Less than a week ago, the first message on his new Twitter account read, "Chief Morgan here -- excited to use this account to share the latest news and events of the #BorderPatrol with followers."


Top court reviews free speech case of man’s anti-police rap

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Mark Scolforo Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. — Pennsylvania's highest court is reviewing the conviction of a Pittsburgh man for making threats against police in a rap song after he was charged with drug offenses.

The Supreme Court on Monday said it would take up an appeal by Jamal Knox, who argues his song, which was briefly posted online, is protected by the right to free speech. Knox wants the court to set aside his convictions for witness intimidation and making terroristic threats.

"Just because a police officer arrests you, doesn't mean you are stripped of any free speech ability to say, 'Wait a minute, that officer did me wrong, and here's why I think so,'" Knox's lawyer Patrick K. Nightingale said Tuesday.

The Allegheny County district attorney's office, which declined comment for this story, told Superior Court last year the song "was not mere political hyperbole but, rather, the sort of 'true threat' that is not protected by the First Amendment."

The case began with an April 2012 traffic stop in the city's East Liberty section, when Knox, now 22, drove away after telling an officer he did not have a valid driver's license. Following a chase in which he hit a parked car and a fence, police found 15 bags of heroin and $1,500 on Knox and a stolen, loaded gun in the vehicle.

Seven months later, an officer came across the video online, performed by Knox under the name "Mayhem Mal" of the "Ghetto Superstar Committee" with co-defendant Rashee Beasley — and accompanied by photos of them both. Knox and Beasley posted another video in which they said they wrote the song.

The title is a vulgar three-word phrase that ends, "the Police."

A transcript shows the lyrics taunt two officers involved in Knox's arrest and bring up the name of Richard Poplawski, who's currently on death row for the shootings deaths of three Pittsburgh police officers in 2009.

The song starts with "If y'all want beef we can beef/I got artillery to shake the ... streets," and uses the two officers' last names. A verse sung by Beasley says he has a "clip filled to the tippy top wit some cop killas," and boasts that "like Poplawski I'm strapped naste."

Knox's lawyers argued that he did not post it online himself nor did he intend for it to be published. The video was taken down from YouTube after three days.

The two officers identified in the song were provided with additional security protections.

Knox's lawyers argued to Superior Court that the question of whether the song is protected free speech or a criminal threat "could hardly be of more substantial importance; it is perhaps the most salient issue of our time."

They said Knox's objective in creating the song, which they described as "political hyperbole-laced," was not to intimidate the police officers. Rather, they said, he was trying to engage in therapy for anger management, to express political speech in protest of social injustice, to spread news to the community and to advance his artistic career.

A judge convicted Knox, in relation to the video, of two counts of witness intimidation and two counts of terroristic threats. His sentence on all counts, including drug charges, was two to six years in prison. He was paroled from state prison last month.

Prosecutors have dismissed the argument that Knox and Beasley were engaged in works along the lines of Maya Angelou and Langston Hughes.

"He does not ... cite to any works of Ms. Angelou or Mr. Hughes — or any other artist, for that matter — in which they threatened to murder in his home a named police officer who had a pending a case against them," the DA's office told Superior Court.


Mont. panel changes bill to restrict release of mug shots

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

By Matt Volz Associated Press

HELENA, Mont. — A Montana legislative panel on Wednesday took a bill backed by police and news media to clarify that mug shots are public information and amended it to do just the opposite.

The House Judiciary Committee changed the measure to bar the release of booking photographs until a person is convicted of a crime. The photos could be released before conviction only if a judge considers it necessary or the accused consents to the release, according to the amendment.

Committee Chairman Alan Doane, R-Bloomfield, compared the release of mug shots when a person is arrested to "revenge porn," or the dissemination of sexual images without consent.

"I've seen people's lives ruined over this," Doane said. "I think it goes against the whole concept of innocent until proven guilty. We do have that concept of freedom of the press, but I don't think we're suppressing that."

The committee approved the amendment by a 14-5 vote, then tabled the measure to give interested parties a chance to weigh in on the change.

Originally, the bill sought to change state law to include booking photographs as public criminal justice information along with arrest records, court proceedings and other information.

Current law is unclear as to whether mug shots are public information or confidential criminal justice information, which has resulted in a patchwork of policies by law enforcement agencies across the state. Until a court decision in 2015, some routinely released the photos to the media, while other did not.

In the 2015 decision, District Judge Jon Oldenburg ruled that booking photos can be released as public information. After the ruling, Gallatin County's attorney asked Attorney General Tim Fox to issue an opinion on the matter.

Fox's office declined to do so, citing the judge's ruling.

Montana Newspaper Association executive director Jim Rickman said the vast majority of counties now release booking photos, and the bill was meant to update the law for consistency.

"This amendment does entirely the opposite of the intent of the legislation and we will oppose it," Rickman said in a statement.

The bill's sponsor, Rep. Frank Garner, R-Kalispell, said he also opposes the change made by the committee.

"I brought the bill because it was supported by press organizations and law enforcement," Garner said. "This definitely changes the intent. I wouldn't be able to support it."


Miss. panel advances ‘Blue Lives Matter’ bill on targeting police

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

By Jeff Amy Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. — A bill to double penalties for crimes targeting police officers, firefighters and medics — in or out of uniform — is moving ahead in the Mississippi Senate.

The Judiciary A Committee decided with a voice vote over some opposition Tuesday to send Senate Bill 2469 to the full Senate.

The proposal says any crime committed against emergency personnel because of their status as police officers, firefighters or emergency medical technicians would be a hate crime, under the same state law that already doubles penalties for targeting people because of race, ethnicity, religion or gender — but does not cover crimes targeting gay, lesbian or transgender people.

Committee Chairman Sean Tindell, R- Gulfport, said the "Blue Lives Matter" measure is needed after police were shot in Dallas and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, apparently by people aggrieved over how police were treating African American men.

"I think this is the perfect avenue to protect our law enforcement and tell people that it you target them, we're going to come down on you," Tindell said.

Gov. Phil Bryant and Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, both Republicans, support the measure.

After the meeting, Tindell said he didn't know of any incidents where police had been targeted in Mississippi.

The committee rejected an amendment by Sen. Chad McMahan, R-Guntown, which would have limited the enhanced penalties to crimes committed against personnel in uniform, which he said would prevent off-duty officers from abusing the law, say, if they simply get into a fist-fight with someone.

The committee also rejected an amendment by Sen. Barbara Blackmon, D-Canton, which would have made it a hate crime for a police officer to kill someone in violation of official procedures. Blackmon argued that Mississippi needs to do more to protect black people from being targeted by police.

"We want to give them, under color of law, enhanced protection," Blackmon said of police officers. "But when they do wrong, under color of law, we won't penalize them."

Erik Fleming, chief lobbyist for the Mississippi chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the group wants to make sure people won't be subject to enhanced penalties for verbal disputes with police during protests.

"It's unnecessary, but if it's going to pass, it should have First Amendment protections and it should be only for uniformed officers," Fleming said.

Tindell said political protesters will be able to show juries they had no hateful intent, limiting its use by prosecutors in such cases.


Fla. woman accused of throwing tampon at cop

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — A Florida woman has been charged after police say she hit an officer with a tampon.

Local news outlets report that 28-year-old Tacora Fields was arrested and charged with aggravated battery on a law enforcement officer.

A police report says Fields was involved in a fight when a St. Petersburg police officer responded.

Police say Fields threatened to hit the officer with her tampon. Authorities say Fields then removed the feminine hygiene product and threw it at the officer, hitting him in the shoulder.

Police say Fields tried to flee the scene, but the officer used a stun gun on her and she was taken into custody. It's unclear if she has an attorney.


Bond set for driver in Cleveland officer’s hit-and-run death

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Mark Gillispie Associated Press

CLEVELAND — The driver accused in the fatal hit-and-run of a Cleveland patrolman kept his hands clasped in front of his face Thursday while a judge set a $500,000 bond in Cleveland Municipal Court.

Israel Alvarez, 44, of Lorain, is charged with aggravated vehicular homicide and failing to stop after a fatal accident in the death of 39-year-old Patrolman David Fahey. Fahey was struck Tuesday morning while setting down flares to close lanes on Interstate 90 after an earlier fatal accident.

Alvarez did not enter a plea Thursday. It's expected that he'll be assigned an attorney at a hearing next week. A public defender in the courtroom on Thursday said Alvarez has five children, including a 10-day-old, and has worked as a construction laborer the last five years.

A prosecutor asked the judge for a high bond because of Alvarez's criminal past, noting that Alvarez had just been released from probation in Lorain County in December. Court records show he pleaded guilty in 2015 to drug trafficking, heroin possession and other charges.

A court affidavit filed in court Wednesday by a Cleveland police accident investigator said Alvarez disregarded emergency lights on numerous vehicles when he struck Fahey at more than 60 mph in the high-speed lane of the interstate. Alvarez's badly damaged car was found several hours later by a Department of Homeland Security agent in the rear driveway of Alvarez's father's home in Lorain, about 30 miles west of Cleveland. He was arrested outside the home at gunpoint.

Cleveland police officers brought Fahey's handcuffs from the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner's Office to use on Alvarez.

Fahey joined the Cleveland police department in July 2014. His Facebook page says he previously served in the U.S. Navy as an aviation boatswain mate and then worked as an emergency medical technician for a private ambulance company and a technician at the Cleveland Clinic. Fahey's mother and stepfather are retired Cleveland police officers. His brother joined the department in 2013.

Cleveland.com has reported that Fahey's father was killed by a hit-and-run driver on a highway exit ramp near downtown Cleveland in 1978. The news site reported that the 21-year-old David Fahey Sr. had stopped to help a co-worker change a tire when he was struck by a motorist who sped off.

A viewing for Fahey is scheduled Friday at Chambers Funeral Home in North Olmsted. A funeral Mass is scheduled for Saturday at Our Lady of Angels Catholic Church in Cleveland.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has ordered flags flown at half-staff at the Statehouse and Cuyahoga County buildings on Saturday to honor Fahey.


Attorneys release body cam footage of viral Texas incident

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Claudia Lauer Associated Press

DALLAS — Bodycam footage from a white Fort Worth police officer who was suspended for wrestling a black woman and her daughter to the ground appears to show the officer using his foot to push a 15-year-old girl into a police car.

The footage was provided Thursday to The Associated Press from attorneys representing Jacqueline Craig, who had called police last month to report that a neighbor choked her 7-year-old son for allegedly littering in his yard. One of her daughters videoed the interactions between Craig and Officer William Martin and posted it online. The neighbor was not charged in the incident.

The Fort Worth Police Department has denied media requests to release Martin's bodycam footage, and a department spokesman didn't immediately return a message seeking comment Thursday morning. But the audio of the bodycam video, reviewed by The Associated Press, matches the audio of the Facebook video posted by Craig's family.

Craig's attorney, Lee Merritt, said in an email that he had received the bodycam video from a trusted source whom he declined to identify.

"Under the laws of the State of Texas, the attorneys for the Craig family are legally entitled to the complete investigative file, records and recordings of this incident and any officers involved. The FWPD have denied and/or delayed several requests from our office in providing this information," Merritt wrote.

The footage also depicts Martin's conversation with Craig and one of her daughters after he places them in the back of a patrol vehicle.

.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

"Here's the deal. When somebody's under arrest, if anybody interferes, they go to jail too," Martin told them.

"Well, I don't know this. I'm 15 years old," Craig's daughter replied.

Craig responds: "He got mad at me for saying what I said. That's why he did it. But it's all recorded, it's all recorded."

Martin served a 10-day suspension and has since returned to work. He is appealing his suspension with the city's Civil Service Commission.

A disciplinary report submitted to the commission said Martin violated department policy by using excessive force and failing to thoroughly investigate. Other findings included neglect of duty, being discourteous to the public and conduct prejudicial to good order.

Fort Worth Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald said earlier this month that Martin violated policy and is sorry for his behavior. Fitzgerald said he has asked Martin, who will also be required to undergo additional training, to go back into the same community "to repair relationships."


2 Miss. deputies wounded in shootout; suspect dead

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

By Jeff Clark The Sun Herald

SOUTHAVEN, Miss. — A DeSoto County sheriff's deputy hit in the chest during a shootout with a robbery suspect Wednesday night is expected to make a "full recovery," according to DeSoto County Sheriff Bill Rasco. A second officer was shot in the foot and is also expected to be fine.

Meanwhile, the suspect involved in the shootout with authorities at a Southaven grocery store was killed in the exchange of gunfire, authorities said.

Speaking at a midnight news conference outside the Regional Medical Center, Rasco said the officer seriously wounded received damage to the lungs and other organs and was in surgery, but doctors expected him to recover.

That deputy, a K-9 officer with the department, and the other officer, a patrol sergeant, were shot while confronting a robbery suspect at the Kroger behind Heartland Church on Stateline Road near Interstate 55 in Southaven about 9:30 p.m. Neither the officers nor the suspect were immediately identified.

Rasco said one of the wounded deputies joined the sheriff's department about 6 1/2 years ago, the other, about 8 1/2 years ago.

The officer struck in the chest was hit in an area not protected by his bullet-proof vet, Rasco said.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Please keep our deputies in your thoughts and prayers. They put their lives on the line every day and every night, so...

Posted by DeSoto County Sheriff's Department on Thursday, January 26, 2017

No information was immediately available about the suspect, but District Attorney John Champion said prior to the midnight press conference that the suspect committed three violent robberies in Horn Lake and Southaven.

Champion said he heard it started with a carjacking in Memphis but could not confirm that information. He said the deputies found a man matching the suspect's description at the Kroger and confronted him. That's when the shooting occurred.

"They were very, very brave," Champion said of the deputies.

Several North Mississippi law enforcement officers converged on the hospital to show their support. Memphis police were also at The Med.

The shootings are the latest in a rash of crimes in DeSoto County and North Mississippi in recent weeks. Champion expressed concern over the rising violent crimes last week during a press conference regarding armed robberies of Little Caesar's pizza locations in Horn Lake and Batesville, Miss. Champion said those robberies were among seven violent incidents last week in his judicial district. Days earlier, Olive Branch police called a press conference to announce the arrest of three suspects in a CVS pharmacy robbery.

It's been unusually violent throughout Memphis' suburban communities. Germantown police captured two burglary suspects Monday after a morning-long manhunt in a neighborhood of the city. The two, Jaylin Pritchard, 19, George Casper Jinkins, 21, both of Memphis, were charged with attempted first-degree murder, aggravated burglary, theft of property over $1,000, possessing a firearm during commission or attempt to commit a dangerous felony and evading arrest.

Bartlett police arrested a man in connection with a shooting during an apparent car sale at Stage and Barltett Boulevard earlier Wednesday.

Rasco was clear in his message Wednesday night: "We're going to make sure you don't come back to DeSoto County. We (law enforcement) all deal with same people. Just because there's a state line doesn't mean anything. But we will come after you if you come to DeSoto County."

Copyright 2017 The Commercial Appeal, Memphis, Tenn.


‘Sanctuary cities’ undaunted by Trump move to cut funding

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Gene Johnson Associated Press

SEATTLE — Politicians in New York, Seattle and other "sanctuary cities" that protect immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally declared Wednesday they won't be intimidated by a move by President Donald Trump to cut off millions in federal funding to such communities.

Many cities vowed legal action, arguing that the threatened punishment would be unconstitutional. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh promised to let immigrants who feel threatened by the administration's actions take shelter in City Hall if necessary.

"This city will not be bullied by this administration," Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said, adding that he instructed city departments to rework their budgets to prepare for the possibility that federal dollars could be lost. "We believe we have the rule of law and the courts on our side."

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee called Trump's executive orders on immigration mean-spirited and unnecessary. California Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, a Los Angeles Democrat, tweeted: "See you in court."

In New York, Trump's hometown, city officials said the administration's action could take away over $150 million in law enforcement funding mainly for counterterrorism efforts, protecting international missions and dignitaries and, arguably, safeguarding Trump Tower, city officials said.

"Here in New York City and in cities across this nation, this order could in fact undermine public safety," Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference Wednesday evening â?? a concern echoed by District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser.

Graphiq

While there is no formal definition of the term "sanctuary city," it generally refers to jurisdictions that do not cooperate with federal immigration officials.

In some cases, these cities tell police not to inquire about the immigration status of those they encounter, or they decline requests from immigration officials to keep defendants in custody while they await deportation.

Others say they do cooperate with such "detainer" requests as long as they're backed by court-issued warrants, but won't allow local officers to enforce federal immigration law.

Advocates say such noncooperation policies protect people who may not have exhausted their rights to apply for U.S. residency. They also say that crime victims and witnesses are more likely to cooperate with police if they are not afraid of being deported.

"We're not going to sacrifice any of our folks here in Providence," said Jorge Elorza, the mayor of Providence, Rhode Island. "My job is to represent every single resident in the city of Providence, and we will continue to do that."

Supporters of a crackdown on sanctuary cities point to cases like the fatal shooting of Kate Steinle in 2015 on a San Francisco pier. A man who had been previously deported and had been released by local law enforcement was charged in her death.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer said the Trump administration is going to "strip federal grant money from the sanctuary states and cities that harbor illegal immigrants."

Trump signed an executive order that appeared more limited than that. It referred to withholding Justice Department and Homeland Security funds from only those jurisdictions that bar local officials from communicating with federal authorities about someone's immigration status.

Peter L. Markowitz, a professor at Cardozo Law School in New York, said such an attempt to cut off funding would face strong legal challenges.

"The Constitution prohibits the president from defunding jurisdictions that won't do his bidding," Markowitz said. "There's nothing in federal law that requires localities or states to participate in federal immigration enforcement. Second, the Constitution grants Congress â?? not the president â?? the power to determine how federal dollars are spent."

In California, local law enforcement officials are barred from holding immigrants arrested on lesser crimes for deportation purposes.

More than 100 immigration rights advocates crowded on the steps of San Francisco City Hall, holding signs that said "Undocumented & Unafraid" and "Don't let hate Trump our values."

"When we know that there is a violation of human rights here, this is where we excel," San Francisco Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer said to cheers. "This is where we lead the nation and we say, 'We will not back down and we will stand up for what we believe is right.'"

___

Associated Press writers Steve LeBlanc in Boston; Kasey Jones in Baltimore; Janie Har in San Francisco; Chris Grygiel in Seattle; Amy Taxin in Santa Ana, California; Deepti Hajela and Jennifer Peltz in New York; David Porter in Newark, New Jersey; and Matt O'Brien in Providence, Rhode Island, contributed.


Affidavit: Couple intended to kill Texas officers when they set house on fire

Posted on January 26, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Ngan Ho San Angelo Standard-Times

SAN ANGELO, Texas — A couple arrested after confronting police officers who responded to a house fire on San Angelo's north side set the fire with the intent of killing police who responded, according to an arrest warrant affidavit.

Texas Rangers have identified husband and wife Gary Ray Wright and Brenda Joyce Wright as the suspects involved in the fiery shooting standoff with San Angelo police on Friday January 13.

According to the arrest warrant affidavit in the case, the couple intended to go out with bang by killing police officers because of a grievance they had with the San Angelo Police Department.

"Brenda Joyce Wright detailed how she and her husband had become frustrated with life," the affidavit stated. "The couple was dissatisfied over how a recent traffic accident had been investigated with the San Angelo Police Department. The couple viewed this as the 'last straw' and decided to put into motion a plan the couple had been planning for several weeks."

The wife and husband plotted to set their house on fire, summon police to their residence and then kill officers as they responded, according to the affidavit.

Brenda Joyce Wright, 60, told detectives that she armed herself with a shotgun, hid in the bathroom next to a window and waited with the intention to kill any officers who would come into range, the affidavit stated.

She was unable to carry out her plan because of heavy smoke from the house fire.

Her husband, Gary Ray Wright, said in the 911 phone call to summon police that he intended to cause a standoff with law enforcement and kill police, according to the affidavit, and asked for the neighborhood to be evacuated.

Gary Ray Wright, 67, had called a local television news station, KLST, before communicating with dispatch, to announce his plans and asked the news director to have reporters bring cameras to the scene.

Police arrived shortly before noon and encountered Gary Wright, who was armed with a rifle, and his wife near the front of their home in the 1200 block East 21st Street, according to the affidavit. Wright ignored police instructions to drop the rifle, and officers shot him. Both the husband and wife were taken to Shannon Medical Center.

Shannon would not release any information on Wright's condition late Monday afternoon.

The Rangers indicated Tuesday morning that an investigation is ongoing and no further information can be released.

There was significant fire damage to the front and back of the house.

Brenda Joyce Wright was arrested the same day and charged with attempted capital murder, a first-degree felony punishable by five to 99 years in prison. She remains at the Tom Green County Jail in lieu of $250,000 bail.


NYPD to install bullet-resistant windows in all patrol cars

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

NEW YORK — In an effort to combat ambush killings of officers in their vehicles, Mayor Bill de Blasio plans to install bullet-resistant glass in all patrol cars.

The New York Post reported the city decided to implement the new glass after the 2014 killing of two NYPD officers sitting in their patrol vehicles and the killing of Officer Brian Moore in an unmarked patrol car.

“This is about having the backs of our men and women in blue who, with courage and commitment, don the uniform every day to protect and serve,” City Hall spokesman Austin Finan said. “This investment is our commitment to ensuring the safety of those officers on the beat.”

According to the publication, NYPD began a window pilot program in 2016. The glass protects the back portion of the both the driver and passenger-side windows, but doesn’t allow the windows to be rolled down.

The city allocated $6.8 million in July to install the bullet-resistant panels that protected the doors, but weren’t ready to sign off on the window inserts.

Now, they have approved the spending of $10.4 million to install the windows in all patrol cars.


70-year veteran cop to young cops: ‘Watch your back’

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

FORT WORTH, Texas — A 70-year law enforcement veteran has words of advice for young officers: Watch your back when you’re on the street.

Deputy Bill Hardin, who turns 94 in March, said he’s learned from his years in law enforcement that it doesn’t matter who’s inside the uniform; the uniform is the only thing people see.

“I don’t understand why … every time you get out on the street, you’re a target,” Hardin told CBS DFW.

Hardin spent most of his 40 years with the Fort Worth Police Department. He also spent eight years with the Tarrant County Sheriff’s Department. Now, he serves as a Johnson County sheriff’s deputy - where he’s worked for 24 years.

According to the news station, Hardin is the oldest officer in Texas and has been on the force longer than any other cop.

“As long as I can make a contribution, how little or how much, it makes me feel good,” he told the publication.

He said that despite being confronted by armed suspects multiple times, he’s never fired his service revolver.

Although he hasn’t set on a date, Hardin is looking to retire soon. But wants to offer advice to young officers who are facing dangers he didn’t experience when he began.

“All I’d say is, watch your back.”


Trump warns he’s ready to ‘send in the Feds’ to Chicago

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Don Babwin Associated Press

CHICAGO — President Donald Trump says he's ready to "send in the Feds" if Chicago can't reduce its homicide problem, and the city's police superintendent says he is "more than willing" to work with the federal government to combat the violence.

Trump tweeted Tuesday night: "If Chicago doesn't fix the horrible 'carnage' going on, 228 shootings in 2017 with 42 killings (up 24% from 2016), I will send in the Feds!"

In response to the president's tweet, Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson reiterated that the city is receptive to assistance from the Department of Justice, FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration and the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms. He also repeated that city officials have sought a "boost" in federal prosecution rates for gun crimes in Chicago since homicide figures spiked.

Trump's tweet came a day after Mayor Rahm Emanuel criticized Trump for worrying about the size of the crowd at his inauguration. Emanuel, a longtime political ally of former President Barack Obama, has acknowledged his own frustration with Chicago's crime rate.

The figures cited by Trump are the same as those published Monday in the Chicago Tribune. The tweet was posted about the time Tuesday evening that the figures were cited on Fox television's "O'Reilly Factor."

The numbers were slightly different from the latest tally by the Chicago Police Department. As of Tuesday, police said, 234 people have been shot in 2017, including 38 who died. At this point last year, 227 people had been shot, including 33 deaths.

Department spokesman Anthony Guglielmi explained that the department's numbers are slightly different because they do not include officer-involved shootings, shootings that were considered "justified," such as those that were in self-defense, and shootings that were investigated by state police because they occurred on expressways.

It appears that the president's numbers for homicides came from the county's medical examiner's office, Guglielmi said.

Earlier this month, before he took office, Trump tweeted that Emanuel should ask for federal help if he isn't able to bring down the homicide rate. Last year, the death toll soared to 762 — the most killings in the city in nearly two decades and more than New York and Los Angeles combined.

In Tuesday's tweet, Trump did not offer specifics about how the federal government could help. The White House website says: "Our country needs more law enforcement, more community engagement and more effective policing."

Rep. Luis Gutierrez, a Chicago Democrat, criticized Trump, suggesting in a statement that the president, whom he called the "tweeter-in-chief," would "rather spend his time on Twitter" than look for ways to reduce gun violence.

"The president wants publicity and to be seen beating up on Democratic elected officials and appearing hostile to a big city like Chicago in the eyes of his suburban and rural voters," Gutierrez said, adding that he does not believe the president "will do anything constructive to get cheap handguns off the streets of American cities."


Trump moving forward with border wall, weighs cuts to sanctuary cities

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Julie Pace, Vivian Salama, Rachel Zoll Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump will use his executive authority Wednesday to jumpstart construction of a U.S.-Mexico border wall, one of his signature campaign promises. He is also expected to target so-called sanctuary cities and potentially restrict the flow of refugees to the United States, according to administration officials.

The president will sign the first actions — including the measure authorizing work on the wall —during a trip to the Department of Homeland Security Wednesday afternoon. He'll also move to increase the number of border patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents.

Trump, in an interview Wednesday with ABC News, said he expected construction of the wall to begin within months. U.S. taxpayers are expected to pay for the upfront costs, though Trump continues to assert that Mexico will reimburse the money through unspecified means.

"There will be a payment, it will be in a form, perhaps a complicated form," Trump said, adding that negotiations with Mexico would begin soon. Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, who has insisted his country will not pay for a wall, is to meet with Trump at the White House next week.

The president is said to still be weighing the details of plans to curb the number of refugees coming to the U.S. The current proposal includes at least a four-month halt on all refugee admissions, as well as a temporary ban on people coming from some Muslim-majority countries, according to a source from a public policy organization that monitors refugee issues. The person was briefed on the details of that proposed action by a government official and outlined the plan to The Associated Press.

The officials and the public policy organization source insisted on anonymity in order to outline the plans ahead of the president's official announcements.

Trump campaigned on pledges to tighten U.S. immigration policies, including strengthening border security and stemming the flow of refugees. His call for a border wall was among his most popular proposals with supporters, who often broke out in chants of "build that wall" during rallies.

In response to terrorism concerns, Trump controversially called for halting entry to the U.S. from Muslim countries. He later turned to a focus on "extreme vetting" for those coming from countries with terrorism ties.

While the specifics of Trump's orders were unclear, both administration officials said Wednesday's actions would focus in part on the president's plans to construct a wall along the southern border with Mexico. He's also expected to move forward with plans to curb funding for cities that don't arrest or detain immigrants living in the U.S. illegally — localities dubbed "sanctuary" cities — which could cost individual jurisdictions millions of dollars.

Graphiq

In claiming authority to build a wall, Trump may rely on a 2006 law that authorized several hundred miles of fencing along the 2,000-mile frontier. That bill led to the construction of about 700 miles of various kinds of fencing designed to block both vehicles and pedestrians.

The Secure Fence Act was signed by then-President George W. Bush, and the majority of that fencing in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California was built before he left office. The last remnants were completed after President Barack Obama took office in 2009.

The Trump administration also must adhere to a decades-old border treaty with Mexico that limits where and how structures can be built along the border. The 1970 treaty requires that structures cannot disrupt the flow of the rivers, which define the U.S.-Mexico border along Texas and 24 miles in Arizona, according to The International Boundary and Water Commission, a joint U.S.-Mexican agency that administers the treaty.

InsideGov | Graphiq

Other executive actions expected Wednesday include ending what Republicans have labeled a catch-and-release system at the border. Currently, some immigrants caught crossing the border illegally are released and given notices to report back to immigration officials at a later date.

If Trump's actions result in those caught being immediately jailed, the administration would have to grapple with how to pay for additional jail space and what to do with children caught crossing the border with their parents.

It appeared as though the refugee restrictions were still being finalized. The person briefed on the proposals said they included a ban on entry to the U.S. for at least 30 days from countries including Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, though the person cautioned the details could still change.

There is also likely to be an exception for those fleeing religious persecution if their religion is a minority in their country. That exception could cover Christians fleeing Muslim-majority nations.

As president, Trump can use an executive order to halt refugee processing. Bush used that same power in the immediate aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. Refugee security vetting was reviewed and the process was restarted several months later.

Graphiq

Ariz. man who saved trooper: ‘I had to help’

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Astrid Galvan Associated Press

PHOENIX — The man who fatally shot a suspect beating an Arizona state trooper said Tuesday that he doesn't consider himself a hero and he's grappling with taking someone's life.

Thomas Yoxall, of Arizona, gave his account of the dramatic Jan. 12 encounter between the now-dead suspect and the state trooper. Yoxall had not been previously identified.

The 43-year-old cried and his legs shook while he recounted killing Leonard Pennelas-Escobar, who was beating Trooper Edward Andersson "in a savage way" after having shot him.

"To be honest with you, it was very visceral and instinctive. I had to help. I knew I had to help. So there wasn't an option for me," Yoxall said during a news conference at Department of Public Safety offices in Phoenix.

DPS officials say Pennelas-Escobar had been in a single-car wreck that killed his girlfriend on Interstate 10 outside of Phoenix when Andersson arrived. Andersson was putting out flares after coming across the crash when Pennelas-Escobar ambushed him, shooting him in the shoulder and chest before beating him.

Yoxall said he has no military or police training, but is a responsible gun owner. He pulled over when he saw the two men.

Yoxall said Pennelas-Escobar ignored his commands to get off the trooper and that he did what he had to do.

"I firmly believe that that morning I was put there... by God," Yoxall said. "It's difficult to think about that day still."

Yoxall flagged down another driver, 44-year-old Brian Schober, for help. Schober says he used Andersson's radio to call for help and used a first-aid kit from the trooper's car to clean blood from his head.

Andersson is recovering but will require more surgeries.

Yoxall, a maintenance supervisor and aspiring photojournalist, says he talks often with his pastor and is working to move on from the traumatic encounter.

DPS Director Col. Frank Milstead said he was grateful for Yoxall's quick actions.

"I'm humbled to have met him and to know what he did because we're having this conversation about a hero and not about an on-duty death," Milstead said.


Ga. police officer driving to training killed in crash

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

WADLEY, Ga. — A police officer died in a car crash while driving to certification training Monday morning.

Wadley Officer Lawrence Thomas Forrest, 37, was killed in the two-vehicle crash around 6:40 a.m., the Statesboro Herald reported. Officer Forrest was pronounced dead at the scene. The other driver, Alpeshkumaar Patel, was taken to a local hospital with serious injuries.

Officer Forrest is survived by his fiancee and two sons. Funeral arrangements are pending and an investigation is ongoing.


Suspect in Fla. officer’s killing curses judge, again

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Mike Schneider Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — A suspect charged with murder in the deaths of his pregnant ex-girlfriend and an Orlando police officer cursed at a judge during a brief first appearance for a misdemeanor charge.

Markeith Loyd uttered the expletive after the judge set a bond of $500 for the charge of resisting arrest without violence during a Wednesday morning hearing.

The 41-year-old Loyd won't be bonding out since another Florida judge set no bond for two first-degree murder counts.

During two court appearances last week for those charges, Loyd also cursed and interrupted the judge.

Loyd, said "I'm here for what?" after the judge read the charge and set the bond during Wednesday's hearing, which lasted about a minute.

The misdemeanor charge stems from Loyd's Jan. 17 arrest after a manhunt that lasted more than a week.


Maine officer saved by ballistic vest during shootout

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

Portland Press Herald

WALDOBORO, Maine — A Waldoboro man was killed in a shootout with police early Sunday that also injured an officer.

Officer John Lash exchanged gunfire with an occupant of the home at 81 River Bend Road, who was identified as Jon M. Alspaugh, 57. The shootout erupted inside the residence, and Alspaugh was mortally wounded, police said.

Waldoboro Police Chief Bill Labombarde said Sunday night that Lash was shot in his upper torso but was probably spared more serious injury because he was wearing a bulletproof vest.

Lash and another officer, Sgt. Jamie Wilson, were called to the home around 1 a.m. Sunday to investigate the report of a domestic disturbance.

“I can’t get into those kinds of details,” Labombarde said when asked to explain the nature of the disturbance.

Labombarde said that two other people were in the home with Alspaugh when the shootout occurred. They were not injured.

A neighbor told WCSH-TV that Alspaugh lived in the home with his wife and his mother-in-law.

“To find out what happened this morning, it is surprising. … They’ve always been nice, seemed like a good couple. Never had any issues with them,” Joshua Smith told the Portland television station.

Lash’s bulletproof vest absorbed the shot, but he was taken to the Miles Campus of LincolnHealth, a health care center in Damariscotta, where he was checked out by doctors and released a short time later, according to the police chief.

As is standard procedure in police-involved shootings, Lash, who has been employed by the police department for three years, has been placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation by the Maine Attorney General’s Office to determine if the shooting was justified. Labombarde said Wilson was not placed on leave.

The Attorney General’s Office said Sunday night that there have been 73 officer-involved shootings in Maine since 2007, including one involving Gregori Jackson, an 18-year-old man who was shot and killed by Waldoboro police Officer Zachary Curtis on Sept. 23, 2007. The AG’s Office ruled that Curtis’ use of deadly force was justified.

Of the 73 officer-involved shootings, 36 resulted in the death of an individual, according to figures supplied by the AG’s Office.

There were six officer-involved shootings in 2016, including two that resulted in death.

According to The Courier-Gazette, Alspaugh was assistant director of the Rockland wastewater treatment plant. The newspaper quoted City Manager Audra Caler Bell as saying that Alspaugh was hired by the city last year.

The home where the shooting occurred is located at the end of a long dirt road, off Route 32. The Courier-Gazette reported that the home is owned by Alspaugh’s mother-in-law. The family has lived in Waldoboro for about 17 years.

Investigators told the Rockland newspaper that Alspaugh did not have a criminal record. Police had not been called to the property before Sunday’s shooting.

Waldoboro police said in a news release that the Attorney General’s Office and Maine State Police are handling the investigation of the shootout.

___ (c)2017 the Portland Press Herald (Portland, Maine)


Alaska lawmaker proposes gun bill after airport shooting

Posted on January 25, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Becky Bohrer Associated Press

JUNEAU, Alaska — A deadly airport shooting in Florida has helped spur a bill in Alaska that would allow authorities to temporarily take away guns from people deemed to be a danger to themselves or others.

The proposal, from Rep. Geran Tarr, an Anchorage Democrat, was introduced after the Jan. 6 attack at a Florida airport that killed five and wounded six others. The alleged gunman, Esteban Santiago, is from Anchorage.

"I want family members to feel empowered to speak up and say something and hopefully, maybe, we can prevent the next violent thing from happening," Tarr told The Associated Press on Tuesday.

Tarr said she had been looking for ways to address violence in her district when the Florida shooting happened. The bill was introduced Monday.

Authorities said that in November, Santiago went to the FBI office in Anchorage and made disjointed comments about mind control. He was taken in for a mental health evaluation and released after several days. The gun he'd had in his vehicle when he went to the FBI office was later returned to him. Authorities said it was the same gun used in the airport shooting spree.

The bill would let immediate family members or police seek protective orders against those believed to be a danger to themselves or others by having access to a gun. Depending on the type of order, a person could be barred from having or attempting to buy a gun or ammunition from three days to as long as six months, though it could be dissolved earlier.

Under the bill, once an order is issued, the person would have to surrender any guns and ammunition the person has or sell them to a gun dealer. Surrendered items would be returned once an order expires.

It's unclear whether the bill will gain traction. House Minority Leader Charisse Millett, an Anchorage Republican, wanted to learn more about the bill before commenting, minority spokeswoman Mallory Walser said by text message.

The National Rifle Association and the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence did not immediately return messages seeking comment Tuesday.

California and Connecticut have gun violence protection order laws, said Jon Griffin, a program principal with the National Conference of State Legislatures. In an email Tuesday, he said bills on the topic were proposed or carried over in at least six states last year but none passed.

Tarr, whose brother killed himself, said high standards would have to be met to prove someone was a danger to themselves or others and she doesn't see the potential for abuse.

But along with efforts like this, she said there needs to be attention on expanding mental health services and access to counseling. The state doesn't have enough treatment beds, she said.

She credits expanded Medicaid coverage with helping people with behavioral health issues receive access to services.

"You definitely have to come at this from all angles," she said.


How self-awareness can improve a police officer’s personal relationship

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

Althea Olson and Mike Wasilewski
Author: Althea Olson and Mike Wasilewski

The dawn of the New Year is traditionally a time for critical self-reflection. Along with the hope that accompanies it, we pause to assess the past, plan the future and reflect on needed changes and how to achieve them. Healthy self-awareness means knowing both where we excel and all the ways we fall short. It is our efforts to correct past failings that form the foundations of serious change.

Most of us tend to focus on areas of life we are able to fix through the simple addition of good behaviors or subtraction of bad – our diet, health habits, exercising more– or deciding to take on new experiences and greater challenges to enrich our lives. There is nothing wrong with any of these types of resolutions. Encouraging positive change in these areas is a staple of our column and we know how important and difficult it is to sustain them. But sometimes the areas we need to examine and work on are deeper and more important than whether we get to the gym enough or choose healthy lunches over the convenience of fast food. Sometimes self-reflection needs to be more about our character and habits toward others, and in particular, those with whom we are closest.

Law enforcement can be hard on relationships and this is especially true between you and your significant other. The demands of a challenging career on any relationship are tough. But the demands and stresses of the law enforcement profession creates peculiar – if somewhat predictable – difficulties. No matter how tight your bond, how long you’ve been together or how successful the relationship, its quality and strength can suffer when bad habits, complacency or the changing pressures of life overwhelm good choices toward each other. So, going into 2017, we’ll focus on how to go deeper in our self-reflection and resolve to protect and strengthen our primary relationship.

Go looking for trouble

When looking inward at our relationship(s) it is easiest to focus on what’s obviously working, rest on past success and assume all is well. Of course, that happens to be the essence of complacency. In order to accurately assess the overall health of your relationship, it’s necessary to look deeper, reflect on where you’ve slipped or gotten lazy, ask your partner for honest – even painful – feedback and uncover the uncomfortable. In a way, you have to go looking for trouble.

Dr. John Gottman and his wife, Dr. Julie Schwartz Gottman, are possibly the most respected and well-known experts in the field of couples therapy. At The Gottman Institute in Seattle, they have been researching relationships and what makes some work and others fail for more than 30 years. From these studies they develop tools for therapists.

From their research, the Gottmans have identified several dysfunctions commonly found in ailing relationships. In examining your own relationship you’ll not just want to emphasize what you still do well but also where symptoms of trouble are starting to show.

Low ratio of positive to negative interactions

Even in conflict, successful couples generally remain positive in how they speak and relate to one another; in fact, the ratio of positive to negative interactions in word, deed and reaction to each other will be at least 5:1. Far better is a ratio of close to 20:1. Among couples in unstable, failing relationships that ratio has been found to be around 0.8:1. Successful couples know to isolate and manage conflict, maintain positive feelings about one another even when angry or frustrated, and work to exhibit kindness and concern. Troubled and failing relationships hemorrhage negativity.

Escalation of negativity

The Gottmans refer to the “Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” to describe four characteristics common to dying relationships. Being in conflict is normal, and feeling and expressing anger and hurt are a part of it, but the “Four Horsemen” – criticism, contempt, defensiveness and stonewalling – signal an often fatal escalation of the negativity.

Are your fights civil, productive and with the goal of strengthening the relationship, or have any of the “Four Horseman” begun to make an appearance? If they have, it is absolutely necessary you oust them now and make efforts to make positivity your default position even in conflict.

Emotional disengagement and withdrawal

The absence of negative affect during conflict, or positive affect whether during conflict or not, is indicative of emotional disengagement and withdrawal. Being unable or unwilling to engage emotionally may mean you’ve already left the relationship, even if you still occupy the same space physically.

Do you still turn to one another emotionally with conversation, joking and laughter, seeking and giving support and making time with one another a top and regular priority? Or have you withdrawn into yourselves, even if unintentionally?

Failing of repair attempts

According to the Gottmans, “The goal of therapy ought not to be helping couples to avoid fights, even ones that are painful and alienating. Nor should it be helping couples to avoid hurting one another’s feelings… Instead, the goal ought to be to help couples process these inevitable fights… and to be able to repair the relationship.”

All couples will have issues about which they disagree, and virtually all will argue and fight over them, but successful couples quickly repair the relationship, soothe any hurt feelings, and know that disagreements are inevitable and something from which to grow. But when normal repair attempts fail, the hurt is too deep, or efforts are no longer attempted, the relationship is in serious trouble.

Negative sentiment override

Negative sentiment override is a serious symptom requiring urgent attention. NSO is present when one or both of the partners “habitually perceive interactions with their partner with a ‘negative subtext.’” Neutral and even attempts at positive interactions are misperceived as negative or as an attack. This happens when at least one of the partners has come to see only negative qualities or intent in the other, attributing them to “lasting, negative personality traits or character flaws.”

Once NSO has taken root even the most well-intentioned efforts will be seen in a negative or malicious light. Defensiveness becomes the default state of one or both partners as the relationship is increasingly perceived as emotionally dangerous.

Chronic diffuse physiological arousal

Chronic diffuse physiological arousal is a condition with a wide range of general symptoms usually experienced when faced with a threat and experienced as a constant state of hyperawareness and anxiety. Our most important relationships should never be the cause, but often are.

When attempts by one partner to raise concerns or introduce conflict are felt by the other as overwhelming or emotionally dangerous, they experience heightened physiological arousal common to maintaining constant vigilance against threats. Not unlike PTSD, this can lead to a fight or flight response contrary to a safe, happy, successful relationship.

You and your partner should be a source of safety to each other. Instead, do either of you live in fear of the next emotional attack, waiting for the next conflict and planning what to do or where to retreat when it comes? Such living is not only emotionally unhealthy, it also manifests itself in physical ailments, and no relationship can survive this level of strain.

The failure of men to accept influence from their women

This next warning is directed at our male readers, and all men should evaluate how they do. In successful heterosexual couples, women wield significant influence with their men, and the men accept and welcome influence from their women. Failing or refusing to accept influence from women leaves them feeling disrespected and eventually disengaged. A lot of men are quite comfortable with an arrangement where they hold the power, making decisions without hindrance or question or needing to weigh other points-of-view. Eventually, though, they are likely to see their partner emotionally disengage or rebel.

So men, do you accept influence from your women, or do you ignore or minimize her influence in favor of your independence?

Seeing all that is good and working in a relationship is extremely important to maintaining positive feelings toward one another, but awareness of problem areas is just as important. When you go for a physical your doctor is looking not just for what is right but poking, prodding, and asking questions to find what might be wrong or need further examination. Looking for and focusing on symptoms is essential to catch problems early. The same applies to our relationships. Start 2017 by making sure all is in order at home.


What cops need to know about TASER use, the Fourth Amendment and excessive use of force

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

Mike Callahan
Author: Mike Callahan

It should come as no surprise to law enforcement officers that civil rights lawsuits directed against patrol officers, their superior officers and their municipalities regarding TASER deployment continue to be filed in multiple federal courts of appeal across America. Some of the most recent cases are worthy of examination and close scrutiny. By analyzing these cases, we can glean constitutional guidance concerning when the use of a TASER is lawfully appropriate and when it is constitutionally excessive.

Scenario 1: TASER use, minor offense, no active resistance

In Yates v. Terry, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a lower court ruling against a North Charleston, South Carolina officer who was accused of using excessive force by means of a TASER against Brian Yates. Yates passed the officer, who was in his police cruiser in a stationary position. The officer pulled out, activated his lights and pulled Yates over in a gas station parking lot. The case does not make clear why the officer pulled Yates over.

The officer approached Yates and requested his driver’s license. Yates responded that he did not have his license, but did have his military identification (Yates was a sergeant in the Army). The officer opened Yates’ car door, forced Yates out of the car and told him to place his hands on the car. Yates complied and was told he was under arrest. Yates asked for an explanation, but none was provided. Yates turned his head to the left and the officer deployed his TASER in the “probe” mode. The court explained, “In probe mode, two probes are fired from a distance, attached to electrical wires, to lodge in the skin of the subject.”

The TASER delivers a five-second cycle of electricity (50,000 volts) designed to override the central nervous system, disabling the subject. Yates fell to the ground, and the TASER was deployed again while Yates remained on the ground. While still on the ground, Yates told his brother – who was standing nearby – to call the officer’s commanding officer and reached for his cell phone. He was TASERed a third time.

Yates was handcuffed when other officers arrived and charged with excessive noise violation, no license in his possession and disorderly conduct. All charges were subsequently dismissed. Yates sued the officer and alleged that the use of the TASER in these circumstances amounted to excessive force. Both the Federal District Court Judge and the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with Yates that excessive force was used.

The Fourth Circuit examined the factors articulated by the United States Supreme Court in Graham v. Connor. These include the severity of the crime, the immediacy of the threat to officers or others and whether the suspect was resisting arrest or attempting to flee. The Fourth Circuit noted that the infractions that Yates was arrested for were at best minor and non-violent. The Fourth Circuit ruled that Yates represented no threat to the officer’s safety at the time the TASER was first deployed or during the second and third TASER deployments. The Fourth Circuit also determined that Yates was not resisting or attempting to flee during the TASER deployments.

The Fourth Circuit explained that “’deploying a TASER is a serious use of force that is designed to inflict a painful and frightening blow,’” (Armstrong v. Pinehurst, 810 F.3d 892, 902 (4th Cir. 2016)). The Fourth Circuit ruled that a TASER “may only be deployed when a police officer is confronted with an exigency that creates an immediate safety risk that is reasonably likely to be cured by using the TASER.” Here there was no immediate safety risk in play. Moreover, the offense was nonviolent and there was no resistance or attempt to flee.

Scenario 2: TASER use, minor offense, active resistance

In Lash v. Lemke, U.S. Park Police entered an encampment of the so-called “Occupy D.C.” movement in Washington D.C. to warn protestors that they would be enforcing anti-camping regulations the next day. Their entrance was met with hostility. Ryan Lash, a protestor, challenged the officers’ right to enter; used profanity and tore down signs the officers had posted. Lash walked away and the officers followed. Lash loudly protested the fact that officers were following him and continued to walk away and proclaim his innocence.

An officer seized Lash’s arms from the rear. Lash pulled his arms away and held them in front of his body. He continued to walk away. The officer once again sought to restrain Lash from behind. Lash again pulled his arms away. Two officers grabbed each of his arms, but Lash resisted and continued to struggle. A third officer deployed her TASER. Lash fell to the ground and was handcuffed. He was subsequently charged with disorderly conduct.

Lash sued the officer who deployed the TASER for excessive force and her supervisor for failure to supervise. The Federal District Court ruled in favor of the officers and the Federal Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit affirmed. In reaching its decision, the Circuit Court had the advantage of viewing videotape of Lash’s arrest. With the help of the videotape, the court quickly rejected Lash’s claims that he submitted to arrest as soon as he understood that the officers were trying to arrest him. The court observed, “No matter what Lash claims now, we know to a certainty that he resisted arrest because we can see him doing so.”

The court examined existing case law and concluded that the TASER use in this instance did not violate clearly established Fourth Amendment law. The court explained that “there is no clearly established right for a suspect who actively resists and refuses to be handcuffed to be free from a Taser application,” (Goodwin v. City of Painesville, 781 F.3d 314, 325 (6th Cir. 2015)). The court cited numerous other Federal Circuit opinions to support its conclusion, specifically, Abbott v. Sangamon County, Ill., 705 F.3d 706, 727 (7th Cir. 2013); Hagans v. Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, 695 F.3d 505, 509-510 (6th Cir. 2012); DeBoise v. Taser International Inc., 760 F.3d 892, 897 (8th Cir. 2014); Buchanan v. Gulfport Police Dept., 530 Fed. Appx 307, 314 (5th Cir. 2013).

Scenario 3: TASER use, active resistance, lawful at outset, excessive during deployment

In Meyers v. Baltimore County, officers were called to a domestic disturbance which involved Ryan Meyers hitting his father and brother and taking refuge inside his home. Officers were informed upon arrival that Ryan was bipolar and had mental health problems. Officers could see Ryan inside the residence holding a baseball bat. Officers tried to talk him into surrendering without success. They were able to enter the home with the assistance of the family. Ryan was ordered to drop the bat but refused. One officer deployed his TASER to no effect. Ryan took two steps toward the police with the bat. The TASER was deployed a second time and Ryan dropped the bat but continued forward. A third deployment of the TASER resulted in Ryan dropping to the floor. Three officers sat on his back. At this point, Ryan was TASERed a fourth time. The officer then switched the TASER into stun mode and applied it six more times during a little more than a minute. Ryan entered into cardiac arrest and died. An excessive force lawsuit followed.

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the first three deployments of the TASER were constitutionally reasonable. The court explained that at the time of these deployments, “Ryan was acting erratically, was holding a baseball bat that he did not relinquish until after he received the second shock and was advancing toward the officers until the third shock caused him to fall to the ground.” The court determined that he “posed an immediate threat to the officer’s safety and was actively resisting arrest.”

Conversely, the court ruled that the remaining seven TASER deployments amounted to excessive force in violation of the Fourth Amendment. The court explained that “after Ryan fell to the floor, he was no longer actively resisting arrest, and did not pose a continuing threat to the officer’s safety, yet, Officer … TASERed Ryan until he was unconscious.” This, in the court’s view, was an “unnecessary, gratuitous, and disproportionate [use of] force to seize a secured, unarmed citizen.”

This review establishes some basic principles regarding the use of the TASER:

The deployment of the Taser is considered by the federal courts to be a “serious use of force” that is designed to inflict a “painful and frightening blow.” The TASER should not be deployed in cases involving minor offenses and in the absence of active physical resistance. The TASER may be constitutionally deployed, even in cases involving minor offenses, when the subject presents active physical resistance that amounts to an immediate safety risk to officers attempting arrest. Use of a TASER to bring an actively resisting suspect under control is entirely appropriate. However, TASER deployment must immediately cease at the moment the subject no longer represents an immediate threat to the arresting officers. For additional case law, review Smalls v. Town of South Boston, (Case No. 4:15-cv-00017) (U.S.D.C., W.D. VA, Danville Division). In Smalls, an officer’s first five deployments of the TASER upon an actively resisting subject were appropriate. However, deployments six through 11 were unconstitutionally excessive.

Okla. officer killed in head-on crash

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

The Oklahoman

STROUD, Okla. — A police officer with the Sac and Fox Nation was killed Tuesday morning in a wreck, tribal officials said.

Officer Nathan Graves, 45, was involved in a wreck on State Highway 99, about 11 miles north of Stroud, according to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol.

“Today our flags are flying at half-staff to honor the loss of Sac and Fox Nation Tribal Police Officer Nathan Graves,” said Principal Chief Kay Rhoads of the Sac and Fox Nation in a news release.

“Officer Graves was killed in a head-on auto accident early this morning while on patrol. The matter is currently under investigation but at this time we are mourning the passing of Nathan and expressing our deepest thoughts and prayers to his wife Janet and family,” Rhoads said.

Sac and Fox Nation Police Chief Bob Roberts said Graves had a “distinguished career as an officer of the law for the Sac and Fox Nation Police Department as well as an officer for the Stroud Police Department.”

A GoFund me page has been set up for Graves. Those wishing to donate toward his funeral expenses can go here.

No other information about the wreck was released as of Tuesday afternoon.

©2017 The Oklahoman


Slain Fla. lieutenant’s family won’t receive same benefits as fallen deputy

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

ORLANDO, Fla. — The families of a lieutenant who was fatally shot while approaching a suspect and a deputy who was killed in a crash while pursuing her killer will receive starkly different pension benefits.

Because Lt. Debra Clayton placed her money in the city’s pension and not the state’s, her family will only receive 60 percent of her annual salary, the Orlando Sentinel reported.

However, because Deputy Norman Lewis, who was killed in a motorcycle crash while pursuing suspect Markieth Loyd, had a pension plan with the state, his family will receive his full annual salary.

The state passed a law last year, called the Scott Pine Bill, which allows the spouse or primary beneficiary of a fallen officer to receive 100 percent of state pension benefits.

Matt Puckett, executive director of the Florida Police Benevolent Association, said the association has tried to apply the new law to city pensions as well, but were denied by the League of Cities, who said benefits should be negotiated at local levels.

"I think it is unfair," Puckett told the publication. "I understand where League of Cities is coming from, but it's really easy to state your position when you aren't talking to a family member of a fallen officer."

Former State Sen. Jeremy Ring, who sponsored the Pine bill, said it never addressed officers with city pensions because they are under collective bargaining at the local level.

Both officers have GoFundMe accounts set up to help their families with expenses — as of Friday, Clayton's had about $60,000 raised, while Lewis' had more than $40,000.


Mont. cops display mezuzah after neo-Nazis threaten Jewish community

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

WHITEFISH, Mont. — As a sign of solidarity with Jewish residents, the Whitefish Police Department hung a mezuzah on the agency’s door.

According to JPUpdates.com, Rabbi Adam Scheier requested Police Chief William Dial place the symbol of protection and faith in the Jewish culture on his office door on Jan. 18.

“He said, ‘No, I won’t put it on my office door. I want to put it in a more central location, where everyone will see it,’” Scheier wrote on Facebook. “So we put it outside a door that every police officer passes upon entering the station.”

The publication reported that neo-Nazi website founder and editor Andrew Anglin called for an armed march “troll storm” in December after Jewish residents allegedly pressured alt-right founder Richard Spencer’s mom to close one of her businesses.

The march was indefinitely postponed due to a lack of permit. But Jewish members of the community received a string online threats in the weeks that followed Anglin’s call for a march, according to Forward.com.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

The police station in Whitefish, Montana, now has a mezuzah on its door. Last week, I was in Jerusalem when the idea...

Posted by Adam Scheier on Wednesday, January 18, 2017


Ore. protesters demand firing of police chief or they’ll ‘shut down city’

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

PORTLAND, Ore. — Demonstrators protesting President Donald Trump’s inauguration Friday said police incited violence with flash bangs and pepper spray when they tried to cross a bridge.

Direct Action Alliance Spokesperson Jacob Bureros told KOIN 6 that the group wants Police Chief Mike Marshman fired because of the alleged excessive force.

“They created a confrontation where there didn’t need to be a confrontation and a lot of people got hurt because of it,” Bureros said.

Police said the protesters threw “rocks, bottles, flares and unknowns liquids” at police.

The group said if the mayor doesn’t fire Marshman by Tuesday night, they’ll “shut down the city” Wednesday.

“A decentralized, citywide occupation of squares, shutting down bridges, shutting down intersections, whatever it may be,” Bureros told the news station. “And it’s going to last for a very long time until the city takes responsibility for what happened that night.”


Fla. cops surprise boy at police-themed birthday party

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

By PoliceOne Staff

CLEARWATER, Fla. — When Tiffany Barnaky called the Clearwater Police Department two weeks ago to invite an officer to her son’s birthday party, she never imagined how many cops would show up.

"He [the PIO] said, as long as the world behaves itself, someone would come by," Barnaky told ABC News. "Four officers were able to come by. We were completely blown away."

Barnaky said her son, Brody, has admired police since last year, and any time he meets one, he shows photos of his policeman Halloween costume.

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Here's one version of the Brody birthday surprise story making the rounds out there.

Posted by Clearwater Police Department on Monday, January 23, 2017

The officers showed up to surprise Brody at his police-themed party, gifting him with a police flag and an “Officer Brody” shirt.

"They were the nicest men. They were so good with the kids,” Barnaky said. “They took them out to the cars, hugged [Brody], they compared muscles, they were absolutely the sweetest officers. The fact that they all wanted to come and do that was just amazing."

The officers let Brody use the PA system and gave him a tour of their patrol cars.

"I think that's why he's fallen in love with them," she said. "The importance of their job to protect the community is what we're showing him. That's why he wants to be a police officer."

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

It's not always a bad thing when police officers crash a party. Just ask 4-year-old Brody, who is a big fan of the men...

Posted by Clearwater Police Department on Sunday, January 22, 2017


Photos: NY cop finds success moonlighting as lingerie, swimsuit model

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

By Nicole Fuller Newsday

FREEPORT, NY — The Freeport mayor is throwing his support behind a village cop who moonlights as a lingerie and bathing suit model.

Freeport Police Officer Samantha Sepulveda, a seven-year veteran of the force, also has 119,000 followers on the photo app Instagram, where she posts pictures of herself in bras and underwear.

In a statement Sunday, Freeport Mayor Robert Kennedy called Sepulveda a “well-respected” officer.

A photo posted by *OFFICIAL*Samantha Sepulveda™? (@sammysep) on

“Samantha appropriately executes her responsibilities as a law enforcement officer and is well-respected by the community and peers,” Kennedy said. “Many police officers have legal businesses and Officer Sepulveda is entitled to the same opportunity.”

Sepulveda, 32, said Sunday that she started modeling about three years ago and that police brass and her colleagues have long been aware of her racy shots posted online.

She said some residents have made disparaging remarks and she had one stalker, but her fellow cops in the 100-sworn-member department have been supportive.

Criminals can’t wait to be arrested by this sexy cop https://t.co/wABQ4MTnyi pic.twitter.com/PqamwuW1EF

— New York Post (@nypost) January 23, 2017

“I see it as I’m their little sister,” she said of the mostly older officers, whom she conceded probably comment privately among themselves on her second job.

“Behind my back, sure,” she said.

When told about the mayor’s thumbs-up, she responded: “Wow, he’s a rock star.”

Sepulveda, who was paid $165,830 by the village in 2015, said her work schedule as a Freeport cop — 12-hour days about 15 days out of the month — allows her to take part in photo shoots and runway shows on her days off from chasing bad guys.

A photo posted by *OFFICIAL*Samantha Sepulveda™? (@sammysep) on

But she doesn’t plan to give up her day job for modeling.

“I wouldn’t leave my police job for it,” said Sepulveda. “It’s fun. What girl doesn’t want to dress up and look pretty? But it’s not as fulfilling as saving lives and impacting people on a personal level. I like that I can do both.”

A photo posted by *OFFICIAL*Samantha Sepulveda™? (@sammysep) on

©2017 Newsday


Rapper Soulja Boy charged with possessing handgun stolen from police

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Scott Schwebke The Orange County Register

LOS ANGELES — Rapper Soulja Boy was charged Monday on suspicion of illegally possessing firearms including a handgun at one time stolen from the Huntington Beach Police Department, according to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office.

The 25-year-old rapper, whose real name is DeAndre Cortez Way, pleaded not guilty on Monday in Los Angeles County Superior Court.

The Studio City resident faces up to four years in prison if convicted of two felony weapons-possession counts, and a misdemeanor count of receiving stolen property.

Way was arrested at his home on Dec. 15 after police found him in possession of a Mini Draco AR-15, and a Glock 21 .45-caliber handgun that had been reported stolen from a Huntington Beach police vehicle, Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney Michael Morse said.

The Glock was taken from the trunk of an officer’s unmarked vehicle parked outside of his Long Beach home in September 2015, Huntington Beach Police Chief Robert Handy said Monday. Handy declined to identify the officer or comment further on the burglary because of the ongoing investigation involving Way.

Although officers are permitted to take weapons home, they must keep them secure or face consequences, Handy said. The loss or theft of a Police Department-issued firearm usually results in discipline against the officer unless there are extenuating circumstances.

“There are very few circumstances where losing a weapon would be OK,” Handy said.

Law enforcement officers must lock up their guns left in unattended vehicles or face fines of $1,000, under a bill signed in September by Gov. Jerry Brown.

The new law – which had been in the works for months and puts officers in the same camp as civilians in storing weapons – came a day after a Register investigation found that at least 329 police firearms were reported lost or stolen from Southern California law-enforcement agencies during the past five years.

The gun in the Way case was among the weapons reported in the Register investigation.

On Dec. 18, 2014, Way was sentenced to two years of probation after a conviction of carrying a loaded firearm in a public place, according to The Associated Press.

He is best known for his September 2007 debut single, Crank That (Soulja Boy), that peaked at No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.


Video shows Bengals’ Adam Jones verbally assault cop: ‘I hope you die’

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

By Brent Axe Syracuse Media Group

CINCINNATI — The Cincinnati Bengals apologized on Monday night for the conduct of cornerback Adam "Pacman" Jones that was recorded in a police video released to the media.

Cincinnati police released a video on Monday showing Jones' behavior in the back seat of a police car as he was taken to jail on Jan.3. Jones asks what charges he's facing and when he's told two misdemeanors, he uses a stream of profanity and racial slurs toward the police officers.

At one point, Jones tells one of the offers that "I hope you die tomorrow."

Jones also appears to repeatedly spit on the floor or seat of the police car. He also tells the officer he would "spit on your ass if I could." According to court documents, Jones later did spit on a female nurse who was trying to examine him.

Jones' language is so vulgar in the video that the Bengals issued an apology -- a rare move for the team that usually avoids comment while a player's case goes through the court system.

"We are extremely disappointed with Adam's behavior," the team said. "The behavior in the video is not what we expect from our players. The club is aware that Adam has put forth his own apology. However, we also offer an apology to the public and to our loyal fans."

The NFL could suspend Jones for the start of next season under its player conduct policy. Jones has been suspended repeatedly during his career.

His case took an unexpected turn when Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters said that he was waiting to see how the NFL reacted to Jones' arrest before deciding how to proceed. As a result, Jones' case was continued until Feb. 10. The police video released on Monday could factor into Deters' decision about whether to prosecute Jones.

In addition to misdemeanor charges over the altercation at the hotel, Jones faces charges that he head-butted police and spit on a nurse at the jail after his arrest. The sheriff's office -- which runs the jail -- said Jones was so combative that he had to be placed in a restraint chair.

The former West Virginia star was the sixth overall pick in the 2005 draft, expected to help anchor Tennessee's defense for many years. His off-field problems started with a strip club melee in Las Vegas in 2007. He pleaded the equivalent of no contest to a misdemeanor charge.

Jones was blamed for instigating violence that led to someone else shooting two club employees, one of whom was left paralyzed from the waist down. He was ordered to pay more than $12.4 million in damages. The NFL suspended Jones for the 2007 season.

He was traded to the Cowboys, and was suspended again in 2009 for six games over an alcohol-related altercation with a bodyguard that the Cowboys provided.

Bengals owner Mike Brown decided to give him another chance, signing him as a free agent before the 2010 season. Jones played in at least 14 games over each of the past five seasons, becoming one of the Bengals' top cornerbacks and kick returners. He was chosen for the Pro Bowl as an alternate in 2015.

While in Cincinnati, he was involved in several court cases.

Jones was acquitted in 2013 on an assault charge in Hamilton County after a woman accused him of punching her in a nightclub. Earlier that year, he paid a fine for disorderly conduct after police accused him of making offensive comments during a traffic stop. He also pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct in January 2012 after an arrest at a Cincinnati bar.


Digital Evidence Management—all about security

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By QueTel

This article is provided by QueTel.com and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of PoliceOne.

Few question the overwhelming impact that digital evidence has made on law enforcement in the 21st Century. It started with point and shoot digital cameras and in car video cameras and has reached an apex with body worn cameras, smart phones, and wireless surveillance videos. Because digital files from these sources is essential evidence, careful attention must be paid to ensure its integrity. Lacking attention to digital evidence integrity leaves the door open to challenge, by a clever defense attorney.

At the heart of ensuring integrity is storing, images, videos, and voice recordings. You can store digital evidence on DVDs. You can store it on your desktop. Alternatively, you can store it on a folder on a server. Many agencies store digital evidence in their records management system.

At the end of the day, however, the legal concern will only be satisfied, if the processes for handling a file, from recording, storing, and sharing, support its unimpeachable integrity. Is digital evidence merely stored, or is it carefully "managed?" What has to happen, to help the prosecutor respond to a defense attorney who asks: "How do I know the files you gave me in discovery are original and untouched?" The answer to these questions is managing each file through a gauntlet of tests—the core of a digital management system.

It must be able to verify that what is stored and has not been Photo shopped or edited using a tool such as Adobe Premier prior to upload in the source memory.

Any copy routine runs a check sum that all of the bytes copied were received. The system should do more than count because bytes may be corrupted without changing the count. It should assure that every byte, copied with 100% accuracy.

The system should be constructed, so that no user can directly access a file. The software should employ means to allow only indirect access through intermediary software.

This leaves open the possibility of access by a rogue IT technician, so the software should expose or prevent such access, preferably without performance degrading encryption of the stored files.

Of course access to the software should be protected by password protected privileges.

Then there are issues of sharing files. How do you prove to the defense attorney and the court that the shared are true copies of the verified original?

If your digital evidence management software anticipates and deals effectively with all of these issues and answers to these questions, you can help your prosecutor hold defense attorneys at bay.


Cleveland officer dies after being hit by car; suspect at large

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

CLEVELAND — An officer who was struck by a car while directing traffic died Tuesday.

Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association President Steve Loomis told Cleveland.com that the officer was directing traffic away from a previous crash when a white Toyota Camry struck him.

The driver fled and police said the car likely has front-end damage. The car has a gray stripe on both sides and a spoiler on the back. It has a partial license plate of GTD.

Investigators are still searching for the suspect.

“Turn yourself in or we will find you,” Police Chief Calvin Williams said in a press conference.

A person involved in the previous crash died as well, police said.

The officer was hit less than a mile away from where Trooper Kenneth Velez was fatally struck by a car in September, according to the publication.

Photos of the vehicle involved in this morning's hit-skip accident. PLEASE SHARE. pic.twitter.com/Ledm1Rf5sO

— Cleveland Police (@CLEpolice) January 24, 2017


Suspect arrested in hit-and-run death of Cleveland officer

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By PoliceOne Staff

CLEVELAND — Authorities arrested a man Tuesday in connection with the fatal hit-and-run of Cleveland Officer David Fahey.

Israel Alvarez, 44, was arrested at gunpoint after police discovered the car at his ex-girlfriend’s house, Cleveland.com reported.

After SWAT responded to the home, Alvarez surrendered and was arrested. He was handcuffed with Fahey's cuffs.

Israel Alvarez, 44, was arrested for the death of Officer David Fahey. https://t.co/xLdDvPyCbH pic.twitter.com/qhjqSxsOqF

— WKYC Channel 3 News (@wkyc) January 24, 2017

Police told the publication that a Homeland Security Agent spotted the car after police put out a description of the vehicle.

Fahey was killed while directing traffic away from a previous accident Tuesday morning.

Alvarez is held on suspicion of aggravated vehicular homicide and felony hit-skip.

BREAKING: Driver arrested in I-90 hit-skip that killed Cleveland officer identified as Israel Alvarez, 44. https://t.co/QxD1rrrFqf

— News 5 Cleveland (@WEWS) January 24, 2017 (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Dozens of officers pay their respects to Cleveland Police Officer David Fahey as he's escorted to the Medical Examiner's Office.

Posted by Fox 8 News on Tuesday, January 24, 2017


NY sheriff’s detective ambushed in patrol car; manhunt underway

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

By Catie O'Toole Syracuse Media Group

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — An Onondaga County sheriff's detective conducting surveillance outside Springfield Garden Apartments in DeWitt was injured Monday night from glass that shattered as two males opened fire on his patrol vehicle, Onondaga County sheriff's Sgt. Jon Seeber said.

The on-duty, undercover detective was sitting in his unmarked patrol vehicle in a parking lot on the north side of the apartment complex on Caton Drive at 6:28 p.m. Monday when two "unknown male suspects" approached him and began firing at his vehicle, Seeber said.

Glass shattered as bullets from what appeared to be handguns sprayed the police vehicle, police said.

"When you have two figures walking up to your car and it's dark out, it's hard to make out the suspects," Seeber said. "The incident was very quick."

The detective, whose name was not released, was alone in the patrol vehicle at the time, Seeber said. He immediately radioed into Onondaga County 911 to say his patrol vehicle had been shot at approximately 10 times, according to a 911 dispatcher.

The bullets narrowly missed the detective, who works with the sheriff's Special Investigations Unit, Seeber said. However, glass that shattered from the patrol vehicle as the shots rang out hit him.

An ambulance, escorted by two police cars, rushed the detective to Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse. His injuries are minor, Seeber said.

"We're very fortunate he wasn't seriously injured," Seeber said.

The suspects were last seen running south through the parking lot, behind building 24 on Caton Drive, according to 911.

For three hours Monday night, dozens of police officers scoured the area around Springfield Garden Apartments, near Le Moyne College.

"A perimeter was set up and streets were closed," Seeber said. "We asked residents to stay inside."

The sheriff's office Tweeted about the shooting Monday night, letting the public know "numerous law enforcement officials are on the scene of a shooting near the Springfield Garden Apartments. We ask residents to stay inside."

Le Moyne College also warned students to avoid the area around the apartments after the shooting. The college sent two emails to students and other members of the college community after receiving reports of shots fired, college spokesman Joe Della Posta said. He said the college wasn't on a lock down, but one Le Moyne College student said security and staff in her dormitory would not allow anyone out of the building. Students on the lower floors also were told to go to higher floors in the dorm.

Campus security also could be seen in the parking lots along the outer perimeter of the college. They were there to make sure no one entered the area where police were investigating, Seeber said.

Police searched several buildings at Springfield Garden Apartments throughout the night to make sure the two suspects weren't hiding inside.

Around 9:30 p.m., police reopened Springfield and Thompson roads, as well as Mountainview Avenue and Springfield Road, which had been closed during the manhunt, Seeber said.

Police still haven't found the two suspects, who were wearing dark clothing, he said.

"We're still investigating," Seeber said. "No one has been taken into custody."

The sheriff's office is asking anyone with information about the shooting or who witnessed it to call detectives at 315-435-3081 or send a tip via Tip 411. ___ (c)2017 Syracuse Media Group, N.Y.


4 questions your potential online learning provider must be able to answer

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

When police agencies face a budget crunch, officer training is frequently the first line item to be adversely affected. Training not only has its own costs, it also has the opportunity cost of taking police officers off the street. However, failure to train becomes a liability issue, so police departments are looking for alternative avenues to get their officers trained, but at lower costs.

One of the options trainers and administrators are turning to is online learning management systems. But because they are unfamiliar with this emerging technology, there is a risk of partnering with a vendor that is not suited to their department's personnel and needs or selecting a training system with an inferior set of features.

Here are four questions police departments should be asking as they evaluate a learning management system partner.

1. Do you have certificates of completion?

Just like in the offline world, individual officers and departments need to show proof that training has been completed. Many officers keep a binder of their training certificates, and many agencies have an administrator who maintains file cabinets full of such documents. In the online world, most providers have some option of certification — either an actual document in PDF form that can be printed out or an electronic record of course completion.

A top issue for your end users, police officers and administrators, is accessibility and availability of those training certificates. It must be easy to find and share proof that training has been completed with a host of possible stakeholders — everyone from the compliance manager at a risk pool to members of the court system.

Another issue with certificates of completion is portability of that documentation. Can an individual officer easily access their certificates and use those not only for their day job, but also to verify their training and credentials for any second job they may have which requires the same training?

2. Is your training approved for state credit?

State-approved training can vary from state to state, as well as between public safety disciplines. Some learning management system providers do have content that has been reviewed by the state oversight authority and has been approved or accredited, but some do not.

In fact, in some cases, states have simply indicated that they do not approve training courses — online or offline. Instead the state sets criteria for training and empowers a department chief or medical director, in the case of EMS training, to approve training.

As a potential purchaser, the training officer should know what the requirements are for their state and their discipline, and that can help inform them on which learning management system is right for their department. Because many departments can approve their own internally developed and locally instructed training programs it is critical to know if the training department can upload its own trainings records to the LMS.

3. Who are you working with in our state?

Just as you would seek to get the opinion of a neighboring agency when purchasing any other sort of equipment — everything from ECDs to squad cars to sidearms — administrators should ask for contacts at other departments who can testify about the learning management system solution. Here are some questions to ask those references:

How easy was it to implement the system? What is the support like when you have a problem? What do you think of the training content? How easy is it to access your certification records? Were the any unseen or unplanned fees after initial setup? 4. What is the fee structure and are there any hidden charges after setup?

Pricing structures can vary for LMS solutions. Some vendors offer multiple options to choose from. There could be an offering which is a one-time flat fee for an unlimited number of users or there could be a per-user/per-year subscription option. Some offerings have a tiered pricing structure for different levels of support after purchase (silver, gold, platinum, for example) which impact the total cost.

The key is to ensure that the vendor is completely transparent about the absolute total cost. No chief wants to get approval from the city council for the purchase of a solution, only to have to go back to those same council members in six months to say, “Well, it turns out I need some more money for the training system.”

Ultimately, the learning management system your police department selects will need the features and functionality you deem the most important. But using these questions as a guide at the start of your planning will be key to the overall success of the program.


5 biggest LMS implementation ‘fails’ (and how to avoid them)

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

The last thing any police department trainer wants to do is to advocate for a new way of doing something, implement the change and then have the whole project blow up in their face. This is a very real possibility for training managers and department administrators who deploy the wrong learning management system for their training department.

Further, even if the perfect solution is chosen and adopted, there are numerous ways in which an LMS program can crash and burn, leaving the agency with a budgetary line item that gets insufficient results.

Here are five LMS implementation mistakes and some suggestions on how to avoid them.

Mistake #1: Build an in-house, proprietary solution

Many agencies have that “one officer” who is tech savvy and has the ability to figure out just about any issue related to information technology. Envision this all-too-common scenario in which the tech savvy officer hears that the department is considering various LMS vendors for an online learning solution, and that person responds that they could easily build an in-house platform using a variety of open source technology. “I can save us a ton of money that way,” the well-meaning officer says.

Sure enough, this brilliant individual sets up a proprietary LMS on the department’s own servers. It’s up and running and whenever there is a question or a need for tech support, our eager in-house tech expert is there to help.

Then he gets promoted. Or she laterals to another department. Or he retires.

Now the agency is left holding a system nobody else knows how to run. The department is in a real bind. New users can't be added. Training records are only accessible by a super administrator. Courses that need to be updated are stuck as they were originally created.

Don’t let this be your police department. Don’t succumb to the temptation to choose the do-it-yourself, in-house solution. Instead select a learning management system with a proven track record, support documentation and customer service to train multiple people at your agency to use and the capability to scale as your department's training needs grow.

Mistake #2: Using multiple applications for training records and storage

Every agency already has a method to track training certificates to ensure their personnel are up to date on state- or department-required courses. This tracking system may be file cabinets in the HR department filled with paper certificates, or it could be some form of proprietary computer spreadsheet maintained by someone in HR.

Administrators implementing a learning management system should recognize that an LMS solution is also a training records management system. Every single training record — from defensive tactics to emergency driving and everything else in between — should be entered into the LMS, making it the agency’s centralized hub of training records.

For example, if a department requires that the SWAT team and patrol division complete a 10-hour active shooter response training involving a combination of force-on-force training and a live-fire qualification on the square range, it is essential that the records of completion be maintained in the online LMS platform, despite the fact that no element of the training took place in that environment.

If the LMS vendor does not offer the ability to enter certificates from attendance at conferences or training courses conducted in the real world, the department should move along in the search. Not having the ability to enter offline training records forces the department to maintain two records manage systems — a sure path to failure.

Mistake 3#: Make online training an optional way to earn continuing education

Having a hands-off attitude about the content in the LMS will doom the program to failure. If the department leaders really want people to use the LMS, the training managers need to assign courses and use due dates. Course completion cannot be voluntary or self-directed.

If a training manager introduces the LMS with the message, “Here’s an online training program — do with it whatever you want” they will likely find that for most personnel, “whatever you want” is doing nothing.

The person leading the program should work with the vendor to identify the very best, most compelling courses, and make those the first assignments. This allows users to immediately see the value of an online component to their training, rather than accidentally bumping into a particularly dry or tedious course which could turn them off of the concept.

Another way to assure use of the LMS is to align online training assignments with the training calendar your department has set for the month, quarter or year. Ask the LMS vendor how courses can be assigned at the start of the year for the year ahead.

Mistake #4: Letting users figure it out on their own

There needs to be multiple champions for using an LMS. In addition to the member of the command staff leading the purchasing process, there needs to be other champions. In fact, it may prove best if those champions are line-level officers who have the respect of their peers. Don't expect your personnel to simply adopt and figure out the online training system without encouragement or peer support.

Get the champions involved in the selection process if possible, so they can attest to the fact that the department chose the solution best suited to their needs. Ensure that they are very well trained on the system and are then made available to others who may have questions about how to navigate the online interface.

Mistake #5. Ignoring the reporting and records management capabilities

It’s a fail if the department waits until the end of the first year to see how the program is progressing. Set up weekly — or at the very least, monthly — reports to see who has completed courses and who is falling behind. Intervene when there are stragglers, perhaps tasking the champions to engage individuals who are not embracing the new learning tools.

By regularly checking in on the reports on the end user’s participation in the system, the training manager can help to ensure the success of the program.

Implementing a change, whether it’s a policy or a technology system, can be challenging. By avoiding these pitfalls, your police department can ensure a successful learning management system implementation and realize the expected benefits that led you to purchase the platform.


6 keys to getting personnel to use an online learning solution

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

Every first responder knows that not all training is dynamic, hands-on work. Before (and often, after) engaging in reality-based scenario training, driver training, defensive tactics and other topics, there is a considerable amount of time spent in a classroom, watching an instructor read a PowerPoint presentation.

The fact is, most of these learning sessions can easily be taken from a classroom lecture and conducted online in a robust learning management system. This can save a police department time and money and improve the quality of the learner’s experience. Because of these savings, many departments are moving toward adoption of an online learning management system.

However, some end users resist the change. How does a training manager for a police department influence personnel to engage in the online system? Here are six proven suggestions.

1. Identify a superuser who can influence stragglers

Select an evangelist for online learning. Ideally, this is a line-level police officer who has the respect of his or her peers and has received robust training in how the system works. An evangelist believes in the value of the LMS the department has selected to implement and the benefits to individual learners. This superuser can help other individuals who have questions about everything, from navigating the user interface to accessing the most compelling content in a proactive and self-guided manner.

2. Assign courses and hold personnel accountable

Pre-determine specific assignments for the quarter or year and use automated reminders that prompt end users about deadlines and training requirements. If users are allowed to simply log on to an LMS when they have time, there is a high probability they will be scrolling a social media site instead, and their training will go unfinished. When officers are required to complete a task, they do it, even begrudgingly.

Start by assigning courses that are most likely to engage users with the training system. A recently created course on officer-down response, mass gathering safety or active-shooter tactics is more likely to make a positive first impression. Save the annual mandatory courses like bloodborne pathogens or slip and fall prevention for when personnel are more familiar with the training system and better understand its purpose.

3. Make LMS content part of the daily “routine”

Create an “every day is a training day” culture in your police department by assigning a short video each day for review during briefing. Five-minute videos can consist of a subject matter expert speaking direct to camera about a specific incident or a general concept. Videos can be scenario-based training or even real-world footage of a recent event.

Another way to create this everyday training mindset is to use the LMS to distribute memos from command staff — important documents like policies, SOPs, general order updates, incident debriefs and AG directives which are required to be read by all personnel across all public safety disciplines — in the online learning platform. Replace the old-school and ineffective practice of posting paper memos to a bulletin board or handing out at briefing by allowing personnel to read documents online.

This also allows the agency to track that the messages and documents have been read. The receipt and reading of the document is recorded in an individual's training files. This can help agencies to prove compliance on high-liability training which is required to be documented in a centralized environment.

4. Have trainers create their own custom content

Get the training cadre to add their own custom-made and blended learning curricula into the LMS platform. Remember also that the LMS can also be used to track of offline or classroom training records.

Off-the-shelf courses certainly have tremendous value, but public safety personnel tend to respond even better to training content that is unique to their jurisdiction or agency. Trainers who are able to design curricula with video of scenarios captured at recognizable places in town will have a more realistic training experience.

For example, if an agency is going to present training on how to self-apply a tourniquet with the officer's non-dominant hand, the trainer could require that a video he or she had recorded on the topic be viewed online before the hands-on practice and competency assessment session. Record the video at a location in the jurisdiction that is well-known to the officers, increasing the value of the segment.

When the officers arrive at training, that portion of the instruction has already been completed, and the learners can immediately get to work practicing that skill. In addition to saving time in the mattroom or training room, this practice encourages use of the LMS platform, and makes the end user’s experience better.

5. Train the training cadre on how to use templates for easy upload of their course assets

Don’t forget your training cadre. It is vital that the trainers be given specialized and detailed training in how to utilize the system. The better the training staff is at getting custom content into the system, the more content they will produce, thus increasing the value of the platform for the end user.

6. Encourage the training staff to have patience with the process

Just like any other change in policies and procedures, there will be individuals who enthusiastically embrace the new way of doing things. However, at least at first, there will be people who resist change and refuse — to the extent possible — to use the system. There may be a small percentage of people who complain about the new system all the way to retirement.

Training staff must not get disheartened and discontinue their work in assigning existing courses as well as creating new training content. In time, the stragglers will come around.

Recognize also that there will also be large group of personnel who are willing to use the system, but just need some direction in to get started. Don’t lose focus on the primary goal — more and better training — because of a small percentage of grumblers and foot-draggers. Focus on the majority of personnel who are willing to make the change with leadership and encouragement from the training cadre.

An online learning management system can help make any police department’s training program more effective and efficient. Remember - bring in a superuser early to gain support and maximize the use of the available feature functionality, like building your own courses. These things, along with creating that “every day is a training day” mentality, can ensure your agency sees strong utilization.


Despite new year, Chicago violence continues

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Tony Briscoe and Katherine Rosenberg-Douglas Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Tucked into the third row of a minivan, talking on FaceTime with a friend, Angela Wojcik wasn't paying much attention to the conversation of her boyfriend and his acquaintances in the front of the vehicle as it sat parked in West Town on Sunday morning.

That was until the percussion of gunfire began shortly before 9 a.m.

"The driver was bleeding from the mouth," said Wojcik, who lives in the suburbs and spent the previous night out at various clubs in the city. Police later identified the driver as a 26-year-old man who was shot in the lip.

"It was blood over his whole face. It was so surreal," Wojcik said.

Her boyfriend, 30, was hit twice in the right calf. The front passenger, who police said was a 25-year-old man shot in the left shoulder, appeared to be in the worst condition of the three, Wojcik said.

"No one screamed," Wojcik said. "But I was FaceTiming with my friend Robert, and he was freaking out."

All three were taken to Stroger Hospital, where their conditions were stabilized, police said.

It was the second triple shooting of the morning Sunday. The other happened around 6:30 a.m.

Hours later there was another shooting with multiple victims, this one leaving four people wounded at 12:15 p.m. in the 1800 block of West 63rd Street in the Englewood neighborhood. In all, 10 people were wounded in multiple-victim shootings within less than six hours Sunday morning and early Sunday afternoon.

"We've had quite a few multiple-victim incidents this weekend," said Officer Jose Estrada, a Chicago police spokesman. There were six triple shootings from Friday afternoon to early Sunday afternoon, in addition to the quadruple shooting.

The most seriously injured in the Englewood shooting was a 26-year-old man who suffered a gunshot wound to the right eye and was taken by a family member to St. Bernard Hospital before being transferred to Stroger Hospital in critical condition, police said.

The others wounded were: Another 26-year-old man, shot in the right buttocks and left foot; a 56-year-old woman, shot multiple times in the left leg; and a 48-year-old woman shot in the right hip. All three were taken to Advocate Christ Medical Center, where their conditions were stabilized.

The four were in a convenience store when they heard gunshots and ran outside, where four armed men or boys shot them, police said. The four attackers got into a white sedan and fled the scene. No one was in custody.

In the first of the three multiple-victim attacks, three people were shot about 6:30 a.m. Sunday in the 3500 block of South Calumet Avenue in the Ida B. Wells/Darrow Homes neighborhood, according to police, correcting earlier information that the shooting happened on Rhodes Avenue. A 22-year-old man was shot in the left leg and was taken by a friend to Mercy Hospital. He was later transferred to Stroger Hospital, where his condition was stabilized.

A 24-year-old man was shot in the left leg, and his condition was stabilized at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. A 23-year-old woman was shot in the leg, and her condition was stabilized at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

The victims weren't being cooperative, and police had no narrative information on the shooting.

Other shootings:

About 9:30 p.m., a 16-year-old boy was shot in Bridgeport. A friend took him to Mercy Hospital and Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the calf, and he told investigators he had been shot in the 2800 block of South Hillock Avenue. The boy's condition was stabilized.

Earlier in an attack that only injured one victim, a man was shot while driving along the 1100 block of North Lockwood Avenue about 11 a.m., police said.

He was traveling north on Lockwood in a 2014 Ford Escape when someone opened fire on his vehicle. He was shot in his left shoulder, arm and ear before crashing his vehicle in the same block, causing his SUV to overturn. He was taken to Stroger, where he was listed in stable condition, officials said. No one has been arrested in connection with the shooting and authorities continue to investigate.

The shootings come as part of a particularly violent weekend in Chicago, with 29 people shot, three fatally, in a 24-hour period from Saturday to Sunday. From Friday to Saturday, one person was killed and 14 were wounded in shootings across the city.

___ (c)2017 the Chicago Tribune


Despite new year, Chicago violence continues

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Tony Briscoe and Katherine Rosenberg-Douglas Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Tucked into the third row of a minivan, talking on FaceTime with a friend, Angela Wojcik wasn't paying much attention to the conversation of her boyfriend and his acquaintances in the front of the vehicle as it sat parked in West Town on Sunday morning.

That was until the percussion of gunfire began shortly before 9 a.m.

"The driver was bleeding from the mouth," said Wojcik, who lives in the suburbs and spent the previous night out at various clubs in the city. Police later identified the driver as a 26-year-old man who was shot in the lip.

"It was blood over his whole face. It was so surreal," Wojcik said.

Her boyfriend, 30, was hit twice in the right calf. The front passenger, who police said was a 25-year-old man shot in the left shoulder, appeared to be in the worst condition of the three, Wojcik said.

"No one screamed," Wojcik said. "But I was FaceTiming with my friend Robert, and he was freaking out."

All three were taken to Stroger Hospital, where their conditions were stabilized, police said.

It was the second triple shooting of the morning Sunday. The other happened around 6:30 a.m.

Hours later there was another shooting with multiple victims, this one leaving four people wounded at 12:15 p.m. in the 1800 block of West 63rd Street in the Englewood neighborhood. In all, 10 people were wounded in multiple-victim shootings within less than six hours Sunday morning and early Sunday afternoon.

"We've had quite a few multiple-victim incidents this weekend," said Officer Jose Estrada, a Chicago police spokesman. There were six triple shootings from Friday afternoon to early Sunday afternoon, in addition to the quadruple shooting.

The most seriously injured in the Englewood shooting was a 26-year-old man who suffered a gunshot wound to the right eye and was taken by a family member to St. Bernard Hospital before being transferred to Stroger Hospital in critical condition, police said.

The others wounded were: Another 26-year-old man, shot in the right buttocks and left foot; a 56-year-old woman, shot multiple times in the left leg; and a 48-year-old woman shot in the right hip. All three were taken to Advocate Christ Medical Center, where their conditions were stabilized.

The four were in a convenience store when they heard gunshots and ran outside, where four armed men or boys shot them, police said. The four attackers got into a white sedan and fled the scene. No one was in custody.

In the first of the three multiple-victim attacks, three people were shot about 6:30 a.m. Sunday in the 3500 block of South Calumet Avenue in the Ida B. Wells/Darrow Homes neighborhood, according to police, correcting earlier information that the shooting happened on Rhodes Avenue. A 22-year-old man was shot in the left leg and was taken by a friend to Mercy Hospital. He was later transferred to Stroger Hospital, where his condition was stabilized.

A 24-year-old man was shot in the left leg, and his condition was stabilized at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. A 23-year-old woman was shot in the leg, and her condition was stabilized at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

The victims weren't being cooperative, and police had no narrative information on the shooting.

Other shootings:

About 9:30 p.m., a 16-year-old boy was shot in Bridgeport. A friend took him to Mercy Hospital and Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the calf, and he told investigators he had been shot in the 2800 block of South Hillock Avenue. The boy's condition was stabilized.

Earlier in an attack that only injured one victim, a man was shot while driving along the 1100 block of North Lockwood Avenue about 11 a.m., police said.

He was traveling north on Lockwood in a 2014 Ford Escape when someone opened fire on his vehicle. He was shot in his left shoulder, arm and ear before crashing his vehicle in the same block, causing his SUV to overturn. He was taken to Stroger, where he was listed in stable condition, officials said. No one has been arrested in connection with the shooting and authorities continue to investigate.

The shootings come as part of a particularly violent weekend in Chicago, with 29 people shot, three fatally, in a 24-hour period from Saturday to Sunday. From Friday to Saturday, one person was killed and 14 were wounded in shootings across the city.

___ (c)2017 the Chicago Tribune


Conn. police want to invest in drones but want rules set first

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null

By Lindsay Boyle The Day

NEW LONDON, Conn. — Across the region, police officials have big ideas about how drones could bolster residents' safety and well being.

They could spot missing people, houses with blight or uncovered manholes. They could document accident scenes from the sky. They could determine when a roof is so hot it's about to collapse, and be sent to find obstacles in tactical situations.

Few are disputing the likely value of the technology, still in its infancy. But locally, many police chiefs are waiting for state lawmakers to establish legislation concerning drone use before they invest in the technology.

"I would kind of like to have one," said Groton City police Chief Thomas Davoren, noting that it could be used to track down blight. "But the rules are changing so quickly. I would hate to invest in something and then not be able to use it."

Such legislation has been proposed in Connecticut and passed one chamber in each of the last two legislative sessions. But it's failed -- primarily because of time, not opposition -- to pass both and be signed into law.

According to David McGuire, executive director of the Connecticut chapter of the ACLU, the organization is pushing to have similar legislation proposed again this year.

"This is useful technology that can help increase public safety," McGuire said. "We in fact want police to be able to use it, but to use it appropriately without violating people's privacy."

Last year, the bill included provisions that would ban the use of weaponized drones in most situations, make police get a warrant to collect footage except during certain emergencies and give police-related organizations just more than a year to provide recommendations for policy regarding the retention of data collected by drones.

The bill passed the House by a vote of 131-14. It never made it to the Senate floor.

McGuire suggested the public should be louder about the legislation so it gets considered and passed. He said it's "a really good sign" that law enforcement officials are looking for guidance, but that police using the technology without regulations is problematic.

"Law enforcement by their nature in trying to keep us safe often push the limits," McGuire said. "We want them to vigorously defend our safety. But without meaningful rules, it's impossible to know where the lines are."

Across the state, McGuire said he knows of three police departments that are using drones: Hartford, Woodbury and Plainfield.

In Plainfield, police were able to purchase a drone with a thermal-imaging, high-resolution camera and an ability to go 60 mph solely because of a $10,000 donation, according to the Norwich Bulletin. There, police reported planning to use the drone to find missing people and document crash scenes.

But cost is not the barrier most chiefs expressed.

Groton Town police Chief Louis J. Fusaro Jr., whose 21-plus years with the state police include time in the counterterrorism and emergency services units, brought up the use of helicopters as a point of comparison. He estimated it takes between $800 and $1,500 to keep one in the air for an hour. The cost to put a drone in the air for the same amount of time?

"Peanuts," he said.

Still, Fusaro said his department hasn't discussed acquiring one. Privacy is an issue, he said, and so, too, is safety. Should a drone go out of range or run out of battery power, he explained, it could hit somebody or something on its way down.

"There are definitely advantages, but the technology is relatively new," he said. "Just like a lot of other things, the laws haven't caught up to it."

According to Stonington police Capt. Todd Olson, his department isn't planning on using a drone anytime soon.

Ledyard police Lt. Ken Creutz said his force has discussed the devices conceptually but also is waiting for policy before making any moves.

"We're relatively new here as independent police department and trying to get normal operating scenarios down smoothly before we try to introduce newer-edge technology like that," he said. "But I'm sure it will be a consideration down the road."

In Waterford, however, police Chief Brett Mahoney said his department, along with other town agencies, has seriously discussed bringing a drone on board.

Like Plainfield, Waterford is a heavily wooded town. Since police purchased ATVs years ago, Mahoney said, they've been deployed countless times -- sometimes to recover stolen vehicles, sometimes to find people who've gone missing.

Drones, he said, could expand the department's search capabilities "tenfold."

Mahoney, however, said he and others envision any drone that comes to Waterford as a town-wide asset.

In large-scale storms, emergency management officials could use the drone to map the damage and let residents know what's going on. In fires, the drone's thermal camera could warn firefighters a roof is hot and susceptible to collapse. When manhole covers are stolen for scrap, the drone could make the pollution control authority aware of it sooner.

As for privacy issues, Mahoney said Waterford's drone would be used solely "from a community safety perspective" and wouldn't be used for surveillance.

He said the department is looking for grant opportunities so the town doesn't have to foot the bill. From there, it will have to apply for licenses, get approval, set policy and then buy the equipment and train some officers and other officials.

Mahoney expects all of that will happen within the next two years.

Drones are "another thing we're going to have to deal with," Mahoney said. "If we're going to have to deal with it, we should also be allowed to take advantage of it." ___ (c)2017 The Day (New London, Conn.)


Amid violent Chicago weekend, 10 wounded in multiple-victim shootings

Posted on January 24, 2017 by in POLICE

null
Author: Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor at Large

By Tony Briscoe and Katherine Rosenberg-Douglas Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Tucked into the third row of a minivan, talking on FaceTime with a friend, Angela Wojcik wasn't paying much attention to the conversation of her boyfriend and his acquaintances in the front of the vehicle as it sat parked in West Town on Sunday morning.

That was until the percussion of gunfire began shortly before 9 a.m.

"The driver was bleeding from the mouth," said Wojcik, who lives in the suburbs and spent the previous night out at various clubs in the city. Police later identified the driver as a 26-year-old man who was shot in the lip.

"It was blood over his whole face. It was so surreal," Wojcik said.

Her boyfriend, 30, was hit twice in the right calf. The front passenger, who police said was a 25-year-old man shot in the left shoulder, appeared to be in the worst condition of the three, Wojcik said.

"No one screamed," Wojcik said. "But I was FaceTiming with my friend Robert, and he was freaking out."

All three were taken to Stroger Hospital, where their conditions were stabilized, police said.

It was the second triple shooting of the morning Sunday. The other happened around 6:30 a.m.

Hours later there was another shooting with multiple victims, this one leaving four people wounded at 12:15 p.m. in the 1800 block of West 63rd Street in the Englewood neighborhood. In all, 10 people were wounded in multiple-victim shootings within less than six hours Sunday morning and early Sunday afternoon.

"We've had quite a few multiple-victim incidents this weekend," said Officer Jose Estrada, a Chicago police spokesman. There were six triple shootings from Friday afternoon to early Sunday afternoon, in addition to the quadruple shooting.

The most seriously injured in the Englewood shooting was a 26-year-old man who suffered a gunshot wound to the right eye and was taken by a family member to St. Bernard Hospital before being transferred to Stroger Hospital in critical condition, police said.

The others wounded were: Another 26-year-old man, shot in the right buttocks and left foot; a 56-year-old woman, shot multiple times in the left leg; and a 48-year-old woman shot in the right hip. All three were taken to Advocate Christ Medical Center, where their conditions were stabilized.

The four were in a convenience store when they heard gunshots and ran outside, where four armed men or boys shot them, police said. The four attackers got into a white sedan and fled the scene. No one was in custody.

In the first of the three multiple-victim attacks, three people were shot about 6:30 a.m. Sunday in the 3500 block of South Calumet Avenue in the Ida B. Wells/Darrow Homes neighborhood, according to police, correcting earlier information that the shooting happened on Rhodes Avenue. A 22-year-old man was shot in the left leg and was taken by a friend to Mercy Hospital. He was later transferred to Stroger Hospital, where his condition was stabilized.

A 24-year-old man was shot in the left leg, and his condition was stabilized at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. A 23-year-old woman was shot in the leg, and her condition was stabilized at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

The victims weren't being cooperative, and police had no narrative information on the shooting.

Other shootings:

About 9:30 p.m., a 16-year-old boy was shot in Bridgeport. A friend took him to Mercy Hospital and Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the calf, and he told investigators he had been shot in the 2800 block of South Hillock Avenue. The boy's condition was stabilized.

Earlier in an attack that only injured one victim, a man was shot while driving along the 1100 block of North Lockwood Avenue about 11 a.m., police said.

He was traveling north on Lockwood in a 2014 Ford Escape when someone opened fire on his vehicle. He was shot in his left shoulder, arm and ear before crashing his vehicle in the same block, causing his SUV to overturn. He was taken to Stroger, where he was listed in stable condition, officials said. No one has been arrested in connection with the shooting and authorities continue to investigate.

The shootings come as part of a particularly violent weekend in Chicago, with 29 people shot, three fatally, in a 24-hour period from Saturday to Sunday. From Friday to Saturday, one person was killed and 14 were wounded in shootings across the city.

___ (c)2017 the Chicago Tribune


Photos, videos: Cops, demonstrators across the US connect during Women’s March

Posted on January 23, 2017 by in